2012 vw jetta

2012 vw jetta DEFAULT

2012 Volkswagen Jetta GLI Autobahn review: 2012 Volkswagen Jetta GLI Autobahn

The Jetta GLI is as different from the Jettas S, SE, and SEL as the movie originally called "Star Wars" is from "Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace." The first is exciting and fun, while the latter is merely a vehicle to get you from point A to point B.

With the 2012 Jetta GLI, Volkswagen starts with a standard Jetta, then puts a turbocharged direct-injection 2-liter engine under the hood, and joins it to a Direct-Shift Gearbox (DSG), Volkswagen's version of the dual-clutch automated manual transmission. This engine and transmission combination is one of the best on the road today.

Volkswagen also replaced the rear drum brakes with discs for the Jetta GLI, and even swapped out the rear torsion bar suspension for a more capable multilink system. Cosmetic enhancements, such as a honeycomb grille and front air intake, give the Jetta GLI a distinct look.

Having previously reviewed a Jetta SEL, I was surprised at the lack of an interface control dial under the center LCD. That is, until I realized that this Jetta GLI lacked the navigation system I had seen in the other car. That system, Volkswagen's RNS-315 head unit, is available as an option. But I was not missing much, as the RNS-315 is pretty basic, using maps stored on flash memory and not integrating traffic data.

These cleverly designed buttons control the phone and audio system.

Without navigation, that left the stereo system as the major piece of cabin tech in this Jetta GLI. As the stereo included iPod integration and satellite radio, the touch-screen LCD served to show music libraries and lengthy channel lists. Volkswagen puts the iPod connector in the glove box, something I find inconvenient as I want to plug in my iPhone every time I get in the car. If I owned a Jetta, I would keep a dedicated iPod in the car.

Given the Jetta GLI's Fender audio system, I would also want to keep a lot of really good music on the car's iPod. Testing this car was the fourth time I've listened to the audio system Fender designed for Volkswagen, and it was just as impressive as the first. Boasting nine speakers and a mere 400 watts, it delivers the best audio quality among cars in the Jetta's price range, and even bests the audio in cars costing much more.

The system stages music neatly in front of the cabin, giving it that first-row-at-a-concert feeling. And the system's clarity and depth make every instrument clearly audible. It is incredibly pleasing to hear instruments you never noticed before on a track. When I first starting testing the system, the bass and treble were cranked all the way up, making the door panels hum uncomfortably. But once brought down to proper equalization the system got on with its near-perfect reproduction.

Few cars priced around the $25K mark offer such a good sound system.

The music sounded excellent as I ran the Jetta GLI through mundane driving situations, like the endless stoplights of a city or the mindless 65 mph drone of the freeway. In these circumstances the car drove easily, with the DSG left in automatic mode to take care of gear changes. The electric power-steering system did its job, giving the right amount of boost for slow parking-lot maneuvers and high-speed lane changes.

But on what this car was made for--twisty back roads where you can enjoy the quick shifts from the DSG and the precision turn-in of the wheel--the music takes a back seat as the car delivers a fast and thrilling ride. Put through these paces, the Jetta GLI proved very fun, despite a few faults.

The first thing I noticed was that the car feels very light, unsurprising as its curb weight is just over 3,000 pounds. Over a succession of rises, it lifted at each crest, to the point where stability control had to step in as I also had to negotiate a slight bend on the way down. It made for a breathless moment.

The DSG more than proved its worth when I left it to shift in its sport mode. As I braked in the last few yards before a turn, the transmission willingly changed down a gear or two, leaving me with plenty of power as I gave it gas for the turn exit. When I tapped the steering-wheel-mounted paddles, it shifted quickly and unerringly, always ready with the right gear.

Volkswagen has been offering the DSG for more than five years now, so has had time to perfect it. It uses two computer-controlled clutches, each covering one set of gears. While one is engaged, say in third gear, the other sits poised above either second or fourth, depending on which gear it anticipates you will want next. The better the programming, the better it will be at anticipating the next gear.

In GLI trim, the Jetta gets red brake calipers and disc brakes, instead of drums, at the rear wheels.

