Corsair h60 vs h55

Corsair h60 vs h55 DEFAULT

Corsair H55 vs H60 – Which one is best?

Liquid CPU coolers can be found anywhere on the market today. In fact, you can see a long list of different technological companies that create and innovate the so-called best Liquid CPU coolers. Most brands advertise their different features and their uniqueness among other which sometimes give you a hard time in choosing the best one.

In this review, we will talk about the two of the best CPU coolers in the industry under the Corsair product line. These are the Corsair H55 and Corsair H Each of them has differences when it comes to physical look and some features yet in some points, they also share the same characteristics, effectiveness, and performance. In order to guide you in choosing the best one, you can consider the following guidelines as your basis in choosing the best CPU cooler for your PC.

Corsair H55 vs H60

Specs and Features

Speedy fans

With the different styles of CPU coolers under this product line, all of them have well-designed fans. This is because the design itself can give either good or bad impact to the overall performance of a CPU cooler. When it comes to the Corsair H55 and H60, Corsiar still shows another well-designed fans that will add up to the overall efficiency.

H55 features its fan with mm blades which are carefully designed to help the air properly flow. The fan from H55 makes its way to efficiency through maintaining a low speed and low noise. But despite the low speed of its fan, this CPU cooler still offers a good airflow since the blades have a wide diameter. This type of blades can produce a better airflow even at a lower state of speed.

When it comes to the Corsair H60, it shares the same measurement with the H Its fan has blades which measured about mm. The blades come in ergonomic design causing it in producing a great airflow while still maintaining the lower noise level when in use.

High heat conductivity material

When talking about Corsair CPU coolers, it is not surprising to see a copper cold plate as the heat conductor material in this product line. Just like other CPU coolers under Corsair, both the H55 and H60 use a copper cold plate for the effective heat transfer. They just became different from each other when it comes to the design as well as to what latest version is being used. The copper cold plate is known as a channel of efficient heat transfer to manifold for an effective control of heat in your processors.

For the H60, it uses a square shape of a copper cold plate with a pre-applied thermal compound. This additional feature of copper cold plate helps you to prevent messy installation set-ups.

H55 uses copper cold plate too. However, unlike from the what you can see in the H60, in H55, you can see a copper cold plate that comes in a circular shape. Aside from that, it is also the latest generation type of copper cold plate or also called as the micro-fin copper cold plate. Aside from that, this CPU cooler has the same properties of the copper cold plate with H60, the pre-applied thermal compound. When all these features work together, it creates the copper cold plate to have a high efficiency in heat exchange.

Unique rubber tooling

When it comes to the rubber tooling, these two CPU coolers share the same properties with each other. For H60, it uses a rubber that comes in large diameter yet low in permeability. This type of rubber tooling offers a long life of use, flexibility, as well as leak protection. Most of all, this rubber tooling from H60 is ideal for tight spaces since it is just easy to install and even suited for starters.

On the other hand, the H55 uses low permeability of rubber tooling as well. Just like in the H60, this type of tooling offers a longer life, flexibility, and protection from any possible leaks.

Complete with basic needs

As these CPU coolers promise a convenient usage to everyone, both the H60 and H55 offers self-contained or complete set-ups. The H55 features its set-up which comes in pre-filled and there is no need for refilling or priming anymore. The H60 is self-contained in its own way too. In fact, this CPU cooler features its set-up which does not need any means of complex plumbing since it is also pre-filled and no need to refilling or priming.

Tool-free installation

Another signature feature of Corsair is the fact that its CPU cooler features a tool-free installation. Both the H55 and the H60 can be installed easily. This is because both of them come in magnetic tool-free bracket kit.

Which one is the best?

As you can see, the H55 and the H60 CPU coolers share almost the same features with each other but quite different in designs.

The H55 CPU cooler can be a good choice knowing that it offers a total-noise free effect when in use. This is because it uses a low-profile black aluminum heat exchanger which is responsible why H55 remain quieter when in use.

On the other hand, the H60 has no special and additional feature except the above-stated features. However, H60 still does not fail to execute a good overall performance. In fact, this CPU cooler can also remain quiet after a long hour of use.

Both of these two CPU coolers from Corsair are easy to install, have good airflow, having a good rubber tooling, can transfer the heat effectively, and most of all, are both complete and self-contained.

