Ne zha netflix

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The animated Chinese epic New Gods: Nezha Reborn finds the tragic side of ultimate power

As wish-fulfillment power fantasies go, finding out you’re secretly a reincarnated god seems like a pretty satisfying one. In Netflix’s imported 2021 Chinese feature New Gods: Nezha Reborn, that revelation comes with a lot of benefits: the ability to survive lethal wounds, the sudden emergence of kick-ass martial-arts powers, the respect and interest of the local power-players, and above all, the ability to rain down fire on any disrespectful enemies. For a street kid trying to find his place in an oppressive city run by a greedy crime gang, those all seem like game-changing benefits, an infinite upside in a world where few people have the strength to resist the dominant order.

But power in this kind of story inevitably comes with a price, and Nezha Reborn gets to the price quickly and definitively. The story, which revives and rewrites a handful of extremely popular characters from Chinese mythology, winds up focusing on the problems godlike power can’t fix as much as it focuses on the ones where white-hot cleansing fire is helpful. For all the eye-popping battles and fast-moving action, it’s an emotional story that takes the time to explore what its protagonist really wants out of life, and why god-tier power may be as much of a burden as a benefit.

Director Ji Zhao, who previously helmed the 2019 CGI feature White Snake, opens New Gods: Nezha Reborn with a quick summary of the cosmos: Three thousand years ago, the world was in chaos, with humanity and gods warring among themselves. The gods fought to establish a new hierarchy, which eventually brought the planet into a queasy balance. But certain gods are always looking to better their position. In Donghai City, a neon-drenched modern town with a strongly retro vibe, four clans rule over the people, and in particular, control the limited water supply. As Ao Bing, the third son of De Clan’s intimidating patriarch, says early on, keeping the town in need gives the poor something to focus on and keeps them in line: “Full bellies foster random thoughts.”

Image: Netflix via Polygon

Keeping the people’s bellies empty means creating artificial water shortages, which creates a niche for water smugglers like Li Yunxiang, a young man with a hot temper and a Robin Hood ethos toward the suffering slum-dwellers. Early on, screenwriter Mu Chuan lays out Yunxiang’s tangled problems: a father who hates his choices and holds him in contempt; a fussy brother who worries about him and tries to bring him to heel; an employer who leads him into danger; a love interest whose name he doesn’t even know; a girl who’s a bit like a possessive but pushy sister. Yunxiang builds and races motorcycles in his spare time, which lets Nezha Reborn launch with a Ready Player One-style manic street competition that defies the laws of physics, and gives Yunxiang something small and specific to care about in a world full of much larger and louder concerns.

But then Yunxiang and Ao Bing face off over Yunxiang’s bike, in a set of sequences somewhere between Akira and the early inciting incident in John Wick. As the rich, spoiled scion of Donghai City’s primary ruler, Ao Bing naturally thinks anything his eyes fall on should be his. Yunxiang disagrees. In rapid order, what starts as a small but potentially fatal conflict over respect and a bike becomes a literal god-level battle, as Yunxiang discovers his secret heritage and power. Problem is, after his violent exaltation, he has no idea how to access or control his new abilities, and he has to seek help among the other secret powers of the world.

That process involves some extremely rich and engaging animation. Nezha Reborn’s CG-animated characters hover just a little too close to realistic to be entirely convincing; they tend to edge into the uncanny valley, rather than being more cartoonish in the way of the CG leads in movies like Lupin III: The First or How to Train Your Dragon. But the world around those characters is stylish and vividly designed, in everything from shining skyscrapers to mythological beasties to the glowing avatars that loom behind god-incarnate warriors when they draw on their heavenly powers. That opening race sequence is show-offy, compete with Yunxiang breaking the fourth wall to brag to the audience, but it sets the stage for a world that keeps visually escalating, falling deeper and deeper into fantasy with each new battle and each wild new setting.