But at times, the 2-liter, four-cylinder engine was not quite ready to give me the benefits of its 200 horsepower. Even with the engine speed kept above 3,000rpm, the turbo lagged, making me wait a few portions of a second before it could give its all.

The suspension also could have been screwed down tighter. There was a lot of body movement as I threw the car into turn after turn. However, over a long drive I began to appreciate the movement, using it as a seat-of-the-pants measure of load balance among the tires.

But the biggest problem with the Jetta GLI is that it is not the GTI. Although the two cars share the same power train, the Jetta GLI is a sedan, and therefore cannot be a hot hatchback. Volkswagen, seeming to recognize the more conservative nature of sedans, did not give it launch control, one of the most childish and fun things about the GTI.

In sum
The other Jetta models all get by with boring engine and transmission combinations, but the 2012 Volkswagen Jetta GLI is the exciting one. Volkswagen may have had direct injection and turbocharging for some time now, but other automakers are only starting to recognize the benefits. The DSG is also an excellent everyday and sporting transmission.

The navigation and phone systems available in the Jetta GLI are good, but do not push the tech envelope in any significant way. The standout piece of cabin tech is the stereo, with its Fender audio system leading in sound quality for cars in this price range.

The Jetta GLI's sedan body has an inoffensive, mundane look, but proved practical, with plenty of trunk and comfortable cabin space. The seats, an upgrade for the GLI model, were particularly nice.

Tech specs
Model2012 Volkswagen Jetta
TrimGLI Autobahn
Power trainturbocharged direct-injection 2-liter, 4-cylinder engine, 6-speed dual-clutch transmission
EPA fuel economy24 mpg city/32 mpg highway
Observed fuel economy23.8 mpg
NavigationOptional flash memory-based
Bluetooth phone supportStandard with contact list download
Disc playerMP3-compatible single-CD
MP3 player supportiPod integration
Other digital audioBluetooth streaming, USB drive, auxiliary input, satellite radio, HD Radio
Audio systemFender 400-watt 9-speaker system
Driver aidsNone
Base price$23,495
Price as tested$25,545
Sours: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/reviews/2012-volkswagen-jetta-sedan-review/
TRIMOriginal MSRP
Clean Retail Price
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The MT clean retail price reflects a reasonable asking price by a dealership for a fully reconditioned vehicle (clean title history, no defects, minimal wear) with average mileage.

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Volkswagen Jetta Expert Review

Staff Writer

There's not much new to report on the 2012 Volkswagen Jetta. Brand-new for the 2011 model year, the 2012 Jetta features a couple new options, and a few new option packages. For 2012 Volkswagen has bundled up some of its more requested standalone options, into packages. The new packages include a Sunroof Package, and a Convenience Package. A newly available option for the 2012 model year across all Jettas is a Fender-branded and Panasonic-developed audio system.

The Jetta continues to be offered with three engine options for 2012. The base 2.0-liter I-4 produces a meager 115 hp and 125 lb-ft of torque. The next engine up the food chain is the 2.5-liter I-5 cranking out 170 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque that sees duty across Volkswagen's lineup. The last available engine is the torquey and fuel-efficient 140-hp 2.0-liter turbodiesel I-4 with 236 lb-ft of torque, that's capable of an EPA-estimated 30 mpg in the city and 42 mpg on the highway.

Although the Jetta shows signs of cost savings in the interior (hard plastics, and cheap fabrics are abundant) it's still a fairly decent place to be. The Jetta offers amenities like satellite navigation and satellite radio, and is plenty roomy for passengers both in the front, and rear.

Body style: Sedan
Engines: 2.5L I-5, 2.0L I-4, 2.0L turbodiesel I-4
Transmissions: 5-speed manual, 6-speed automatic, 6-speed manual, 6-speed dual-clutch automatic
Models: Volkswagen Jetta S, Volkswagen Jetta SE, Volkswagen Jetta SEL, Volkswagen Jetta TDI

With the introduction of the Jetta GLI this year, the rest of the Jetta lineup just gets minor tweaks and changes for the 2012 model year. This year, Volkswagen has bundled up some of its more requested standalone options into packages including a Sunroof package and a Convenience package. A newly available option for the 2012 Jetta is a Fender Guitar-branded and Panasonic-developed audio system.

