Textured paint rollers

Textured paint rollers DEFAULT

How to Paint With an Orange Peel Nap Roller

Texture on walls and ceilings is a matter of personal taste and preference. While perfectly smooth walls can look elegant, they also reveal every little imperfection in the drywall and paint job. Adding a light orange peel texture can help cover up small problem spots and repairs without creating a heavy texture that is difficult to replicate.

Orange Peel

Orange peel, in terms of walls and painting, is a light texture that hides imperfections and blemishes, but without creating an obvious relief or pattern on the wall. This texture is similar to that of an orange peel: smooth from a distance, but dimpled upon close inspection. It can be applied with a sprayer or a roller using thinned drywall mud. A texture similar to orange peel is sometimes created on a smooth wall by painting with a roller that has a thick nap. This causes the paint to create a slightly raised texture, and each additional coat of paint increases the effect.

Nap

Some rollers are labeled specifically as orange peel rollers, or for use on walls with an orange peel texture. Others, however, aren't labeled as such but can create an orange peel texture when used with thin drywall mud. These rollers can be identified by their heavy nap. The nap is the length of the fibers on the roller. A roller with a thin nap gives a smooth finish, while a thick nap creates a textured finish. Generally, a nap up to 3/8 inch will produce a smooth finish, but starting at about 1/2 inch the fibers will start to create an orange peel effect. As the size goes up, so does the amount of texture created. The amount of texture will vary, depending on the type and quality of fibers, the thickness of the drywall mud and the original surface.

Rolling

An orange peel paint roller is used in the same manner as any other paint roller. Fill the well of a paint tray about halfway with drywall mud that has been thinned to a consistency slightly thicker than paint and then dip the roller in the mud. Roll it up and down the sloped part of the paint pan a few times to work the mud into the nap. Apply the mud to the wall by working in approximately 4-feet-by-4-feet sections and rolling in a zigzag pattern until the entire section is covered. Repeat the process by dipping the roller again and working on an adjacent section of wall, making sure to overlap the edges of the first section.

Paint

To create a texture with paint that is similar to orange peel but not as raised, choose a roller with a heavy nap, usually about 3/4 inch, and roll the paint onto the wall as usual. The fibers will do the work of creating a texture. Each additional coat will increase the amount of texture. Experiment on a scrap piece of wood or drywall with different paints and roller naps to find the exact texture you want to create. A wall that already has an orange peel texture should be painted with a roller labeled for orange peel, or with a nap of at least 1/2 inch. Thicker naps will add to the texture.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/paint-orange-peel-nap-roller-74095.html

How to Texture a Wall With a Roller

Materials

  • Painter's tape
  • Drywall compound
  • Flat paint or drywall primer
  • Paint
  1. Patch the Surfaces

    Some fixing of wall and ceiling surfaces may be necessary before you can apply the stipple texture.

    Patch any holes or chips with either drywall compound (mud) or lightweight spackle. Use your drywall knife to force the compound into the hole and give it a quick swipe with the edge of the knife to smooth the compound across the surface. Do not spend too much time on this, as it will get covered with the texture material. It's usually not necessary to sand the surface—simply smoothing it with a drywall knife is fine.

  2. Prime the Surface

    Apply a coat of flat white latex wall paint or drywall primer. Let it dry. This pre-coat is essential because texture paint applied directly to the bare drywall will be absorbed into the wall surface, compromising your efforts.

  3. Mix the Texture Compound

    Create your own inexpensive wall texture material by thinning out drywall compound with water in a 4:1 ratio. Use a 5-gallon bucket and a paint mixer attachment on your drill to mix the texture compound thoroughly. Blend the mixture until it has the consistency of thick latex paint. It should be smooth and easy to roll on.

    Alternatively, you can purchase premixed texture paint. Popular brands include Sheetrock Texolite and Behr Premium Plus Texture Paint. Stir the paint thoroughly, as directed by the manufacturer, to prepare it for application.

  4. Roll Out the Wall Texture

    Texturing involves a two-part rolling process—an initial application, then a second rolling over the applied material once it has partially dried. Getting the timing correct is the trickiest part of the process.

    Fill a paint tray with the texture material or texture paint. Dip a paint roller into the paint tray, roll it out, and then apply the texture over the wall or ceiling surface. An ordinary roller cover will produce a texture, but there are also special roller covers available that are designed for stippling.

