Garmin fenix 3 issues

Garmin fenix 3 issues DEFAULT

Garmin Fenix 3 Troubleshooting

The battery is losing its charge more quickly than usual.

Sometimes software such as Bluetooth will cause excessive drain on the battery. Disable Bluetooth or other outstanding software and monitor the battery drainage.

Power issues can sometimes be solved by performing a soft reset, which will not result in lost information. Press and hold the LIGHT button until the watch turns off. Press the button again to turn it back on. Charge the battery to 100%. Use as normal and monitor the battery drainage.

If any of the previous fixes fail to solve the issue, you may need to replace the battery. See our guide on how to replace the battery here.

The buttons stick when pressed, or do not register input.

The buttons can become sticky or unresponsive when exposed to salt water. If this symptom has appeared recently, quickly soak the watch in warm, fresh water for 30 minutes. Check the buttons for responsiveness.

Sometimes the electronics can become faulty if the watch is left on for too long. If the buttons are still responsive, hold the LIGHT button until it shuts off, then press it again to turn it back on. If the buttons are unresponsive, wait for the battery to drain, and then recharge it. Turn the watch back on and check the buttons for responsiveness.

Garmin Fenix 3 watches can experience wear in all components, including the electronics. If resetting the watch does not solve the issue, the motherboard may require replacement. See our guide on replacing this part here.

Screen is frozen, blank, or responding improperly.

Software or display issues can sometimes be solved by performing a reset. Press and hold the LIGHT button until the watch turns off. Press the button again to turn it back on. Ensure the screen is displaying properly.

If possible, backup your data. A hard (factory) reset will wipe your personal data from the watch. First, turn off the watch. Then press and hold the BACK/LAP button. Power the watch back on while still holding BACK/LAP. Release the button when a screen appears with the message “Clear user data?” Select “Yes.” The watch should power back up and bring you to a setup wizard screen. Repeat these steps if the setup wizard does not appear. After setup is complete, ensure the screen is displaying properly.

Garmin Fenix 3 watches can experience wear in all components, including the electronics. If resetting the watch does not solve the issue, the motherboard may require replacement. See our guide on replacing this part here.

The information is responsive, but distorted or faulty on the screen.

Sometimes the watch face can get scratched during intense activity. If the scratches are small, they can be concealed without needing to replace the lens. Acquire a screen protector for your watch. Then apply Vaseline to the scratches carefully using a toothpick - do not apply enough for it to smear, as it will warp the image. Once the scratches are filled, place the screen protector over top. The scratches should no longer be noticeable.

If the watch face is cracked beyond easy concealment, you may need to replace the watch face yourself. See our guide for replacing this part here.

If none of these steps have worked, the device may have a hardware issue that can only be fixed by Garmin itself (such as the display containing dead pixels). Please refer to the Garmin website to learn about their Return/Replacement process for the device.

The wrist strap coming loose, or coming unsecured.

Garmin Fenix 3 wrist straps can break after a period between one to two years. This depends on the kind and frequency of use, and is not uncommon. The wrist strap may be torn or stretching. To replace the wrist strap, see our guide here.

"GPS locates slowly, inaccurately, or not at all."

Software or display issues can sometimes be solved by performing a reset. Press and hold the LIGHT button until the watch turns off. Press the button again to turn it back on. Ensure the GPS is locating properly.

If possible, backup your data. A hard (factory) reset will wipe your personal data from the watch. First, turn off the watch. Then press and hold the BACK/LAP button. Power the watch back on while still holding BACK/LAP. Release the button when a screen appears with the message “Clear user data?” Select “Yes.” The watch should power back up and bring you to a setup wizard screen. Repeat these steps if the setup wizard does not appear. After setup is complete, ensure the GPS is locating properly.

Garmin Fenix 3 watches can experience wear in all components, including the electronics. If resetting the watch does not solve the issue, the motherboard or GPS antenna may require replacement. Replace them one at a time, and check if this solves the problem. See our guide on replacing the motherboard here. If this doesn't work, see our guide on replacing the GPS antenna here.

Sours: https://www.ifixit.com/Wiki/Garmin_Fenix_3_Troubleshooting

Garmin Fenix 3 Review

The Garmin Fenix 3 was at the high end of Garmin's GPS watch line until it was replaced by the Garmin Fenix 5X. The Fenix 3 fits in a little above Garmin 920XT, but a little below the Garmin Epix, though reality is not quite that simple (see the table further down for clearer understanding of their positioning.) The biggest advantage the Fenix 3 has over the 920XT and the Epix, as well as most other running watches is that it's an attractive watch. It looks like as a large chronometer style watch and is made of high quality materials. It makes most other running watches look cheap, and all of them rather dorky. Like many recent Garmin watches, the Fenix 3 includes Connect IQ that allows it run applications, much like a smartphone, which I love. There are a number of apps with real value, and I hope other manufacturers follow suit. Its styling, real buttons, and rich functionality make it a nice running watch, but it's let down by poor GPS Accuracy and its bulk. I've received more emails from runners complaining about the GPS accuracy of the Fenix 3 than any other watch. I suspect these complaints are disproportionately common because the buyers of this watch have higher expectations, maybe because of the high-quality materials. The price of the Fenix 3 has gone down with the release of the Garmin Fenix 5X, which makes Fenix 3 a more affordable option. The Fenix 3 has the combination of good functionality, Connect IQ support, great Stryd support for accurate distance/pace, and for ultrarunners it supports Charge On The Run nicely.

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This review was made possible by readers like you buying products via my links. I buy all the products I review through normal retail channels, which allows me to create unbiased reviews free from the influence of reciprocity, or the need to keep vendors happy. It also ensures I don't get "reviewer specials" that are better than the retail versions.

Different runners look for many different things in a running watch, but I believe that the four questions below represent the core functionality that most runners are looking for.