Rather reserved in appearance compared to its predecessor, the Jetta carries over to 2012 with no exterior changes. The Jetta S comes standard with 15-inch steel wheels, a black plastic grille, and black mirror caps. The Jetta SE also has 15-inch steel wheels (with 16-inch alloys an option), a black grille, and body color mirror caps. The Jetta SEL gains 17-inch alloy wheels and a chrome-accented grille. The Jetta TDI features five-spoke 16-inch wheels, body color mirrors, and a chrome-accented grille.

While the interior is generally attractive and well laid out on the 2012 Volkswagen Jetta, during our First Test we came under the impression that "VW might have dipped into the company's parts bins too many times." We also noticed that the Jetta's interior featured lower quality materials than VW had previously used on the Jetta: "The dash is covered in hard plastic; switchgear materials feel downmarket; and the leatherette seats won't fool anyone." On the plus side, we did find the cabin roomy, offering plenty of space for both front, and rear passengers. We also found the trunk offering plenty of cargo room (15.5 cubic feet).

With the Jetta GLI carrying the performance flag for the Jetta, the rest of the lineup doesn't feature any barnburners. The 2012 Jetta continues to offer consumers three engines: a 2.0-liter I-4 producing 115 hp and 135 lb-ft of torque, a 170-hp 2.5-liter I-5 with 177 lb-ft of torque, and our favorite, the 140-hp 2.0-liter turbodiesel I-4 with 236 lb-ft of torque. In our testing, the Jetta TDI accelerated from 0-60 mph in 8.8 seconds, while a 2.5-liter equipped model took 8.3 seconds. We found the Jetta TDI to have the strongest on-center steering feel, and all-around best steering feel, while the Jetta SEL we tested had an artificial steering feel.

There are no changes in regards to safety for 2012 model year Volkswagen Jettas. All Jettas still come standard with front, and front side mounted airbags, and side air curtain airbags in the front and rear. The 2012 Jetta also comes standard with ABS, electronic brake pressure distribution, hydraulic brake assist and an un-defeatable traction and electronic stability control system. The Jetta also features Volkswagen's Intelligent Crash Response System, which will unlock the doors, turn off the fuel pump, and activate the Jetta's hazard lights in the event the vehicle's airbags are deployed.

Jetta S: 24 mpg city/34 mpg highway (manual); 24 mpg city/32 mpg highway (automatic)
Jetta SE: 23 mpg city/33 mpg highway (manual); 24 mpg city/31 mpg highway (automatic)
Jetta SEL: 23 mpg city/33 mpg highway (manual); 24 mpg city/31 mpg highway (automatic)
Jetta TDI: 30 mpg city/42 mpg highway (manual); 30 mpg city/42 mpg highway (dual-clutch auto)

  • Dated base engine
  • Hard, cheap interior plastics

Cheap interior but good diesel option

  • Chevrolet Cruze
  • Ford Focus
  • Honda Civic
  • Mazda3
  • Subaru Impreza
Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/cars/volkswagen/jetta/2012/
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CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-2012-Volkswagen-Jetta_z8261

From the April 2013 Issue of Car and Driver

INGO BARENSCHEE

Haters of the “people’s car” are always quick to point out Volkswagen’s less-than-sterling reputation for reliability. What the Corolla-loving cranks always overlook is that a VW, even the lowest and cheapest version queued up at a Düsseldorf taxi stand, is engineered for the autobahn. Which is to say, it can sustain 100-plus-mph travel. Perhaps over-engineered for American roads, VWs have acoustic damping more than adequate for 75 mph and an overall sense of high-velocity refinement. The brand’s loyalists know that there’s more than one way to measure quality.

Granted, the new-for-2011 Jetta is a car designed to generate more North American sales (which it did), and bucking the VW reliability reputation will take more than a bigger back seat and trunk. To keep prices low, base Jettas get a cheaper torsion-beam rear suspension and a Formica-hard dashboard, two indicators of U.S.-spec cost-cutting not seen in European Jettas.

