Filipino given names

Filipino given names DEFAULT

Filipino baby names are a beautiful and unique way to keep alive the rich tradition of the Philippines. The culture has many ties to other cultures and you will hear not only traditional Tagalog names but also Spanish, Italian and American names.

Popular Filipino Baby Names

Many of the most common names in the Philippines are also popular in the United States. With that said, if you want to homage to the Filipino culture with a truly unique sounding name, there are plenty of common Filipino baby names that are from Tagalog, Spanish or follow another uniquely Filipino trend like combining names.

Related Articles

Girl

  • Althea - wholesome or to heal
  • Amihan - Northwest wind
  • Angel (f/m) - heavenly being; commonly used as a girl name
  • Aurora - dawn
  • Bituin - star
  • Blessica - to confer blessing; a combo of Bless and Jessica
  • Chesa - celestial
  • Janella - God has shown favor
  • Jasmine - the national flower of the Philippines
  • Lyka Mae - pretty face
  • Maricar - combo of Maria and Carmen
  • Norjannah - variation of the combination of Nora and Joanna
  • Princess - royal daughter
  • Rowena - white-haired
  • Zenaida - life of Zeus

Boy

  • Christian - a follower of Christ
  • Crisanto - Christ in the Filipino language
  • Daniel - God is my judge
  • Danilo - God is my judge; Tagalog version of Daniel
  • Dranreb - the name Bernard spelled backward
  • Gabriel - devoted to God or a hero of God
  • Jacob - supplanter
  • James - derived from the name Jacob, it means one who follows
  • Jejomar (m/f) - combination of the names Jesus, Joseph and Mary; most commonly used as a boy name
  • John Mark - two of the four Gospels in the Bible, John means God has been gracious and Mark means war-like
  • Joshua - God is salvation
  • Mohammed - praiseworthy
  • Nathaniel - gift of God
  • Rizalino - a derivative of the surname Rizal; popularized by civil rights activist Dr. Jose Rizal
  • Rodrigo - famous ruler

Traditional (Tagalog)

Although Tagalog names are considered old-fashioned, you still may hear a few here and there, especially from parents who want to acknowledge their Filipino culture while also having a unique name.

Girl

  • Atay - liver
  • Diwa (f/m) - gift of god
  • Diwata - guardian spirit of nature in Filipino mythology
  • Eeya - generous and helping
  • Kulay-abo - gray
  • Ligaya - happiness
  • Luningning - brilliance
  • Luwalhati - glory, splendor
  • Mahalina - to be fascinated
  • Marikit - beautiful or pretty
  • Mayumi - tender
  • Mutya - talisman, jewel or pearl
  • Sampaguita - the Filipino word for the flower Jasmine
  • Tadhana - destiny or fate
  • Tala - goddess of the stars

Boy

  • Alab - blaze
  • Banoy - eagle
  • Buwan - moon
  • Dakila - great
  • Datu - chief
  • Heherson - he is her son
  • Isagani - character in a novel by Rizal
  • Joriz - abbreviation of the name Jose Rizal, a Filipino national hero
  • Kidlat - lightening
  • Makisig - handsome
  • Magiting - heroic
  • Ramil - sand
  • Sinag (m/f) - ray
  • Tanashiri (m/f) - sacred lotus
  • Ulan (m/f) - rain

Filipino Baby Names With Italian Origins

As it happens, Italy plays host to the largest population of Filipino migrants of any country in Western Europe. Sharing both Catholic routes, and a love for Italian culture, it's no wonder that there are quite a few Italian names that you'll hear in the Philippines.

Girl

  • Adelfa - a derivative of Adelphia meaning 'from the same womb'
  • Amalia - vigor or work
  • Arianna - very sacred or pure
  • Arminda - Jerusalem liberated
  • Bianca - white
  • Candida - pure or innocent
  • Corina - maiden
  • Dafrosa - rose belt
  • Daria - to possess
  • Emerlinda - one who takes care of the house
  • Mimosa - a tropical tree
  • Rea - flowing
  • Ricci - forever strong
  • Rosio - rose
  • Teodorica - variation of Theodore, which means God's gift

Boy

  • Arnulfo - strong as an eagle, smart as a wolf
  • Asterio - star
  • Aquilino - brown or dark
  • Aurelio - golden
  • Basilio - chief or master
  • Benigno - good, affable, loving and gentle
  • Brando - sword
  • Claudio - lame or crippled
  • Concordio - harmony
  • Dante - patience or virtue
  • Edgardo - propserous spearman
  • Edilberto - noble and bright
  • Liberato - liberty
  • Macario - fortunate, supremely blessed
  • Vedasto - a saint

Filipino Baby Names With Spanish Origins

Many names that are somewhat common in the Philippines are Spanish because the Philippine Islands were colonized by Spain for more than 300 years. During that time, Spanish rulers insisted on Catholic or Spanish-sounding names both as first and last names.

