Deep purple fantasy springs

Deep purple fantasy springs DEFAULT

DEEP PURPLE SEPTEMBER 3, /RIVERSIDE, CA.

The setting, was Deep Purple&#;s pre-concert Meet & Greet&#;s with Machine Head album members Roger Glover

(bassist) Ian Paice (drummer) and Steve Morse on lead guitar who joined the band in and keyboardist

Don Airey who joined the band in Lead singer Ian Gillan does not partake in any of the MG&#;s.

 

Upon myself and the other 8 fans generously receiving our signed memorabilia in person from the band members,

we then lined up to take turns for the band photo opt.  As I entered the room I turned to Mr. Morse and to

Mr. Airey and politely asked them if I could please take a photo with just Roger and Ian. My words,

&#;Guys, no disrespect at all intended, but, I really want to take a photo with just Roger and Ian. Would this be okay?&#;

To which both men acknowledged and seemed to be just fine with such a request, and stepped away.

I thanked them yet again reiterating that I wished to express no disrespect whatsoever. Their

photographer had even added that she was fine with that as it was my photo opt anyways.

(that photo of myself with Roger Glover and Ian Paice can be seen below)

 

After-which, the photographer offered to take a second photo with all the Meet & Greet band members to

which I thanked the photographer and all the band, for allowing a very rare &#;second photo&#; to document my

 MG experience. I then thanked the band members yet again, as my portion of the Meet & Greet had concluded.

Don was simply being Don and expressing a bit of humor. There was/is/was nothing malicious intended, 

as I found out in speaking to Don through email thereafter. Simply a great guy indeed!

 

 

 

The man is simply amazing with the keyboards.

 

Sours: https://rockandrollcollection.com/deep-purple/

Deep Purple's Don Airey talks evolving sound, Indio gig

Don Airey keeps his chops up playing classical music and he’s worked with Ozzy Osbourne, Jethro Tull and Broadway composer Andrew Lloyd Webber.

Roger Glover, Ian Gillan and Steve Morse of English rock band Deep Purple are coming to Fantasy Springs Casino in Indio.

So, he was the perfect guy to replace original keyboard player Jon Lord in the seminal heavy metal band, Deep Purple.

Airey, who will bring his varied influences to the group’s show Saturday at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, has played for Deep Purple for 13 of its 47 years. The band’s biggest hit, “Smoke on the Water,” was recorded 43 years ago.

Airey discussed how Deep Purple has evolved in a recent telephone interview.

What was it like having to replace Jon Lord?

It was quite a difficult task. They were so shocked that Jon had left, they were in disarray for a couple of years. But we’ve gradually molded into quite a fighting force again and the last five or six years have been very successful – sustained touring, sustained recording.

In the early days, Richie Blackburn’s (guitar) sound was dominant. I understand there were fights over Jon’s desire to be more orchestral while Richie wanted to be more hard rock. It seems like you’ve become more of what Jon wanted the band to be.

Yes. Richie once told me that Jon wanted to call the band Orpheus — very pretentious. Richie was having none of it, so Jon said, ‘Well, you think of a name then.’ Richie’s Aunt Daisy’s favorite song was “Deep Purple,” so Richie said, “Well, let’s call it Deep Purple.”

The old Sarah Vaughan song?

Yeah. So they did a concerto, which was a great success. But Richie said, ‘I don’t want an orchestra. Let’s just be a band and see what we come up with.’ They were in the Lyceum one night and saw King Crimson playing “21st Century Schizoid Man” and it floored them. They decided they wanted to do something like that.

But you’re not Ozzy Osbourne and you’re not King Crimson. How did they compromise? The last album, ‘Now What,’ is such a clean album.

A big part of the making of the album was the producer, Bob Ezrin (producer of Pink Floyd’s “The Wall”). He put us in a really good studio and made sure he had plenty of separation. The recording process was actually very quick. We got all the backing tracks, 15 songs, down in a week.

“Hell To Pay” sounds like a classic ’70s song, but, at the same time, it’s modern. So, did someone conceive of that compromise?

Bob Ezrin said, “I want to hear you guys playing. That’s what I want to record.” And that’s what we did. The organ solo on “Hell To Pay” was live. I don’t think I overdubbed anything. Everything on there is played in real time.

I understand “Uncommon Man” is a tribute to Jon Lord’s affinity for orchestra music.Was the “Common Man” fanfare your idea?

Well, the fanfare was mine, but the intro was really just a jam between all of us. And it was about Jon. We were halfway through recording when the awful news came through that Jon had passed away. We were deeply shocked. So that’s a tribute to him. He was an uncommon man.

Did you know him well?

I was very friendly with him over the years. At one point I used to phone him every year and just report in on what I had been doing. He was marvelous like that. He was very supportive.

The album has been very successful. What has that done for you in terms of gigs?

Well, it’s just kept us on the road, which is where we like to be. The gigs have gotten better and we sell out quite a bit.

You have kids. How is it to be on the road so much?

It’s just something you get used to. Obviously, you miss a bit of your kids’ upbringing, but there are compensations. My wife says the best thing she ever sees is two big cases in the hall, which means I’m going out and the money’s coming in. It’s an unusual lifestyle. One of my sons is a chartered accountant, but sometimes he’ll come out for a week with me and live the life. His colleagues are just dumbfounded by this, that somebody’s going out on the road for a week with a rock ’n’ roll band.

How old are your kids?

They’re 28, 30 and I’m a grandfather as well.

Was there a period in your life when you wanted to do more studio work to be home more often?

Yeah, there was a point. I came off the road in and I was a session musician for two or three years, but, in the end, I just wanted to play rock ‘n’ roll.

You played with so many different bands. How is it different for you playing in this band?

It’s a tough gig for people to play with Deep Purple. Most gigs as a keyboard player you kind of coast for a couple of numbers and you think, ‘Oh, in two numbers times, I better be on my toes.’ But with Deep Purple, it’s got to be percent every night. Nothing less will do. They’re prompt, their punctual, they’re professional people. That’s what’s made it work, especially over the last few years. It’s just been great.