    Make sure to follow the product directions when using commercial texture paint. They may recommend a single coat.

    Tip

    In most cases, if you are having an issue with your wall texture, the cause is the proportion of water to the drywall compound. Too little water yields sticky, sharp-peaked textures. Too much water results in peaks that do not hold or even in water dripping down the wall.

  5. Reach Tight Areas With a Brush

    Where the roller cannot reach—the corners and edges around woodwork—complete the texturing by applying the material with the flat face of a paint brush.

  6. Let the Texture Dry

    Let the texture dry partially—about halfway to full dryness. Test for dryness by pressing your thumb into the surface and pulling it away. The result should be sharp spikes, almost like a meringue.

  7. Texture a Second Time

    When the applied texture material has reached the desired consistency, roll over the surface again. This will slightly pull up the partially dried material, creating the desired three-dimensional texture. In places where the roller cannot reach, you can use the flat face of a paint brush to pull up the material slightly from the surface.

  8. Create a Knock-Down Surface (Optional)

    As an option, before the surface is completely dry, you can knock down the surface by smoothing a drywall knife across the texture, with the tool held at a flat angle. This slightly flattens the peaks of the surface, creating a look much like textured plaster.

    Again, the texture substance needs to be the correct consistency for this to work. If it is too wet, the texture will smear; if it is too dry, it will not knock down.

  9. Paint Homemade Texture

    If you use a homemade mixture of drywall mud to create the texture, let the surfaces dry completely, then prime and paint them as desired.

    Tip

    Don't skip the primer. Drywall mud is chalky and sucks the moisture out of paint, leading to inconsistent results and wasted paint. Primer is relatively cheap and seals the surface for the finish coats of paint.

When to Call a Professional

If you need to cover large areas with wall texture, it is usually best to hire a painter or decorator to create texture with an air-compressor texture sprayer. Fog, orange peel, splatter, and knock-down effects are all possible with texture sprayers. Application is rapid, and drying time takes only a few hours.

Sours: https://www.thespruce.com/hide-flaws-with-stipple-texture-4121027
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What is the Best Paint Roller for Your Paint Project? - Home Decorating & Painting Advice

Credit: Glidden / Glidden.Com

What is the Best Paint Roller for Your Paint Project? - Home Decorating & Painting Advice

