Alto sax jazz licks

Alto sax jazz licks DEFAULT

STORYTELLERDo your solos brim with vitality, gliding across a colorful landscape, as you explore ever deeper into the ocean of sound?  Or do you flounder among waves of notes, swimming through a maze of chord changes?

STORYTELLER 3Thematic development will transform your playing, as you weave your exciting, personal story.

The following clips illustrate three powerful tools to stimulate your creative potential and enthuse your audience.

1.  RHYTHMIC SHIFT– Example 1 presents a 7-beat phrase that starts on the “and” of beat 3.  The phrase is then repeated, but this time, it begins on the “and” of beat 2.  Repeating the phrase gives your thought unity, while the rhythmic offset offers variety and surprise.  Try playing along with this recording in all 12 keys.

MIXOLYDIAN LICK 1

2.  DIMINUTION– In example 2, the 7-beat phrase is the same, but a triplet compresses the second statement of the theme.  Your motif is still easily recognized, but you have added variety.

MIXOLYDIAN LICK 2

3.  TONAL SHIFT– In Example 3, the second statement of the theme modulates up a minor third.  Tonal shift was a favorite device of John Coltrane.  The listener still recognizes your theme, but her ear delights in this fresh new element you have added to the mix.

MIXOLYDIAN LICK 3

As you become more comfortable with creating and developing thematic material, your unique personality defines your individual style.  You improvise dynamically and coherently.

STORYTELLER 2

To master these 3 techniques, play along with the 3 audio files offered here.  Contact me, if you need a chart.  Or, if you want to learn to play by ear in all 12 keys (as I did while recording these clips), download “New Ears Resolution” and liberate your musical imagination!

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Sours: https://craigbuhler.com/tag/jazz-licks/

Easy ii-V-I Lick

In this lesson, I’m going to teach you an easy ii-V-I lick. As always there’s a pdf download for you that goes along with this lesson in the BetterSax Shed.

The idea is not to learn a bunch of phrases by rote and then plug them in to create a paint by numbers solo though.

Rather, we want to build a large vocabulary of these phrases. That way in the moment we are able to improvise our own melodies using fragments and building blocks we’ve learned in the process.

It is very important to take lines like the one we are about to learn through all 12 keys.

If you’ve never done this before, I challenge you to download the pdf for this lesson and learn this lick in all 12 keys. It may take you a day, it may take you a week, doesn’t matter. The result will be a big leap forward for your saxophone playing.

If you can make learning phrases in all 12 keys part of your daily practice routine, over time you will be able to make significant improvements.

I’m playing this lick today on alto sax in the key of concert Bb — that puts me in my G. 

You can take any ii-V- I lick and break it down into little melodic fragments. When improvising, we are basically creating our own melodies out of the various building blocks we have in our vocabulary.

Breaking it Down

 So let’s take a look at what’s happening here.

The entire lick is made up of straight eighth notes until the very last note and each measure has one chord in it.

On the ii chord we are playing straight up the dorian scale from the root to the 5th. Let’s think of that as our first fragment. Just going up the scale.

The second half of this first measure we jump from the fifth to the 7th and then change direction and head back down the scale.

This new fragment contains what we call an enclosure. This is a very common musical device where you have a target note in this case the F# and we enclose it with lower and upper neighbor tones.

The F# is our target note because it is the third of the 5 chord that is coming one beat later. We are getting to the target note a little early, but that is okay.

Our next fragment which begins in measure 2 on the V chord starts with a bit of chromaticism. We play from the root of the 5 chord down the scale with the addition of this chromatic passing tone.

Some of you may recognize this as part of the bebop scale. The extra chromatic passing tone in this scale makes the chord tones land on the downbeats. 

By the way, if you are feeling a little lost with all the talk of chord tones and scales, I have made a course explaining all the music theory you need to know in order to study jazz improvisation called Harmonic Foundation

In the second half of the measure we have another fragment. This one is a mirror of the our earlier fragment that had the enclosure. This time our target note is the G of the following measure. We are enclosing it with its lower neighbor F# and the upper neighbor A.

So as you can see, this easy ii-V-I lick will get you practicing the enclosure technique which is a staple of the bebop language. For the first enclosure the lower neighbor is a whole step below, and the upper neighbor is a half step above. In this second enclosure it’s reversed. The lower neighbor is a half step below and the upper neighbor is a whole step above.

If you take this lick through all 12 keys, you will have practiced 2 of the most common ways to play an enclosure on every single note. Your fingers will remember the work you put in and that vocabulary will start to come out in your improvised solos.

The final fragment of this lick is on the 1 chord. We play this very common 1235 scale pattern which is often associated with Coltrane’s Giant Steps solo since he used it a lot there, but you’ll find that pattern everywhere you listen.

The Finer Details

Now let me point out a few important details you may not have noticed.

First, this lick follows a pattern where the root of the chord is the first note in each measure.

I built it that way on purpose. I’m calling this an easy ii-V-I lick, and I wanted it to be very clear to anyone starting out. Effective ii-V-I licks will usually have a chord tone on the down beats especially where the chords change. Every downbeat of this particular lick is a chord tone.

When I say I built this lick what I mean is I put together a bunch of common melodic fragments from my vocabulary in a logical and musical way to make this phrase.

I learned these fragments from listening to great improvisors in the jazz tradition and transcribing what I heard.

