Madison county il genealogy

Madison county il genealogy DEFAULT

Madison County Logo Madison County ILLINOIS

CountyClerkPhotoHeader

The Madison County Clerk's office provides copies of vital records for the purpose of genealogical research.  In 1916, it became law in the state of Illinois for counties to keep vital records.  We began keeping vital records well before it became law.

  • Births were recorded beginning in the late 1800’s
  • Marriage records date back 1813
  • Death were recorded beginning in 1878

Under Illinois law, genealogical records are defined as:

  • Birth certificates older than 75 years.
  • Marriage certificates older than 50 years.
  • Death certificates older than 20 years.

All genealogical records issued by the Clerk's office are NOT considered certified documents and stamped "For Genealogical Purposes Only."

DocumentCost
Birth$12; and $8 for each additional copy
Marriage$12; and $8 for each additional copy
Death$12; and $8 for each additional copy

Other sources you can contact directly may be helpful in your search and locating records:

To obtain a genealogical record, you must:

Mail your request to:

Debbie Ming-Mendoza
Madison County Clerk
157 N. Main Street, Suite 109
P.O. Box 218
Edwardsville, IL. 62025-0218

Include the following items:

  • A completed vital records form
  • a check or money order payable to the Madison County Clerk

Download the vital records form you will need in PDF format.

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Visit us in person

Madison County Clerk
157 N. Main Street, Suite 109
P.O. Box 218
Edwardsville, IL. 62025-0218

Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday

Sours: https://www.co.madison.il.us/genealogy_research.php

Madison County, Illinois Genealogy

Guide to Madison County, Illinois ancestry, family history, and genealogy birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

Illinois Online Genealogy Records

County Organization[edit | edit source]

Known Beginning Dates for Major County Records[1]
MarriageCourtLandProbateCensus
1860 1813 1878 1803 1802 1813 1810
*Statewide registration for births and deaths started 1916. General compliance by 1922.

County records are most often kept at the County Courthouse or another local repository. For further information about where the records for Madison County are kept, see the Madison County Courthouse page.

Historical Facts[edit | edit source]

Madison County is named for James Madison, the fourth president of the United States.

Parent County[edit | edit source]

  • 1812--Madison County was created 14 September 1812 from St. Clair County.  County seat: Edwardsville [2]

Description[edit | edit source]

The county was named for President James Madison. The county seat is Edwardsville and the county was organized on September 14, 1812.[3] The County is located in the West central part of the state.[4]

Boundary Changes[edit | edit source]

For animated maps illustrating Illinois county boundary changes, "Rotating Formation Illinois County Boundary Maps" (1790-1869) may be viewed for free at the MapofUS.org website.

Record Loss[edit | edit source]

There is no known history of courthouse disasters in this county.

Places / Localities[edit | edit source]

For a complete list of populated places, including small neighborhoods and suburbs, visit HomeTown Locator. The following are the most historically and genealogically relevant populated places in this county:[5]

Records and Resources[edit | edit source]

Biography[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

The Cemeteries of Madison County, Illinois are documented in sixteen volumes of cemetery and tombstone inscription books prepared by the Madison County Genealogical Society. All sixteen volumes are available on-line at the Illinois Digital Archive. The volumes are organized by township, and are fully text searchable.

Census[edit | edit source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1820 13,550
1830 6,221 −54.1%
1840 14,433 132.0%
1850 20,441 41.6%
1860 31,251 52.9%
1870 44,131 41.2%
1880 50,126 13.6%
1890 51,535 2.8%
1900 64,694 25.5%
1910 89,847 38.9%
1920 106,895 19.0%
1930 143,830 34.6%
1940 149,349 3.8%
1950 182,307 22.1%
1960 224,689 23.2%
1970 250,934 11.7%
1980 247,691 −1.3%
1990 249,238 0.6%
2000 258,941 3.9%
2010 269,282 4.0%
Source: "Wikipedia.org".

For tips on accessing census records online, see Illinois Census.

Elsie Wasser's transcriptions of the Illinois State Census for 1845, 1855, and 1865 for Madison County are available on the Illinois Digital Archive site as part of the Madison County Genealogical Resources collection.