Metal progenitors

What: Deep Purple in concert

When: 8 p.m. Saturday

Where: Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio Springs Parkway, Indio

Tickets: $$

Information: ()

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Sours: https://www.desertsun.com/story/life/entertainment//08/12/deep-purple-brings-evolved-heavy-metal-indio//
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Fed by underground springs, the desert comes alive here, not only with signature palms, but also with a string of resort communities—Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Indian Wells, and others, as well as the namesake town of Palm Springs—sporting a cool, mid-century modern vibe and countless ways to relax. Back in the s, stars like Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley built sleek estates, played rounds of golf at championship courses, and wined and dined the desert night away. Today, the region still has plenty of retro hipster swagger but also next-gen energy, with hot new restaurants, luxury lodgings, and fabulous shopping. Plus, there’s the beauty of the California desert all around. Step away for a moment and gaze up at a million stars—nothing but you, your thoughts, and the sound of the desert wind.

Style and Design Icons of Palm Springs

If you appreciate sleek lines and extreme attention to detail, put these five locations on your itinerary

L'Horizon Resort & Spa

When you’re staying at this historic property, it’s worth waking up early to watch the sun rise and turn the sky pink against the San Jacinto Mountains. Romance suffuses this upscale hectare-and-a-half resort of low-slung bungalows, designed in and later refreshed by acclaimed designer Steve Hermann. The light-drenched Fireplace Junior Suite Bungalow—once Marilyn Monroe’s room of choice—is a favourite for couples, with its private outdoor shower and wood-burning copper fireplace, plus Frette robes and L’Horizon-branded eye masks. The property’s restaurant, SO•PA, is equally alluring, thanks to a linear fire pit and fountain outdoors and sparkling modern metallic chandeliers inside. While the menu of New American fare is inspired—try the honey mussels paired with an Infinity Paloma cocktail—the chef will also create, with advance notice and upon request, a personalised tasting menu riffing off the day’s best produce and in keeping with any dietary restrictions. Pro tip: The deep-tissue rubdown at the indoor-outdoor spa is unparalleled, but pampering doesn’t need an occasion here—hit the poolside sun beds early for complimentary back and foot massages.

Trina Turk

Since opening her first store in Palm Springs in , fashion designer Trina Turk has forged a style that’s become synonymous with desert chic—an inimitable riot of colour, pattern, and texture. Her original shop has now expanded twice to fill an entire square-metre Albert Frey building, helping spark the revitalisation of the city’s upscale Uptown Design District. Designed by Kelly Wearstler, the interior’s penny tile flooring, vintage foil wallpaper, and Lucite and acid-yellow accents create a glamourous, playful backdrop for Turk’s trendsetting women’s and men’s collections. This being Palm Springs, an entire department is devoted to swimwear (don’t miss the dressing room’s wallpaper). You’ll also find curated pieces that fit with the Trina Turk aesthetic, such as pool floats from Sunny Life, Missoni Home towels, Dinosaur Design resin accessories, and Jonathan Adler home goods. Insider’s tip: This is the brand’s only location where you’ll find vintage treasures, including Missoni and Pucci caftans, that Turk hand selected.

Workshop Kitchen + Bar

Regulars at Workshop Kitchen + Bar know not to get too attached to any one dish. Innovative chef/owner Michael Beckman—who trained in Lyon and worked in Berlin—might be serving honey-lavender glazed black cod one night; a sausage, rapini, and fennel pizza another; and his signature burger (with pastrami and wagyu oxtail) the next. Diners in the know ask for the off-the-menu whole striped sea bass, grilled in the wood-fired oven with seasonally shifting ingredients. The adventurous menu is a big draw, to be sure, but so is the magical setting: The year-old Spanish-inspired building—once an art gallery and movie theater—features 8-metre-high ceilings, which the trendsetting architecture firm SOMA updated with poured concrete for an industrial cathedral aesthetic. (The work won it a James Beard Design Award.) If you’re there for Sunday brunch or an early dinner, ask for booth #7, which is flooded with natural light, or a table in the whitewashed courtyard. Cocktails such as the Mountaineer—made with little-known Génépy des Alpes liqueur, pineapple and lime juice, and bitters—are just as revelatory early in the evening as they are on late weekend nights, when the place is bustling.

BKB Handcrafted Art + Design

The high desert seems to generate its own creative force field, attracting and inspiring artists for decades. Today’s generation showcases its work at BKB Handcrafted Art + Design. The Palm Springs outlet of this shop (the original is in Joshua Tree) features locally crafted, modern pieces, each one chosen for its soul and authenticity. You’ll find pendant lights and vessels by the shop’s founder, ceramicist Brian Bosworth, along with desert-influenced weavings by All Roads Studio, block prints by Aili Schmeltz, and sculpture by Jonathan Cross, displayed in a gallery-like space that’s both minimalist and warm. The shop’s selective, exclusive element extends to locally made olive oil, jewelry, and furniture, too, making it a must-visit for thoughtful gifts and souvenirs. BKB has also become a stylish and unparalleled hub for the desert’s creative community, regularly hosting art openings, artist talks, and events. Pro tip: Swing by on a Saturday—that’s when artists usually drop by to deliver new work or just hang out.

Albert Frey House II

Architecture geek or not, you only need a set of eyes to appreciate the Albert Frey House II. The innovative architect built his personal home on a mountain lot that to most people seemed uninhabitable, shaping a compact modernist glass-and-steel structure around a massive rock so it almost blends into the landscape. Even the interior takes its cues from the desert, with its original sky-blue ceiling and curtains to match the yellow Encelia flowers that bloom each spring. The glass invites in streams of light by day and reflects the stars at night, bringing the rooms to life in ways Frey surely planned. A longtime Palm Springs resident, Frey bequeathed his home to the Palm Springs Art Museum on his death in , allowing it and its contents (including architectural drawings, correspondence, and personal effects) to be seen by people in the field of architecture. But even those not in the industry can get the full experience by booking through the Modern Tour at least 48 hours in advance. Tours are led by author and historian Michael Stern, who knew Frey—and many of the midcentury masters—so a deep dive full of insightful anecdotes is guaranteed.

In Partnership with Afar.

