Fishing wrecks in delaware bay

Fishing wrecks in delaware bay DEFAULT
DELAWARE BAY REEF map

With 18 artificial reef sites deployed and maintained by the State of New Jersey, the Division of Fish and Wildlife decided on taking a calculated chance by constructing a new reef, not offshore like the rest of the Garden State’s artificial reefs, but number 19, the Delaware Bay Reef.

Located inside the relative shallows of Delaware Bay, construction began in 2017 at a particular spot on the Jersey side of the Delaware Bay, roughly 6.6 miles from the Cape May Canal, 9.8 miles from Maurice River and 12.5 miles out of Fortescue Creek. Water depth in the area spans from a minimum depth of 19 feet down to a maximum of 35 feet and covers an area of 1.3 square miles.

Major components of the reef structure include low profile objects such as reef balls, bridge rubble and concrete culverts with a base consisting of rock dynamited from a dredge site near the Commodore Barry Bridge. Most structure on the Delaware Bay Reef will vary from the size of a basketball to the dimensions of a car as the waters are too shallow to jettison any shipwreck or larger type structure. The new rubble pile will no doubt attract life and there’s plenty to look forward to.

As mussels and clams begin to colonize the rocks, this could be a solid spot to find black drum in the springtime as they hang in the area to feed. Spring months could also bring a boom to striped bass fishing once again in the bay as the rock rubble may just have enough life growing on it after a few years to keep the linesiders stuck to the area as they migrate up the Delaware River to spawn out. Summer months will truly hold the glory here as fluke will enjoy the new digs to sit in wait as currents funnel baitfish by and through the low profile debris.

There’s always a chance the area will hold croakers and weakfish, but that’s hopeful wishing for now until we see results. Come fall into wintertime, no doubt blackfish will inhabit the area as they do in areas such as Brandywine Light inside the bay and don’t forget that those tog will also be pushing into the backwaters on their spring migration as well.

As the debris attracts finfish, any anglers looking to play catch and release with sand tiger sharks, blacktips and brown sharks can set up on slicks during hot summer nights.

Delaware Bay will benefit greatly from the new addition and the rewards should start to become realized this year as nearly two years of marine growth should have taken hold onto the pieces. Plug in the numbers and hit the new kid on the block!

CORNER COORDINATES

NW         39 03.309′ x 075 04.595′

NE           39 03.295′ x 075 03.506′

SE           39 02.288′ x 075 03.520′

SW          39 02.297′ x 075 04.606′

 

Sours: https://www.thefisherman.com/article/delaware-bay-reef/

Artificial Reef Program

Delaware has 14 permitted artificial reef sites in Delaware Bay and along the Atlantic Coast. Cleaned and stable construction materials, boats, and subway cars create new habitat. They support expanded recreational fishing and diving.

Delaware Reef Guide Latest Reef News

Development of the state’s reef system began in 1995. It is part of a comprehensive management effort that helps sustain important fisheries, recreational fishing, and Delaware’s tourism industry.

The reef system in detailed in a Delaware Reef Guide, which includes detailed information about each location in the Artificial Reef System.

Improving Habitat

Artificial reef construction is important in the mid-Atlantic region. Near-shore ocean bottom in this region is usually featureless sand or mud. There are none of the natural rocky outcrops common in New England or coral reefs of the southeastern Atlantic coast.

Durable, stable, non-toxic reef materials can develop a rich invertebrate community. That community provides food and protection for reef fish such as tautog, seabass, scup, spadefish and triggerfish. Gamefish, such as bluefish, striped bass, and weakfish come to hunt the baitfish that congregate around reef structures.

A Growing Collection of Reef Materials

Delaware’s artificial reef sites began with recycled concrete products and ballasted tire units. The collection grew to include decommissioned military vehicles and small vessels. Eventually, several tugboats and small retired ships were added.

The most well-known reef site – The Redbird Reef – got it’s name from the “Redbird” paint scheme of the subway cars added in 2001. The New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority donated more than 600 of the 51-foot long subway cars for the reef.

