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LIMITED-TIME OFFER

Keep your current phone and switch at zero cost.

We’ll cover the support costs on your eligible device, and we’ll give you up to $ to help pay it off.

Keep your current phone and switch at zero cost.

We’ll cover the support costs on your eligible device, and we’ll give you up to $ to help pay it off.

Zero Cost to Switch: At participating stores. Qualifying consumer or small business account, credit, service, device, & port-in required. T-Mobile will cover $30 assisted support charges that may apply for up to 5 new lines. May not be combinable with some offers or discounts (e.g. new device offers).

Keep and Switch: Limited-time offer; subject to change. Qualifying device, credit, service, and port-in (Verizon, AT&T, Spectrum, Claro, Xfinity, US Cellular, or Boost) required. You must unlock device before port-out; ask us how. Device balance (incl. lease purchase option) up to $ paid by virtual prepaid MasterCard® Card (no cash access & expires in 6 months) which you can use online or in-store via accepted mobile payment apps, typically within 15 days. Tax excluded. Submit proof of balance & 90+ days in good standing with carrier & device within 30 days of port-in and be active and in good standing when processed; allow up to 15 days. We might ask for more information. Up to 5 lines. One offer per subscriber. T-Mobile Prepaid MasterCard Card is rebate/reimbursement or exchange on port-in; for any tax implications, consult a tax advisor. No money has been paid by you for the card. Card is issued by Sunrise Banks N.A., Member FDIC, pursuant to a license from Mastercard International Incorporated. Mastercard is a registered trademark of Mastercard International Incorporated. Use of this card constitutes acceptance of the terms and conditions stated in the Cardholder Agreement.

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After your device is paid off, wait 24 hours before requesting an unlock from Spectrum.

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Activate up to 4K UHD streaming on capable device, or video typically streams at p. 40GB full-speed tethering. 5G coverage not available in some areas; capable device required. Awarded fastest by Opensignal Awards, USA: 5G User Experience January See full terms

Introducing Magenta® MAX:
Our best plan ever.

Magenta MAX, the first 5G smartphone plan for consumers to offer unlimited premium data that can’t slow you down based on how much data you use. Plus, enjoy 40GB of high-speed mobile hotspot data—on T-Mobile.

Opensignal Awards – USA: 5G User Experience Report January , based on independent analysis of average speeds from mobile measurements recorded during the period September 16 – December 14, ©  Opensignal Limited. While 5G access won't require a certain plan or feature, some uses/services might. See Coverage details, Terms and Conditions, and Open Internet information for network management details (like video optimization).

Magenta MAX General Terms: Credit approval, deposit, and, in stores & on customer service calls, $30 assisted or upgrade support charge may be required. U.S. roaming and on-network data allotments differ: includes MB roaming. Unlimited talk & text features for direct communications between 2 people; others (e.g., conference & chat lines, etc.) may cost extra. Unlimited high-speed data US only. In Canada/Mexico, up to 5GB high-speed data then unlimited at up to kbps. Not available for hotspots and some other data-first devices. Capable device required for some features. Activation required to deliver video streams at speeds that provide up to Ultra HD video capability (MAX 4K); some content providers may not stream their services in UHD.  May affect speed of video downloads; does not apply to video uploads. Netflix: Offer subject to change. Receive Netflix Basic (1-screen, up to a $/mo. value) while you maintain 1 qualifying Magenta MAX line in good standing or Netflix Standard (2-screen) while you maintain 2+ qualifying lines in good standing. Value (up to $ or $/mo.) may be applied to different Netflix streaming plans. Not redeemable or refundable for cash. Cancel Netflix anytime.  Netflix Terms of Use apply: www.netflix.com/termsofuse.  1 offer per T-Mobile account; may take bill cycles. See t-mobile.com/netflix for add'l info.  Like all plans, features may change or be discontinued at any time; see T-Mobile Terms and Conditions at T-Mobile.com for details. Tethering: 40GB high-speed data then unlimited on our network at MAX 3G speeds. Service may be terminated or restricted for excessive roaming. For the small fraction of customers using >50GB/mo., primary data usage must be on smartphone or tablet. Smartphone and tablet usage is prioritized over Mobile Hotspot Service (tethering) usage, which may result in higher speeds for data used on smartphones and tablets. AutoPay Pricing for lines Without AutoPay, $5 more/line/mo. May not be reflected on 1st bill. Int’l Roaming: Usage may be taxed in some countries. Calls from Simple Global countries, including over Wi-Fi, are $/min. (no charge for Wi-Fi calls to US, Mexico and Canada). Standard speeds approx. Kbps. Not for extended international use; you must reside in the U.S. and primary usage must occur on our network. Device must register on our network before international use. Service may be terminated or restricted for excessive roaming. Coverage not available in some areas; we are not responsible for our partners’ networks. Scam Shield: Capable device req’d. Turning on Scam Block might block calls you want; disable any time. Gogo: on U.S.-based airlines; Wi-Fi Calling functionality, valid e address, & 1 prior Wi-Fi call w/ current SIM card req’d for messaging. Stateside Int’l Talk: Calls must originate on T-Mobile’s U.S. network or in Canada/Mexico. Rates and included countries vary and may change.