Female

  • Amor - love
  • Belen - Spanish for Bethlehem
  • Benilda/Benilde - she who fights with bears
  • Carmelita - garden (as in garden of Eden)
  • Cassandra - one who shines
  • Cecilia - blind
  • Charo - nickname for Rosario
  • Cielo - sky
  • Dolores - pain
  • Flordeliza - the name is derived from the Spanish, 'flor de Liza' or Liza's flower
  • Imelda - powerful fighter
  • Marisol - a combination of Miriam and Soledad
  • Nieves - snow
  • Perlita - pearl
  • Reyna - Spanish for queen

Male

  • Agapito - loved
  • Alejandro - helper of mankind
  • Amado - loved
  • Ambrosio - Based on Saint Ambrose
  • Antonio - Spanish for Anthony which means highly praiseworthy
  • Andres - brave and manly
  • Efren - Spanish version of Ephraim; fertile and fruitful
  • Ernesto - Spanish version of Ernest; meaning serious or resolute
  • Esteban - crown or garland
  • Homobono - Spanish for 'good man'
  • Honesto - honest
  • Joaquin - lifted by Yahweh
  • Joselito - God will increase, based on the name Joseph
  • Pacifico - of the Pacific
  • Renaldo - wise ruler, or advice from a ruler

Naming Trends

Filipinos today tend to prefer Spanish or American names, and so you will hear many familiar names if you head to the Philippines or variations of something both traditional and American, making it a uniquely Filipino American name. In addition, Filipinos are comfortable using last names as first names. For example, Dalisay, Abaya, and Umali all can be first-name options, even though they are Filipino surnames. The end result is a large variety of names from several different cultures all of which make beautiful boy and girl names.

© 2021 LoveToKnow Media. All rights reserved.

Sours: https://baby.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Filipino_Baby_Names

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You can find a direct link to all these sources under the ‘References’ tab at the bottom of the page, as well as the date this profile was published (indicating when these statistics were last updated).

Sours: https://culturalatlas.sbs.com.au/filipino-culture/filipino-culture-naming
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Appendix:Tagalog given names

Main page: Category:Tagalog given names

This appendix lists given names of the Tagalog-speaking people.

Tagalog given names are usually of these types: Spanish, English, and native names. The common trend on naming is mostly using English names, through many Spanish given names may still be popular. Given names are mostly composed of one or two individual names, with three or more on some cases. Usually, where two given names are used, they tend to be from one source language, but given names composed of two or more names from different languages also occur. Usually in the case of two given names, with the exception of true compound names, such as some Spanish given names like Jose Maria (male, most commonly shortened to Jomari or Jomar), and a few English ones, like Mary Ann, only one of them is used in everyday conversation.

This appendix lists given names alphabetically, and by type. Common hypocoristics, usually used as nickname are listed after each.

Spanish given names[edit]

This list includes given names that are spelled the same in English, but pronounced differently.

Male[edit]

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Female[edit]

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Y[edit]

English given names[edit]

This name category is broad: it can include names from other languages except Spanish.

Male[edit]

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

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F[edit]

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Native and locally coined given names[edit]

Male[edit]

Female[edit]

Diminutives[edit]

Diminutives, hypocoristics, or pet forms, in Tagalog are usually formed by adding the suffixes -ng (both genders, e.g. Berting for Alberto, Norberto, or Roberto, or Maring for Maria), -ay (female names: e.g. Chichay, Pepay) or -oy (male names, e.g. Buboy, Nonoy) to a short form of a name, or clipping a longer name to two syllables (e.g. Cora for Corazon). Most hypocoristic forms are based on a Spanish diminutive form, commonly with the suffixes added. In other cases, reduplication (e.g. Tonton, for Anton, Antonio, or Anthony), Anglicization (e.g. Connie for Consolacion) or English-based forms (e.g. Joey for Jose) are used. Diminutives using -ng are no longer popular, with forms using the suffixes -ay/-oy, clipped forms, reduplicated names, and English-based diminutives being more common.