In 2018, a project to deepen the Delaware River navigational channel produced approximately a million tons of rock for the reefs. The US Army Corps of Engineers removed a layer of bedrock and cleared away glacial rock that washed downstream during the most recent ice age.

That rock, added to several reef sites, has proved to be one of the best reefing materials used by the program. Natural rock is a rare habitat type in the mid-Atlantic region. It supports a rich, diverse and novel invertebrate community, dominated by blue mussels.

In recent years, a series of larger ships have been added to the reefs. these have included the ex-destroyer USS Arthur W. Radford, the retired Coast Guard cutter the Zuni/Tamaroa, the MV Twin Capes, from the Cape May/Lewes Ferry fleet, former coastal freighter and military survey ship the Shearwater, and a retired Chesapeake Bay cruise ship.

Related Topics:  artificial reef, dfw, fish, fish and wildlife, fishing, habitat, outdoors, outdoors and recreation, recreation, reef


Sours: https://dnrec.alpha.delaware.gov/fish-wildlife/fishing/artificial-reefs/
  1. Lip gloss collection videos
  2. Bulk tote bags
  3. Candidates for duval county
  4. Tacoma urgent care kaiser

Delaware Artificial Reefs
GPS Coordinates for Fishing

Del-Jersey-Land - 1 Gregory Poole 175’ Minesweeper/Menhaden harvesting vessel sunk 12/2/2007 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 30' 55" N38° 30.91' N38.5151774° 30' 36" W74° 30.597' W-74.50995 Del-Jersey-Land - 10 USS Arthur W. Radford, a retired 563 foot NAVY destroyer ship, sunk August 10, 2011. Split into 3 pieces within a few hundred feet of each other.
Depth: 134 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 134 ft 38° 30' 51" N38° 30.85' N38.5141774° 30' 39" W74° 30.656' W-74.51093 Del-Jersey-Land - 2 Atlantic Mist 185’ Menhaden vessel sunk 1/16/10 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 4" N38° 31.063' N38.5177274° 30' 16" W74° 30.271' W-74.50452 Del-Jersey-Land - 3 44 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 36" N38° 31.6' N38.5266774° 30' 36" W74° 30.6' W-74.51 Del-Jersey-Land - 4 44 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 36" N38° 31.6' N38.5266774° 30' 24" W74° 30.4' W-74.50667 Del-Jersey-Land - 5 44 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 30" N38° 31.5' N38.52574° 30' 48" W74° 30.8' W-74.51333 Del-Jersey-Land - 6 44 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 36" N38° 31.6' N38.5266774° 30' 48" W74° 30.8' W-74.51333 Del-Jersey-Land - 7 44 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 41" N38° 31.68' N38.52874° 30' 23" W74° 30.384' W-74.5064 Del-Jersey-Land - 8 44 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 36" N38° 31.6' N38.5266774° 30' 12" W74° 30.2' W-74.50333 Del-Jersey-Land - 9 24 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 31' 30" N38° 31.5' N38.52574° 30' 30" W74° 30.5' W-74.50833 Site # 2 - 1 500 tons of concrete culvert deployed 3/28/96.
Depth: 22 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 22 ft 39° 11' 20" N39° 11.335' N39.1889275° 18' 23" W75° 18.379' W-75.30632 Site # 2 - 2 500 tons of concrete culvert deployed 9/15/98.
Depth: 26 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 26 ft 39° 11' 2" N39° 11.038' N39.1839775° 18' 2" W75° 18.033' W-75.30055 Site # 2 - 3 886 tons of concrete culvert deployed 6/20/00.
Depth: 28.5 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 28.5 ft 39° 10' 34" N39° 10.565' N39.1760875° 17' 46" W75° 17.774' W-75.29623 Site # 2 - 4 1,100 tons of concrete culvert deployed 5/11/02.
Depth: 28 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 28 ft 39° 11' 16" N39° 11.265' N39.1877575° 18' 6" W75° 18.097' W-75.30162 Site # 2 - 5 1,000 tons of concrete culvert deployed 12/23/02.