5 Private Tours of Palm Springs and the Desert

Memorable only-in-California experiences for travellers interested in nature, history, food, shopping, and more

The upscale resort city of Palm Springs sits kilometres east of Los Angeles. The surrounding desert communities—stretching across the Coachella Valley from the towering San Jacinto Mountains to Joshua Tree National Park—offer travellers an antidote to urban life. For decades, visitors have come to this stylish destination to relax and get away from it all, hike, play golf, indulge in spa treatments, and appreciate the desert landscape. Recently, the area has drawn a new generation of creative residents, many of whom are opening new businesses and helping to set the stage for the region’s future. To get a better sense of place and indulge in a unique desert experience, book one of these customisable private tours designed with the discerning traveller in mind.

For the Luxury Off-Roader

Desert Adventures Red Jeep Tours brings travelers to Indian Canyons, the ancestral home of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, and Mecca Hills, where knowledgeable guides offer an introduction to the area’s unique geological formations. On a sunset tour to the San Andreas Fault you may spot some of the desert’s wildlife, including coyotes and owls, emerging after the heat of the day has passed. You’ll also see a colourful display as the setting sun paints the sky in vivid purples and oranges.

For the Bird’s-Eye View

Relive the golden age of ballooning by taking flight near Palm Springs, where the climate is perfectly suited for hot-air balloon tours. Book a private sunrise tour with Balloons Above. While the cooler temperatures have their advantages when it comes to piloting the balloons, they also have a plus for passengers: You’ll get a bird’s-eye view of a new day dawning on the desert. Book a morning flight that includes breakfast and a champagne toast, to celebrate your adventure in the air.

For the Traveller Who’s Always Learning

Whatever your particular passion —bird-watching, photography, geology, cultural history—the Desert Institute of the Joshua Tree National Park Association offers a field class, tour, or lecture on the subject. Spend the day with a naturalist, learn tips from a photographer, or head out on a desert hike with a guide who knows how to access the most stunning vistas, and then assure you get back safely, too. Contact the Institute in advance to reserve a custom tour based on your interests.

For the Architecture Aficionado

Mid-century modern architects left their mark in Palm Springs and the desert. The Modern Tour offers exclusive access to a number of private homes by pioneering architects Albert Frey, Richard Neutra, and others. The architects aren’t the only bold-faced names on this tour; guests will also visit the former residences of celebrities including Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, and William Holden. All tours are semi-private, with a maximum of six guests, or you can book a private tour for an additional $

For the Shopper

El Paseo in Palm Desert is best known as the “Rodeo Drive of the Desert.” Don’t miss the distinctive shops, restaurants, and art galleries that line the mile-long strip. At Elizabeth & Prince, a women’s clothing boutique, owners Analisa and Shawn Holoubek showcase pieces by emerging designers. If you’re looking for a delicious brunch option in town, go to Wilma & Frieda’s Café, where comfort food is served with a twist. Two standouts on the menu include a churro waffle and blackberry custard French toast. For dinner, try the classic steak and seafood menu at Mitch’s on El Paseo. And if you want to stay on the strip, book a suite at Hotel Paseo, an Autograph Collection property that pays homage to mid-century modern design with a Airstream onsite.

In Partnership with Afar.

Eat Like a Local in Palm Springs

These seven spots cover a vast culinary landscape—everything from sushi to Southwestern to cherries jubilee

4 Saints

Timing is everything at 4 Saints: Arrive well before the sun goes down to snag a table for magic hour. The rooftop restaurant, which sits poolside on the seventh floor of the Kimpton Rowan Hotel, is the desert’s highest, with panoramic views of the San Jacinto Mountains. A convivial bartender behind the four-sided marble-and-wood bar may recommend a boutique aromatised or fortified wine to start, the low alcohol content allowing you to enjoy a string of standout cocktails over the course of a night. (Try the Highway , a local take on the Old Fashioned that uses bourbon infused with Coachella Valley dates.) The seasonal selection of globally influenced small plates by chef Stephen Wambach makes it easy to linger in the lantern-lit dining room or under the stars on the patio. Sharing is encouraged, if only so you can try as many dishes as possible, such as foie gras and berries with brioche, and sea urchin served with almond, grapefruit, and parsnip.

King's Highway

If there’s one night to slide into a booth at this casual diner inside the hip Ace Hotel & Swim Club, make it a Monday. That’s when the place is transformed by the unmissable presence of year-old ex-showgirl Shirley Claire, who sings and brings a healthy dose of razzle-dazzle as she hosts Fabulous Bingo. In fact, most nights of the week have a theme—see Tuesday karaoke at the adjacent Amigo Room bar, half-off wine bottles on Wednesday, and Taco Jueves—so making reservations is a good idea, but not a must. If you wind up waiting for a table, grab an Orange You Glad To See Me—made with gin, orange, Chareau, and lime—and pop into the photo booth. With its stone wall, leather booths, and globe pendant lights, the diner (a former Denny’s) embraces the spirit of the sixties, while the menu offers a distinctly Californian twist on Southwestern and Mexican fare. Must-orders: For breakfast (served until 2 p.m.), opt for the desert classic Date Shake and Huevos Rancheros, made with California- and Coachella Valley–sourced ingredients. For dinner, try the Grilled Mahi Mahi Tacos or Desert Highway Burgers, and request the pickled jalapeños for added kick.

Workshop Kitchen + Bar

Regulars at Workshop Kitchen + Bar know not to get too attached to any one dish. Innovative chef/owner Michael Beckman—who trained in Lyon and worked in Berlin—might be serving honey-lavender glazed black cod one night; a sausage, rapini, and fennel pizza another; and his signature burger (with pastrami and wagyu oxtail) the next. Diners in the know ask for the off-the-menu whole striped sea bass, grilled in the wood-fired oven with seasonally shifting ingredients. The adventurous menu is a big draw, to be sure, but so is the magical setting: The year-old Spanish-inspired building—once an art gallery and movie theatre—features foot-high ceilings, which the trendsetting architecture firm SOMA updated with poured concrete for an industrial cathedral aesthetic. (The work won it a James Beard Design Award.) If you’re there for Sunday brunch or an early dinner, ask for booth #7, which is flooded with natural light, or a table in the whitewashed courtyard. Cocktails such as the Mountaineer—made with little-known Génépy des Alpes liqueur, pineapple and lime juice, and bitters—are just as revelatory early in the evening as they are on late weekend nights, when the place is bustling.