Male[edit]

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* Also a given name.

Most popular given names[edit]

1948-2012 (leap years)[edit]

This section lists the top 10 most popular given names for newborn babies as listed by the Philippine Statistics Authority on leap years between 1948 and 2012. [1]

Male[edit]

1. Romeo
2. Wilfredo
3. Richard
4. Michael
5. Joel
6. Reynaldo
7. Roman
8. Ronald
9. Jose
10. Rolando

Female[edit]

1. Evelyn
2. Vilma
3. Maricel
4. Jocelyn
5. Michelle
6. Jennifer
7. Elizabeth
8. Mary Grace
9. Mary Ann
10. Fe

2015[edit]

This section lists the top 10 most popular given names for newborn babies as listed by the Philippine Statistics Authority as of 2015. Provided also are the influences that popularized the name.[2]

Male[edit]

1. Nathaniel (popularized by Nathaniel, a local TV series with the protagonist of the same name)
2. Gabriel
3. James
4. Francis (popularized by Pope Francis's visit in the Philippines in 2015)
5. Joshua
6. Jacob
7. Angelo
8. Daniel
9. Alexander
10. John Mark

Female[edit]

1. Angel
2. Althea
3. Princess
4. Ashley
5. Samantha
6. Sophia
7. Andrea
8. Angela
9. Janine
10. Sofia (popularized by Sofia the First)

2016[edit]

Male[edit]

1. Nathaniel
2. James
3. Angelo
4. Joshua
5. Gabriel

Female[edit]

1. Althea
2. Angel
3. Princess
4. Sophia
5. Samantha

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Tagalog_given_names

Most Common Filipino Names : 2005

The NSO-Office of the Civil Registrar General (NSO-OCRG) received a total of 1,688,918 copies of birth certificates from Local Civil Registry Offices nationwide on births reported to have occurred from January 2005 to December 2005. More than half (52.0 percent) or a total of 878,084 of the reported births in the year 2005 were males while 48.0 percent or 810,834 babies born then were females. 

About 0.9 percent or 7,758 of the total male births reported were named “Joshua”, while 0.6 percent or 4,722 of the total female births were named “Angel.”

The name “Joshua,” a biblical character who is the successor of Moses as leader of the Israelites, has always been the most preferred choice of Filipino parents for their male siblings since the year 2000 except in the years 2004 and 2002.

In 2004, while the name “Joshua’ ranked second in the Top Five Most Common Filipino Names Among Males, there were 259 (3.3 percent) more baby boys or a total 8,017 births reported bearing the said name than in 2005.

On the other hand, the name “Angel”, which means a divine being who acts as a messenger of  God or a spirit that protects  and offers guidance in some religions, was the favorite name for female babies born in 2005.  For the first time in the last four consecutive years (2000-2004), “Angel” surpassed the name “Angelica” which wasconsistently on top. 

Other names in the top lists of choices by Filipinos were actually a variation of names from the root word “angel.”  The names “Angela” and ”Angeline” were on the fourth and 15th place, respectively among females.  Relatedly, “Angelo” ranked 10th among males.  

Meanwhile, nine of the Top 10 most common double-worded names among males in 2005 had “John” as first name– John Paul, John Mark, John Lloyd, John Michael, John Carlo, John Rey, John Benedict, John Patrick and John Vincent.

For baby girls given “combo” names, “Mary” was the favorite in 2005.  In fact five of those in the top ten were Mary Joy, Mary Grace, Mary Rose, Mary Jane and Mary Ann. 

Sours: https://psa.gov.ph/content/most-common-filipino-names-2005

Given names filipino

Filipino name

Naming customs in the Philippines

"Philippine name" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Names of the Philippines.

Filipinos have various naming customs. They most commonly blend the older Spanish system and Anglo-American conventions, where there is a distinction between the "Christian name" and the "surname". The construct containing several middle names is common to all systems, but having multiple "first" names and only one middle and last name is a result of the blending of American and Spanish naming customs.

Today, Filipinos usually abide by the Spanish system of using both paternal and maternal surnames, with the latter used as the "middle name". The particle y is used only for legal purposes and is otherwise dropped. The middle name in its natural sense would have been the second name if the person had one, but is never counted as an individual's given name.