  • How far did I run? This is the most basic question, and sadly, the Fenix 3 does badly here. The Fenix 3 is not as bad as its predecessor, and it's comparable with the Epix/920XT, but it's a long, long way behind the Polar V800 or the Suunto Ambit3. However, with the advent of the Stryd Footpod, GPS Accuracy is much less of an issue. The Stryd Footpod is so accurate that no calibration is needed, and it's far more accurate than any GPS watch. And thankfully, the Fenix 3 has excellent Stryd support.
  • How fast am I running? Knowing how fast you're running can be a nice to know, or it can be vital for your training or race performance. Because of the nature of GPS, watches that rely on GPS signal alone tend to have serious problems with current pace. Again, we can be thankful that the Fenix 3 has excellent Stryd support.
  • Where am I? The Fenix 3 has some basic navigation functions. It's not as good as the Garmin Fenix 5X, Garmin Epix or the Leikr with their full color maps, but it's at least as good as any other watch.
    • Track Outline. There is a display of where you've run, rather like a breadcrumb trail. There are no maps, so this is just the outline on its own without any context. However, you can use it to backtrack along your path.
    • Course Outline. This is an outline of a route that can be downloaded. I've found this useful during ultras or in unfamiliar cities where I've needed to know where to go.
    • Back To Start. This is a simple arrow point to your starting point, so it won't help you backtrack.
    • Back To Waypoint. You can mark a location and use the arrow to point to it later. Again, this is a simple "as the crow flies" pointer.
    • GPS "Compass". There's no magnetic compass so you have to be moving for the GPS to give you a sense of direction.
  • What's my cadence? Cadenceis one of the most critical and often overlooked aspects of running. If you get your Cadence right, many other things naturally fall into place. Not only does the Fenix 3 get Cadence from a Footpod, it will also get it from the Garmin Run Heart Rate monitor. There is also support for Cadence from the internal accelerometer, though I find that's not as accurate. The Cadence alerts are especially useful for keeping you on track.

The Fenix 3 is available in a nice array of options. You can have it with sapphire glass, which is far tougher and might be worthwhile if you expect to abuse your watch in a way that's likely to scratch it. You can also get it with various colored straps and faces; I went for the silver bezel with the red strap, which I rather like, though the Rose Gold bezel and White Band is attractive to my eyes.

  • The Fenix 3 is styled as a large "chronometer" watch and I think it's the nicest looking running watch. The materials are high quality and on par with the Polar V800, but with more traditional watch styling. You can get the Fenix 3 in various materials, and while the leather strap isn't very practical for running, it looks great. Of course, like other chronometer style watches, it's large and heavy, so it feels awkward on my tiny wrists. At least the Fenix 3 is not partly integrated into the band, so it wraps around my wrist far better than the Polar V800 which I have to wear over a sweatband.
  • The color display is the largest of the current running watches with the exception of the huge Leikr that's nearly twice as big. The display quality is similar to the Garmin Epix or the Garmin 920XT, though I think the backlight is a little brighter. The Fenix 3 will activate the backlight when you turn your wrist, and the display looks much better with the backlight even in daylight. This will burn through the battery faster, but for most people it's probably a reasonable compromise. The color display has much richer colors than some of Garmin's earlier watches which always seem rather washed out.
  • The outstanding street is support is a key benefit to the Fenix 3. (See below for details.)
  • The Fenix supports Garmin's Connect IQ, which allows for the creation of apps in much the same way you can run apps on Android or iOS. I've found these apps to really enhance my use of Garmin watches, and knowing I can code up extensions is wonderful.
  • Like the Garmin 620, Garmin Fenix 2, and the Garmin 920XT, the Fenix 3 supports Running Dynamics which can show and record Cadence, Vertical Oscillation (VO) and Ground Contact Time (GCT) when paired with the Garmin HRM-Run chest strap.
  • The Fenix 3 can be configured to alert you when a metric is out of range. The alert for Cadence is particularly useful. The Cadence alert will work when it's using the internal accelerometer for Cadence, as well as the HRM-Run strap or a Footpod.
  • There is a metronome to help you keep your Cadence where it should be, which is a really nice feature. The metronome can be set to make a sound and/or vibrate. The vibration option is nice so you don't annoy people you're running with. You can set the alert to go off every second, fourth, or sixth beat.
  • Like many recent Garmin running watches, the Fenix 3 can display the Firstbeat Training Effect, an indicator of how hard a training session is. While I find this useful, it's important to remember that the Training Effect is strongly biased towards intensity rather than duration. (Training Effect requires a heart rate monitor.)
  • There is also support for the Firstbeat Estimate of Recovery Time before the next workout, which I also like, though you have to take this with a large pinch of salt.
  • The Fenix 3 will cache the GPS satellite locations for the next few days to reduce startup time. I found that the update of the cache was rather patchy, and often the Fenix 3 would take several minutes to acquire a lock. I was not able to work out a pattern or reason for this inconsistency.
  • There are five real buttons on the Fenix 3, which I prefer over a touchscreen. Of course, the combination of several real buttons and a touchscreen gives you the best of both worlds, which is what you get with the Garmin Epix.
  • The prediction of your V̇O2max worked well for me, but I would not rely on its accuracy.
  • The Fenix 3 will upload your workouts to Garmin Connect via USB, WiFi, or via a smart phone and Bluetooth. The smart phone can upload a workout as it takes place, which is nice for folks tracking you during a race, though it means wearing the watch and the phone together. If you plug the Fenix 3 into a computer it will function as a flash drive, giving you direct access to your workouts as '.FIT' files. The FIT files provide compatibility with a huge range of software.
  • The Fenix 3 will not display Heart Rate Variability but it is possible for it to record Heart Rate Variability for later analysis. To enable this recording, you need to download a special FIT file from the firstbeat.com web site. (There is a Connect IQ app that will calculate HRV, but you can't use it during a workout, something I hope will be corrected in the future.)
  • My testing showed the 20 hour battery life is actually 22 hours. That still puts it quite a bit longer than the Garmin Epix or Garmin 920XT which claim longer battery lives but they don't actually last as long. The 22 hours is good enough for shorter ultramarathons, or faster runners in 100 milers and the extended mode allows for 50 hours with degraded GPS accuracy.
  • There is a nice display that shows the route you've taken for navigation, but there is no support for displaying a map; you need the Garmin Epix for that.
  • You can use the Fenix 3 as an activity monitor, something that's common to many new sports watches. I find the Fenix 3 too big to want to sleep with it on, so I didn't use it for activity monitoring.
  • The Fenix 3 will record your personal best performances, such as fasted 5K or longest distance. These are a nice novelty, but for most people you won't be setting PR's on a regular enough basis for it to add much value.
  • While the Fenix 3 does not have much in the way of graphs out of the box, Connect IQ is being used to add graphs for things like heart rate.

The downsides are remarkably small if you combine the Fenix 3 with a Stryd Footpod.

  • You need to have the new HRM for the some of the features. The Fenix 3 will display Heart Rate and calculate Training Effect with the older Garmin HRM, but not Running Dynamics. There is a version of the Fenix 3 with an optical HRM, but it's the same technology as found in the Garmin 235 which I found to be rather useless.