Melvyn's

Since the s, Melvyn’s has hosted a string of famous guests—most notably Frank Sinatra, who held court from corner booth #53 whenever he was in town. The Rat Pack spirit endures here. Old standards play nightly (except Mondays) at the piano bar, while tuxedo-clad waiters serve up Manhattans and martinis. A face lift spruced up the chandelier-strewn dining room and returned the bar to its former pale pink–tufted glory. Melvyn’s was and still is one of few places in Palm Springs with a dress code—it once famously turned away Steve McQueen and Ali McGraw for showing up in motorcycle ensembles—although diners are now allowed to dress more casually if they’re eating under the striped awning of the patio. Call ahead to reserve a table (yes, Sinatra’s booth is still available) and then give in to nostalgia. For lunch, try the Monte Cristo sandwich; after dark, follow jumbo prawn cocktails and oysters Rockefeller with tableside-prepared steak Diane and cherries jubilee. Insider’s tip: Ask maître d’ Brian Ellis, hired when Melvyn’s first opened, about the night the FBI stopped by.

Counter Reformation

There’s something about a place being “secret” that makes it exponentially more exciting. Counter Reformation, the European-style wine bar hidden from sight inside the Parker hotel, lives up to that notion. Open from Thursday to Monday, 3 to 10 p.m., the pocket-sized shrine to great wine has no tables and takes no reservations (though leaning at the low-lit seat bar is encouraged). But there is food, and fantastic food at that. Instead of trying to be everything to everybody, Counter Reformation’s tapas menu is short and original, including caviar served with crème fraîche and a quail egg, plus a layered summer tomato salad with melon. The wines are carefully curated from California, France, and Italy, with a few wild cards from places like Portugal and Oregon, and are all priced the same. While the spot has the feel of an insider’s club, it’s without pretense, with the experts behind the bar providing enthusiastic guidance. For dessert, order the foie gras macarons with sea salt, with a sip of champagne. If you overdo it, don’t worry: You can ask for forgiveness in the restaurant’s authentic confessional booth, shipped in from Italy.

Sandfish by Engin Onural

While sake may be standard at other sushi restaurants, this game-changing spot pays homage to Japan’s other great boozy tradition: whiskey. In the lively modern space—all blonde wood, concrete, and industrial lighting—chef/owner Engin Onural serves a creative lineup of sushi, including the Sandfish (a spicy tuna and crab-meat roll topped with fried potato slivers) and zucchini flowers filled with tuna and cream cheese. Things get really interesting at the bar. Using all craft ingredients—house-made syrups, fresh juices, artisanal spirits, and local brews—the bartenders create inspired whiskey-centric cocktails. Try the elegantly layered Old Fashioned (made with Nikka Pure Malt, Pierre Ferrand Formula cognac, bitters, and Demerara sugar), and a play on a Spanish gin and tonic called Foraged, which features Death’s Door white whiskey infused with wild juniper berries Austin forages himself, plus fresh grapefruit, Szechuan peppercorns, rose petals, and yuzu.

In Partnership with Afar.

5 Impeccably Luxurious Palm Springs Properties

Elegant design, Hollywood-style glamour, and epic pools are the main draw at these lush locations

The Lautner

Some people dream of private islands with snowy sand and palm trees. Others fantasise about sleeping in a John Lautner house. For the latter, nothing beats this remote compound of luxury “living units” designed by the Frank Lloyd Wright protégé, the only Lautner residence open to public bookings. All concrete, redwood, glass, and steel, the four flats, which sleep two adults each, are distinctly designed with vintage furniture, organic cotton pillow-top mattresses, Heath Ceramics–tiled showers, and contemporary kitchens. Spend the day sunbathing from your private patio and cooling off in the saline plunge pool, and stargaze from the skylight above your bed at night. The micro-resort is self-catering, but that makes it all the more special—instead of eating in a restaurant, up to 12 people can dine under a communal redwood pergola; arrangements can be made for private chef dinners there, too. A hidden speakeasy-inspired bar for guests of the Ranch House (this additional accommodation, not a Lautner, sleeps four) only fuels the retro fantasy. Plan ahead: Weekends fill up months in advance.

Holiday House Palm Springs

It’s all about the playful details at Holiday House, from the love beads that guests receive on arrival to the custom fortune cookies they take home with them. But make no mistake—this and-up property is an upscale, high-style destination. Built in , the 28 rooms and communal spaces were originally designed by pioneering architect Herbert W. Burns, one of the major forces behind Palm Springs modernism. A update by lauded interior designer Mark D. Sikes reinvented the hotel, giving fresh life to its clean lines with curated artwork and a cobalt, white, and warm wood palette (even the bicycles match). Accommodations are organised as Good, Better, and Best—and the latter is well worth it for the soaking tub and outdoor shower. The pool scene is laid-back and refined—waiters serve rosé flights between guests’ dips in the water—while an honour-system pantry is stocked with such desert “essentials” as sparkling water, straw hats, and potted succulents. Pro tip: Make a reservation in advance for the al fresco Friday night fried chicken dinner, which draws a crowd for its locally sourced chicken, delivered fresh that day and served with comfort-food sides.

ARRIVE

The pool is the centre of all action at this Design District hotel. Show up early for yoga alongside the metre-long pool, and then settle into a private cabana for a day of lounging and swimming—with, perhaps, a round at the marble ping-pong table or bocce court thrown in. Opened in , ARRIVE was the first ground-up hotel to be built in Palm Springs in a decade, rebooting the desert’s signature style with its butterfly roofs, clerestory windows, and 32 guest rooms decorated in urbane modern pieces (half the rooms also feature private patios and fireplaces). The vibe is casual and playful at all turns—guests check in at the bar, rather than a registration desk, where they’re promptly handed a cocktail. The hotel has two restaurants—Reservoir, which opens to the pool, and Draughtsman, a Southern California take on the gastropub—as well as in-room spa services. Don’t miss: The pool parties, which are as popular with locals as with guests. Sundays bring live bands and DJs spinning vinyl, and once a month movies play on a big screen starting at sundown.