MORGAN SEGAL

The GLI, however, is different. Introduced for the 2012 model year, it comes with all the stuff that Europeans get as door prizes. With a soft-touch dash, a more sophisticated multilink rear suspension, and the ubiquitous EA888 turbo 2.0-liter four-cylinder putting out 200 horses, this Jetta is not a poverty model. Instead, the GLI, along with the ’13 hybrid version, represents the top of the Jetta pyramid, and without a doubt it’s the best one to drive. As with all VWs, scheduled maintenance is included for the first three years or 36,000 miles, easing ownership worries for the skeptics.

This “Tornado Red” GLI touched down at our office for long-term testing in October 2011. We asked for all the add-ons, ­specifying navigation to make it road-trip friendly. Equipped with the Autobahn ­package’s 18-inch wheels, leatherette upholstery, and sunroof, our six-speed manual GLI totaled $27,215. It’s a great buy considering that a similarly equipped 2012 GTI, with real leather, runs some $4150 more.

Before we had the chance to install winter tires, though, the car’s reliability came roaring into question. A chassis vibration indicated that the wheels were out of balance, so off to the tire shop went the GLI. The balancing cost us $64, but the vibration remained, requiring a visit to the dealership.

The GLI spent seven nights there, and in that time we learned a few things. First, both half-shafts had to be replaced for unspecified reasons. This was covered under the GLI’s three-year warranty, and it quelled the vibration. (It still would have been ­covered under the five-year, 60,000-mile power­train warranty had this happened later in the car’s life.) Second, the right-front tire had an excessive amount of Fix-A-Flat in it. The gooey tire sealant can get you moving in a pinch, but it makes a mess inside the tire, often throwing it off-balance, and the labor required to clean it out relegates it to emergency-only use. The evidence of this quick fix troubled us because the GLI comes with a full-use spare tire. No staffer fessed up to using an inflator can instead of changing the tire, so we wondered: Had the goop been in there when we took delivery? Still, the dealer made all the repairs. It’s unlikely that the unbalanced wheel caused the half-shaft issue so early in this car’s life, though we didn’t attempt to pin the dealer down on it.

Commuters praised the GLI’s highway manners. It proved smooth and collected, with ample power for overtaking without the need for a downshift. The sport-tuned dampers and the multilink rear suspension turn pavement chop into gentle nudges. Handling, while deft, failed to produce a gush of positive comments in the logbook. Call it enjoyable rather than the wildly entertaining GTI sedan we might have hoped for.

Some idiosyncrasies were less charming. In dry conditions, only the hardest-driving staffers deemed the stability control intervention too persistent. But after we installed four Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 winter tires ($199 each) to combat the snow, slush, and ice of a Michigan winter, more comments appeared about the hyperactive stability system, which cannot be shut off as it can in most cars. Scooting through slippery intersections occasionally triggered the traction control, shutting down power and making what should have been an uneventful crossing rather thrilling.

Starting the car requires full cognitive cooperation, a trait many of us lack before coffee kicks in. The start button is obscured by the shifter and some center-console trim.Even after performing the startup sequence many mornings, without the visual cue we sometimes couldn’t remember where it was hiding. Once started, a delightfully light clutch pedal took the chore out of driving a manual in rush-hour traffic.

One thing almost all commenters noted was the GLI’s peculiar engine note. The turbo and aforementioned German-spec insulation diminish much of the engine noise. The nod to enthusiasts is an engine-note enhancer: the so-called Soundaktor is an electronic noisemaker that occasionally seems to function independent of the engine. And sometimes the car drones like a digital kazoo full of phlegm. Perhaps not surprisingly, YouTube has several videos explaining how to remove it.