The Fenix 3's 20-hour battery life is not enough for longer ultramarathons; most runners in a 100-mile race will need a little longer at least. One option is to reduce the GPS polling interval, which bumps the battery life up to 50-hours, but you could also consider charging the Fenix 3 during your run. The Fenix 3 has about a 350 mAh (milliamp-hour) battery based on my measurements (others put it at nearer 300 mAh), so it doesn't take much to recharge it. In fact, the problem is generally finding a battery pack that's small enough, as batteries tend to be heavy. My two preferred options are below, the Anker and the PulsePak.

The Anker and the PulsePak.
The inside of the PulsePak
A close up of the PulsePak battery.

The Anker is much bigger (3.75"/9.5cm) and heavier (2.9oz/82g), though it's shape makes it easy to carry in your hand and it will slip into the pockets of Race Ready shorts. It holds 3,350 mAh, which is way more than you need, recharging the Fenix 3 over ten times. It's reasonably priced at
. The PulsePak is far smaller (2"/5cm), lighter (0.5oz/15g), and cheaper at
. It only holds 500 mAh, but that's enough for a full charge, and it's small enough to carry a couple. The obvious approach is to use the charging dock and cable that came with the Fenix 3, holding a battery pack in your hand, which is shown below. I'm not a fan of this approach as the battery occupies your hand and the cable is rather long. You can tuck the battery in a pocket, but then the cable really annoys me. (Putting the watch and battery in a pack or pocket seems to defeat the object of having a watch if you can't see it.)

The Anker and the Garmin cable.

You can use an adapter to use the PulsePak with the Garmin charger which requires a full size USB plug, which makes the batter lighter, but still isn't ideal.

Charge On The Run - MicroAdapter.jpg

Inspired by David Jackson's blog], I decided a better approach is to use an aftermarket dock. The advantage of the aftermarket dock is that it has a microUSB socket rather than a cable, which is
. While the quality of the aftermarket dock is not quite as good as the Garmin original, it's surprisingly close. Because the dock sits under the watch, it naturally stays in place.

Original Garmin dock and an aftermarket alternative.

Here you can see the microUSB socket with the dock worn under the watch. The underside of the dock does not cause me any problems, such as skin irritation or pressure points.

Charge On The Run - Fenix3 (4).jpg

Here's the PulsePak plugged into the dock while being worn. I've not had a problem with the battery sticking out. You could use a micro-USB extension cable and tuck the battery into the wristband of the watch, but I preferred this simpler approach.

Charge On The Run - Fenix3 (5).jpg

I find it's a little more comfortable worn over a wrist band. The thickness of the wristband combined with the thickness of the dock does make the watch feel a little more cumbersome, but I found I was boosting the battery charge by about 50% in half an hour, so you shouldn't be wearing it for an extended period.

Charge On The Run - Fenix3 (2).jpg

It's important to note that you have to set the USB mode to "Garmin" to get the Fenix 3 to charge on the run.

Charge On The Run - Fenix3 (3).jpg

My biggest concern with this approach would be running in the rain. I've not tried charging a watch in the rain, so I'd be interested to learn if anyone has experience with this.

The GPS Accuracy for the Fenix 3 is poor, but not as bad as the complaints I've received led me to expect. That's partly a reflection on how bad many of the other Garmin watches are than on the accuracy of the Fenix 3. As always, determining if it's acceptable for your running will depend on your usage.

  • The Fenix 3 can give a reasonable estimate of how far you've run but the errors can add up. The amount of error depends on your route; in straight lines the Fenix 3 is okay, though even then it's worse than most other devices. However, on a twisty course it can be out by more than a mile on a 20-mile run. That's enough to mess up your marathon training in a big way. This also translates to errors on your average pace, so you really do want a footpod.
  • GPS watches are not accurate enough to give you a useful display of your current pace. However, the Fenix 3 will display your current Pace From A Footpod while getting data like distance and overall pace GPS.
  • The Fenix supports both GLONASS and WASS, but I have not gathered sufficient data to know if they will help accuracy (initial testing suggests not.)
  • On the out-and-back turnaround the Fenix 3 is poor, but no worse than you'd expect from its overall rating.
  • Running in a straight line is a fairly easy task for most GPS watches, but while the Fenix 3 does better here than elsewhere, it's still rather poor.
  • I not had any issues with the Fenix 3 maintaining the GPS signal, though I have had occasional times when it's struggled to acquire an initial signal (Time To First Fix). I suspect this is mostly an issue with the Wi-Fi synchronization not downloading the satellite cash.
The Fenix mostly does okay under the bridge, though it has more problems than most. It's pretty appalling through the twisty section, not only cutting the corners but sometimes just wandering off the path completely. It does a little better with the sharp turn seen on the right side of the diagram, though you can see it getting a bit lost on occasion. The blue lap markers are quite widely spaced, another indication of poor accuracy. Of course, compared with the Garmin Fenix 2, it's doing great, but that's "damned with faint praise." (This diagram has tracks color coded with green indicating good accuracy through to read indicating poor accuracy, and the lap markers as blue dots.)
This close up section of a zigzag highlights the problems the Fenix 3 has. There is poor alignment between the tracks and the change in direction of the course, and the lap markers are widely spread out. (This diagram has tracks color coded with green indicating good accuracy through to read indicating poor accuracy, and the lap markers as blue dots.)
Here the Fenix 3 shows the typical GPS behavior of having the tracks that have the green lines shifted slightly down and to the left, blue up and to the right. However, this patent is a little more randomized than some other watches. You can also see that the lap markers are shifted, which might indicate a delay in the way the Fenix 3 processes the data. (This image has the tracks color-coded for direction, with green coming from the right, blue from the left.)

If you want better GPS Accuracy than the Fenix 3, then the Polar V800 is the best I've tested, though I'd suggest the Suunto Ambit3 is probably a better option overall.

Main article: Stryd

As noted above, while the Fenix 3 has poor GPS accuracy, even the best GPS watch is still not good enough for accurate pacing. The answer currently lies with Stryd and extremely accurate Footpod that can measure distance and pace far better than GPS. The Fenix 3 has the best level of Stryd support, and will allow you to have all the accuracy of Stryd for pace and distance while having GPS active. This allows you to maintain all of the navigation features of the Fenix 3, as well as recording a GPS track for later use. You can even get an estimate of your Running Power from Stryd via a Connect IQ data field. I'd strongly recommend getting a Stryd Footpod to go with your Fenix 3. If that's too expensive, I'd argue that you're much better off getting the Stryd and saving money by getting a cheaper watch like the Garmin Vivoactive. For a walkthrough on adding Stryd, see the section towards the end of this article.