Image: Netflix via Polygon

New Gods: Nezha Reborn draws heavily on pan-Asian folklore and myth for its narrative spine. Nezha in particular has been a popular character for centuries, evolving from god to general to child to spirit in myths as disparate as the 16th-century novel Journey to the West, China’s 1979 animated hit Nezha Conquers the Dragon King, and the 2019 Chinese CGI feature Ne Zha, also currently streaming on Netflix. (That film takes a much more slapstick-driven approach to Nezha’s heavenly guardians in particular, and the visual approach starts off cartoony and child-centered compared to Nezha Reborn. But it eventually develops its own resonant emotional drama and staggering action sequences. The two films make an enjoyable double feature, just to see two radically different interpretations of the same classic characters.)

But in the New Gods incarnation, Nezha takes an almost literal back seat to Yunxiang, whose concerns are grounded and human. He wants to help his suffering people, and he wants to earn his father’s respect. And once his powers emerge, he has to face the fact that he’s dangerous to the people he cares about. The powers he’s channeling and the spirit within him are destructive and volatile rather than healing or nurturing. The story follows a track that’s familiar in Western animation and Western video games: Yunxiang inevitably finds bigger bosses to fight at periodic intervals, and levels up with every new conflict. But he’s never entirely free to think of his war as satisfying, pure, or righteous, the way so many power-tree-climbing Western heroes do. Even as a temperamental young man whose enemies are grasping, underhanded, and inhuman, he has to pause to consider the physical and emotional cost of his actions.

Image: Netflix via Polygon

And when he inevitably fails in places, that failure hits hard. Nezha Reborn is a startlingly emotional story, one that finds time between explosive battles to let Yunxiang weep over his losses, and ponder his place in the universe. The filmmakers similarly find time to let his allies and enemies engage with each other, mulling over the past and the way their relationships have evolved over the eons. For a two-hour action movie, Nezha Reborn is startlingly dense and effective, and even surprisingly moving.

Like most fables, it eventually comes down on the predictable side of the cost-of-power debate. Ultimately, Yunxiang decides, having the ability to fight and change the world is better than being powerless and afraid. It’s a logical enough conclusion, even outside the boundaries of fantasy stories involving reincarnating gods and dragons. But New Gods: Nezha Reborn actually takes the time to give the question some serious thought, which makes it a much richer and more gratifying story than the usual magical-martial-arts throwdown.

New Gods: Nezha Reborn and Ne Zha are currently streaming on Netflix.

Sours: https://www.polygon.com/22388029/new-gods-nezha-reborn-review-netflix

Ne Zha

Ne Zha on Netflix

Films Based on Books, Chinese Films, Action & Adventure, Asian Action Films, Comedies

 

Bound by a divine mandate, rebellious outcast Ne Zha grapples with his formidable powers and a destiny that would imperil his loved ones.

 

Year: 2019

Duration: 1hr 50m

 

Director: Yu Yang

 

Cast: Lü Yanting, Joseph, Han Mo, Chen Hao, Lü Qi, Zhang Jiaming, Yang Wei

 

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Production & Box Office Details:

"Ne Zha" was produced by Beijing Enlight Pictures and Horgos Coloroom PicturesWith it's initial release on July 26th 2019 it made approximately $686.07m at the Box Office.

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Bound by a divine mandate, rebellious outcast Ne Zha grapples with his formidable powers and a destiny that would imperil his loved ones.

 

Certificate:TV-14Parents strongly cautioned. May not be suitable for ages 14 and under.

 

Year: 2019

Duration: 1hr 50m

Audio: English, Mandarin (Putonghua)

Subtitles: English, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese

 

Cast and Crew

Director:Yu Yang

 

Cast:Lü Yanting, Joseph, Han Mo, Chen Hao, Lü Qi, Zhang Jiaming, Yang Wei

 

Production & Box Office Details:

"Ne Zha" was produced by Beijing Enlight Pictures and Horgos Coloroom Pictures. With it's initial release on July 26th 2019 it made approximately $686.07m at the Box Office.