1840 Pensioners[edit | edit source]

  • A Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services: With their Names, Ages, and Places of Residence, as Returned by the Marshalls of the Several Judicial Districts, Under the Act for Taking the Sixth Census. Washington, D.C., 1841. FHL 973 X2pc 1840; FHL 2321; digital version at Google Books. [See Illinois, Madison County on page 187.]

Church Records[edit | edit source]

Copies of Original records

List of Churches and Church Parishes

City Directories[edit | edit source]

Court Records[edit | edit source]

Original court records are held in the office of the Circuit Court Clerk. See Illinois Court Records for more information about using court records.

The following abstracts and copies of original records may be accessed through the Family History Library or the Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD) located at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) - search for Madison County records. For information on how to use IRAD see the SIU IRAD Wiki page.

  • 1813-1818 Illinois, Madison County court records, 1813-1818, and indenture records, 1805-1826 : register of slaves, indentured servants & free persons of colour, with individual indexes FHL Book 977.386 P2s, World Cat
  • 1818-1821 Court Records of Madison County, Illinois, 1818-1821 FHL Book 977.386 P2j, World Cat
  • 1825-1911 Madison County, Illinois circuit court in chancery records, 1825-1911 FHL Film 2194343 First of 10 films.

Ethnic Research[edit | edit source]

African American[edit | edit source]

The following have information concerning African American research.

Genealogy[edit | edit source]

History[edit | edit source]

Land and Property[edit | edit source]

Original land records are held in the office of the County Clerk . See Illinois Land and Property for more information about using land records.

The following abstracts and copies of original records may be accessed through online sources, the Family History Library or the Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD) located at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) - search for Madison County records. For information on how to use IRAD see the SIU IRAD Wiki page.

Abstracts

  • A Gazetteer of Madison County, Containing Historical and Descriptive Sketches... (Google Books) published in 1866 by James T. Hair covers the geography and history of Madison County from the 1600's, and includes a directory of residents as of 1866. Also available on Ancestry($).

Copies of Original Records

Online Resources

Local Histories[edit | edit source]

  • The Madison County Genealogical Society publication A Complete Surname Index to the History of Madison County, Illinois is available on-line at the Illinois Digital Archive as part of the  Madison County Genealogical Resources collection.
  • A fully-digitized copy of the original book, The History of Madison County, Illinois with Biographical Sketches of many Prominent Men and Pioneers, published in 1882 by W.R. Brink and Company, Edwardsville, Illinois, is available for free at Internet Archive and for a fee at the subscription sites Ancestry($) and HeritageQuest Online($)[6]
  • Norton, William T. Centennial History of Madison County, Illinois, and Its People: 1812 to 1912. Chicago: Lewis Pub., 1912. Digital version at Ancestry($).

Maps[edit | edit source]

IL MADISON.PNG

Click a neighboring county
for more resources

Military[edit | edit source]

Civil War[edit | edit source]

Civil War service men from Madison County served in various regiments. Men often joined a company (within a regiment) that originated in their county. Listed below are companies or regiments that were formed from men of Madison County.

- 1st Regiment, Illinois Cavalry
- 2nd Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Company D.
- 9th Regiment, Illinois Infantry (3 months, 1861), Companies, G, I, and K.
- 9th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Companies A and I.
- 10th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Companies E and F.
- 10th Regiment, Illinois Infantry (3 months, 1861), Company K.
- 10th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Companies D and K.
- 22nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Company B.
- 26th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Company F.
- 27th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Companies D and F.
- 59th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Company D.
- 97th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Companies G and I.
- 117th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Companies D, F, and G.
- 133rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry (100 days, 1864), Company D.
- 140th Regiment, Illinois Infantry (100 days, 1864), Company K.
- 143rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry (100 days, 1864), Companies F and K.
- 144th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, G, I, and K.
- 149th Regiment, Illinois Infantry (1 year, 1865), Company I.
- 150th Regiment, Illinois Infantry (1 year, 1865), Companies G and H.
- 15th Regiment, Missouri Infantry (Union), Company I
:- 68th Regiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia (Union), Company A
:- 68th Regiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia (Union), Company H
:- 68th Regiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia (Union), Company I
:- 9th Regiment, Missouri Infantry (Union), Company D
:- 1st Regiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia Cavalry (Union), Company L
:- 1st Regiment, Enrolled Missouri Militia Cavalry (Union), Company M

Naturalization[edit | edit source]

  • Madison County Naturalization Records[[1]

Online Records

Newspapers and Obituaries[edit | edit source]

Probate Records[edit | edit source]

Online Probate Indexes and Records


Original estates and wills are held in the office of the Circuit Court Clerk. See Illinois Probate Records for more information about using probate records.