While I don't consider these missing features as 'cons', it's worth understanding the features that are missing compared with other watches. You'll notice that the Fenix 3 has a rather short list of missing features.

  • Web Configuration. Some watches allow you to setup the configuration via a web site, and then download your changes. This is vastly easier than fiddling with the watch.
TomTom Cardio Runner side

The trio of Epix, Fenix 3, and the 920XT are more alike than they are different, and the differences are not obvious. Here's my simple cheat sheet to help you understand the important differences

Epix Fenix 3 920XT
Preloaded Maps? Yes No No
Looks Pretty? No Yes No
WiFi Upload No Yes Yes
Touchscreen Yes No No
Tempe Temperature sensor Yes Yes No

Garmin has introduced a version of the Fenix 3 with an optical heart rate monitor. This is the first of the higher end Garmin watches to include an optical heart rate monitor, but it uses the same technology found in the Garmin 235. I've not tested the Fenix 3 HR, partly because I buy all the things I test through retail outlets rather than getting free samples from the manufacturers. While this allows me to produce unbiased reviews that frequently upset the manufacturers, it doesn't mean I have to pick and choose the devices I test. However, the biggest reason for not testing the Fenix 3 HR is that my testing of the Garmin 235 showed that the optical technology that Garmin are using is pretty grim. I didn't want to waste time and money reviewing the device that I expect to perform unacceptably.

I evaluate running watches in three distinct ways. Firstly, you can use a watch on its own, without any kind of Footpod. This is probably the most common way runners use their watch, but you miss out on a lot. The second rating is with a standard Footpod that is available quite cheaply. These Footpod's can be reasonably accurate once the calibrated, but calibration is a little tedious. The final evaluation is with the Stryd Footpod, which is vastly more accurate than any other type of Footpod, or and more accurate than GPS. The table below looks at the score, and the value for money of each watch for each of the three conditions. (I’ve also tested the Apple Watch 3, but I’ve not included it in these tables as it’s not really a running watch.)

The score is the sum of how well each watch can answer the four basic questions (how far, how fast, where are you, what's your cadence), plus some bonus points.

  1. The "How far you've run" will be based on GPS only for "without Footpod" and "with Standard Footpod", but based on Stryd if supported in the "with Stryd Footpod" table..
  2. How fast you're running assumes you're using a Footpod if it's supported, otherwise the rating is 0-2 based on GPS accuracy.
  3. The "Where are you?" is based on various navigation features such as back to start, breadcrumbs, and preloaded maps. For some watches, you have to turn GPS off to get the benefit of Stryd, so those watches have worse "where are you scores" with Stryd than without.
  4. The cadence score uses 1 point for an internal cadence sensor, 2 points for footpod support, 1 point for support from chest strap cadence, and 1 point for cadence alerts.
  5. I give 1-2 bonus points for application support, 1-2 bonus points for data upload, 1-2 bonus points for Optical Heart Rate Monitoring, and 0-1 bonus points for battery life.
  6. Value for money is the score divided by the price (at the time I last updated the table.) Your needs may be different, so you might weight the different aspects of the watches differently, or be basing your decision on different criteria totally. Hopefully this table will give you a good starting point for your decision.

12.2 Score Breakdown with a Standard Footpod

12.4 Basic Features

Review

Battery
Life (hr)
Tested Battery
Life (hr)
Extended
Battery
Life (hr)
Charge On The Run? Training
Effect
HRVGPS cache Sensors
Garmin Epix Review24 17.6 50 Yes (with USB=Garmin) Yes Record Yes Ant+
Garmin Fenix 5X Review20 23 35 Yes, but can't be worn Yes Record Yes Bluetooth/Ant+
Garmin Fenix 3 Review20 22 50 Yes (with USB=Garmin) Yes No Yes Ant+
Garmin 935 Review24 24.5 60 Yes, but can't be worn Yes Record Yes Bluetooth/Ant+
Garmin Vivoactive HR Review13 13 Yes (with USB=Garmin) No No Yes Ant+
Garmin 920XT Review24 19 40 No (terminates) Yes Record Yes Ant+
Garmin Vivoactive 3 Review13 13 No Yes Bluetooth/Ant+
Garmin Vivoactive Review10 10 10 Yes (with USB=Garmin) No No Yes Ant+
Suunto Spartan Trainer Review10 11 30 Yes Yes No Yes Bluetooth
Suunto Ambit2 Review15 50 Yes Yes Record Yes Ant+
Suunto Ambit3 Peak Review20 100 Yes Yes Record Yes Bluetooth
Suunto Spartan Ultra Review18 17 26 Yes, but can't be worn Yes Record Yes Bluetooth
Garmin Fenix 2 Review15 50 Yes (with USB=Garmin) Yes No Yes Ant+
Suunto Ambit3 Run Review10 10.5 100 Yes Yes Record Yes Bluetooth
Suunto Ambit2 R Review8 7.3 25 Yes Yes Record Yes Ant+
Garmin 235 Review11 11 Yes, but no optical HR Yes No Yes Ant+
Garmin 620 Review10 10 No (resets) Yes Record Yes Ant+
Garmin 910XT Review20 20 Yes, but no display Yes Record No Ant+
Garmin 310XT Review20 20 Yes, but no display No No No Ant+
Garmin 225 Review10 11 10 No (resets) No No Yes Ant+
TomTom Cardio Runner Review8 6.3 8 No (resets) No No Yes Bluetooth HR
Polar V800 Review13 24 50 No (terminates) Yes Display Predictive Bluetooth
Polar M430 Review8 8 8 No No No Yes Bluetooth
Polar M400 Review8 8 Yes, but can't be worn No No No Bluetooth
Garmin 610 Review8 8 Yes, but no display Yes Record No Ant+
Leikr Review5 6.5 5 Yes, but can't be worn No No Yes (few hours) Ant+
Epson SF-510 Review30 30 30 No No No Yes (few hours) Bluetooth HR
Epson SF-810 Review20 26 20 No No No Yes (few hours) None
Garmin 10 Review5 5 No No No No None

For "navigation":

  • Color Maps gives you full color maps, rather like a smart phone, with roads and paths marked out.
  • Track Outline is a display of where you've run, rather like a breadcrumb trail. If there are maps, the outline is superimposed otherwise this is just the outline on its own without any context.
  • Course Outline is an outline of a route that can be downloaded. I've found this useful during ultras or in unfamiliar cities where I've needed to know where to go.
  • Back To Start is a simple arrow point to your starting point, so it won't help you backtrack.
  • Back To Waypoint returns you to a previouslymarked location using a simple arrow to point.
  • Compass. A magnetic compass can help you orient yourself or the map. Without a magnetic compass you have to be moving for the GPS to give you a sense of direction.