Historical context and examples[edit]

In ancient times, the Tagalogs had a naming system that changed via family dynamics. A Tagalog man (especially a chief) would lose his name, take his first born's name, and become known as "son's/daughter's father"; rather than his offspring adopting his surname like today. If he was baptized into Christianity, he would take a Spanish "Christian name" but retain his native name as surname. For example, Calao's father became Don Luis Amanicalao (Lord Luis, a chief of Tondo, Calao's Father). This also applied to mothers (e.g., Inanicao) etc. One also gained numerous "poetic" titles (i.e., "pamagat"; lit. "to have something to go before", today literally translated as "title", from where the prenom "Gat" is derived) from his renown/actions (e.g. valiance in battle) or other naming means (like a naming feast for those without offspring).[1]

Historical examples: Manila/Tagalog chiefs listed in the Tondo Conspiracy (1587–88) Phelipe Amarlangagui/Amarlangagui ('Felipe, Ama ni Langawi'), Luis Amanicalao (Luis, Ama ni Calao), and Omaghicon/Amaghikon (Ama ni Hikon).[2]

Another example is found in the only surviving baybayin writings; i.e., the Sto. Thomas Land Titles (1613-1625). In Document B (1625), Line 12,[a] a certain Amadaga was named. The contract stated that the owner of the land adjacent to the one sold in the contract was Maria Gada who had acquired it from Amadaga. Although no other context was given in the document, it is quite possible that Maria Gada is the daughter of "Ama ni Gada" (misspelled) and inherited the land from him as a legacy.[3]

Given names[edit]

Filipinos may have one or more official given names (as registered in their birth certificates and baptismal certificates) and various types of temporary or permanent nicknames. Filipinos commonly give themselves or each other nicknames and monikers. Some nicknames are carried for life, while others are used only with certain groups; a person can have multiple nicknames at different ages or among different groups of people.

Abbreviations, combinations, and elisions[edit]

Long given names can be shortened in various ways. Emmanuel can become Eman, Manuel, Manolo, Manny, or Manoy; and Consolación would be shortened to Connie, Cons, Sol, or Chona.

Filipino women with two given names such as María Cristina or María Victoria may choose to abbreviate the very common María (in honor of the Virgin Mary) as Ma. (with a full stop), thus rendering these given names as Ma. Cristina or Ma. Victoria. Filipino males with two given names such as José Mariano or José Gerardo could follow the same practice of abbreviating José as Jo., though this is not as consistent. Another common practice seen in other cultures (most commonly with Spanish conventions) is to elide or combine multiple given names into one nickname. The aforementioned María Cristina and María Victoria may thus acquire the nicknames Maricris and Marivic. Thus the Filipino names Maricel, Maritoni, Marijo, Maritess, and Maricon come from Maria Celia (or Celeste), María Antonieta (or Antonia), María Josefa (or Josefina), María Teresa, and María Concepción (or either Consuelo or Consolación) respectively.

A related custom is that parents combine their given names to create a name for their child. For example:

  • Joseph + Maria = Jomari
  • Maria + Carlos = Malolos
  • Elvin + Liza = Elliza
  • Marino + Erlinda = Marinerl

Some first names like Lodegrano or Lorimer may have been invented on the spot by the parents, or derived from some partially remembered foreign term. Other coined first names have unusual spellings or spellings which are pronounced differently.

Honorifics and titles[edit]

Honorifics and titles are sometimes used in place of a person's actual name. As such, titles for family elders are often used by the younger persons and then adopted by the wider community: Apo (grandson/granddaughter). Lolo (grandfather) and Lola (grandmother) are used for senior elders; Tatay/Itay/Ama (father) or Tito/Tiyo/Tsong (uncle) and Nanay/Inay/Ina (mother) or Tita/Tiya/Tsang (aunt) for middle-aged elders; Manong or Kuya (elder brother) and Manang or Ate (elder sister) for anyone slightly older than the person speaking.

People in the Filipino community are often addressed by their military or police rank, professional titles or job descriptions, either with or without their names (e.g., Architect, Attorney, Engineer, Teacher etc.) instead of Mister, Miss, Ms, or Mrs. especially when the addressee's name is not yet known by the speaker. This applies to all people that are living and working in the Philippines. Sir and Madam/Ma'am are usually not used before a nickname.

Numerals and birth order patterns[edit]

People with the same name as their father are registered as Junior (abbreviated to Jr.) or numbered with Roman numerals (III, IV, V, etc.); their father adds Senior (Sr.) after his surname or suffix. Inevitably, the younger person tends to be nicknamed Junior, Jun or Junjun permanently.[citation needed] This can also be applied to numerals; i.e., the nickname can be Third or Fourth. Because of this, a family will necessarily bestow a variety of unofficial nicknames to distinguish the various people with nearly identical official given names.