Depth: 28 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 28 ft 39° 11' 11" N39° 11.181' N39.1863575° 18' 9" W75° 18.146' W-75.30243 Site # 2 - 6 1,610 tons of concrete culvert deployed 11/07/03. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 11' 26" N39° 11.426' N39.1904375° 18' 11" W75° 18.177' W-75.30295 Site # 2 - 7 1,212 tons of complex concrete deployed 1/26/2012 [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 10' 55" N39° 10.915' N39.1819275° 17' 58" W75° 17.969' W-75.29948 Site #1 - 1 500 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge 3/28/96.
Depth: 30 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 30 ft 39° 15' 34" N39° 15.559' N39.2593275° 20' 41" W75° 20.689' W-75.34482 Site #1 - 2 500 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge 9/15/98.
Depth: 29 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 29 ft 39° 15' 23" N39° 15.377' N39.2562875° 20' 45" W75° 20.75' W-75.34583 Site #1 - 3 1,690 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge 1/09/03. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 15' 41" N39° 15.685' N39.2614275° 21' 2" W75° 21.032' W-75.35053 Site #1 - 4 782 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge 7/3/04. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 15' 41" N39° 15.685' N39.2614275° 21' 2" W75° 21.032' W-75.35053 Site #1 - 5 1,582 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge 7/10/04. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 15' 47" N39° 15.788' N39.2631375° 21' 11" W75° 21.177' W-75.35295 Site #1 - 6 40’ steel hull pilot boat [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 15' 31" N39° 15.519' N39.2586575° 20' 45" W75° 20.753' W-75.34588 Site #1 - 7 1,215 tons of complex concrete deployed from an anchored barge 7/27//11 [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 15' 37" N39° 15.615' N39.2602575° 21' 12" W75° 21.2' W-75.35333 Site #10 - 1 Previously existing wreck (barge?) [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 56" N38° 36.934' N38.6155774° 55' 49" W74° 55.821' W-74.93035 Site #10 - 10 “Mr. G” and “Rusty Pusher” (small tug and push boat) 3/4/09 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 39" N38° 36.649' N38.6108274° 56' 39" W74° 56.646' W-74.9441 Site #10 - 11 YC 725 a 110’ Navy barge sunk 03/10/10 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 36" N38° 36.608' N38.6101374° 56' 30" W74° 56.494' W-74.94157 Site #10 - 12 95’ barge. Sunk 03/10/10 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 36" N38° 36.608' N38.6101374° 56' 30" W74° 56.494' W-74.94157 Site #10 - 2 1000 tons of concrete culvert and stabilized tire units deployed from an anchored barge 8/5/96. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 53" N38° 36.89' N38.6148374° 56' 27" W74° 56.454' W-74.9409 Site #10 - 3 850 tons of concrete culvert and stabilized tire units deployed on 5/19/98.
Depth: 61 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 61 ft 38° 36' 22" N38° 36.365' N38.6060874° 56' 36" W74° 56.6' W-74.94333 Site #10 - 4 875 tons of ballasted tire units deployed from an anchored barge 8/19/99.
Depth: 64 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 64 ft 38° 36' 26" N38° 36.432' N38.607274° 55' 52" W74° 55.871' W-74.93118 Site #10 - 5 Yon 80 Navy barge sunk 6/18/02.
Depth: 62 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 62 ft 38° 36' 25" N38° 36.424' N38.6070774° 56' 30" W74° 56.498' W-74.94163 Site #10 - 6 1,190 tons of concrete deployed 11/20/02.
Depth: 60 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 60 ft 38° 36' 35" N38° 36.589' N38.6098274° 56' 28" W74° 56.469' W-74.94115 Site #10 - 7 5.6 nautical miles of marine cable deployed 5/11/03.