Rimrock Ranch

The charm is simple—and highly photogenic—at this property, where old western actors like Roy Rogers used to get away between takes. When new owners bought the ranch in , they began renovating bit by bit, outfitting the rooms with vintage-inspired Smeg refrigerators, turntables, Coleman lanterns, and Pendleton wool blankets. The accommodations vary wildly, ranging from four original knotty pine–paneled cabins to midcentury-modern rooms in the lodge to a glass-and–corrugated metal duplex called the Hatch House, which Lloyd Russell designed in There’s even an option to stay in a remodeled s Airstream, which features a live-edge wood bar with copper inlays. True to its original intent, the hectare ranch is laid-back and without pretense, the kind of retreat where hikes in neighbouring Joshua Tree National Park stand in for a spa day, and guests make their own meals in the antique kitchens and at the outdoor grills. The real magic happens at sunset on the observation deck, and is best enjoyed with a BYO cocktail.

Sparrows Lodge

Tensions dissolve immediately when guests arrive at Sparrows Lodge. Take your welcome cocktail—sangria with wild blueberries—straight to the arbour, where the scent of citrus and the soothing fountain flow embody “out of office.” Like much of Palm Springs, this room bolt-hole dates to the s, when it was owned by MGM actor Don Castle and known as Castle’s Red Barn. Fully restored in , the lodge is more rustic modern than midcentury, with russet red walls, exposed beams, and Swiss army blankets. It’s a decidedly unplugged place (rooms don’t have TVs or phones) with a casual atmosphere that’s akin to summer camp. Plan to spend quality time at the pool, tooling around town on one of the free Sole bikes, or in the Out of Africa–style massage tent. The Barn Kitchen’s family-style dinners on Chicken Wednesdays and Steak Saturdays are a can’t-miss. Strangers become fast friends over three-course feasts by chef Gabriel R. Woo (reserve at least a week in advance). Pro tip: Ask for a poolside room with a deep steel horse trough bathtub—and bring a good book.

In partnership with Afar.

Go Off the Beaten Path in the Desert

Stay in a historic hotel, enjoy a private rock-climbing experience, and stroll through an outdoor museum

Rimrock Ranch

The charm is simple—and highly photogenic—at this property, where old western actors like Roy Rogers used to get away between takes. When new owners bought the ranch in , they began renovating bit by bit, outfitting the rooms with vintage-inspired Smeg refrigerators, turntables, Coleman lanterns, and Pendleton wool blankets. The accommodations vary wildly, ranging from four original knotty pine–paneled cabins to midcentury-modern rooms in the lodge to a glass-and–corrugated metal duplex called the Hatch House, which Lloyd Russell designed in There’s even an option to stay in a remodeled s Airstream, which features a live-edge wood bar with copper inlays. True to its original intent, the hectare ranch is laid-back and without pretense, the kind of retreat where hikes in neighboring Joshua Tree National Park stand in for a spa day, and guests make their own meals in the antique kitchens and at the outdoor grills. The real magic happens at sunset on the observation deck, and is best enjoyed with a BYO cocktail.

Cliffhanger Guides

Never mind if you’ve never snapped on a climbing harness before. The sole prerequisite for a private climbing experience with Cliffhanger Guides in Joshua Tree National Park is a willingness to try something new. After speaking with you at length about your comfort level and goals, one of the outfitter’s pro guides will custom-tailor an expedition around the area’s 9, rock climbs. Instead of visiting crowded tourist-frequented areas, you’ll wind up on lesser-known paths that often lead to blonde domes of gritty quartz monzonite that you’ll have all to yourself. Slab climbing—a style valuing balance and fine footwork over forearm strength—usually prevails, giving you the stamina to handle a five-hour, half-day or unlimited-time full-day trip. The expedition includes all necessary technical equipment, along with a less-than-rugged picnic lunch—hummus, fresh vegetables, wine-soaked cheese—but climbers should bring their own water. The guides are friendly and approachable, happily pointing out rare desert plants and giving you a local’s perspective on the area (ask about their favorite trails and juice bars). The region’s popularity continues to explode, with weekends and holidays filling up weeks out, so book in advance.

Noah Purifoy Outdoor Desert Art Museum

Throughout his life, African-American artist Noah Purifoy reimagined junk as art, using found materials to create sculptures inspired by Southern California’s culture and landscape. Some of his best-known pieces were made out of charred debris from the Watts riot, and he worked tirelessly to bring art programs into the local community and prison system. Then in the late s, Purifoy moved to the desert, where he spent the last 15 years of his life creating his original and distinctive magnum opus: a series of large-scale sculptures sprawled across 10 acres of sandy red earth in the Mojave. The space redefines the notion of a museum, with an atmosphere that’s both meditative and reminiscent of Mad Max. While the found items are evident upon close inspection, the impact of the pieces themselves—with such titles as “The White House,” “Band Wagon,” and “Ode to Frank Gehry”—is deeply moving. The museum is open all day and free (though donations are encouraged), but you can also schedule a one-hour group tour or a private tour with a docent. Pro tips: Visit as early as possible or at sundown to avoid the scorching heat and experience the place at its most picturesque. Bring water and watch out for snakes.

The Lautner

Some people dream of private islands with snowy sand and palm trees. Others fantasise about sleeping in a John Lautner house. For the latter, nothing beats this remote compound of luxury “living units” designed by the Frank Lloyd Wright protégé, the only Lautner residence open to public bookings. All concrete, redwood, glass, and steel, the four flats, which sleep two adults each, are distinctly designed with vintage furniture, organic cotton pillow-top mattresses, Heath Ceramics–tiled showers, and contemporary kitchens. Spend the day sunbathing from your private patio and cooling off in the saline plunge pool, and stargaze from the skylight above your bed at night. The micro-resort is self-catering, but that makes it all the more special—instead of eating in a restaurant, up to 12 people can dine under a communal redwood pergola; arrangements can be made for private chef dinners there, too. A hidden speakeasy-inspired bar for guests of the Ranch House (this additional accommodation, not a Lautner, sleeps four) only fuels the retro fantasy. Plan ahead: Weekends fill up months in advance.