The following abstracts and copies of original records may be accessed through, the Family History Library or the Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD) located at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) - search for Madison County records. For information on how to use IRAD see the SIU IRAD Wiki page.

Abstracts

Copies of Original Records

Online Resources

Repositories[edit | edit source]

County Courthouse[edit | edit source]

County records are most often kept at the County Courthouse or another local repository. For further information about where the records for Madison County are kept, see the Madison County Courthouse page.

Family History Centers[edit | edit source]

Family History Center and Affiliate Library Locator map - search for local Family History Centers or Affiliate Libraries

  • Family History Centers provide one-on-one assistance, free access to center-only databases, and to premium genealogical websites.
  • FamilySearch Affiliate Libraries have access to most center-only databases, but may not always have full services normally provided by a family history center.

Local Centers and Affiliate Libraries

Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD)[edit | edit source]

IRAD is a system of Illinois Regional Archives Depositories managed by the Illinois State Archives, housing the archival records of local Illinois counties, townships, municipalities and school districts. The seven Regional Depositories are housed on state university campuses scattered throughout Illinois. Southern Illinois University houses the records for Madison County.

Public Libraries[edit | edit source]

Social Groups Online[edit | edit source]

Societies[edit | edit source]

The Society maintains a genealogical library in the Edwardsville Public Library.

Taxation[edit | edit source]

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

See Illinois Vital Records for more information about Vital records in Illinois. See also How to order Illinois Vital Records or order electronically online.


Vital records consist of birth, death, marriage and divorce records. Original birth and death certificates recorded until the year 1916 are kept by the Madison County Clerk while those recorded after 1916 are kept by the Illinois Department of Public Health with a copy to the County Clerk. Original marriage records are usually kept by the County Clerk from the establishment of the county to the present. Original divorce records are generally in the office of the Circuit Court Clerk.

The following abstracts and copies of original records may be accessed through online databases, the Family History Library and the Illinois Regional Archives Depository (IRAD) located at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) - search for Madison County records. For information on how to use IRAD see the SIU IRAD Wiki page.

Births[edit | edit source]

There are a number of birth records on the ILGenWeb site.

Marriages[edit | edit source]

  • 1587-1959 - Illinois, United States Marriages at FindMyPast — index $
  • 1763-1900Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900
  • 1790-1860 Illinois Marriages, 1790-1860 at Ancestry–($);Index, INCOMPLETE
  • 1805-1985Illinois, Church Marriages, 1805-1985 at FamilySearch — index
  • 1810–1934Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934 at FamilySearch — index and images
  • 1833-1889Illinois, Civil Marriages, 1833-1889 at FamilySearch — index

Deaths[edit | edit source]

There are a number of death records on the ILGenWeb site.

Websites[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), Madison County, Illinois. Page 192-199 At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002; Alice Eichholz, ed. Ancestry’s Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, Third ed. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 194-197.
  2. The Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, UT: Everton Publishers, 2002), 196. (FHL Collection Ref Book 973 D27e 2002). WorldCat entry.
  3. ↑Genealogy Trails History Group, “Madison, Illinois Genealogy and History”, http://genealogytrails.com/ill/madison/ accessed 04/17/2017.
  4. ↑Wikipedia contributors, "Madison County," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_County,_Illinois 04/17/2017.
  5. ↑Wikipedia contributors, "Madison County, Illinois," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_County,_Illinois, accessed 22 March 2020.
  6. ↑Your local public library may offer free access from home to HeritageQuest Online. Go to your library's web page for more information.
Sours: https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Madison_County,_Illinois_Genealogy
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Welcome to this
Madison County, Illinois
Genealogy Trails Website

Our goal is to help you track your ancestors through time by transcribing genealogical and historical data and placing it online for the free use of all researchers

If you have a love for history, a desire to help others, and basic webpage-making skills, consider joining us! Get the details on our Volunteer Page.
[A desire to transcribe data and knowledge of how to make a basic webpage is required.]