Depth: 62 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 62 ft 38° 36' 45" N38° 36.75' N38.612574° 55' 40" W74° 55.67' W-74.92783 Site #10 - 8 1,072 tons of concrete deployed 7/9/03. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 44" N38° 36.738' N38.612374° 55' 58" W74° 55.965' W-74.93275 Site #10 - 9 1,039 tons of concrete deployed 7/26/03. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 36' 51" N38° 36.857' N38.6142874° 56' 10" W74° 56.161' W-74.93602 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 1 26 military track vehicles deployed in 3 tightly grouped clusters 1/96. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 42" N38° 40.702' N38.6783774° 43' 32" W74° 43.531' W-74.72552 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 10 1,100 tons ballasted tires deployed from a moving barge 2/11/99 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 29" N38° 40.49' N38.6748374° 43' 27" W74° 43.45' W-74.72417 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 11 YC 1479 (160’ Navy barge) sunk 10/20/00 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 22" N38° 40.365' N38.6727574° 43' 49" W74° 43.818' W-74.7303 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 12 90’ Commercial tug “Margie Ann” sunk 6/19/01.
Depth: 90 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 90 ft 38° 40' 19" N38° 40.322' N38.6720374° 44' 8" W74° 44.132' W-74.73553 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 13 85’ shrimp trawler “Frieda Marie” sunk 01/16/10. [2]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 36" N38° 40.606' N38.6767774° 43' 57" W74° 43.957' W-74.73262 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 14 74’ push boat, “Sandy Point” sunk 03/10/10. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 40" N38° 40.667' N38.6777874° 43' 58" W74° 43.97' W-74.73283 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 15 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 41" N38° 40.688' N38.6781374° 43' 35" W74° 43.576' W-74.72627 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 16 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 34" N38° 40.567' N38.6761274° 43' 48" W74° 43.805' W-74.73008 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 17 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 32" N38° 40.534' N38.6755774° 44' 16" W74° 44.272' W-74.73787 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 18 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 12" N38° 40.2' N38.6774° 44' 24" W74° 44.401' W-74.74002 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 19 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 13" N38° 40.218' N38.670374° 43' 52" W74° 43.862' W-74.73103 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 2 26 military track vehicles deployed in 3 tightly grouped clusters 1/96. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 42" N38° 40.703' N38.6783874° 43' 31" W74° 43.518' W-74.7253 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 20 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 16" N38° 40.263' N38.6710574° 43' 28" W74° 43.468' W-74.72447 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 21 Subway cars [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 22" N38° 40.372' N38.6728774° 44' 23" W74° 44.389' W-74.73982 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 22 Margaret 85’ tug sunk 6/28/07
Depth: 88 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 88 ft 38° 40' 22" N38° 40.361' N38.6726874° 43' 40" W74° 43.672' W-74.72787 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 23 William C. Snow 55’ tug sunk 6/2/08
Depth: 84 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 84 ft 38° 40' 6" N38° 40.105' N38.6684274° 44' 36" W74° 44.6' W-74.74333 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 24 Fels Points 110’ tug sunk 6/2/08
Depth: 77 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 77 ft 38° 40' 13" N38° 40.212' N38.670274° 43' 12" W74° 43.196' W-74.71993 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 25 Cittie Point 95’ tug sunk 6/2/08