In the end, the H55 is much modernized compared to the H However, both of them are efficient in their own ways which made them a good choice among people. And note, despite the fact that H55 CPU Cooler comes with a modernized approach, it doesn’t mean that the H60 is not efficient anymore, not all the time a stylish product can be the best one.

More Comparison Article:
Corsair Hi v2 Vs Hi – Which one is the best?
Corsair H60 vs H75 – Which one is the best?
Corsair H60 vs Hyper Evo – Which one is the best?

Like this:

LikeLoading

John WickT+

Related Posts

Sours: https://keyboardr.com/corsair-hvs-h60/

Details about  Mounting Bracket Fits For Corsair H55/H60/H75/H80I/HI/H/H/HI

Postage to: Worldwide

Excludes: Africa, Central America and Caribbean, South East Asia, South America, American Samoa, Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Guam, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna, Western Samoa, Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan Republic, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Georgia, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, South, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Bermuda, Greenland, Mexico, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, United States, Gibraltar, Guernsey, Jersey, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Vatican City State, Bahrain, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, PO Box

Postage and packaging

Each additional item

To

Service

Delivery*

£

£

Russian Federation

Economy SpeedPAK from Greater China

Estimated between Thu. 28 Oct. and Mon. 6 Dec.

£

£

Russian Federation

Standard SpeedPAK from Greater China

Estimated between Mon. 25 Oct. and Mon. 29 Nov.

£

£

Russian Federation

Express Delivery (Expedited Shipping from Greater China to worldwide)

Estimated between Mon. 18 Oct. and Mon. 25 Oct.

* You’ll see an estimated delivery date based on the seller’s dispatch time and delivery service. Delivery times may vary, especially during peak periods and will depend on when your payment clears.

Sours: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/
  1. Accidents in tallahassee today
  2. Ushining flip phone
  3. Tsunade last name

Thread: The Great Corsair Hydro Debate - H55, H60, H80i, or H90?

Hey all! I’ve been researching for the last month which Corsair CLC system to buy and have found a lot of conflicting information. I wanted to put this out there on the overclock.net, corsair, and ROG forums to see what the users, moderators, and (maybe if I’m lucky to get a response from Yellowbeard or Ramguy) the manufacturer have to say.

Here’s my specs:

Intel Core i5 k
ASUS Maximus Gene V
eVGA Signature2 OC edition
2x8gb G.Skill Ares RAM
Apevia QPack2 case
Ambient temps are around 21 degrees Celcius

I’m currently using the stock Intel fan and get temps of about 88 degrees Celsius when running Prime I have the processor overclocked to ghz with offset voltage, which raises the temperature to about Obviously that’s way too high. For now, however, I’m ok to keep it overclocked at as the processor doesn’t usually go above 65 degrees when gaming. I would like to get it to ghz, but want to get a better cooler first.

I would like to get a CLC as my case can only fit a CPU fan up to 76 mm in height. I’ll need to mod the case to fit the rad, which will be mounted on the outside of the case. I can’t imagine that I’ll be able to do anything other than an exhaust setup. There is a similar build below:

http://www.pctechadvice.com/gallery/lds-spartacus/

You can kind of see in picture 16 the holes that will need to be cut. I also plan to cut out the plate covering the fan for extra airflow. I have an 80 mm fan in the front of the chassis pulling air into the case.

I’d prefer NOT to use corsair link for two reasons: 1.) I’d like to keep the number of cables in my case to a minimum, and 2.) it doesn’t seem that stable yet.

But which fan to buy? Here are a couple examples of the conflicting information:

http://www.anandtech.com/show//cnzxt-compared

Anandtech shows the H55 beating the H60 by about 3 degrees. They attribute this to a better waterblock:

“Unfortunately, part of the reason the H55 looks so good is because the H60 performs so poorly. The H60 runs $10 more than the H55 for an arguably better PWM-controlled fan and a somewhat lesser quality waterblock. In this corner of the market, there's really no legitimate reason to spend up on the H60 when the H55 performs as well or better for less.”

http://www.hardocp.com/article//olers_review/1

Hard OCP shows the H60 beating the H55 by about degrees when overclocked. They also attribute this to a better waterblock:

“It is able to best the original by about two degrees which is impressive considering it uses the same radiator and pump, so surely this points to a more efficient coldplate design.”