Moorten Botanical Garden and Cactarium

For decades, the Moorten Botanical Garden and Cactarium operated quietly, visitors referred by word of mouth for strolls through the family-owned quarter-hectare grounds. Then Instagram happened. Thanks to social media, this collection of exotic desert plants, succulents, and crystals dating to the s now sees hundreds of people per day. The second-generation members of the Moorten family, who still manage the garden, make sure the grounds are impeccable. There’s plenty to see year-round—the garden is open daily, except Wednesdays—but the best time to visit is in April to late August, when you’ll find it abloom. Tours led by master gardeners several times daily reveal the fascinating stories behind the plants; desert shrubs, succulents, and garden supplies are also for sale. Whether you believe it’s from the crystals or not, the place is charged with positivity and peace. Pro tips: Arrive early to nab a shaded table for a bring-your-own picnic. And if you run into proprietor Clark Moorten, ask him about his childhood trips through Central and South America in search of specimens for the collection.

In partnership with Afar.

L’Horizon Palm Springs

Sleep inside a mid-century masterpiece filled with Hollywood history

Staying at L’Horizon Palm Springs is a bit like stepping into a mid-century-modern time machine, with all the luxury trappings of a Hollywood hideaway in the desert.

After all, that’s exactly what it is. The hotel compound was built in by architect William F. Cody, who designed many of the famous mid-century buildings around the desert; he was commissioned by Hollywood producer Jack Wrather (behind such TV shows as The Lone Ranger and Lassie) to create a desert home that could also accommodate plenty of his A-list friends. The result was this collection of 25 sleek bungalows, spread over a hectare against a mountain backdrop. Some of the guests over the years included Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable, and presidents Nixon and Reagan. 

In , the compound got a refresh from contemporary designer Steve Hermann, embracing that classic Palm Springs aesthetic. The original, slump-stone walls are juxtaposed against warm exposed wood beams in the ceilings, bespoke and vintage decor, and floor-to-ceiling windows. To stay in Marilyn’s old room, book the Fireplace Junior Suite Bungalow, which also has a wood-burning copper-clad fireplace, and a big view of the zero-edge pool.

Even though you’re a short distance from Palm Springs area shopping and golf courses, this is the kind of place that invites you to keep a low profile, like a star hiding out from the paparazzi. Chill out at the spa (with body treatments such as the Espresso Mud Wrap or the Lemongrass Mimosa Scrub) and enjoy all three meals at the elegantly al fresco So-Pa restaurant—ranging from the Dungeness-crab-accented L’Horizon Benedict at breakfast to the dinner menu of seafood, organic duck breast, or Niman Ranch short ribs. Adding to the serene ambience: This is an adults-only property.

The poolside bar is a fabulous throwback in itself. Choose from classic cocktails like a Tom Cat Collins, a Manhattan, or the rye-centered Vieux Carré. Or sip on more contemporary cousins, like La Martinque (with port, cognac, and pineapple juice) or the Summer in Russia (vodka, grapefruit juice, and elderflower liqueur).

4 Fantastic Resorts in Greater Palm Springs

Find the perfect place to stay in Palm Springs, from boutique mid-century inns to lavish golf resorts

From the hip and modern to the traditional and classic, resorts in and around Palm Springs let you escape in the desert any way you like. You’ll find just the right place, whether you’re planning to play a few rounds on one of the Coachella Valley’s world-famous golf courses, lounge by the pool, or experience the desert’s incomparable mid-century architecture.

Parker Palm Springs

Design buffs love the Parker Palm Springs for its Jonathan Adler décor, while celebs also adore this intimate inn’s seclusion—especially the one-bedroom villa suites with enclosed patios. After a private yoga session and a seaweed wrap at the spa—playfully named the Palm Springs Yacht Club—hole up in a cabana alongside one of the inn’s two saline pools. For dinner, settle into a corner banquette and indulge in the braised Wagyu beef short ribs at the seductive bistro, Mister Parker’s. Pro tip: Don’t miss Counter Reformation, a cozy wine bar that features a wooden confessional flown in from Italy.

Ace Hotel Palm Springs

The Ace Hotel Palm Springs brought a mid-century hotel back from the dead and infused it with an artsy spirit that combines the best of Palm Springs cool, both old school and new. Groove to DJs in the lobby and poolside, or create your own soundtrack in a room with a record player and a selection of classic vinyl. Dine on the refined roadhouse fare at the hotel’s King’s Highway restaurant (once a Denny’s) and take your pick of 21 craft beers on tap in The Amigo Room.

L’Horizon Resort and Spa

Blending the style of iconic architect William F. Cody and the vision of renowned designer Steve Hermann, L’Horizon Resort and Spa is Palm Springs incarnate. With post-and-beam bungalows, some featuring outdoor showers, the low-slung, one-hectare resort earned raves from Architectural Digest as “the most jaw-dropping of the pack” of Palm Springs’ mid-century hotels. Take in dramatic mountain views through your bungalow’s floor-to-ceiling windows and dine al fresco on executive chef Jason Niederkorn’s inventive cuisine at L’Horizon’s So.Pa restaurant.

La Quinta Resort & Spa

Long before Palm Springs became synonymous with a s aesthetic, the Spanish-inspired La Quinta Resort & Spa defined California desert style. Come to this lavish oasis, with its 41 swimming pools and seven restaurants, to golf on five leading courses, including the Stadium Course at PGA West (named one of the country’s top 50 by Golf Digest). Afterward, rejuvenate your spirit with one of the 14 different yoga classes or during immersive, personalised yoga retreats inspired by Indian spiritual centers.

Hot Air Balloon Tours of Palm Springs

Get a bird’s-eye view of the Coachella Valley and then celebrate with bubbly

One of the best ways to appreciate the panoramic desert of the Greater Palm Springs area is to literally get above it—taking in the expanses of citrus trees and date palms, the sagebrush, the spring wildflowers, and even the plus manicured golf courses from a hot air balloon, with the San Jacinto and Santa Rosa mountains as a backdrop.

A number of operators do hot-air balloon rides in the Coachella Valley, primarily in the high season of November through May, with sunrise and sunset being the most popular times of the day for tours. Operators will typically come pick you up at your hotel for the trip and tours are fairly small—anywhere from two to 10 of you along for the ride.