Diane Henkler of InMyOwnStyle.com tells Glidden® how to choose the right paint roller for your next DIY project. {^widget|(name)CtaButton|(Label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(Url)%2fproducts|(Target)_top|(Color)d6414d|(Edge)btn-rect|(GtmT)cta|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button^} Q: How do I know which paint roller to use for my painting project? A: The surface you’re painting determines the nap (the thickness of the woven cover) you will need. The size of the paint roller is also important. Be sure to choose the right paint roller for your project. If you don't, you may waste time and money, and will not get the result you want.   {^widget|(name)CtaButton|(Label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(Url)%2fproducts|(Target)_top|(Color)d6414d|(Edge)btn-rect|(GtmT)cta|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button^} Paint Roller Nap Have you ever stood in the paint roller aisle in the paint or home improvement store and wondered what the difference between paint roller covers was? Some are thick, some are thin, and they come in many colors. It can be confusing. Most paint roller covers are made of woven materials and come in a variety of colors. Each brand has different colors, but the majority are white, yellow, or blue.  {^widget|(name)CtaButton|(Label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(Url)%2fproducts|(Target)_top|(Color)d6414d|(Edge)btn-rect|(GtmT)cta|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button^} Choose the right nap to use for your project based on the kind of surface you will be painting: Stucco, Decks, Brick, and Masonry - Thick 3/4″ nap roller covers can hold more paint and get into the crevices of the rough surface. If you use a thin 1/4″ cover over stucco, the cover will rip apart quickly and not get paint into all the crevices. ​ Ceilings and Drywall - Medium 3/8″ nap roller covers work best. Walls, Wood, and Metal - Small 1/4″ nap roller covers or foam rollers will produce the smoothest finish.  Light to Medium Textured Surfaces - Microfiber rollers are best. Smooth Surfaces - Use a white woven short nap roller for an ultra fine finish. If you use a thick 3/4″ nap roller cover on a smooth wall, it will produce an orange peel textured surface. Paint Roller Size There are two basic sizes for paint roller frames - large 9″ long roller frames and a smaller 4″ style. {^widget|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button|(target)_top|(url)%2fproducts|(color)d6414d|(label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(name)CtaButton|(edge)btn-rect|(gtmt)cta|(width)|(height)^} {^widget|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button|(target)_top|(url)%2fproducts|(color)d6414d|(label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(name)CtaButton|(edge)btn-rect|(gtmt)cta|(width)|(height)^} Decide which roller size to use depending on what you will be painting: Walls and Ceilings - The large roller is better for big surfaces. Doors, Furniture, and Cabinets - A 4" paint roller is ideal.  {^widget|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button|(target)_top|(url)%2fproducts|(color)d6414d|(label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(name)CtaButton|(edge)btn-rect|(gtmt)cta|(width)|(height)^} Paint Roller Tips Now that you have the right paint roller nap and size, here are a few other things to keep in mind when using a paint roller: To attach the roller cover to the paint roller frame, simply align the hole in the cover with the end of the frame and push it on. If needed, you can screw on a painting roller extension pole to each roller frame to reach high places. Use the rounded end of the foam roller cover when you don’t want any roller edge lines to show up in your finish. Don’t use excessive pressure to apply paint—an even, light pressure is all that is needed. Remove your roller cover from the roller frame right after you are finished painting. Use soap and water to clean up after using latex paint. Hold the roller cover under running water and squeeze your hand over the roller to remove the paint. Repeat until all the paint is out of the roller, then let dry. Never leave the cover soaking in water. {^widget|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button|(target)_top|(url)%2fproducts|(color)d6414d|(label)See+Glidden+Paint+Products|(name)CtaButton|(edge)btn-rect|(gtmt)cta|(width)|(height)^} Always buy the best rollers and covers that you can afford. They will last much longer and give you superb results. Bargain roller covers may break apart quickly and can leave lint in your paint finish. Try different brands of paint roller frames to make sure the handle feels good in your hand. If you are doing a lot of painting, a roller frame with a comfort grip will keep your hand from cramping.     {^widget|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button|(target)_top|(url)%2finspiration%2fall-articles|(color)d6414d|(label)See+More+Painting+Advice+Articles|(name)CtaButton|(edge)btn-rect|(gtmt)cta|(width)|(height)^} {^widget|(widget_displayname)CTA+Button|(target)_top|(url)%2fcolors|(color)d6414d|(label)See+All+Glidden+Paint+Colors|(name)CtaButton|(edge)btn-rect|(gtmt)cta|(width)|(height)^}

By Diane Henkler

Diane Henkler of InMyOwnStyle.com tells Glidden® how to choose the right paint roller for your next DIY
project.

Best Paint Roller

See Glidden Paint Products



Q: How do I know which paint roller to use for my painting project?

A: The surface you’re painting determines the nap (the thickness of the woven cover) you will need. The size of the paint roller is also important. Be sure to choose the right paint roller for your project. If you don't, you may waste time and money, and will not get the result you want.
 

Paint Roller Nap


Have you ever stood in the paint roller aisle in the paint or home improvement store and wondered what the difference between paint roller covers was? Some are thick, some are thin, and they come in many colors. It can be confusing. Most paint roller covers are made of woven materials and come in a variety of colors. Each brand has different colors, but the majority are white, yellow, or blue. 



Choose the right nap to use for your project based on the kind of surface you will be painting:

Stucco, Decks, Brick, and Masonry - Thick 3/4″ nap roller covers can hold more paintand get into the crevices of the rough surface. If you use a thin 1/4″ cover over stucco, the cover will rip apart quickly and not get paint into all the crevices. ​

Ceilings and Drywall - Medium 3/8″ nap roller covers work best.

Walls, Wood, and Metal - Small 1/4″ nap roller covers or foam rollers will produce the smoothest finish. 

Light to Medium Textured Surfaces - Microfiber rollers are best.

Smooth Surfaces - Use a white woven short nap roller for an ultra fine finish. If you use a thick 3/4″ nap roller cover on a smooth wall, it will produce an orange peel textured surface.