Many nicknames are bestowed by parents or other elders on children while they are still toddlers (e.g., Boy, Toto/Totoy (young boy), Girlie, Baby, etc.) and these nicknames are often carried by the person throughout their lives. These names may follow a certain pattern in certain cases, such as beginning with a certain letter of the alphabet (e.g., Diego Arnel, Diamond Amelia), such that all their initials will be the same (e.g. DAZL if the middle name is Zulueta and the surname is Lim). An example is former Senator Joker Arroyo's brother, Jack.[4] Children can also be named after certain themes, such as countries, car trademarks, and popular brand names. For instance, World Champion boxer and incumbent Senator Manny Pacquiao named his two daughters Queen Elizabeth and Princess.[4]

Reversals, indigenized names and anglicization[edit]

The Filipino given name Dranreb was invented by reversing the spelling of the English name Bernard, while someone calling himself Nosrac bears the legal name Carson. Joseph Ejército Estrada, the 13thpresident of the Philippines, began as a movie actor and received his nickname Erap as an adult; it comes from Pare spelled backwards (from Spanish compadre, which means "fellow godparent").[4]

An old custom is to replace or insert Filipino phonemes into a Spanish or English name: Mariano becomes Nano, Edwin becomes Aweng, Eduardo becomes Dwarding, Roberto becomes Berting, Ponciano becomes either Popoy, Onse, or Syano. Sometimes there is a tendency to convert a grandiose given name into something more mundane, such as when John Paul becomes JayPee, Peter John becomes Peejong, Anthony becomes Tonyo and María Elena becomes Ineng or Inyang. Complementary to this is the practise of anglicizing (with the implication of "modernising") a Spanish given name. Thus José Roberto becomes Joseph Robert (further shortened to Joebert) and Eduardo becomes Edward and then Eddy or Eddie Boy (sometimes further shortened to Daboy).

Monikers and progressional names[edit]

The variety of Filipino names, some of them with negative connotations in the English language, often take English speakers by surprise.[4] However, most Filipinos usually don't notice these negative connotations unless they are pointed out.[4]

Many Filipino celebrities and high-status personalities, such as actors and politicians, are often more well known by their nicknames than their actual given names.[4] One example of this is film and television celebrity German Moreno who is more known by the nickname Kuya Germs (kuya = elder brother).

Middle names[edit]

Main article: Filipino middle names

Surnames[edit]

Indigenous languages[edit]

Though most Filipinos adopted Spanish surnames, some preserved surnames that derive from words in indigenous languages, like Tagalog, Visayan (Cebuano and Hiligaynon), Ilocano, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan. Many indigenous surnames derive from words displaying qualities of people, especially those related to strength (e.g., Tagalog Macaraeg and Panganiban), defiance (e.g. Tagalog Dimayuga), or settlement (e.g. Cebuano/Hiligaynon Magbanua).

Most indigenous surnames are spelled closely following the Spanish-derived orthographic conventions of the time. Many of these words are spelled differently today in the various Philippine languages (following spelling reforms since the late 19th century).[5]

Cordilleran[edit]

Unlike their lowlander counterparts, Igorots living in the Cordillera Central in northern Luzon were not conquered by the Spaniards and preserved their naming customs from foreign influence. Each group had their own naming customs, but generally, like Indonesian names, there is only one given name and no surname to speak of. The given name's meaning is usually connected to natural phenomena or objects, such as danum for water. Only the Igorots who have had interacted with Spaniards and lowlanders for trade were given a name that follows the binomial "first name"-"surname" system, such as Mateo Cariño and Mateo Carantes.

At the beginning of the 20th century and the advent of the American occupation of the Philippines, the Igorots' naming customs slowly conformed with the national legal naming system used today, aided by the evangelization efforts of American Protestant missionaries. Most older people, however, still keep the singular given name given to them by their parents while also using the "Christian names" to conform to Philippine law. The singular given names of some individuals living in the early 20th century have since been adopted as a surname by their descendants.