Depth: 81 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 81 ft 38° 40' 37" N38° 40.624' N38.6770774° 43' 10" W74° 43.173' W-74.71955 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 26 Bay Tide 110’ tug sunk 1/30/09 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 32" N38° 40.54' N38.6756774° 43' 57" W74° 43.957' W-74.73262 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 27 Crazy Horse 77’ trawler sunk 1/30/09 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 29" N38° 40.49' N38.6748374° 43' 57" W74° 43.957' W-74.73262 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 3 26 military track vehicles deployed in 3 tightly grouped clusters 1/96. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 43" N38° 40.718' N38.6786374° 43' 33" W74° 43.55' W-74.72583 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 4 7 military vehicles deployed in clusters [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 39" N38° 40.648' N38.6774774° 43' 32" W74° 43.535' W-74.72558 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 5 13 military vehicles deployed in clusters [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 34" N38° 40.561' N38.6760274° 43' 29" W74° 43.487' W-74.72478 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 6 9 military vehicles deployed in clusters [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 37" N38° 40.618' N38.6769774° 43' 26" W74° 43.43' W-74.72383 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 7 11 military vehicles deployed in clusters [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 37" N38° 40.624' N38.6770774° 43' 26" W74° 43.43' W-74.72383 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 8 850 tons of ballasted off road tire units deployed 7/24/98
Depth: 90 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 90 ft 38° 40' 23" N38° 40.389' N38.6731574° 43' 26" W74° 43.433' W-74.72388 Site #11 - Redbird Reef - 9 90’ commercial tug “Delilah” sunk 1/15/99, [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 40' 26" N38° 40.433' N38.6738874° 43' 23" W74° 43.386' W-74.7231 Site #3 - 1 1,000 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge 5/14/97.
Depth: 32 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 32 ft 39° 1' 3" N39° 1.054' N39.0175775° 16' 53" W75° 16.882' W-75.28137 Site #3 - 2 807 tons of concrete culvert deployed 6/1/00.
Depth: 30 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 30 ft 39° 0' 53" N39° 0.881' N39.0146875° 16' 45" W75° 16.749' W-75.27915 Site #3 - 3 961 tons of concrete culvert deployed 7/7/00.
Depth: 34 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 34 ft 39° 0' 56" N39° 0.928' N39.0154775° 16' 55" W75° 16.914' W-75.2819 Site #3 - 4 1,300 tons of concrete deployed 7/15 / 01. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 1' 53" N39° 1.888' N39.0314775° 17' 56" W75° 17.936' W-75.29893 Site #3 - 5 1,000 tons of concrete deployed 6/10/02.
Depth: 28 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 28 ft 39° 1' 27" N39° 1.449' N39.0241575° 17' 24" W75° 17.395' W-75.28992 Site #3 - 6 1,092 tons of concrete deployed 4/14/03.
Depth: 26 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 26 ft 39° 1' 44" N39° 1.73' N39.0288375° 17' 38" W75° 17.64' W-75.294 Site #3 - 7 1,590 tons of concrete deployed 3/11/04.
Depth: 26 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 26 ft 39° 1' 20" N39° 1.339' N39.0223275° 17' 15" W75° 17.242' W-75.28737 Site #3 - 8 1,808 tons of complex concrete deployment 3/23/12 [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 1' 45" N39° 1.743' N39.0290575° 17' 43" W75° 17.716' W-75.29527 Site #4 - 1 900 tons of concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge on 2/12/97.