(Older Reviews: Polar RC3 GPS, Soleus 1.0, Motorola Motoactv.)

Sours: https://fellrnr.com/wiki/Garmin_Fenix_3
  1. Rare value duel links
  2. Leader accessories replacement canopy
  3. Todays birthday horoscope
  4. Kitchenaid mixer grease
I had the similar issue, contacted Garmin and replaced. There is a sequence to validate if the sensor is dead, if so, send it to Garmin before 1 year, they replace it.

Here is what i had from Garmin:

Checking the Baro Test page while the Forerunner 935 is in Test Mode, with these instructions below.
To access Test Mode:
  1. Power off device
  2. Hold the Down key
  3. Power on device (still hold Down) to put in Test Mode
  4. Press the Back key 8 times

The Baro Test screen will show with values (see picture below).



The barometer is likely broken when any one of the following conditions are true:
  • Valid? says Not Valid
  • Local Pressure does not fluctuate
  • Local Altitude is off by 10,000 feet (3000 meters) or more
  • Baro Temp is more than 50

If just one of the bullet points are true, the barometer is broken.
Sours: https://forum.slowtwitch.com/forum/Slowtwitch_Forums_C1/Triathlon_Forum_F1/Anyone_else's_Garmin_altimeter_go_completely_haywire%3F_P6989940/
GARMIN fenix 3 Firmware Upgrades

The following lists of changes are based on information provided by GARMIN. Changes or improvements which we consider important or especially useful are shown highlighted.

To view the current firmware version, complete the following steps:

  1. Turn on the GPS
  2. Press and hold the UP button
  3. Select "Settings" (press the START/STOP button)
  4. Select "System" (press the UP button and then the START/STOP button)
  5. Select "About" (press the UP button and then the START/STOP button)
  6. The watch displays the Unit ID and the software version (press the BACK/LAP button to go back)

Each upgrade replaces the complete firmware in the GPS, which means you need to install only the version you wish to apply. There is no need to install any previous versions.


Changes made from version 9.00 to 9.40:

  1. Fixed an intermittent issue where the device might crash around midnight.

Firmware Upgrade V9.40 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 8.90 to 9.00:

  1. Fixed a potential issue where speed spikes were reported during certain activities.
  2. Fixed an issue where courses created on Garmin Connect were losing course points, after being transferred to the watch.
  3. Fixed a potential issue where intensity minutes being logged during certain activities were too high.
  4. Fixed a potential issue where calories being reported during daily use was too high.
  5. Fixed an issue where the option to 'View Runs' was available in the main menu outside of a Ski/Board activity.
  6. Fixed an issue where the tempe sensor was missing device information on the about page.

Firmware Upgrade V9.00 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 8.70 to 8.90:

  1. Improved Bluetooth connectivity with Huawei phones.
  2. Fixed an issue where smart notifications would not work intermittently, after a power cycle.
  3. Fixed an issue where one could not set the wheel size to a value less than 100 mm when working with a trainer.

Firmware Upgrade V8.90 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 8.50 to 8.70:

  1. Fixed an issue where altimeter doesn't update in watch mode if Activity Tracking is disabled.

Firmware Upgrade V8.70 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 8.30 to 8.50:

  1. Added support for persistent sensor history data. Altimeter, Barometer and Heart Rate history graphs should now retain data after power cycling the device. The barometer history data should also be retained while switching between different plot scales.
  2. Added support for communication with a VIRB 360. Also, added support for new VIRB remote commands like Sleep and Wakeup.
  3. Added support for logging Heart rate range information along with time in corresponding zones to activity FIT files, which allows for displaying this information on Garmin Connect Web.
  4. Fixed an issue where a failed WIFI sync after an activity could cause the Run Cadence to be invalid on the subsequent activity.
  5. Fixed an issue where a '?' was being displayed on the turn direction page while navigating a course.
  6. Fixed an issue where Total Descent on the Ski data page was not respecting the system elevation units.
  7. Fixed an issue where certain characters on the watchface were getting clipped for some languages.
  8. Fixed an issue where the month information on the watchface was using an incorrect glyph in Russian.
  9. Fixed an issue with executing custom interval bike workouts on device.
  10. Fixed an issue with the 'Distance per stroke' data field for paddle sports.
  11. Fixed an issue where the random seconds style for a digital watchface would only update for the top half of the screen. (Requires Display 3.70)

Firmware Upgrade V8.50 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 8.20 to 8.30:

  1. Improved the accuracy of step counting while walking fast.
  2. Fixed an issue, where cadence settings in a workout were cut by half after being transferred to the device.
  3. Fixed an issue, where the stride length average was not being calculated correctly.
  4. Fixed a potential issue, where the device could crash if one were to change the dog tracker settings while an asset search was active.
  5. Fixed a potential issue, where one might see a large descent value when starting a Ski activity.
  6. Fixed an issue, where step goal updates on the Garmin Connect Mobile App were not syncing with device right away.
  7. Fixed a potential issue, where the device might lock up when in a XC Ski activity, Row or other paddling activities.

Firmware Upgrade V8.30 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 8.00 to 8.20:

  1. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.4.
  2. Fixed an issue where the activity summary information being displayed to the user was incorrect, immediately after a sync.

Firmware Upgrade V8.20 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 7.60 to 8.00:

  1. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.3.4.
  2. Added support for LiveTrack Auto Start. Once enabled on the Garmin Connect Mobile app (More > LiveTrack), the LiveTrack session will be automatically started when the user begins an activity.
  3. Improved the app settings editing experience.
  4. Fixed a potential issue where VO2 Max was not being generated for certain users living close to sea level.
  5. Fixed a potential issue where the users calories could drop to 0 during an activity.
  6. Fixed a potential issue where users VO2 max and Performance Condition values were getting affected with non-Run and Bike activities (Ex: Walk, Hike, SUP etc.).
  7. Fixed a potential issue where the Virtual Partner pace could change during a multisport activity.
  8. Fixed a potential issue where the track log for an activity was not being shown in Garmin Connect.