Spanish[edit]

See also: Catálogo alfabético de apellidos

Almost all Filipinos had Spanish or Spanish-sounding surnames imposed on them for taxation purposes, but a number of them have indigenous Filipino surnames. On November 21, 1849, Governor General Narciso Clavería y Zaldúa issued a decree stating that Filipinos should adopt Spanish surnames to make census counting easier. Some Filipinos retained their native pre-colonial names, especially those who were exempted from the Clavería decree such as the descendants of rulers of the Maginoo or noble class. These surnames of the native nobility include Lacandola, Macapagal, Macabulos, and Tupas whom each descended from different Datus. They were allowed to keep the name to claim tax exemptions.

The Spanish surname category provides the most common surnames in the Philippines.[6] At the course of time, some Spanish surnames were altered (with some eventually diverged/displaced their original spelling), as resulted from illiteracy among the poor and farming class bearing such surnames, creating confusion in the civil registry and a sense of detachment from their better-off relatives. Except for the "ñ", Filipino surnames from Spanish are written without accents due to US-imported typewriters used in civil registry that lack special characters.[citation needed]

Chinese[edit]

Chinese Filipinos whose ancestors came to the Philippines from 1898 onward usually have single syllable Chinese surnames. On the other hand, most Chinese ancestors came to the Philippines prior to 1898 usually have multiple syllable Chinese surnames such as Gokongwei, Ongpin, Pempengco, Yuchengco, Teehankee, and Yaptinchay among such others. These were originally full Chinese names which were transliterated in Spanish orthography and adopted as surnames.

Common Chinese Filipino surnames are: Ong/Wong (Wang, 王), Lee/Dy/Sy (Li, 李), Chan/Tan (Chen, 陈), Lao/Lew (Liu, 刘), Tiong/Chong (Zhang, 张), Yung/Yana/Auyong/Awyoung (Yang, 杨), Ng/Uy/Wee (Huang, 黄), Tiu/Chiu/Chio/Chu (Zhao, 赵).

There are also multiple syllable Chinese surnames that are Spanish transliterations of Hokkien words. Surnames like Tuazon (Eldest Grandson, 大孫), Dizon (Second Grandson, 二孫), Samson/Sanson (Third Grandson, 三孫), Sison (Fourth Grandson, 四孫), Gozon/Goson/Gozum (Fifth Grandson, 五孫), Lacson (Sixth Grandson, 六孫) are examples of transliterations of designations that use the Hokkien suffix -son (孫) used as surnames for some Chinese Filipinos who trace their ancestry from Chinese immigrants to the Philippines during the Spanish Colonial Period. The surname "Son/Sun" (孫) is listed in the classic Chinese text Hundred Family Surnames, perhaps shedding light on the Hokkien suffix -son used here as a surname alongside some sort of accompanying enumeration scheme.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Copy originally translated by Villamor, 1922

References[edit]

  1. ^Blair, Emma (1906). The Philippine Islands, 1493–1898 Vol. 40. Arthur H. Clark Company. pp. 57–58. Retrieved April 26, 2020.
  2. ^Blair, Emma (1906). The Philippine Islands, 1493–1898 Vol. 7. Arthur H. Clark Company. pp. 87–103.
  3. ^Morrow, Paul (March 4, 2018). "Document B"(PDF). Sari-sari Etc. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  4. ^ abcdefKate McGeown (March 27, 2011). "Playful Filipino Names Hard to Get Used To". BBC News. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  5. ^Morrow, Paul. "Clavería's catalogue".
  6. ^"List of some surnames in the Philippines". Archived from the original on October 25, 2009.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filipino_name
5 Former Names of the Philippines- Featured History

Top 10 Odd First Names In Tagalog

The pangalan or first names in Tagalog can be different from the naming conventions in Western countries. As a basis, the locals usually want the names to stand out or reflect a deeper meaning, so most of these may sound religious, interesting, or very traditional. In addition, a massive number of Philippine names are derived (or at least a variation) of Spanish and English, making it almost impossible to distinguish if the name "Joseph" is a Filipino, a Mexican, or an American! Let's get to know more about this in this post today!

Out of all the names globally, Filipino names can be considered one of the fascinating ones due to their distinct bizarreness at times. In fact, who would ever believe that there are babies from here whose names are HTML, Covid Bryant, Pretty Nice, and Coviduvidapdap? Mind you, these are 100% real names given to Filipinos and are printed on their national birth certificate! Somehow, these names are testaments to how humorous the locals are and the length they will go through to make sure their child's name will be one in a million!