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, front-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $27,700 (base price: $24,515)

ENGINE TYPE: turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 16-valve inline-4, iron block and aluminum head, direct fuel injection

Displacement: 121 cu in, 1984 cc
Power: 200 hp @ 5100 rpm
Torque: 207 lb-ft @ 1700 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 104.4 in
Length: 182.2 in
Width: 70.0 in Height: 56.6 in
Curb weight: 3236 lb

PERFORMANCE: NEW
Zero to 60 mph: 6.2 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.5 sec
Zero to 120 mph: 24.8 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.8 sec
Top gear, 30-50 mph: 13.9 sec
Top gear, 50-70 mph: 9.7 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.0 sec @ 96 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 127 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 179 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.86 g
*Stability-control-inhibited.

PERFORMANCE: 40,000
Zero to 60 mph: 6.5 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 17.3 sec
Zero to 120 mph: 27.3 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.9 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.1 sec @ 94 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 171 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.88 g
*Stability-control-inhibited.

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 22/33 mpg
C/D observed: 28 mpg
Unscheduled oil additions: 0 qt

WARRANTY:
3 years/36,000 miles bumper to bumper;
5 years/60,000 miles powertrain;
12 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
3 years/36,000 miles roadside assistance
3 years/36,000 miles free routine maintenance


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Months in Fleet: 7 months
Current Mileage: 18,455 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 26 mpg
Average Range: 377 miles
Service: $0
Normal Wear: $0
Repair: $0
Damage and Destruction: $842

For most of its history, the Volkswagen Jetta was the three-box version of the two-box Golf hatchback, which meant the performance-oriented Jetta GLI was simply the sedan version of the coveted 10Best-winning GTI. The Jetta’s sixth-generation makeover, however, included plopping the four-door onto new underpinnings. The idea was to give it a bigger back seat, a larger trunk, and reduced complexity to better compete with the likes of the Honda Civic, Ford Focus, and Toyota Corolla. (The Golf will move to VW’s new MQB architecture.)

In the split from its Golf roots and in the interest of competitive pricing, the base U.S.-spec Jetta abandoned its sophisticated multilink rear suspension and soft-touch interior plastics for lower-cost items. Needless to say, we weren’t bowled over during our initial drive, and a Jetta 2.5 later finished last in a five-car comparo. But a potential remedy was available via the turbocharged, 200-hp GLI, which has the fancy rear chassis setup and squishy dash. We quickly ordered one up to see if 40,000 miles behind the wheel of the enthusiast’s Jetta could win us over.

(All Jettas sent to Europe have the multilink rear and nicer cabin materials; here’s a rundown of the differences between Euro and American Jettas. More recently, we’ve learned that Volkswagen has made and will continue to make running updates to non-GLI versions of the car, including the brakes, the interior, and under the hood.)

Time to Arrive

Our six-speed manual Tornado Red GLI showed up with 381 miles on the clock and a full boat of options (excepting the available automatic), which meant it arrived packing the $2050 Autobahn package (18-inch wheels, a sunroof, a Fender-branded stereo, auto climate control, and faux leather seats) and the $900 navigation system. All-weather floor mats, including a trunk liner, added another $235 to the tab for a grand total of $27,700. For comparison’s sake, a fully loaded five-door GTI, which has real leather seats and xenon headlamps, runs $31,365.

First impressions were mixed. Few of us—okay, maybe one—liked the fake rumble generated by the “Soundaktor” engine-noise enhancer, and even long-haul comfort came under fire by some drivers, although most have found the firm seats supportive. One staffer with a longer commute said she could make her drive every day without complaint.

There have been a few ergonomic gripes, chief among them being the interface for the navigation and audio systems. Many drivers have noted there are too many layers to sort through to access info. Also raising some ire is the location of the engine-start button, ahead of the shifter. Locating the obscured button becomes second nature after spending an extended period of time with the car, but to get into a vehicle with keyless start and have to think about how to turn it on seems to defeat the purpose of having such a system.

We’d Like to Leave the Nest, K Thx

For reasons we can’t fathom, all Jettas have full-time stability control. There is no higher-threshold mode like that found in the GTI, and the overly protective system limits skidpad grip to 0.86 g. A couple of drivers have reported that the stability control intervened when they shot a gap in traffic, fighting them for control of the car.