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Ne Zha (2019 film)

2019 Chinese animated fantasy adventure film by Jiaozi

Ne Zha[7][3][11][12] (Chinese: 哪吒之魔童降世[3]; pinyin: Nézhā zhī Mótóng Jiàngshì; lit. 'Birth of the demon child Nezha'), also spelled Nezha,[13][12][14] is a 2019 Chinese 3Dcomputer animation[3]fantasyadventure film[7] directed and written by Yu Yang, credited as Jiaozi.[14] Its animation production is done by the director's own Chengdu Coco Cartoon.[4][15] Featuring the popular Chinese mythological character Nezha, the plot is loosely based on the classic 16th-century novel Investiture of the Gods, attributed to Xu Zhonglin.[2][16]

It was released in China exclusively in IMAX and China Film Giant Screen theatres[6] on 13 July 2019, followed by other theatres on 26 July,[3] distributed by Beijing Enlight Pictures.[4] It is the first Chinese-produced animated feature released in IMAX format,[15] and, despite being the debut feature of its director and animation studio, and having no widely known actors in its voice cast, it has been one of the biggest commercial successes in Chinese cinema, setting numerous records for box-office grosses: as of August 2019, the film is the highest-grossing animated film in China,[17] the worldwide highest-grossing non-U.S. animated film,[18] and the second worldwide highest-grossing non-English-language film of all time. With a gross of over $725 million,[19] it was that year's fourth-highest-grossing animated film, and China's all time third-highest-grossing film.[20]

It began a North American release on 29 August 2019 in select IMAX 3D theatres, before a nationwide rollout on 6 September.[21] It was selected as the Chinese entry for Best International Feature Film at the 92nd Academy Awards,[22] becoming the first animated film from China to ever do so,[23] but it was not nominated.

A second film set in the same universe, titled Legend of Deification, was released on 1 October 2020, which is National Day in China.[24]

Plot[edit]

A Chaos Pearl, birthed from primordial essences, begins siphoning energies gluttonously. Yuanshi Tianzun dispatches his disciples Taiyi Zhenren and Shen Gongbao to subdue the sentient pearl. Due to its ability to absorb energy, Taiyi and Shen are unable to gain the upper hand. Eventually Tianzun separates the pearl into two opposite components: the Spirit Pearl and the Demon Orb. Tianzun places a heavenly curse upon the Demon Orb: in three years time it will be destroyed by a powerful lightning strike. Tianzun then instructs Taiyi to take the Spirit Pearl to be reincarnated as the third son of Li Jing, to be named Ne Zha.

Shen conspires to steal the Spirit Pearl and in the ensuing battle, the Demon Orb is placed on the ritual altar instead, causing Li Jing's pregnant wife Lady Yin to give birth to a child, Ne Zha, whose demonic nature is apparent. Taiyi tells them that Ne Zha's fate is sealed: in three years' time the heavenly curse placed upon the Demonic Orb will kill him regardless. Li travels to Heaven with Taiyi in an attempt to plead for Ne Zha's life, but is told that the curse is unremovable.

Meanwhile, it is revealed that Shen stole the Spirit Pearl for the Dragon King to reincarnate as his son, Ao Bing. The dragons resent their role as jailers of the Heavenly Court and being confined to a hellish existence on the ocean floor. They hope that through the blessed nature of a son born from the Spirit Pearl that dragon kind would be deemed worthy by Heaven, allowing the dragons to ascend. The Dragon King allows Shen to take Ao Bing as a student.