Fantasy Balloon Flights, Balloons Above, and HavNFun Hot Air Balloons all use FAA-certified pilots and embrace the centuries-old tradition of offering up some sparkling wine after your voyage. (Ballooning as a sport began in France, no doubt including Champagne, in the 18th century). Expect to be in the air anywhere from 40 to 90 minutes. Some of the operators let you get pretty hands-on, too: HavNFun lets passengers help set up and take down the balloon before and after their flights, while Balloons Above is happy to arrange lessons on how to fly the balloon yourself.

On the Fantasy Balloon Flights tour of Palm Springs, the pilot will point out spots like the San Andreas Fault, the Salton Sea, and even celebrity homes. The company also offers Temecula wine country flights that glide over the vineyards and then touch down for a winery tour. 

Saguaro Palm Springs

Escape to this colorful oasis, where pool parties and taco nights are the norm

You can’t miss the Saguaro when you’re driving through Palm Springs. The trendy boutique hotel is easily recognizable (and often photographed) due to its bright façade of yellows, oranges, and pinks. Known for its lively pool scene and active events calendar, the Saguaro Palm Springs appeals to anyone looking for fun in the desert sun. 

With guest rooms, two restaurants, a freshly renovated event space, a spa, and popular party pool, the Saguaro has plenty to keep you busy during a desert getaway. Explore the desert on a cruiser bike, relax during a spa treatment, take a yoga session, or sway your afternoon away in a rainbow-colored hammock while your friends play bocce nearby. Check the calendar for upcoming events—normal weeks may include karaoke nights or movies on the lawn, while festival weekends (such as Coachella) feature poolside DJs and live performances.

As far as eating and drinking—you’re set. Try a boozy brunch pairing at Rocco’s Electric, where Chilaquiles Verde comes with a Michelada, and Chorizo Con Papas Burrito is served with a margarita. During the weekend, the poolside bar serves breakfast, appetisers—like almond-crusted local Coachella dates—and tacos. It’s worth extending your trip just to take advantage of Taco Tuesday and Thursday (“because one day is not enough”) at the hotel’s main restaurant, El Jefe.

Before you book, check for specials—especially if you’re organising a bachelor or bachelorette party. Recent packages have included a late checkout, luxury pool floats, a bottle of champagne, and more with a two-night stay.

BMW Performance Driving School

Drive fast in an M Series BMW at a racetrack south of Palm Springs

Zooming really fast in an ultra-speedy M Series BMW may seem like one of those Walter Mitty moments that’s out of your reach. But now those need-for-speed fantasies are available to anyone willing to plunk down a credit card and show up, ready to roll, at the BMW Performance Driving School in the Southern California desert south of Palm Springs.

Splurges with a side of adrenaline don’t get much better than taking part in a high-speed driving classes, conducted year-round at The Thermal Club—a posh, plus-hectare racetrack, training facility, and motorsports club just south of Indio. The goal of all BMW classes, stress the course instructors, is to improve your driving skills and let you feel what it’s like to push these high-performance machines to the limit in a safe driving environment.

And push them you will. Instructors (many of them professional racers) first outfit you with ultra-padded race helmets, then show you how to customise your driving position in one of a fleet of gleaming M Series BMWs. Quick tips like “A squealing tire is a happy tire,” and “Don’t be afraid to skid,” are reminders that going fast—or at least faster than normal—is the order of the day.

Feel like James Bond zooming across the desert in an M Series BMW.

Then, seatbelt snugged, you head out on the tarmac. Depending on the course you sign up for, you could be pitted against your classmates in a time trial. Or you could do power laps of the impressive kilometre South Palm Circuit, the largest track at The Thermal Club with banked turns and a pedal-to-the-metal main stretch. Finish off riding shotgun with your instructor, or another top driver, to see (and feel) what it’s like to go really, really fast around the track.

California Questionnaire: The Bryan Brothers

The record-smashing tennis partners (and twins) share their favorite foods, views, and tunes

As the most dominant doubles team of all time, pro tennis players Bob and Mike Bryan have wowed fans worldwide. But the crowd-pleasing identical twins, known for their signature high-flying chest bump after each victory, echo that there’s no place like home—especially when that home is California’s Central Coast. Though they now live elsewhere, the pair often returns to Camarillo, in Ventura County, roughly halfway between L.A. and Santa Barbara. We sat down with the high-flying pair at the home of the BNP Paribas Open, Indian Wells Tennis Garden near Palm Springs, and asked them to serve up their views on everything from how they’d spend a perfect day in their home state to their favorite local place for soft tacos.

Where do you live?

Mike: We grew up in Camarillo, and I have a second home there, in Santa Rosa Valley. We live on a little five-acre [two hectare] horse farm; my wife’s a big horseback rider so we’ve got some land out there in the same development as Gary Sinise. He’s my neighbour.

Bob: I’m out of state, but I’m hoping to come to get back to California when my kids are older. Maybe when my daughter goes to Stanford, my alma mater, I’ll move out there.

Why there?

Mike: [My Santa Rosa Valley home is] close to my parents, close to where our roots are. We love the area—we’ve traveled the world and there’s no place like home. It's just beautiful: the mountains, the ocean five miles [8km] away. That’s gonna be the place we’ll stay once we’re done playing. We’ll probably die in that house.

Bob: I like the variety and diversity of California—mountains, oceans, deserts—there’s not really any place like it that has it all.

Who or what is your greatest California love?

Mike: It’s tough to beat the Ventura County and Santa Monica beaches. We grew up bodysurfing there. And we love the mountains too—up behind Ojai in the Santa Monica Mountains—my mum and wife go horseback riding there all the time. We love the Channel Islands too—on a clear day and you see them on the horizon. It's a great view.

Bob: The fact that you can escape into nature on a trail and see what the Native Americans saw hundreds of years ago—it’s cool.

What is the biggest misperception about California?

Mike: That it’s all about showbiz and Hollywood. You get a whole range of people here—even cowboy types. It’s so diverse.

Bob: Yeah, everyone sees the Hollywood sign and that’s what they attach to California—but that’s just a very small part of this place.

What is the stereotype that most holds true?