At least the stability control didn’t hamper the initial test results, as the GLI dashed to 60 mph in 6.2 seconds and cleared the quarter-mile in 15.0 seconds at 96 mph. That’s right on top of a GTI’s numbers and way quicker than the 6.8-second GLI we tested a few months back.

At about the 3500-mile mark, a vibration developed at the front axle. The dealership replaced the front half-shafts under warranty. At the same time, the service techs discovered and removed the remains of a Fix-A-Flat application from the right-front wheel and tire. We did not use the temporary flat fix, or at least no one is fessing up to it. So either the dealership that initially prepped the car filled the tire with goo, or someone thought that emptying the quick-fix can into our tire would be a good prank. Either way, the cleanup was covered under warranty, too.

Cheap to Operate So Far

In its seven months with us, the GLI has made one scheduled maintenance stop, at 10,000 miles, which consisted of an oil change, inspection, and tire rotation. This service (as will be the forthcoming ones at 20K and 30K) was covered under the maintenance plan that comes with all new VWs, so we paid nothing out of pocket. The dealer attended to two recalls, better securing the trunk-mounted subwoofer and replacing some potentially faulty headliner clips. Christmas time brought a present in the form of an $842 bumper repair after a staffer emerged from shopping to discover he’d been the victim of a parking-lot hit-and-run. No note was left, no suspect found.

With EPA fuel-economy ratings of 22 mpg in the city and 33 on the highway, we weren’t expecting to be blown away with the car’s efficiency. But so far we’ve averaged 26 mpg, which is pretty strong, considering our driving style and that the GLI has been on only two road trips. Reliability has thus far been good, which is heartwarming news—especially considering VW’s deserved reputation for low performance in that department.

So far, so good, but has the GLI won us over? Not entirely, but give us another 20,000 or so miles, and we’ll let you know.

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, front-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $27,700 (base price: $24,515)

ENGINE TYPE: turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 16-valve inline-4, iron block and aluminum head, direct fuel injection

Displacement: 121 cu in, 1984 cc
Power: 200 hp @ 5100 rpm
Torque: 207 lb-ft @ 1700 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 6-speed manual

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 104.4 in
Length: 182.2 in
Width: 70.0 in Height: 56.6 in
Curb weight: 3236 lb

PERFORMANCE: NEW
Zero to 60 mph: 6.2 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.5 sec
Zero to 120 mph: 24.8 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.8 sec
Top gear, 30-50 mph: 13.9 sec
Top gear, 50-70 mph: 9.7 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.0 sec @ 96 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 127 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 179 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.86 g
*Stability-control-inhibited.

PERFORMANCE: 40,000
Zero to 60 mph: 6.5 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 17.3 sec
Zero to 120 mph: 27.3 sec
Rolling start, 5-60 mph: 6.9 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 15.1 sec @ 94 mph
Braking, 70-0 mph: 171 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad*: 0.88 g
*Stability-control-inhibited.

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 22/33 mpg
C/D observed: 28 mpg
Unscheduled oil additions: 0 qt

WARRANTY:
3 years/36,000 miles bumper to bumper;
5 years/60,000 miles powertrain;
12 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
3 years/36,000 miles roadside assistance
3 years/36,000 miles free routine maintenance


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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15113706/2012-volkswagen-jetta-gli-long-term-test-wrap-up-review/

Jetta 2012 vw

Constant pursuit of girls, walks to the cinema and cafes, and as a result - a lot of bummer. Then I made good friends with two of my classmates. One was called Gosha - this is a tough guy who works in a rocking chair. The second Romoi is an ordinary guy, but he is so cute that he sometimes looks like a girl. Although the guys were local, they were distinguished by their good nature.

Volkswagen Jetta saloon review - CarBuyer

His eyes were as lifeless as his body. So young, and already in a psychiatric hospital, the student thought. Peering into the features of his face, it seemed to Meadami that somewhere she had already seen him, but where. There was a loud scream near her head, from which Midami screamed herself.

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He came up with everything for this moment of agreement: her death and his body. He ends up in a dying agonizing body. His sharp gaze of a cobra, hypnotising, will penetrate into the soul. Here, only you and me, and I am yours, she whispered.



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