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Sours: https://www.t-mobile.com/offers/switch-to-t-mobile-from-verizon-or-att

An ex-Verizon employee explains why it's not worth helping customers

amazon-facebook-internet-outage-verizon-5d14ca6abdcfjunposter.jpg

I used to go to phone retail stores with a disturbing regularity.

It was always interesting to look at new phones and ask salespeople what they really, really feel about those phones.

COVID has somewhat curtailed my forays into the outside world. This hasn't, however, stopped carrier store employees from getting in touch and, well, telling it how they see it.

Today, let's listen to Gordon -- not his real name, for very good reasons -- who recently left his job at a Verizon store after being, in his words, "in the top 1% of the company for multiple years in sales."

Gordon contacted me in a particular spirit. He told me: "I'm not a disgruntled ex-employee but someone who legitimately believes that people are being ripped off just because they don't know any better."

It sounded like there was some vehemence attached here. So I asked Gordon to explain.

"The company is directing employees to only offer a $17 a month insurance offer called Verizon Protect," he said. "This is a product that is made up of a bunch of individual products sold as a package. If someone wants coverage on their phone for lost or stolen stuff, there is an option for $ a month. However, it was forbidden by leadership for retail employees to offer this to customers."

This sounds a touch peculiar. There's a product you have, but you don't want customers to know about?

Gordon believes the more expensive product isn't so good: "Verizon Protect includes features like Tech Coach, which is a third-party technical support line that's absolutely horrible."

Well, yes, but upselling is part of the game, isn't it? The company wants to make more money, so it gets salespeople to push the more expensive items.

Offer You Service? That Could Cost Us.

It was another aspect highlighted by Gordon that made me stop and wonder about the meaning of (commercial) existence.

Gordon explained that previously it had been possible to make "fairly attractive money" by "behaving with dignity and without pushing customers into items they don't need."

But then came COVID

"During COVID, they decided to make the commission a team model," he said. "They also took out upgrades as a form of compensation altogether."

Instead, explained Gordon, in order to get commission salespeople had to either sell new lines or accessories, watches, tablets, and insurance. There was a new, third way to qualify for commission.

"They also added in a new component that directly affected commission -- based off of customer satisfaction surveys," said Gordon. "If you open an account, the customer got a survey. If that customer gave you an eight or below that would lower the pay for the store."

Some might mutter this was a good move. Surely incentivizing customer service would create positive results for both customers and employees.

Oh, but some salespeople looked at it a slightly different way.

"What happened is that no one would open accounts," said Gordon. "If the customer isn't buying something, they sent them away to either the website, the chat, or the call-in customer service."

Wait, I wondered, what does "open accounts" mean? 