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We regret that we are unable to do personal research for anyone.
All data we come across will be added to this site.
We thank you for visiting and hope you'll come back again to view the updates we make to this site
Happy Trails to you on your quest for your ancestors.

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Madison County
Founded September 14, 1812
It was formed from parts of Randolph and St. Clair counties
Named for President James Madison
The county seat is Edwardsville, and its largest city is Granite City.

In the late 19th century, Madison County became an industrial region, and in the 20th century was known first for Graniteware, and later for its steel mills, oil refineries, and other heavy industries.  Industrial restructuring cost many jobs and reduced the population. The county now is part of semi-rural, sparsely populated east of the St. Louis metropolitan area , as is neighboring St. Clair County.
In 2009, the EPA issued an air pollution report that ranked Madison County as the county with the second-highest cancer risk in the country due to air pollution, second only to Los Angeles County, California.

Cities, Towns, and Villages
Alhambra * Alton * Bethalto * Collinsville * East Alton * Edwardsville * Fairmont City * Glen Carbon * Godfrey * Granite City * Grantfork * Hamel * Hartford * Highland * Livingston * Madison * Marine * Maryville * New Douglas * Pontoon Beach * Rosewood Heights * Roxana * South Roxana * St. Jacob * Troy * Venice * Williamson * Wood River * Worden

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DATA

Sours: http://genealogytrails.com/ill/madison/

Madison County ILGenWeb

Welcome to Madison County ILGenWeb

Madison County ILGenWeb Coordinator - Beverly Bauser

 

BRIEF HISTORY OF MADISON COUNTY

Madison County in IllinoisNamed after James Madison, the fourth President of the United States and father of our Constitution, Madison County was established in the Illinois Territory on September 14, 1812 from Randolph and St. Clair Counties. At the time it was established, Madison included all of the modern state of Illinois north of St. Louis, as well as all of Wisconsin, part of Minnesota, and Michigan's Upper Peninsula. In 1814, the formation of Edwards County removed almost half of the eastern part, and the final boundary change came in 1843, when a small portion on the northeast corner of Madison County became part of Bond County.

On September 19, 1812, Illinois Territory Governor Ninian Edwards appointed Isam Gilham as the first Sheriff of Madison County, with William Rabb, John G. Lofton, and Samuel Judy as judges; and Josiah Randall as Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas. Josiah Randall was named Recorder, and Robert Elliott, Thomas G. Davidson, William Gilham, and George Cadwell were appointed Justices of the Peace.

Edwardsville, the county seat, was laid out in 1815 on the site designated by Governor Edwards in his proclamation organizing the county. It was named in his honor, and later became his residence.

***********

THE ST. JAMES HOTEL, EDWARDSVILLE
St. James Hotel, EdwardsvilleHugh Kirkpatrick was born in Randolph County, Illinois, in September 1832. He engaged as a clerk in St. Louis for two years, then lived in Sparta, working as a salesman. He later embarked in the mercantile business, then opened the Shannon House in Sparta. He moved to Edwardsville in 1861, and in October of that year opened the Union House, which he conducted with considerable success until 1874. For several years he had entertained the idea of building a large hotel in Edwardsville. He began work on the brick structure, and in 1874 the St. James Hotel was opened. The St. James was one of the finest hotels in the area. Kirkpatrick died in May 1895, leaving a widow and four children. His funeral was held at the St. James.

The St. James Hotel was located on the east side of North Main Street, just south of the Wildey Theater. Including grounds and furniture, it cost $20,000. It was a fine brick structure, three stories high, with a basement. It had the capacity of accommodating 75 guests, and had two sample-rooms, a commodious office, and a dining room. An 800-seat opera house – the Tuxhorn Theater - was connected to the St. James by a second-floor walkway.

The St. James was destroyed by fire in October 1932. The remains of the building were razed in April 1934. A parking lot now stands at the site.

   

 

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Sours: https://madison.illinoisgenweb.org/

Il madison genealogy county

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