Firmware Upgrade V8.00 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 7.50 to 7.60:

  1. Added support for 'Find My Watch' (Garmin Connect Mobile App > More > Garmin Devices > Connected Device > Find My Device).
  2. Added support for VIRB Ultra 30.
  3. Improved support for the new Garmin Face-It mobile app, enabling creation of a Connect IQ watch face with a photo.
  4. Improved the warning alert for the last length of a swim workout.
  5. Improved the usability of the DogTrack widget.
  6. Improved the Last Swim widget to display pace for open water swim activities.
  7. Fixed a potential issue where intensity minutes would reset at midnight.
  8. Fixed an issue where the units on the DogTrack widget were not in sync with the system unit settings.
  9. Fixed an issue where the sport weekly and monthly total list items were getting highlighted even though they are not selectable.
  10. Fixed a potential issue with writing developer data through apps that support the Connect IQ 1.3 SDK.

Firmware Upgrade V7.60 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 7.20 to 7.50:

  1. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.3.0.
  2. Added support for Apple Media Service - users can now control any active music player, e.g. Spotify, as well as volume (requires iOS 8.0 and higher).
  3. Added support for phone apps to subscribe for more frequent data updates.
  4. Added support for the dog tracker widget (Settings > Widgets > DogTrack).
  5. Improved the accuracy of pace data for paddle sports.
  6. Improved how sleep movement could impact intensity minutes calculations.
  7. Improved the responsiveness of floors climbed data.
  8. Fixed potential issues with golf scorecards and summary information.
  9. Fixed an issue with the intensity minutes widget potentially showing dashes for high intensity minute values.
  10. Fixed a potential issue with access to navigation while running a Connect IQ app.
  11. Fixed a potential issue with access to app settings while running a Connect IQ app.
  12. Fixed a potential issue with the backlight failing to turn on when using the LIGHT key.
  13. Fixed an issue where calorie data was not being recorded correctly on a subsequent activity, after using an HRM-Tri or HRM-Swim.
  14. Fixed a potential issue with swim workouts.

Firmware Upgrade V7.50 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 7.00 to 7.20:

  1. Added support for accessing other data screens while in a swim workout rest interval.
  2. Improved accuracy of distance and lap counting for Pool Swim.
  3. Improved Auto Lock behavior to avoid locking while in use.
  4. Improved the reliability of foot pod calibration.
  5. Improved ETA and ETE estimates when navigating a course.
  6. Improved label and background consistency across all widgets.
  7. Fixed an issue where Project Waypoint was not using the system setting for bearing units (Settings > Sensors > Compass > Display).
  8. Fixed a potential issue where VO2 Max and Lactate Threshold estimates were being used incorrectly with Trail Run activities.
  9. Fixed an issue where distance data fields for SUP were using incorrect precision and units.
  10. Fixed a potential issue with high battery drain in watch mode.
  11. Fixed a potential issue where the user was not given a warning alert on the last length of a swim workout.
  12. Fixed a potential issue where certain multisport profiles were not available in the app list when navigating a course.
  13. Fixed a potential display issue with one of the analog watch faces (Requires Display update 3.50).

Firmware Upgrade V7.20 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 6.90 to 7.00:

  1. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.2.6.
  2. Added support for Achievements (Summary of personal records available after an activity is saved, and while still on the saved activity summary page).
  3. Added support to turn off activity monitoring Goal Alerts (Settings > Activity Monitoring > Goal Alert).
  4. Added support for post activity download of Heart Rate data from HRM-Tri and HRM-Swim sensors (History > Activity > Download Heart Rate).
  5. Added support to calibrate altimeter at extreme altitudes.
  6. Added floors climbed history to the steps widget.
  7. Added the heading bug to the elevation plot page.
  8. Added support for saving a waypoint from the Dual Grid page.
  9. Added support for displaying status of GPS EPO data to the About page (Settings > System > About > Scroll to the EPO Status Page). Note: Downloaded EPO data will not always be stored on the device file system (EPO => Extended Prediction Orbit, data to help locate GPS satellites more quickly and reduce the time to first fix).
  10. Added support for viewing more than 100 Saved Locations on the device.
  11. Added support for Walk App (Settings > Apps > Walk).
  12. Added support for Swimrun App (Settings > Apps > Swimrun).
  13. Added additional backlight settings: A 4 second timeout and a 5% backlight level.
  14. Improved distance scrolling on the Project Waypoint page.
  15. Improved Bluetooth to phone connection reliability (Requires BLE/ANT FW 3.50, see second page under "About").
  16. Improved auto zoom during waypoint navigation.
  17. Improved the readability of golf course names on the golf course list page.
  18. Improved accuracy of floors climbed data.
  19. Fixed a potential issue where Intensity Minutes were not being calculated correctly for devices paired with a Heart Rate sensor.
  20. Fixed an issue where the Auto Scroll setting was not available for paddle sports activity profiles.
  21. Fixed a potential issue with Timer alarms not working as expected if Do Not Disturb was enabled.
  22. Fixed a potential issue where the device could crash when saving a swim activity with HRM Tri data.

Firmware Upgrade V7.00 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 6.80 to 6.90:

  1. Added support for Elevation Plot navigation data screen (Settings > Navigation > Data Screens > Elevation Plot). Note: this screen should give a 'glanceable' indication of effort remaining along the course being navigated. It shows completed (in green) and future (in blue, if available in the course) altitude data plotted over the distance of the navigation. Ascent fields are also displayed for current accumulation and the amount remaining to destination. Plan your next adventure using the Course creation tool at garminconnect.com!
  2. Added support for reviewing elevation history for an activity (History > Activities > Choose an activity > Elevation Plot. The data field represents total ascent for the activity).
  3. Added support for Auto Lock (Settings > System > Auto Lock).
  4. Added support for configuring Wi-Fi as a Hot Key option (Settings > System > Hot Keys > Choose a key > Wi-Fi).
  5. Improved the colors used for sensor bar status icons.
  6. Improved the accuracy of floors climbed data.
  7. Fixed an issue where paddle sport activities could not be used for workouts that were classified as 'Other' on Garmin Connect.
  8. Fixed a potential issue where one could not change the crank length of a third party power meter.
  9. Fixed a potential issue where the device could fail to calculate HARP (high altitude release point) for a HALO (high altitude - low opening) jump.
  10. Fixed a potential issue where par and bogey information on golf summary could be incorrect.
  11. Fixed a potential issue where a users current CIQ watch face could change, if they had multiple CIQ watch faces and were upgrading from a software version before 6.50.
  12. Fixed a potential issue where certain widgets could disappear from the widget loop after a software update.
  13. Fixed a potential issue where Foot Pod was being used as a distance source in Bike Indoor activities.