Depth: 38 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 38 ft 39° 3' 43" N39° 3.712' N39.0618775° 16' 3" W75° 16.051' W-75.26752 Site #4 - 2 1,000 tons of concrete deployed on 10/2/97.
Depth: 35 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 35 ft 39° 3' 34" N39° 3.56' N39.0593375° 16' 4" W75° 16.07' W-75.26783 Site #4 - 3 1,100 tons of concrete deployed on 3/21/99.
Depth: 37 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 37 ft 39° 3' 21" N39° 3.358' N39.0559775° 15' 59" W75° 15.99' W-75.2665 Site #4 - 4 850 tons of concrete deployed on 4/8/99.
Depth: 42 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 42 ft 39° 2' 37" N39° 2.621' N39.0436875° 15' 42" W75° 15.695' W-75.26158 Site #4 - 5 1,192 tons of concrete deployed 3/28/03.
Depth: 38 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 38 ft 39° 3' 4" N39° 3.065' N39.0510875° 15' 43" W75° 15.724' W-75.26207 Site #4 - 6 1,511 tons of concrete deployed 7/7/04. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 2' 51" N39° 2.853' N39.0475575° 15' 48" W75° 15.805' W-75.26342 Site #4 - 7 1,407 tons of concrete deployed 11/02/05.
Depth: 34 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 34 ft 39° 3' 21" N39° 3.342' N39.055775° 15' 45" W75° 15.743' W-75.26238 Site #4 - 8 1,757 tons of complex concrete material deployed 10/2/11. [1]
Tides & Solunars39° 2' 45" N39° 2.746' N39.0457775° 15' 35" W75° 15.587' W-75.25978 Site #5 - 1 1,000 tons of concrete culvert deployed on 8/17/97.
Depth: 25 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 25 ft 38° 54' 6" N38° 54.095' N38.9015875° 11' 40" W75° 11.67' W-75.1945 Site #5 - 2 997 tons of concrete culvert deployed on 7/12/00.
Depth: 26 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 26 ft 38° 54' 29" N38° 54.476' N38.9079375° 12' 13" W75° 12.224' W-75.20373 Site #5 - 3 1,100 tons of concrete deployed on 6/11/01. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 13" N38° 54.218' N38.9036375° 11' 57" W75° 11.952' W-75.1992 Site #5 - 4 1,300 tons of concrete deployed on 8/10/01. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 6" N38° 54.092' N38.9015375° 11' 44" W75° 11.732' W-75.19553 Site #5 - 5 1,098 tons of concrete deployed on 7/29/02. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 51" N38° 54.85' N38.9141775° 12' 43" W75° 12.715' W-75.21192 Site #5 - 6 1,087 tons of concrete deployed on 12/29/02. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 38" N38° 54.638' N38.9106375° 12' 34" W75° 12.567' W-75.20945 Site #5 - 7 1,085 tons of concrete deployed on 4/25/03. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 18" N38° 54.303' N38.9050575° 11' 41" W75° 11.684' W-75.19473 Site #5 - 8 1,588 tons of concrete deployed on 8/24/04. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 59" N38° 54.983' N38.9163875° 12' 39" W75° 12.657' W-75.21095 Site #5 - 9 1,100 tons of concrete deployed 3/30/06. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 54' 18" N38° 54.306' N38.905175° 11' 43" W75° 11.71' W-75.19517 Site #6 - 1 500 tons concrete culvert deployed from an anchored barge - 6/21/96. [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 57' 47" N38° 57.776' N38.9629375° 9' 21" W75° 9.349' W-75.15582 Site #6 - 10 1,586 tons of complex concrete deployment on 10/11/11 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 57' 53" N38° 57.89' N38.9648375° 9' 38" W75° 9.639' W-75.16065 Site #6 - 11 1,896 tons of concrete deployed on 12/17/14 [1]
Tides & Solunars38° 57' 56" N38° 57.927' N38.9654575° 9' 37" W75° 9.614' W-75.16023 Site #6 - 2 900 tons of concrete deployed from an anchored barge 9/25/99.
Depth: 39 ft [1]
Tides & Solunars 39 ft 38° 57' 49" N38° 57.814' N38.9635775° 9' 35" W75° 9.577' W-75.15962
Sours: https://www.tidespro.com/fishing/us/delaware/delaware-artificial-reefs