Hard to decide which one! For the sake of argument, let’s ignore cost. They are all pretty close to each other in price and $50 one way or another is not going to persuade me. I do care about noise level. I have come up with some questions that will help me decide:

1. Does the H55 or H60 have the better waterblock?
2. With a mild overclock (), is a H55 or H60 enough to keep the temps below 50 degrees over ambient when running Prime95?
3. From the pics and reviews, the waterblock on the H60 seems much easier to install. Is that correct?
4. Are the H50 and H55 consistently ranked higher than any of the other coolers just because they are cheaper?
5. Is a 27mm radiator too thin to benefit from a push/pull configuration?
6. If a 27mm radiator does benefit from the push/pull, would it be enough to keep the temps below 50 degrees over ambient?
7. Can you run a H80i without CorsairLink?
8. Would a H90 with a >mm adapter work (essentially acting as a shroud)?
9. Do the preliminary tests for the H90 show it works better than the H80i?

Side-issue – I have a 3-pin mm case fan. I’ve noticed my RPM’s are not consistent. Does that mean my motherboard is modulating the voltage? If so, is there really any advantage to PWM fans? Based on Anandtech’s radiator fan review and the fact that they match my system, I’ll most likely swap out any stock fans for the Enermax Magma fans – the ones on FrozenCPU are red and black.

http://www.anandtech.com/show//fan-harder/7

I really appreciate the information these forums contain. Hopefully this post will help others asking the same questions.

Thanks,
<Azra<<

Sours: https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?The-Great-Corsair-Hydro-Debate-HHH80i-or-H90

Corsair Hydro H60 refresh and new Hydro H55

Corsair Hydro H60 refresh and new Hydro H55

Corsair updated their Hydro H60 sealed liquid cooler and released the  new Hydro H Both coolers are currently shipping in the US for $ and $, respectively. The Hydro Series H55 is an update to the hugely respected Hydro Series H50, and is based on the latest, 4th generation cold-plate design. The updated version of the Hydro Series H60 takes advantage of the latest cold plate, manifold and fan technology to further increase performance and reduce noise levels.

"The Hydro Series H50 and H60 have a hard-won reputation for delivering effective, reliable, and quiet CPU cooling," said Thi La, Senior VP & GM of Memory and Enthusiast Component Products at Corsair. "These new and improved versions demonstrate Corsair's commitment to providing our customers with the latest and best integrated liquid cooling technology."

In addition to the new cold plate and manifold design, the Hydro Series H60 also utilizes larger diameter tubing, which increases the coolant flow rate and performance. The new composite rubber tubing makes installation easier, but retains the low-evaporation rates of the older, more rigid tubing, guaranteeing a long lifetime. The Hydro Series H60 also introduces a new magnetic mounting bracket, which makes it simple to select the correct motherboard socket format.

H60 Includes Fan Based on Award Winning Air Series SP
A high-quality fan designed specifically to move air through the fins of a liquid cooling radiator is an essential part of any liquid cooling system. The new H60 includes a mm fan based on the award-winning Air Series SP This utilizes a motor that has been specially tuned for high torque, ensuring outstanding static pressure, and consistently high performance at low noise levels.

The Hydro Series H55 is designed to provide a simple and effective upgrade from a basic CPU air cooler. The 4th generation cold plate design, and high static-pressure, low noise mm fan provides great performance, while the tool-free mounting bracket and low-permeability rubber tubing makes installation simple.

Both the Hydro Series H55 and Hydro Series H60 CPU coolers are compatible with most cases that feature a rear mm fan mount. Both support motherboards based on the Intel LGAx//, and AMD AM2/AM3/FM1 sockets, and are backed by a five year limited warranty.



Corsair Hydro H60 refresh and new Hydro H55Corsair Hydro H60 refresh and new Hydro H55






Corsair Carbide Series R - 10/24/ PM
Corsair R mid-tower chassis. Priced at $59 and offering features designed to make PC building incredibly easy and quick, the R is ideal for PC builders looking for great value for money. The Carbide Series R is Corsair’s lowest-cost chassis, yet it still includes many of the features that make Corsair chassis popular with enthusiasts and gamers, such as built-in SSD compatibility, front panel USB ports, intelligent cable-routing, tool free installation, and a matt-black interior.