To tame his demonic nature and to make him happy, Ne Zha's parents lie to him, telling him that he was born of the Spirit Pearl and is destined to be a great demon hunter. Ne Zha studies under Taiyi and acquires great skills. Eventually becoming impatient, the impetuous Ne Zha escapes his confines to hunt demons. While chasing a water demon, he burns down a fishing village. Ao Bing also comes to fight the demon, but is eventually defeated. Ne Zha cleverly overcomes the water demon and rescues both Ao Bing and a little girl, but is nevertheless misunderstood by the townsfolk. In a rage, Ne Zha lashes out at the villagers, hurting many of them.

The Li household organizes a lavish birthday party for their son, inviting a nervous town to attend. Shen visits Ne Zha before the party, revealing the truth of his nature to him. Angry and upset, Ne Zha unleashes his true demonic form and nearly kills his father. Feeling betrayed, Ne Zha leaves to await his fate.

Shen says that if his deceit is revealed to Tianzun then not only will he be punished, all of dragon kind will be condemned forever. Ao Bing, not wanting to betray his kind, decides to bury the town alive under a massive sheet of ice so there are no witnesses. Meanwhile, Ne Zha learns that while visiting Heaven to plead for his life, his father sought an enchantment that would allow him to trade his life for Ne Zha's. Moved by his father's sacrifice, Ne Zha returns to the village to stop Ao Bing. Eventually unleashing his full demonic form, Ne Zha defeats Ao Bing but spares his life, calling him his only friend.

When the heavenly lightning approaches, Ne Zha surrenders to his fate but is unexpectedly joined by Ao Bing. Linking hands, they unleash the power of the Chaos Pearl, which has the ability to absorb energy. Their mortal bodies prove too weak to contain the energy of the strike. Though their bodies are destroyed, the townsfolk kneel before Ao Bing and Ne Zha in their spirit forms.

In the mid and post credits scenes, the Dragon King vows vengeance on the citizens of Chentangguan for what happened to Ao Bing, while in an unknown location, Jiang Ziya is introduced.

Voice cast[edit]

Mandarin Chinese[edit]

  • Lü Yanting as the child Nezha, son of Li Jing and Lady Yin
  • Joseph (囧森瑟夫) as the adolescent Nezha
  • Han Mo as Ao Bing, the Dragon King's third son
  • Chen Hao as Li Jing, the chief who governs Chentangguan. He becomes a noble father willing to sacrifice his own life to rescue his son Nezha
  • Lü Qi as Lady Yin, Nezha's mother
  • Zhang Jiaming as Taiyi Zhenren, Nezha's master, a Taoist immortal who lives on the Kunlun.
  • Yang Wei as Shen Gongbao

English[edit]

Production[edit]

Inspiration[edit]

The film tells the mythological origins of Nezha, who is a protection deity in Chinese folk religion, and its story is loosely based on the literary version of the myth that forms two chapters of Investiture of the Gods, a Ming-dynastyshenmo novel, traditionally attributed to Xu Zhonglin, which incorporates various existing myths into a wider narrative.[2]

The story has been adapted for the screen many times before, at least as early as 1927[citation needed] or 1928,[25] whether on its own (as in the 1979 traditionally-animated film Nezha Conquers the Dragon King) or as part of adaptations of the whole of Investiture of the Gods (such as the 2016 live-action film League of Gods).

Pre-production[edit]

Director Jiaozi spent two years in total to write the screenplay, and the film was in production for three years.[26][27]

Animation production[edit]

The film has more than 1,318 special effects shots, and it took over 20 Chinese special effects studios, employing more than 1,600 people, to realize the film's fairy tale setting, the mysterious Dragon King's Palace, and a complex fight between fire and water. One scene alone took two months to complete.[26][28]

Release[edit]

Domestic[edit]

Executive production company and distributor Beijing Enlight Pictures[4] premiered Ne Zha on 11 July 2019 in Beijing, followed by an encore on 12 July.[5] The film was given a limited release in IMAX and China Film Giant Screenpremium large format theatres[6] on 13 July, and was released nationwide on 26 July.[3][29]

Box office[edit]