Fishing the Wrecks and Reefs out of Indian River, DE

Run out of Indian River, Delaware to fish any of the wrecks and reefs in 40, 60, or even 120 feet of water, and you’ll soon discover that this type of fishing can seem like work. You need to use lots of lead or very heavy jigging spoons, constantly work to properly position your boat over and around the structure, and fight both currents and wind. But this is the kind of work that any angler loves—especially when fat hump-back sea bass and doormat flounder start coming in over the rails. You say this is just the sort of job you’re up for? Then head for the wrecks and reefs off the Delaware coast.

sea bass fishing

DE Wreck Fishing Hotspots

  1. 38’40.398 x 75’00.272 – This reef site is about as close to the inlet as you can realistically hope to score on bass. It lies in water ranging from 50’ to 60’ deep, and most of the chunks of wreckage are relatively small, so plan on drifting or pin-point anchoring. But remember, spots this close to the inlet get pounded pretty hard. Longer runs will almost always prove far more productive.
  2. 38’36.522 x 74’56.410 – This is Delaware Artificial Reef Site 10, which has all kinds of reef materials ranging from concrete rubble to tire units plus several wrecks. Laying in 60’ to 70’ of water, this site is just six to seven miles from the beach, so it sees a fair amount of pressure during the summer months. Most of the time the bass found here are on the small side but flounder fishing has been pretty good in recent history.
  3. 38’40.290 x 74’44.188 – 18 miles from the inlet, Site 11 may be a fairly long run for bottom fishermen but it will get you outside of the most heavily-pressured areas. There’s scattered wreckage here, laying in water 75’ to 85’ deep, including several 90 foot long wrecks and clusters of military vehicles. For several seasons now, this area has produced excellent flounder fishing—and we do mean excellent. This is one of the prime flattie spots within shooting-distance of Indian River..
  4. 38’30.390 x 74’31.490 – This is one substantial piece of wreckage of several in the area; also look at 30’30.933 x 74’30.544 and 38’30.900 x 74’30.599. These are a combination of wrecks and a single 563’ destroyer, the USS Arthur W. Radford, which broke apart into several pieces. Chunks of some of these wrecks rise significantly off the bottom and they often hold big sea bass—lots of big sea bass. It’s a long run (about 28 miles from the inlet) and quite snaggy, but well worth the effort if you want to target those hump-back sea bass. If you’re feeling adventurous and the timing is right—stay in tune with our weekly fishing reports—when bluefin tuna are around, they also can sometimes be caught around these wrecks. Try dropping a speed jig down to the wreckage and zipping it back up through the water column as quickly as possible, when the other anglers onboard target those bass.

Basic Wreck and Reef Fishing Tactics

Traditional sea bass anglers will drop oversized top-and-bottom rigs with 4/0 to 6/0 hooks, baited with squid strips, cut bait, or clam chunks, and weighted down with five to eight ounces of lead. The tried-and-true does work, of course. But sporty anglers who are willing to try new tactics may want to also try jigging with heavy metal. If you try this be sure to use a jig with the hook at the top, only, or you’ll lose a lot of tackle to snags. Use a long sweeping up-and-down motion, with a short pause-and-jiggle now and again, and expect the hits to come most often as the jig sinks or is jiggled. Adding a strip of squid to the hook helps, too. When targeting the bass you want to be dropping your offerings as close to or literally on top of the wreckage, so naturally, you have to expect that however you choose to go after these fish there will be some amount of gear lost to snags—bring plenty of extras.

TIP: Attach your weight to the bottom of your rig with a short length of light line. That way if the weight becomes lodged in the wreckage you can snap it off with a sharp jerk, and get the rest of your rig back.

flounder fishing delaware

Those targeting flounder in specific will want to pick up some two-hook Fluke Killer rigs. Get an assortment of colors and experiment, but expect chartreuse, white, yellow, and pink to be top producers most days of the week. These are traditionally baited with a minnow and a strip of squid, but using a five or six inch Berkley GULP! Swimming Mullet has over-shadowed “regular” bait the past few years. Whichever you opt for, try to establish a drift pattern that takes you in-between a number of wreck/reef/structure items, instead of directly over one big one. You’ll lose a lot less gear and catch a lot more fish.

TIP: Hit the MOB button when you hook a flounder and repeat future drifts over the spot. These fish school quite regularly around the reef sites, and where you catch one you’re likely to catch more.

Sours: https://fishtalkmag.com/blog/fishing-wrecks-and-reefs-out-indian-river-de

Bay delaware wrecks fishing in

And one more thing - get the night vase. And you, Mademoiselle, lie still and think about the pleasant. The doctor put the bowl on the floor, away from his. Feet, and began to search again in his bag.

Delaware Bay Weakfish

I don't want to see anyone. I close this scene. Well, what are you doing.

Now discussing:

And it is: slightly open legs, stockings and panties - you can hardly forget, you are just teasing me. Well, you will pay for this, you naughty girl. One more glance in your direction - and your legs are already chastely closed. There are no hints of what I just saw, but the exciting picture still stands clearly in front of my eyes.

The evening is over, we are driving home and you are sitting in the front seat next to me, sparkling with my lovely knees.



2452 2453 2454 2455 2456