Corsair Force GS GB SSD review - 07/25/ AM
We review the Corsair Force GS GB SSD. Corsair introduces the Force GS series, and they are equipped with the series SandForce controller. Paired with SanDisk Toggle Toggle NAND flash ICs that

Corsair GS PSU review - 07/18/ AM
We review the Corsair GS power supply. The power supply is on the market for a while now already and it one of the more popular models. It offers Bronze efficiency, a single 12V rail and comes with

Corsair Carbide Series R Windowed Edition - 07/13/ AM
Corsair presents a windowed edition of its Carbide R case. Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced that the Carbi

Corsair 8GB DDR3 Memory Module - 07/12/ AM
Corsair



Click here to post a comment for this news story on the message forum.


Sours: https://www.guru3d.com/

Vs h55 h60 corsair

Corsair Hydro Series CPU Cooler Decoder Ring and Case Compatibility Chart

Having been in the cooling business for a few years now, at Corsair we’ve developed a pretty healthy lineup of liquid CPU coolers. So healthy, in fact, that it may be a little bit difficult to figure out which cooler you want or even need.

So how do you figure out which cooler to buy?

For starters, the larger the cooler you use, the slower you can run the fans. The slower you run the fans, the quieter the cooler is. In our testing, we found that even an H80i GT can run with its fans on their minimum setting and keep a mighty Intel Core iX (at stock speeds) under 55C. So while it’s entirely possible to have “overkill,” it’s also typically pretty safe to just buy the largest cooler we offer (that’s compatible with your case) since you will, if nothing else, reap lower noise levels.

Of course, what you’re cooling plays a big part in determining which cooler you’ll need. If you’re not planning on doing any serious overclocking and not using one of AMD’s W processors, you can actually likely get by with even an entry-level Hydro Series H55 or H But different chips have different thermal characteristics and produce different amounts of heat.

For example, Intel’s Haswell (non-E) and Devil’s Canyon processors can hit a heat wall where they simply can’t transfer more heat into the cooler. Getting a bigger cooler can get you lower noise levels, but if your core voltage is already at V, odds are good a beefier cooler isn’t going to get you more overclocking headroom. And it shouldn’t; that heat wall shows up at roughly the highest amount of voltage you’d want to put into an Intel chip for daily use. So even though an overclocked Core iK may only dissipate about W of heat – essentially where Intel’s Haswell-E processors start – characteristics of the chip itself prevent it from dissipating any more heat than that, regardless of the cooler used. Haswell-E chips, on the other hand, can dissipate as much as W when overclocked, but because they have lower heat density and better thermal transfer characteristics than non-E chips do, they can eke more performance out of a better cooler.

With all of that information in mind, I’ve produced a “decoder ring” which should give you a clear idea of the differences between all of the coolers we have available.

Note that all of our coolers support all modern Intel (LGA , , , , ) and all AMD sockets after the ancient Socket A (excluding AM1). If you have an older Intel CPU (Core 2 Duo or LGA), please refer to the individual cooler pages for compatibility information.

About Radiator Thickness

The greater the thickness of the radiator, the deeper the cooler overall and the greater its performance potential. Note that a mm radiator with the standard 25mm thickness requires less static pressure to cool than a mm radiator with <50mm thickness; though the mm radiator may have nearly as much surface area, greater static pressure from the fans – and thus greater noise – is required to adequately cool the radiator.

About Corsair Link

Any cooler with Corsair Link can be connected to a USB header on your motherboard and have fan speed programmed through our Corsair Link software. These coolers also sport RGB-backlit pump caps that can have their color changed in Corsair Link.

mm Coolers

These coolers are typically going to be the most compatible as far as cases are concerned. If your case has a rear mm fan mount, you should be able to use one of these.

Note that because of the H80i GT’s extra thick radiator, some motherboard layouts that place the CPU socket closer to the rear I/O cluster may create compatibility issues. You should measure a minimum of 50mm from the absolute rear of the case to the CPU socket to ensure compatibility.

mm Coolers

We only have one mm cooler: the oft-overlooked Hydro Series H90.

The H90 comes with a single mm PWM fan, is 25mm thick, and does not offer Corsair Link connectivity. Compatibility is also dependent upon your case having a mm fan mount. That said, the H90 can also offer surprisingly exceptional cooling performance. Adding a second fan to the H90 can also generate enough air pressure to let you substantially reduce the speeds of both fans, giving you great cooling without a lot of noise.

mm Coolers

Most of our cases are compatible with our mm coolers, but you’ll want to measure at least 55mm of clearance to mount any of them; the H requires an additional 15mm of clearance. This form factor has become very popular for its balance of noise and performance, and support for it is very common on modern cases.