The film grossed 600 million yuan (est. $84 million) in its first three days alone. It broke local records with a $91.5 million opening, the highest ever for an animated film in China.[30]

On August 2, 2019, It became the highest-grossing animated film of all time in China, a record held by Zootopia ($235.6 million) since 2016.[31] On 7 August 2019, Ne Zha became the fastest animated film to reach $400 million (in 12 days). It is currently the highest-grossing animated film of all time in a single market ($703.71 million in China)[19] overtaking Incredibles 2 (2018) ($608.5 million in North America), the highest-grossing non-Disney or Pixar animated film in a single market, overtaking Shrek 2 (2004) ($441.2 million in North America), and the highest-grossing non-English spoken animated film, overtaking Spirited Away (2001) ($361.1 million worldwide).[26][32][33][34] Upon reaching $700 million (in 46 days), it became the first ever animated feature film in film history to reach that milestone in a single market.

International[edit]

The film was released in cinemas in English-speaking regions in Mandarin with English subtitles around the end of August and beginning of September 2019.

It was released in Australia on 23 August and in New Zealand on 29 August, distributed by CMC Pictures.[35]

It was released in the United States and Canada in select IMAX3D venues on 29 August, followed by other cinemas on 6 September, distributed by Well Go USA Entertainment.[18][21][12]

It was released in the United Kingdom and Ireland, including in select IMAX 3D venues, on 30 August, distributed by CMC Pictures in collaboration with Cine Asia.[36][7][11]

Reception[edit]

Douban, a Chinese media rating site, gave the film 8.7 out of 10.[37]

The review aggregatorRotten Tomatoes reported that 88% of critics have given the film a positive review based on 17 reviews, with an average rating of 7.17/10.[38] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 54 out of 100 based on 5 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews."[39]

Future[edit]