As mentioned by Wall Street Journal, these strange names are not just given for the sake of attention but also to ensure that it stays unique to prevent future problems when dealing with identification check. This shift in naming form is also prevalent in other countries because unique names are harder to confuse with making future transactions easier. Read on below to get to know more about the famous yet weirdest names in the Philippines.

 

The Oddest First Names In Tagalog

Top 10 Odd First Names In Tagalog

If New Zealand has "Talula Does the Hula From Hawaii" and the UK has "Cyanide," the Filipino people also have some of the best meaningful names you will never forget.

Dhrecxzeus

While you might think that this first name is just a random combination of letters, Dhrecxzeus is actually inspired by the Greek God "Zeus" and the name of the kid's father, "Dhrecxiar." Career-wise, the name certainly packs a punch as it sounds glorious or something that is out of historical movies set in Ancient Rome.

Sincerely Yours ‘98

The name Sincerely Yours '98 may seem funny, but it actually symbolizes that the kid is the family's last child. To make matters extra interesting, this same family also named their children Macaroni '85 and Spaghetti '88. In one interview, the family shared that the names may sound a bit funny, but it has tremendously helped them fit in with society and landing a job. In the same interview, they also mentioned that the siblings would not change their names if given a chance.

Dzwyrgh

Looking for a Filipino name that is practically made of consonants? The sibling Dzywrygh, Djknyll, and Pzxydynn will seriously make you think twice! The siblings shared in one interview that their names may be difficult to pronounce, but these helped them gain more friends and have other people remember them right away.

Hitler Manila

Among the most challenging things that a new family has to face is how to name their child appropriately. For one lucky guy out there, he was brought to life and christened as Hitler Manila. Based on BBC reports, his name is indeed memorable enough, but it has caused cultural misunderstanding. When Manila exposed his name while he was in Germany, the people looked at him with tense reactions as they couldn't believe that anyone will be named Hitler Manila.

Ghrowizard

This name from the Escobar family in the Philippines does not have any meaning, but it is still catchy. The bearer of this name states that he loved it because it made a mark on everyone he meets. In addition, he finds the questions about his name quite entertaining, which is why he will not change his name even if given a chance to do so.

Yghngjhyll

This name is related to stenography and is popular due to its all-consonant form. Based on the social media account of this lucky person, the pronunciation of his name is “Eynjhyll."

Fort McKinley

This name was given to a bright young boy whose father served as an AFP personnel in the Philippines. His father was stationed at Fort William McKinley, where he got fond memories as a soldier.

Godis Withus

This is basically "God is with us," but when it is spoken with a heavy Bisaya accent, the pronunciation can be Godis Withus. This Catholic name may sound weird at first, but it has helped the child in terms of finding comrades as people are naturally drawn to someone who seems unique!

Dipsy

A popular name from the Teletubbies, there are reports saying that a Filipino kid was named as such due to the popularity of the tv series.

Drink Water

Drink Water is a name that will never make you forget to drink. Based on interviews, the mother named the kid since it reminds her of what she felt while she was carrying her child: always in need of water!

 

Popular Filipino Baby Names

Baby Boy

NameMeaning
BernardA Western name usually spelled backward by Filipinos
RizalinoA variation for Dr. Jose Rizal's name
John MarkCombines two Gospels from the Bible
JoshuaA name referring that God is salvation
DaniloTraditional version for Daniel
CrisantoThe Tagalog version of "Christ"
NathanielGift of God
MakisigTagalog word which means strong
JejomarCombines Jesus, Joseph, and Mary
AlabTagalog word which means ablaze

Baby Girl

NameMeaning
MaryMother of Jesus 
AngelHeavenly being
AmihanNorthwest wind
MariaLatinized version of Miriam 
MaricarCombination of Maria and Carmen
Jasmine National flower of the Philippines
PrincessRoyal daughter
BituinStar
MarikitTagalog word which means beautiful
DiwaGift from God

 

Learn Tagalog Language Today!

As we reach this part of the post, we hope that you could get to know all the first names that you probably wouldn't ever expect to hear. If you enjoyed this post, feel free to review our previous discussion regarding Filipino names and critical information about the national language of the Philippines.

But, wait... would you like to master Tagalog and 60+ other languages? Then, it's time that you check out and learn about Ling App by Simya Solutions. This language learning application is popular today, given its unique features that will motivate you to learn on the go. So, download it today and discover how AI and gamification can speed up your learning process.

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Sours: https://ling-app.com/fil/first-names-in-tagalog/

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