Sours: https://www.corsair.com/pl/pl/blog/Corsair-Hydro-Series-CPU-Cooler-Decoder-Ring-and-Case-Compatibility-Chart
Refrigeración Liquida PC - Porque comprar el Corsair H60 2018 Led

Scythe Mugen 5 vs Corsair Hydro Series H55

Scythe Mugen 5

Corsair Hydro Series H55 Quiet Edition Liquid CPU CoolerCorsair Hydro Series H55 Quiet Edition Liquid CPU CoolerCorsair Hydro Series H55 Quiet Edition Liquid CPU Cooler

Corsair Hydro Series H55

Prices
(Change region)
Prices
(Change region)
* Pangoly may earn a commission when you use one of the links to make a purchase. (Disclosure)
* Product prices and availability are subject to change frequently. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon at the time of purchase will apply.
Brand
SCYTHE
Brand
Corsair
Model
SCMGAR
Model
Release Date
-
Release Date
📅 January * First availability for purchase, it may not correspond to the actual market launch date.
User reviews

Add a product review

User reviews

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

( reviews)

Add a product review

Price history
View Details ►
Price history
View Details ►
Recommended supported parts

Processors ►Motherboards ►

Recommended supported parts

Processors ►Motherboards ►

Supported Sockets
  • AM2
  • AM2+
  • AM3
  • AM3+
  • AM4
  • FM1
  • FM2
  • FM2+
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
Supported Sockets
  • AM2
  • AM2+
  • AM3
  • AM3+
  • AM4
  • FM1
  • FM2
  • FM2+
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
  • LGA
Liquid Cooler
No
Liquid Cooler
Yes
Radiator Size
-
Radiator Size
mm
Bearing Type
-
Bearing Type
Unknown
Noise Level
4 - dB
Noise Level
dbA
Fan RPM
- RPM
Fan RPM
RPM
Height
mm
Height
-
Critic Reviews
-
Critic Reviews

"UK summaryproduct Kompakt vandk&oslash;lingssystem fra Corsair. 3,6 0 5 Forrige side"

by Hardware-Test

-
Sours: https://pangoly.com/en/compare/cpu-cooler/scythe-mugenvs-corsair-hydro-series-h55

You will also like:

Introducing the Closed-Loop Cooler Line-Up

While closed-loop liquid coolers seem to perform at best comparably to the highest end air coolers, there's a certain appeal in their flexibility, stress on the motherboard, and sometimes even in cost. Prolimatech's industry standard Megahalems starts at $70, and that's before you even put halfway decent fans on it. Meanwhile, closed-loop coolers are getting to the point where you can find them for under $ One of those is Corsair's H55, just one of the coolers we have in for review today.

Of course, in addition to the H55, Corsair has refreshed their H60, H80, and Hs with the H60 Edition, the H80i, and the Hi. The "i" designates Corsair's Corsair Link technology, software that allows you to control fan speeds from within Windows as well as potentially integrate and monitor other Corsair peripherals. Not to be outdone, NZXT hit us with two coolers based on mm fans instead of mm: the Kraken X40 and X With a mm radiator, the Kraken X60 could very well be the best closed-loop cooler available.

This is all just surface, though. The reality is that these new coolers are almost uniformly indicative of an evolution of this product type as a whole. Corsair's H80i and Hi integrate with their existing Corsair Link software (also supported by their "i" series power supplies), while NZXT's Kraken coolers also include USB headers and their own fan speed control software. This kind of integration alone is a smart differentiation point from air coolers.

They need it, too. What's important to keep in mind is that while there's some special sauce for the waterblocks, software, and fans from the vendors of these units, we're still ultimately looking at systems that are built by either CoolIT Systems or Asetek. You can tell who's responsible for which unit, too, just by the way the waterblock mounts to the motherboard. We may have six coolers in for review (as well as last year's incumbent, the Corsair H80), but there are only two different mounting systems. Everything else is just mounting the radiator and connecting the fans/USB headers.