The creative team behind the film has announced that Ne Zha will be the first installment in a fictional universe based on the stories told in the Fengshen Yanyi.[40] The next film in the franchise was announced to be Legend of Deification, featuring Jiang Ziya. It was slated for release on 25 January 2020 in China,[41] but following the COVID-19 pandemic, all Chinese New Year releases were cancelled. It was released on the 1st of October 2020, which aligned with China's national day, in both China and the U.S.[42]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc. movie.douban.com (in Chinese).
  2. ^ abcZhang, Phoebe (4 August 2019). "Chinese animated legend Nezha makes box office history, roaring past The Lion King". Yahoo. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  3. ^ abcdefghi. movie.douban.com (in Chinese).
  4. ^ abcdeMilligan, Mercedes (30 July 2019). "'Nezha' Breaks Chinese Animation BO Records".
  5. ^ ab"Ne Zha (2019) - IMDb". imdb.com.
  6. ^ abcde"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 25 August 2019. Retrieved 26 August 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ abcde"NE ZHA | British Board of Film Classification". bbfc.co.uk.
  8. ^"AiF""Animation is Film". Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  9. ^"Ne Zha Zhi Mo Tong Xiang Shi (2019) - Financial Information". The Numbers. Retrieved 18 September 2019.
  10. ^"Ne Zha (2019) - International Box Office Results - Box Office Mojo". boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved 18 September 2019.
  11. ^ ab"Past, present and future releases to Past, Present and Future Releases | UK Recent and Upcoming Movie". launchingfilms.com.
  12. ^ abc"NE ZHA (2019)". Well Go USA Entertainment.
  13. ^The title is romanized as Ne Zha on the film's title card but as "Nezha" in the official English subtitles when referring to the character, and also on the U.S. poster and in the U.S. trailer.
  14. ^ ab"NE ZHA (2019) Official Trailer | Epic Animated Chinese Movie". youtube.com.
  15. ^ ab"$91.5 Million Debut Of 'Nezha' Crushes Animation Records In China". Cartoon Brew. 29 July 2019.
  16. ^ (in Chinese). thepaper. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  17. ^"'Nezha' Overtakes 'Zootopia,' Sets All-Time Highest-Grossing Chinese Animation Record". Cartoon Brew. 2 August 2019.
  18. ^ ab"American Audiences Don't Have To Wait Long To See The Chinese Blockbuster 'Ne Zha' In Theaters". Cartoon Brew. 16 August 2019.
  19. ^ ab"Boxoffice, China Boxoffice, China film Boxoffice, Weekly Boxoffice, Yearly Boxoffice". EntGroup. Retrieved 12 September 2019.
  20. ^"Ne Zha 2nd place on Chinese mainland's all-time box office chart". China.org.cn. Retrieved 10 September 2019.
  21. ^ abBrzeski, Patrick (16 August 2019). "China's Summer Hit Ne Zha to Get North American Release from Well Go USA (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 19 August 2019.
  22. ^"93 Countries in Competition for 2019 International Feature Film Oscar". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  23. ^"Oscars: China Selects 'Ne Zha' for International Feature Film Category". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  24. ^"国漫力作《姜子牙》10月1日国庆上映-新华网". www.xinhuanet.com. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  25. ^. movie.douban.com (in Chinese).
  26. ^ abcKatherine Chen (8 August 2019). "Nezha Becomes China's Highest-Grossing Animation Ever". thatsmags. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  27. ^. zaobao.com (in Chinese). 27 July 2019.
  28. ^. sina (in Chinese). 24 July 2019.
  29. ^ (in Chinese). iFeng. 2 July 2019. Retrieved 26 July 2019.
  30. ^Mia (25 July 2019). (in Chinese). sina. Retrieved 26 July 2019.
  31. ^https://www.screendaily.com/news/nezha-beats-zootopia-to-become-biggest-animation-of-all-time-in-china/5141709.article
  32. ^"Ne Zha leads Chinese mainland box office for 7th day". chinadaily. 2 August 2019. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  33. ^Dudok de Wit, Alex (9 August 2019). "Nezha Smashes $460 Million Box Office, Set To Overtake Avengers: Endgame In China". Cartoon Brew. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  34. ^Davis, Rebecca (5 August 2019). "China Box Office: Nezha Is 10th-Highest Grosser Ever in China After Two Weekends". Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  35. ^"Sina Visitor System". passport.weibo.com.
  36. ^"Sina Visitor System". passport.weibo.com.
  37. ^. Sohu (in Chinese). 29 July 2019.
  38. ^"Ne Zha (2019)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  39. ^"Ne Zha Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  40. ^"《哪吒2》来了,饺子导演透露剧情走向,新角色新法宝都将登场?". Retrieved 9 June 2020.
  41. ^"Chinese mythology series Jiangziya relay Nezha at the beginning of the new year". jqknews.com. 25 September 2019. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  42. ^https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11177804/releaseinfo?ref_=tt_ov_inf

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ne_Zha_(2019_film)

Zha netflix ne

New Gods: Nezha Reborn

2021 Chinese animated fantasy action film by Zhao Ji

New Gods: Nezha Reborn (Chinese: 新神榜:哪吒重生) is a 2021 Chinese 3Danimatedfantasyaction film directed by Zhao Ji and written by Mu Chuan, based on the character of Nezha from the Ming dynasty novel Investiture of the Gods. In the film, a steampunk and cyberpunk take on the story, Nezha is reincarnated as Li Yunxiang in the fictional city of Donghai (loosely based on 1920s Shanghai) and must settle a 3,000-year-old grudge with the Dragon Clan.[2][3]

The film was released in mainland China on 12 February 2021 (Chinese New Year).[4][5]Netflix acquired global rights to the film except in China, and it was released on the platform on 12 April 2021.[6][7]

New Gods: Nezha Reborn is not related to the 2019 film Ne Zha; they came from different production companies and have different distributors. New Gods: Nezha Reborn actually started production before Ne Zha did, but both films are loosely based on the same Ming Dynasty novel.[8][9][10]