"'Open an account' would be asking for a phone number and sending a verification to the customer. You don't need to sell anything. You just go into the account to look at a bill or take a payment. Also, if the customer picks up an order, 'open an account' would be accessing an account."

Essentially, then, some salespeople didn't want to risk being scored poorly by a customer -- and risk lowering their team's commission -- so they tried to send the customer to other parts of Verizon for help.

Which may, to some, feel like an exalted level of absurdity. Oddly, though, that's not all.

Your Service Is Not Being Upgraded.

There was another kink when it came to helping those who wanted to upgrade their phones. Explained Gordon: "If someone upgrades a phone and doesn't buy accessories or get the top tier insurance -- or goes on a low-cost plan -- individuals are judged against that as employees."

Gordon also pointed me to an online forum where Verizon employees express themselves heartily -- and anonymously.

Here's a sample from a Verizon salesperson addressing the company's bosses. It's a reaction to a recent company email inviting customers to come back to stores.

The salesperson pleads to their bosses: "You think you are going to get quality when I'm abused all day and our customers had to wait forever I'm just trying to survive the day. Do you know we are touchless and have to wear masks, then catch grief all day about masks from customers?"

This has been an issue across retail and certainly at carrier stores. Yet now, says this Verizon salesperson, store staffing has been reduced by half. 

The salesperson again: "Do you know our SMB (small and medium business) reps hide at home and we only have the ability to help half as many customers as before and you ask us why SMB sales are down? Do you know how many new lines walk away daily due to not being staffed properly? Of course, you don't. Do know how many customers come to get help at the store only to walk away in disgust because of the lack of help? Really? Does this sound like a successful business strategy?"

Not entirely, I hear you sniff.

Naturally, I contacted Verizon for its reaction on these issues. Has the company, I asked, actually seen an improvement in customer service scores since adding those scores to employee commission calculations? I will update, should I hear back.

Customers Still Want Humans. But Does Verizon?

This salesperson struck on a very important issue. People still want to go to a store and talk to a real person. (I'm one of them.)

Says the salesperson to their bosses: "You changed retail's entire landscape. Stop placing blame and understand we all want to succeed, but your vision handicapped our ability to win. Your customers aren't ready and willing to do the telesales world. They don't want a chatbox. They don't want bad answers from an app."

And there you were thinking AI is truly wonderful.

Of course, this might all be kvetching from a minority. It may be that Verizon's management is trying hard to do the right thing -- or, at least, the right thing for its corporate purposes.

I confess I've always experienced kind, thoughtful, and thorough customer service in Verizon stores -- even during the pandemic. But Gordon believes the company is "trying to make their corporately owned retail stores obsolete."

He added: "What customers don't realize is that a few years ago Verizon laid off all of their technical support people. Not one employee in a Verizon-owned retail store has any type of technical training on devices."

Which would seem awkward, but perversely believable.

Gordon has extremely fond memories of his years at Verizon.

Yet now, he says: "I can sleep at night. The culture was great, but the new upper leadership has distorted it."

Related Topics:

Smartphones Mobile OS Security Hardware Reviews Sours: https://www.zdnet.com/article/an-ex-verizon-employee-explains-why-its-not-worth-helping-customers/
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Time to cut internet cords: T-Mobile, Verizon up their bids to be your next home broadband

The new T-Mobile Home Internet service (4G/5G gateway shown at right) is expected to be available across 30 million U.S. households at launch, including a large swath of rural America. It boasts average downloads speeds of about Mbps (uploads are expected to be in the Mbps range).

Cord cutting is coming to home internet access, not just pay TV – but not every embittered broadband customer will be able to fire their current provider and switch to residential wireless from T-Mobile and Verizon.

Both carriers offer connectivity at speeds that may not match those of cable internet but should be fast enough for many home uses. They also don’t inflict cable’s data caps or modem-rental fees. What they can’t do yet: match the vast service footprints of incumbent cable providers.