 Corsair H80 ()Corsair H55Corsair H60 ()Corsair H80i
Type mm mm mm mm
Dimensions (in mm) xx38 xx27 xx27 xx38
Fans (Supported) 2 (2) 1 (2) 1 (2) 2 (2)
OEM CoolIT Asetek CoolIT CoolIT
MSRP (NewEgg) - ($89) $69 ($59) $79 ($76) $ ($)

 Corsair HiNZXT Kraken X40NZXT Kraken X60
Type mm mm mm
Dimensions (in mm) xx27 xx27 xx27
Fans (Supported) 2 (4) 1 (2) 2 (4)
OEM CoolIT Asetek Asetek
MSRP (NewEgg) $ ($) $99 $

NZXT's coolers aren't available to mass market just yet, and we just got these review units in not too long ago. mm fan support in enclosures is fairly uncommon and dual mm even less so, but many of you seem convinced and I do agree that mm is really the direction things should be and are going.

At first it seems like there's a pretty brutal premium on NZXT's coolers, but it's not as bad when you look at what they're competing against. The X40 is really facing off with the H80i, which is selling for a pretty hefty $, while the X60 is doing battle with the Hi. Since the X60 is basically the largest closed-loop cooler you can buy (or at least will be), it makes sense that it would also be the most expensive. Let's hope for NZXT's sake it's also the best performing.

AT Deals: EVGA SuperNOVA P2 PSU Down to $Netgear Updates Orbi Lineup with RBKE Wi-Fi 6E Quad-Band Mesh SystemSeagate Updates Game Drive SSD for Xbox with New Look and Internals

TWEETS

  • IanCutress: @BenFranklin I've been in quite a few that charge for basic access. Usually business-focused hotels in major ci… https://t.co/HB5znUqFyq
  • IanCutress: @JamesDSneed Yeah completely missed that somehow
  • IanCutress: @Wronglebowsk A lot of events I went to pre-pandemic, if they were in semi-reasonable hotels in big cities, still charged you
  • IanCutress: @BenFranklin Blinded by the first thing I see. Thanks
  • IanCutress: @realAkashPatel Sometimes there are. Most of the time there isn't.
  • andreif7: @shameermulji @reneritchie I disrespectfully say that's just stupid. If you don't like a feature, don't use it. Giv… https://t.co/HcCs6ISsgr
  • andreif7: @handleym99 @iMarc96 @reneritchie What are you even talking about, that's the worst possible example. The A10 had a… https://t.co/SsK88VPHEs
  • andreif7: @VadimYuryev @dazeone81 > 4-second delay before switching down from hz Where did you get this from? That's not how it works.
  • andreif7: @mitchellmllnnl @reneritchie The X3 and 1+9Pro are garbage and don't have LFD working at all, the Note20Ultra and S… https://t.co/sREmqr2cwe
  • andreif7: @mitchellmllnnl @reneritchie There are literally only 2 other phones on the market having the same hardware class, so I repeat what I said.
  • RyanSmithAT: @JumboShrimp @BrettHowse Ahh, okay, you're talking about Windows Since today's piece was about the Surface h… https://t.co/bSPOukjtox
  • RyanSmithAT: @JumboShrimp @BrettHowse Just for future reference, what else would you have liked to see?
  • RyanSmithAT: If you only read one (more) thing today, read this. @andreif7 has once again knocked it out of the park with his di… https://t.co/hr3PPXwCJT
  • RyanSmithAT: @Tech_nerd_02 We're cracking away on it! @andreif7 only received the phones a few days ago, so there's still quite a bit of work left to do
  • ganeshts: A Thunderbolt 4 / USB4 hub from @plugable at a very attractive price point (considering the USBC-HDMI value add). A… https://t.co/DiJZS8MmF9
  • RyanSmithAT: @andreif7 If you're not already, use iTunes to do it. For whatever reason it goes a lot faster that way than having… https://t.co/Be9IMU4gja
  • ganeshts: @JamesDSneed @IanCutress Yes, NAND has the ability to store dynamic sector remap information - this is not only for… https://t.co/J0NYC9oCZk
  • ganeshts: @AG_ Micron has a history of doing these silent changes. The P2's silent move from TLC to QLC resulted in worse… https://t.co/UfmTilvFi1
  • ganeshts: @ricswi Looks like that requirement is Home-only. Other editions will still allow local accounts. I can't remember… https://t.co/qOvPnduAuY
  • ganeshts: @Laughing_Man @hnpn Benson, is there an update planned for the Twinkie PD to support EPR? I still use the USBC-T… https://t.co/D6g5nmQvB5
Follow @ANANDTECH
Sours: https://www.anandtech.com/show//closing-the-loop-contained-liquidcoolers-from-corsair-and-nzxt-compared


14479 14480 14481 14482 14483