Plot[edit]

Three thousand years after Nezha fought the sea, Li Yunxiang, a young motorbike rider in Donghai City, discovers that he is Nezha reincarnated. Before he has mastered his powers, his old enemies appear, and he must settle a 3,000-year-old grudge with the Dragon Clan.[2]

Voice cast[edit]

Li Yunxiang
Voiced by: Yang Tianxiang (Mandarin), Stephen Fu (English)
  • The main protagonist. He is a smuggler and courier and current reincarnation of Nezha
The Masked Man
Voiced by: Zhang He (Mandarin), Jason Ko (English)
  • A masked monkey who is believed to be the Six-Eared Macaque, but in reality, he is Sun Wukong the Monkey King. He is based on the Monkey King, Sun Wukong, from Journey to the West.
Ao Guang
Voiced by: Xuan Xiaoming (Mandarin), Andrew Kishino (English)
  • The main antagonist. He is the leader of the De Clan whose true identity is the Dragon King of the East Sea.
Su Junchu
Voiced by: Li Shimeng (Mandarin), Nicole Fong (English)
  • A doctor from Cijie hospital who enjoys competitive motorbike racing. Yunxiang's crush and lover.
Kasha
Voiced by: Zhu Ke'er (Mandarin), Victoria Grace (English)
  • Yunxiang's childhood friend and a lounge singer.
Ao Bing
Voiced by: King Zhenhe (Mandarin), Aleks Le (English)
  • The son of Ao Guang and the Dragon Prince who was defeated by Nezha in the past. He controls ice-based powers.
Li Jinxiang
Voiced by: TBA (Mandarin), Harrison Xu (English)
  • Yunxiang's older brother. He supports his brother's job as a courier despite their father's wishes.
Donghai Yaksha
Voiced by: Gao Zengzhi (Mandarin), TBA (English)

Production[edit]

New Gods: Nezha Reborn expands on the original story of Nezha from the Ming Dynasty novel Investiture of the Gods. It was directed by Zhao Ji and produced by Light Chaser Animation Studios, and it took four years to produce. Zhao Ji and Light Chaser previously collaborated on the 2019 film White Snake, which features some of the same cast and crew.[12]

The cyberpunk city of Donghai was designed based on a mixture of Manhattan in the 1920s and '30s and Republic of China–era Shanghai, according to Zhao.[9]

Release[edit]

The film was originally scheduled for a summer 2020 release,[12] but was delayed. In 2020 it was presented as a "work in progress" at the Annecy International Animation Film Festival and released a promotional video.[13] In August 2020, its first official trailer was released.[3] On 10 October 2020, a promotional poster was released and the film's release was announced for 12 February 2021 (Chinese New Year).[14] It was screened at IMAX theaters in China on 6 February 2021, with a second round of screenings on 9 February.[15]

In its opening weekend, the film grossed US$21.3 million.[5]

Netflix has acquired streaming rights for the film outside of mainland China,[5] and it was released on the platform on 12 April 2021.[6][7]

Reception[edit]

Critic Lim Yian Yu called the film "an interesting take" on the classic novel, and said it was "definitely a family-friendly movie that can be enjoyed by children and adults alike".[16]

Sun Jiayin praised the decision to bring the character of Nezha into a setting 3,000 years after the original story, saying that this made the film distinct from the plethora of other Investiture of the Gods adaptations out there.[17]

Sequel[edit]

A sequel is scheduled for a 2022 release.[18]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Gods:_Nezha_Reborn
La Película Animada Más Taquillera de la Historia!!! (en China) - Resumen en 13 minutos

Chto verily we uvleklis this delom, nado hotya would dozu umenshit, verily a nakidyvaemsya and. Osadok vypadaem - skazal I prisazhivayas nA svoo mesto. Ty Reconnectwhat do you remember.

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