T-Mobile says the $60 5G home internet service it announced April 7 covers “more than 30 million households” across some million square miles (the total U.S. land area is million). It hasn’t posted a coverage map, so would-be customers must plug in their home addresses at its site to check for service. 

A FAQ page touts download speeds of 50 megabits per second, with “most new subscribers” exceeding Mbps. A separate disclosures page cites upload speeds of 13 to 28 Mbps, well above cable uploads that often start at 3 Mbps.

Verizon launched its 4G LTE home internet service last June; with its most recent expansion, announced Oct. 1, it now reaches “parts of markets across 48 states.” Here, too, there’s no coverage map, so you’ll have to check your own address at its site. This $60 service ($40 if you already get Verizon smartphone service) offers downloads of 25 to 50 Mbps and uploads of 3 to 6 Mbps. 

In 30 cities, Verizon also offers a much faster 5G Home service – $70, or $50 with a Verizon phone plan – with advertised downloads of Mbps and uploads of 50 Mbps. But its reliance on Verizon’s fragile, short-range millimeter-wave 5G leaves it with excruciatingly limited coverage that PCMag.com found fell short of even that carrier’s millimeter-wave 5G smartphone service. 

Either T-Mobile 5G or Verizon LTE should represent a serious upgrade over aging, slow DSL connections, said Avi Greengart, president and lead analyst at Techsponential.

“Realistically, even today’s 4G speeds are often orders of magnitude faster than DSL, never mind mid-band 5G,” he wrote in an email. “In other areas, a local cable monopoly will win on speed, but adding an alternative should spur the incumbent to offer a better value proposition.” 

T-Mobile’s 5G, built on mid-band 5G spectrum unmatched at Verizon (or AT&T), has better odds of competing with cable. 

Will Townsend, senior analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, pronounced himself “very confident” in T-Mobile and its competitive position in rural markets because of that spectrum advantage. 

He was less optimistic about Verizon’s prospects even after that carrier puts its own mid-band 5G into service (expect that at the end of this year). Noting the $45 billion Verizon spent to buy that spectrum, Townsend warned that this and other deployment costs “will likely result in higher subscriber prices.” 

T-Mobile, for its part, has warned that the chip shortage may limit how many Wi-Fi gateways it can ship and therefore how many people can sign up. Maisie Heine, a publicist for the company, said it expects to have more than , subscribers by year-end and 7 million to 8 million total in five years. 

That would leave many Americans with subpar connectivity, but any upgrade on the current situation should be welcomed. 

Said Greengart: “I don’t think that fixed wireless will solve all suburban and rural broadband access problems, but I’m optimistic that it will have a significant impact.”

T-Mobile ups 5G ante:With home broadband, free phone upgrades

What AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile are buying up:The 5G battle between US carriers just got very interesting

Rob Pegoraro is a tech writer based out of Washington, D.C. To submit a tech question, email Rob at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter at @robpegoraro.

The views and opinions expressed in this column are the author’s and do not necessarily reflect those of USA TODAY.

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Sours: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist//04/19/t-mobile-verizon-up-their-bids-your-next-home-broadband//

T-Mobile raised a few eyebrows — and got some unflattering press attention — when the Wall Street Journal reported on its new privacy-invasive ad program. Beginning April 26, T-Mobile says it will use its customers’ web browsing and app usage data to sell targeted ads unless those customers opt out.

It sounds very creepy. No one likes to think that someone is watching and cataloging all the websites they visit. But it’s also a good example of just how much of our data can be and is collected through our mobile devices and how few rules there are for the carriers we’re forced to trust with it.

It’s not really clear what T-Mobile’s new program is or how it differs from T-Mobile’s current personalized ads program. As a T-Mobile customer, I was personally annoyed to discover that I was automatically opted in to this program, which uses data including the apps on my phone and “broadband information” to target ads to me. T-Mobile did not respond to a request for clarification, but said it would share more about its ad partnerships when the new privacy policy takes effect at the end of April.