So my lick here is not so much an original thought — It’s more like rearranging the furniture to get a new layout in your living room. You’ve got the same couch, but when you put it over there it changes the whole room, right?

When you learn enough jazz vocabulary you’ll want to start experimenting with this on your own. Try taking little melodic fragments and rearranging them.

Final Thoughts

Let us know how this lesson when for you in the comments below, I love hearing from my students!

Be sure check out the other courses at BetterSax.com as well as the BetterSax studio program for the best online learning experience.

Also be sure to follow BetterSax on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube to stay up to date with us for news, giveaways, and other saxophone tips and tricks.

Sours: https://bettersax.com/how-to-turn-licks-into-solos-easy-ii-v-i-lick/
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25 Easy ii-V-I Licks

When it comes to becoming a great jazz improviser, it’s all about learning jazz language. Learning jazz language can happen in a lot of different ways. Listening to jazz, learning solos by ear, or learning jazz standards.

But if you want some quick and helpful rewards for your time investment, learning licks is a great way to go.

Licks are short musical phrases, usually played over the context of a chord or chord progression. You can learn them by ear from one of your favorite jazz musicians, from teaching resources, or even create your own.

But if you’re not sure what chord progressions you should be learning licks over, look no further.

The 2-5-1 (or ii-V-I) chord progression is the most common in jazz repertoire.

Therefore would it be a great idea to learn licks over 2-5-1 chord progressions? You bet! The most important thing you can do is learn them, and then practice them the right way.

So in this lesson, I’m giving you 25 easy ii-V-I licks. 

These are fantastic, simple ideas composed by former LJS contributor Camden Hughes, and he packed these full of fantastic lessons.

Before you start, though, be sure to sign up for my free mini course “Accelerate Your Jazz Skills.” Learning licks is great, but you need to go deeper than that. This mini-course will help.

Let’s take a look at them. Play through each one, and try to get the feel for them. If you find one you like in particular, hone in on that one.

25_Easy_ii_V_I_Licks-page-00125_Easy_ii_V_I_Licks-page-00225_Easy_ii_V_I_Licks-page-003

Practice Tips:

  1. Pick one that stands out to you and learn it.
  2. Spend time analyzing it. What are the important notes in the line that help define each chord?
  3. Take that lick into all 12 keys, by choosing one or two to work on each practice session. Don’t do too many at a time! Less is more.

Hope you enjoy practicing these licks.

The more jazz language you learn the easier improvising in jazz gets. You become familiar with the sounds and the chord progressions, and before you know it, it will become second nature.

Again, licks are great to learn and very helpful. But jazz improvisation has so much more too it.

Be sure to sign up for my free mini-course Accelerate Your Jazz Skills and I’ll walk you through the other important elements you need to know to improve your jazz improv skills.

Sours: https://www.learnjazzstandards.com/blog/25-easy-ii-v-i-licks/

Saxophone Licks and Etudes - VOLUME I: II - V Cadences

My Jazz Licks and Etudes - Volume I is a collection of Jazz Phrases over different II-V cadences encountered on typical Jazz standards and many other contemporary music contexts. The licks are built from all my years of studying, transcribing and playing Jazz. This first volume is based on licks composed by combining typical Jazz language, approaching chord tones efficiently, playing with different chord extensions, and using bits and pieces of typical phrases played by great Jazz Saxophonists such as Dexter Gordon, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Michael Brecker, among others. Read full description…

My Jazz Licks and Etudes - Volume I is a collection of Jazz Phrases over different II-V cadences encountered on typical Jazz standards and many other contemporary music contexts. The licks are built from all my years of studying, transcribing and playing Jazz. This first volume is based on licks composed by combining typical Jazz language, approaching chord tones efficiently, playing with different chord extensions, and using bits and pieces of typical phrases played by great Jazz Saxophonists such as Dexter Gordon, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Michael Brecker, among others.

Each lick contains a brief description of it's characteristics and you can transpose them by clicking one button.

Also, you will find 3 solo Etudes over the chord progressions of “Have You Met Miss Jones”, “Stablemates” and “Cherokee”.
The first one uses many of the licks from this course and the other two showcase Bebop vocabulary that will enhance your playing.

Jazz Lick #1: II-V-I in Eb Major - Played On Alto Sax
Jazz Lick #2: II-V-I in Gb Major - Played On Alto Sax
Jazz Lick #3: II-V-I in G Minor - Played On Tenor Sax
Jazz Lick #4: II-V- I in Bb Major - Played On Tenor Sax
Jazz Lick #5: Turn Around/Rhythm Changes in Bb Major - Played On Alto Sax
Jazz Lick #6: Turn Around/Rhythm Changes in Eb Major - Played On Tenor Sax
Jazz Lick #7 - Turn Around/Rhythm Changes in Eb Major - Played On Alto Sax
Jazz Lick #8: Minor Turn Arounds and II-Vs - Played On Tenor Sax
Jazz Lick #9: II- V- I in Eb Major - Played On Alto Sax
Jazz Lick #10: II-V-I-VI Harmonic Progression - Played On Tenor Sax
Jazz Lick #11: Consecutive II-Vs - Played On Alto Sax
Jazz Lick #12: II-V-I in Eb Major - Played On Tenor Sax
Stablemates - Saxophone Solo Series, Vol I "Bebop Vocabulary"
Etude #3 - Cherokee
Etude #1 - Have You Met Miss Jones

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Licks jazz alto sax

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3 Melodic Minor Licks You NEED to Know

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