Paint Roller Size

There are two basic sizes for paint roller frames - large 9″ long roller frames and a smaller 4″ style.

See Glidden Paint Products



See Glidden Paint Products


Decide which roller size to use depending on what you will be painting:

Walls and Ceilings - The large roller is better for big surfaces.

Doors, Furniture, and Cabinets - A 4" paint roller is ideal. 

See Glidden Paint Products

Paint Roller Tips


Now that you have the right paint roller nap and size, here are a few other things to keep in mind when using a paint roller:
  1. To attach the roller cover to the paint roller frame, simply align the hole in the cover with the end of the frame and push it on.
  2. If needed, you can screw on a painting roller extension pole to each roller frame to reach high places.
  3. Use the rounded end of the foam roller cover when you don’t want any roller edge lines to show up in your finish.
  4. Don’t use excessive pressure to apply paint—an even, light pressure is all that is needed.
  5. Remove your roller cover from the roller frame right after you are finished painting.
  6. Use soap and water to clean up after using latex paint. Hold the roller cover under running water and squeeze your hand over the roller to remove the paint. Repeat until all the paint is out of the roller, then let dry. Never leave the cover soaking in water.


Always buy the best rollers and covers that you can afford. They will last much longer and give you superb results. Bargain roller covers may break apart quickly and can leave lint in your paint finish. Try different brands of paint roller frames to make sure the handle feels good in your hand. If you are doing a lot of painting, a roller frame with a comfort grip will keep your hand from cramping. 
 

Diane Henkler

Diane Henkler decorated her first home using tricks from her work in the display trade. She wrote a book called Instant Decorating and now shares her decorating ideas on her blog, InMyOwnStyle.com
 

Sours: https://www.glidden.com/inspiration/all-articles/what-is-the-best-paint-roller-for-your-paint-proje

How to Add Texture Using a Paint Roller

Paint rollers are great for achieving smooth painted walls, but-- did you know that they can help you add texture, too? To achieve a textured wall, all you need is some textured paint and a roller, or some regular paint and a textured roller. Follow the simple steps below to get started on your next painting project.

Step 1 – Choose Your Paint

There are many types of paints you can use to achieve a textured wall surface. You can use regular paint if you choose to use a textured roller, as described below in Step 3, or you can choose a textured paint with a regular roller.

In addition, you can use a mixture of joint compound and water with a regular roller. You should follow the directions on your product Generally, it will direct you to mix the compound with a little bit of water until it’s the consistency of a milkshake. And, the larger the roller nap, the greater texture you will get with this method.

Once you’ve chosen your paint type, empty it into a paint tray and get ready to begin painting.

Step 2 – Use a Paintbrush to Cut-In

Next, take a paintbrush about 2 inches thick, and dip it in the paint. Cover the edges and corners of the walls just as you would with regular paint, using a paintbrush to get into small spaces. This process is known as cutting-in. Use even strokes and avoid over-brushing, which will thin out the texture.

Step 3 – Choose a Paint Roller and Method

Now, paint the remaining wall space by choosing your desired paint roller and texture method.

If you choose to use textured paint or joint compound and water, you can use a regular roller with a medium-nap roller cover. Roll on the paint in long, even strokes in one direction for uniform texture, and as near to the corners as possible to help even out the brushstrokes done cutting-in with a paintbrush earlier. Do not overlap previously painted areas or the stipple texture left by the roller will be uneven.

If you would prefer to use regular paint and a textured roller, check out the two other options below.

Stippling

Stippling is a technique in which the paint roller is used to create a texture. It is best done with thick oil-based texture paint and a framed paint roller. Apply the thick paint with the help of a standard roller frame covered with a stipple roller cover.

Stencil Rollers

Another technique to add texture to the paint roller is to get a stenciled roller. Stencil paint rollers have raised patterns on the rubber of the roller. Just put the roller in the texture paint tray and roll it until it is completely covered with the paint. Then, start rolling the stencil roller on to the wall to imprint the pattern. Every time you wet the roller with the paint, the roller must be aligned with the previously painted area so that the pattern is continuous.

Sours: https://www.doityourself.com/stry/how-to-add-texture-using-a-paint-roller

Paint rollers textured

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Easiest Way to Texture Walls And Ceilings

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