What T-Mobile is doing isn’t unusual, however, and it’s not new. Verizon and AT&T have been doing this for years. Mobile carriers figured out a long time ago that they have two ways of making money off of their customers: what those customers pay to use their services, and then, what carriers earn by selling the datathose paying customers provide as they use those services. The former is clear and obvious to the customer, especially when the monthly bill comes due. The latter is buried under lengthy and confusing privacy policies and account settings, and most customers don’t even know it’s happening.

Here’s how this works: When you use a carrier’s cellular network (LTE, 4G, 5G, etc.), that carrier then knows what sites you visit, mobile apps you use, phone calls you make — basically anything you do over its network, unless you’ve taken measures to obscure it, like using an encrypted messaging service like Signal or a mobile VPN. There are privacy laws that limit some of what your carrier can disclose or use without your express permission (or a court order), but marketing off of data that isn’t attached to personally identifiable information is generally fine. So that’s what they do.

T-Mobile’s new program is notable because it’s more aggressive in the kinds of data it collects and the fact that customers are automatically enrolled in it. Verizon’s and AT&T’s personalized ad programs that use web browsing information — Verizon Selects and AT&T’s Enhanced Relevant Advertising program, respectively — are opt-in.

“Our customers must make an affirmative choice to opt in to our plans that would allow the use of location information or where customers go on the web to serve third-party advertisement,” a Verizon spokesperson told Recode.

But alongside the opt-in programs,Verizon and AT&T also automatically enroll you in their other advertising programs that collect less detailed information.

AT&T has “Relevant Advertising,” which uses your “non-sensitive information” (age range, zip code, gender) to target you with ads, including those served up by its digital and TV ad network, Xandr, which is named after Alexander Graham Bell, who invented phones and surely never saw something like this coming out of them. AT&T also sells your data to third parties to target you with ads.

Verizon has its Business and Marketing Insights and Relevant Mobile Advertising programs. Business and Marketing Insights sells aggregate information to other businesses that might want to know how many Verizon users in a certain demographic go to a website or walk into a store or use an app. Relevant Mobile Advertising uses your general information — pretty much the same stuff as AT&T’s Relevant Advertising program — and also shares that information with its own Verizon Media ad platform and network, which sends targeted ads to websites, apps, even your TV.

In addition to those two programs, Verizon also opts you into sharing your Customer Proprietary Network Information (for example, the calls you make and receive) with its own companies and affiliates to market more Verizon products and services to you. Verizon says it has to obtain your consent to do this, but it also considers you not opting out within a certain amount of time to be consent.

So all of these mobile carriers are still trying to make money off of your data, just less intimate types of it.

As the Wall Street Journal pointed out, Verizon’s and AT&T’s ad operations are far bigger than T-Mobile’s, so maybe T-Mobile is just trying to play catch-up here, and it’s being a little sneaky to get as many users as possible on board. It’s also trying to get its new, post-merger Sprint customers, who previously had to opt in to this kind of data collection and use, on the same page as the existing T-Mobile users.

There is a little bright spot here: These companies claim that they don’t attach your personal information, like your real name or address, to this data. They either just lump you in with a large anonymous pool of customers to use as aggregate data, or they assign a unique identifier to you, attach a bunch of categories based on interests or demographic information inferred from your data to that identifier, and then give that to third-party advertisers to target their ads to. That’s supposed to prevent advertisers from knowing your real identity, but depending on what’s used as an identifier and how specific the data attached to that identifier is, it could be easy enough to re-identify you through it. You just have to trust that T-Mobile (or Verizon or AT&T) and their advertising partners won’t do that.

Unless you live in Maine, these companies don’t have to get your permission to collect a lot of this stuff. They’re not exactly careful with your data either, as demonstrated by the many Federal Communication Commission (FCC) fines these companies haveincurred over the years for violating the few privacy rules that do exist.

It doesn’t have to be this way. The Obama-era FCC tried to enact privacy rules that would have required broadband service providers to get users’ permission before sharing certain information, including websites they visit and apps they use. But the Republican-led Congress overturned those rules a few months after Trump took office.