Mike: The language. “Dude”—it’s what we grew up saying. When people hear us talk they know we’re from California.

Bob: Yeah: “Chill out, dude.”

What is your favorite Golden State moment?

Mike: The sunsets on the beach. We always go to the huge sand hill on the way to Malibu. I go up that and watch the sunset and the waves crashing. Mornings are great too—the crystal-clear air, the blue sky, the crispness. You can wake up on Christmas and go outside to a 21ºC day.

Bob: The cool shade. The air’s a little thicker on the east coast. I like the freshness in California—just throw on a light sweater at night and a t-shirt during the day.

Time for a road trip—where are you going?

Bob: I’d go up Highway 1 and stop at Santa Barbara, Hearst Castle, Big Sur, then spend the night at Ventana Inn. Then go to Santa Cruz Boardwalk, and I’ve gotta stop at Stanford. Then go across the Golden Gate Bridge into Muir Woods and then keep going up to Napa to do some wine tasting. Then come back and do it all over again.

Mike: I'd hit the national parks. We’d go to Sequoia National Park—my wife has never been and I want her to see those big trees. Then we’d hit Yosemite, then Lake Tahoe and go out on a boat on the water. We’d drive around the lake—on the California side, of course—roll all the way up the state, then zoom down the I-5 to Joshua Tree National Park.

If you could decree an official state culinary experience, what would it be?

Bob: A carne asada soft taco or a chile verde burrito—they seem to get it right in Southern California. I’m always looking for authentic Mexican food.

Mike: We’d always go to Somis Market near Camarillo. It was in the middle of nowhere, and we hit it almost every day. It was pretty greasy and fattening, but it had the best flavour, and you couldn’t match those beans and rice and the sauces and salsas. To this day our favorite is Mexican food. A huevos rancheros breakfast—you can’t beat it.

Bob: Yeah, if we had one last meal on this earth, it would be Mexican food from Somis Market.

Best California song?

Bob: “California Love” by Dr. Dre and Tupac.

Mike: And any songs by the Beach Boys—my dad went to high school with them. He taught us to play music at an early age, and he taught us all the Beach Boys songs—“Surfin’ USA,” “California Girls.”

How would your California dream day unfold?

Bob: We’d wake up early, drop the kids off at school. We’d go on a bike ride in Ojai, maybe take a boat out on Lake Casitas, then swing over to Carpinteria Beach—the so-called safest beach in the world—and do a little body-whomping. Come back down, pick up the kids, go to the Santa Barbara Zoo, maybe do some shopping at the outlets. Then bedtime with some good Mexican food.

Mike: I’d wake up early, go get some great breakfast down in Venice, then go roller-blading along the beach. Take off the blades and go into the ocean for a little dip. Then get some lunch in Bel Air, maybe catch a concert with friends at the Hollywood Bowl…

Bob: Which concert?

Mike: Maroon 5. Then I’d go watch the sunset…

Bob: Where?

Mike: In Yosemite.

Bob: You’d need a space ship. Sounds like a good day.

Mike: Then I’d come back and do some horseback riding with my wife, then shut it down. Yeah, that sounds like a good day. 

Sours: https://www.visitcalifornia.com/au/destination/spotlight-greater-palm-springs

Among the reasons iconic rock band Deep Purple is still drawing full houses is the authenticity of the band’s layered sound.

“The fact is, essentially, we are a live band with no Pro Tools back stage,” keyboardist Don Airey said. “There’s no faking it. What you see and what you hear is all real, in direct contrast to what is going on with a lot of shows.”

Deep Purple, the pioneering band that gave the music world such classics “Smoke on the Water,” “Highway Star” and “Burn,” will perform Saturday, Aug. 15, at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino in Indio.

While Airey is not an original member, he is legendary in his own right, with time logged playing with Rainbow, Whitesnake and Ozzy Osbourne, with his work being heard on classics such as Osbourne’s “Mr. Crowley” and Whitesnake’s “Here I Go Again.” He originally played with Deep Purple when original organ player Jon Lord fell ill.

In , Lord left the band for good, leading to Airey becoming the permanent keyboardist. He is joined by guitarist Steve Morse and longtime members Ian Paice (drums), Ian Gillan (vocals), and Roger Glover (bass).

“The first gig was such short notice that the secret is to just be yourself and that’s what I was,” he said. “I didn’t try to play just like Jon because he was so unique.”

Of course, there were some challenges.

“I’ve always been a big fan of the band, and on my first gig we did ‘Fools,’ which is a marvelous track, but one I wasn’t familiar with and I had a couple of hours to learn it,” he said.

Despite stepping into a group with a well-known sound, Airey stayed true to his playing.

“No matter what I do I always sound like me,” he said, laughing. “A musician has to be themselves and I have a big enough track record that it works well for me.”

However, Airey did start off using Lord’s Hammond organ.

“The Hammond organ is an amazing instrument, but no one is like the other,” he said. “It’s not easy to get a rock sound out of it. You can’t just push a button and have it go. You really have to know what you are doing. I had to refurbish his.”

Although Deep Purple is credited for being one of the architects of heavy metal, the band’s roots had a much different sound.

“I was just talking to Ian Paice about it and he pointed out that in the early days, Deep Purple was a free form jazz band,” he said. “They just went out and no one was quite sure what was going to happen. Numbers would change overnight, and there would be different bits and people would play flat out.”

As the band evolved, songs such as “Burn” featured blazing guitar riffs and solo and an iconic keyboard solo. “Highway Star” is another that features a wild solo and the band’s most iconic song, “Smoke on the Water,” has one of the most recognizable riffs in rock music.

“‘Smoke on the Water’ wasn’t perceived as anything exceptional,” Airey said. “Bruce Payne, who was the manager then and still manages us, pushed the record company to release it. It took seven times before it would be a hit.”

Throughout the years, Deep Purple has attracted scores of fans, including young ones.

“A great part of it is the audience of young persons whose parents played Deep Purple music nonstop on vinyl so all these kids and a lot of young people want to see what it is and what it is and what it sounds like live,” he said.

Contact the writer:[email protected]

Sours: https://www.pe.com//08/12/fantasy-springs-deep-purple-to-showcase-deep-rock-roots/

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