“The FCC needs to revisit this issue ASAP,” Alan Butler, executive director and president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), told Recode.

But the FCC has not revisited this issue yet, so T-Mobile and the others can still collect, use, and profit off of your data for now, while you actually pay them for the privilege. They also give you ways to opt out, so why not use them?

T-Mobile:

On the web: Go to T-Mobile.com> Account > Profile settings > Privacy and Notifications > Advertising & Analytics > Turn off “Use my data to make ads more relevant to me” and “Use my data for analytics and reporting.”

On the T-Mobile app: Go to “More” on the menu bar > Advertising & Analytics > Turn off “Use my data to make ads more relevant to me” and “Use my data for analytics and reporting.”

Verizon

On the web: Go to www.VerizonWireless.com/myprivacy> Select “Don’t share” for Customer Proprietary Network Information, Business & Marketing Insights, and Relevant Mobile Advertising.

On the Verizon app: Go to “More” on the menu bar > Tap the gear icon for Account Settings > Manage Privacy Settings > Switch off Customer Proprietary Network Information, Business & Marketing Insights, and Relevant Mobile Advertising.

AT&T

On the web: Go to AT&T’s “Consent Dashboard” > Relevant Advertising > switch allow use to “No.”

On the AT&T app: Go to “More” on the menu bar > Profile > Data & Privacy > Privacy settings > Relevant Advertising > Switch allow use to “No.”

Also, you might as well check out Verizon’s and AT&T’s “opt-in” personalized ads while you’re at it, just to make sure you haven’t opted in without realizing it via a sneaky pop-up with a lot of fine print (the owners of the AT&T account I used to research this article, for example, had no idea when or how they opted into Enhanced Relevant Advertising). For AT&T, just follow all the instructions above, but click on “Enhanced Relevant Advertising.” For Verizon, follow the instructions above, but click on “Verizon Selects.”

Of course, you can always opt into (or stay opted into) all of these ad programs if you’re happy enough trading some of your most sensitive data for a personalized ad experience, which these companies insist is something customers want. According to a report from AT&T’s Xandr ad platform (consider the source), two-thirds of people surveyed “wish advertisements were more relevant to them and their lifestyle.”

I have never personally met one of those people despite their supposed majority in the population, but apparently they do exist somewhere.

Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.

Sours: https://www.vox.com/recode//t-mobile-verizon-att-ad-targeting-data

My mobile verizon time

Verizon Employee Reviews

Great benefits, and good culture in specific locations.

Solutions Specialist (Current Employee) - Greensboro, NC - October 12,

I love Verizon, they have allowed me to be able to do a lot of things through my employment. They took care of us while stores were shut down due to covid, and allowed us to utilize our time volunteering virtually if we wanted to. And verizon has always responded to crisis, which is exactly what they did and will continue to do. I will always be grateful. I know that things were a lot worse for others. I maintained an income and pay and was still not working for almost a month.
I feel like recently the company has stopped caring so much about employees and more about the bottom line. In the last year alone there have been so many changes that have directly effected frontline employees, some to such a severe degree that they’ve been forced to find a different employer. I still believe that Verizon has the best intentions when it comes to innovation and helping customers. However I feel like they have cast aside employees. I know that there is a bottom line that needs to be hit, and that there are monies that need to be made to make up for , but I feel like some of the changes that were made and continue to be made are detrimental to employees and morale. The summer/fall after we returned to work jobs were cut, stores were closed and now most of us are taking on multiple roles instead of focusing on the role we were hired for. I work in retail and I will say I do appreciate the new hours that has helped with the work life balance, and the benefits are awesome.

Pros

Benefits, tuition reimbursement for business related degrees.

Cons

You will work Holidays, weekends and still a retail schedule

Sours: https://www.indeed.com/cmp/Verizon/reviews
First Look: Verizon Wireless Jetpack 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L

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