Firmware Upgrade V6.90 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 6.50 to 6.80:

  1. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.2.2.
  2. Added Intensity Minutes widget (Settings > Widgets). Note: requires a connection to a Heart Rate Strap to accrue Vigorous minutes.
  3. Restored support for the (optional) manual entry of Sleep mode (Settings > Activity Tracking).
  4. Added support for 'Auto Do Not Disturb' (Power Menu > Do Not Disturb > Sleep Time). Sleep and wake up times can be setup through Garmin Connect Mobile.
  5. Added support for Speed/Pace and Heart Rate audio prompts (Requires Garmin Connect Mobile App version 3.2.1, select More > Settings > Device > Audio Prompts to configure).
  6. Improved list of app activities shown during navigation and interval training.
  7. Fixed an issue where users were seeing auto lap information during swim activities.
  8. Fixed potential issue with battery drain when using Analog watch faces (Requires display update 3.20, see second page under "About").
  9. Fixed a potential issue with display of day/month on the watch face (Requires display update 3.20, see second page under "About").
  10. Fixed a potential issue with the back light coming on for Smart Notifications, after placing the watch in 'Do Not Disturb' mode.
  11. Fixed a potential issue with the vibration setting getting affected after a software update.

Firmware Upgrade V6.80 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 5.10 to 6.50:

  1. Added support for Row App. New features include 500m pace, stroke rate, stroke count, distance per stroke, upgrades to virtual partner, stroke rate alerts, and 'every beat' metronome option.
  2. Added support for Row Indoor App. New features include stroke rate, stroke count, stroke rate alerts, and 'every beat' metronome option.
  3. Added support for Standup Paddleboarding (SUP) App. New features include stroke rate, stroke count, distance per stroke, upgrades to virtual partner, stroke rate alerts, and 'every beat' metronome option.
  4. Added support for Golf App. New features include download of courses through Garmin Connect Mobile, distance to front/middle/back of green, layup distances, measure shot, in-round scorecard, odometer/round timer, and scorecard uploads to Garmin Connect.
  5. Added support for Project Waypoint App (Settings > Apps > Project Wpt).
  6. Added support for Tactical App (Settings > Apps > Add New).
  7. Added support for Jumpmaster App (Settings > Apps > Add New).
  8. Added support for the Advanced Running Dynamics metrics; Ground Contact Time Balance (This feature measures your running symmetry and appears as a percentage of your total ground contact time.), Stride Length (This feature measures the length of your stride from one footfall to the next.) and Vertical Ratio (This feature provides the cost-benefit ratio of vertical oscillation to stride length, serving as one indicator of a runner's efficiency.) Requires HRM-Run v. 6.60, HRM-Tri v. 4.20.
  9. Added support for the Lactate Threshold feature (Main Menu > My Stats > Lactate Threshold). This estimates the level of effort at which fatigue rapidly increases in terms of a runner's heart rate and pace.
  10. Added support for the Performance Condition feature. This provides a real-time fitness-level measurement relative to a runner's average baseline, which indicates performance readiness for the day's workout or race. This feature requires a physical HR strap.
  11. Added support for the Stress Score app. (Settings > Apps > Stress Score.) This uses heart rate variability to assess the user's overall physiological stress. This feature requires a physical HR strap.
  12. Added ABC widget which combines Altimeter, Barometer and Compass data (Settings > Widgets). Note: press START to view altimeter/barometer plots and compass view.
  13. Added Steps widget with floors climbed (Settings > Widgets). Note: Steps replaces the previous Wellness widget. Sleep mode is now automatic and can be setup via Garmin Connect and Garmin Connect Mobile.
  14. Added My Day widget (Settings > Widgets).
  15. Added Golf widget (Settings > Widgets).
  16. Added Last Run widget (Settings > Widgets). Note: press START to view history.
  17. Added Last Ride widget (Settings > Widgets). Note: press START to view history.
  18. Added Last Swim widget (Settings > Widgets). Note: press START to view history.
  19. Added Last Sport widget (Settings > Widgets). Note: press START to view history.
  20. Added Calories widget (Settings > Widgets).
  21. Added Do Not Disturb feature (press & hold LIGHT). Note: Use during sleep if no notifications or alerts are desired.
  22. Added support for a new HR gauge data screen (Settings > Apps > Activity > Data Screens > HR Gauge).
  23. Added support for audio lap alerts in Garmin Connect Mobile. (GCM > Garmin Devices > Fenix 3 > Audio Alerts > Lap Alerts).
  24. Added support for viewing GPS state before starting a workout.
  25. Added support for a new 'MOB' (Man Overboard) hot key option (Settings > System > Hot Keys).
  26. Added support for a new 'Dual Grid' hot key option (Settings > System > Hot Keys).
  27. Added new Digital watch face Layout option (showing step goal progress and move bar).
  28. Added new Digital watch face Seconds Style (Requires Display software v. 3.00, see second page under "About").
  29. Added new Hands and Background analog watch face options (Requires Display software v. 3.00, see second page under "About").

Firmware Upgrade V6.50 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 5.00 to 5.10:

  1. Fixed potential issue with unexpected battery drain.
  2. Fixed potential issue reconnecting to ANT sensors.

Firmware Upgrade V5.10 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 4.90 to 5.00:

  1. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.2.1.
  2. Added Ascent and Descent elevation alerts (Settings > Apps > Alerts > Elevation).
  3. Added support for 'repeating' sports in a multisport profile (Settings > Apps > Multi Sport Profile > Repeat). This is useful for events such as 'Swimrun'.
  4. Added support for on device course creation (Navigation > Courses). New data fields such as next waypoint, distance to next waypoint, ETA to next waypoint, ETE to next waypoint etc. were introduced in conjunction with this feature.
  5. Added new Hands and Background analog watch face options (requires Display firmware version 2.90, see second page under "About").
  6. Improved consistency and accuracy of altimeter auto calibration (performed during a GPS activity). Notes: GPS and manual calibration points will be used to determine the best overall calibration possible. A secondary step when acquiring a GPS fix at activity start will help denote a more accurate fix for altitude purposes (yellow to green ring indication). Settings > Sensors > Altimeter > Auto Cal. is now an On/Off setting as the 'Once' and 'Continuous' settings are no longer necessary. Use Settings > Sensors > Altimeter > Calibrate to calibrate the Altimeter to a known altitude.
  7. Improved altimeter and barometer accuracy in watch mode (when not performing a GPS activity). Note: use Settings > Sensors > Altimeter > Calibrate or press START from the Altimeter widget to calibrate the Altimeter to a known altitude.
  8. Improved vibration profiles to be differentiated based on alert type.
  9. Improved reliability of 'Weather' widget on iOS.
  10. Improved ability to detect time zone changes without a GPS fix (requires connection to Garmin Connect Mobile app and time set to 'Auto' on device, Settings > System > Time > Set Time).
  11. Improved activity tracking step calculation accuracy for certain use cases.
  12. Fixed potential issue with a Foot Pod sensor dropping out as a source for speed.
  13. Fixed an issue where key presses would not work, if a low battery notification was received when the unit was locked.
  14. Fixed potential issue with manual altimeter calibration during a GPS activity.
  15. Fixed issue with Tempe sensor connectivity.
  16. Fixed a potential issue with exiting the 'Find Phone' app.
  17. Fixed a potential issue with storm alerts not working in certain use cases.
  18. Fixed a potential issue with a Foot Pod sensor being incorrectly used as the source for distance accrual.
  19. Fixed issue with storing a large number of saved locations.

Firmware Upgrade V5.00 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 4.70 to 4.90:

  1. Added new Hands and Background analog watch face options (requires Display firmware version 2.90, see second page under "About").
  2. Fixed a potential issue with Footpod being incorrectly used as the source for distance accrual.
  3. Fixed potential issue when receiving a large number of notifications using iOS 9.

Firmware Upgrade V4.90 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 4.60 to 4.70:

  1. Fixed a potential issue with Scheduled workouts.
  2. Fixed a potential issue with heart rate zones not persisting across software updates. This change will take effect with subsequent software updates.

Firmware Upgrade V4.70 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 4.40 to 4.60:

  1. Added ability to configure foot pod speed and distance (Settings > Sensors > Foot Pod).
  2. Added support for setting up compass user magnetic variation (Settings > Sensors > Compass > North Ref.).
  3. Added the option to configure the navigation heading bug (Settings > Navigation > Heading Bug).
  4. Added support for editing altitude and position for Saved Locations (Navigation > Saved Locations).
  5. Fixed a potential issue with navigating activities.
  6. Fixed a potential issue with distance calculations during workouts.
  7. Fixed potential issues with syncing activity tracking data.

Firmware Upgrade V4.60 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 4.20 to 4.40:

  1. Added Course navigation mode (Settings > Navigation > Type). A HSI Compass (Horizontal Situation Indicator) will be utilized on the Guide data page when navigating in this mode.
  2. Added support for deleting all saved locations (Navigation > Saved Locations > Delete All).
  3. Added support for automatic saving of an activity after 25 minutes without an action on the Save/Resume/Discard options.
  4. Improved support of edited locations from BaseCamp.
  5. Improved low battery notifications.
  6. Improved the Swim Drill Log page.
  7. Fixed a potential issue with navigating courses.
  8. Fixed an issue with utilizing the setting for Swim Stroke Type Detection.

Firmware Upgrade V4.40 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 4.00 to 4.20:

  1. Fixed a potential issue with the 'Set a Target' Training option.
  2. Fixed an issue with displaying smart notifications while sleeping.
  3. Fixed an issue with customization of data fields on 'Lap Alert' and 'Rest Screen' data screens.

Firmware Upgrade V4.20 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.80 to 4.00:

  1. Added support for HRM-Tri and HRM-Swim.
  2. Added support for Smart Notification Actions (interact with the incoming notifications directly from the pop-up or within the Notifications widget, e.g. clear a message or reject an incoming call).
  3. Added 'Find My Phone' app (added at the end of the app list).
  4. Added a heading arrow indicator to data pages when in navigation mode.
  5. Added support for advanced VIRB remote (compatible with VIRB X/XE: control camera settings, display additional status information).
  6. Added advanced alarm clock features (multiple alarms, recurring options, notification customization).
  7. Added support for 'Auto' backlight mode (options are now available to configure backlight separately for keys, alerts and gestures: Settings > System > Backlight).
  8. Added setting to control Bluetooth connection alerts (Settings > Bluetooth > Alerts).
  9. Improved ascent and descent calculations.
  10. Improved pairing time with the tempe sensor.
  11. Fixed issue with saving of lap ascent values.
  12. Fixed potential issue with steps being lost during an activity.
  13. Fixed potential issues with heart rate sensor connection reliability.

Firmware Upgrade V4.00 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.60 to 3.80:

  1. Fix potential issue with GPS acquisition, when resuming an activity.

Firmware Upgrade V3.80 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.40 to 3.60:

  1. Improved GPS tracking performance (Requires GPS Software 2.90. Note: after applying GPS software updates, for best results please allow the device to track GPS signals continuously for 10 to 15 minutes. This one-time process will allow the device to re-accumulate satellite information lost in the update process).
  2. Improved GPS distance accumulation (requires GPS Software 2.90).
  3. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.1.3.
  4. Fixed potential issues with 'Resume Later' app option.

Firmware Upgrade V3.60 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.30 to 3.40:

  1. Added support for Walking sport type (Settings > Apps > Add New).
  2. Added support for configuring LAP key behavior (Settings > Apps).
  3. Added support for Connect IQ SDK 1.1.2.
  4. Fixed issue with Open Water app settings.
  5. Fixed potential issue with GPS acquisition when using the My Workouts feature.
  6. Fixed potential issue with alarm settings.

Firmware Upgrade V3.40 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.20 to 3.30:

  1. Fixed potential issue with the latest time zone update.

Firmware Upgrade V3.30 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.10 to 3.20:

  1. Added Hot Keys press-and-hold START and BACK key customization (Settings > System > Hot Keys).
  2. Added Back to Start option for straight-line navigation back to activity start.
  3. Improved Connect IQ stability.
  4. Improved pace stability at low speeds.
  5. Fixed issue with import of elevation of saved locations from GPX files.
  6. Fixed issue with display of 3 digit speeds on ski data pages.
  7. Fixed potential device lockup when exiting watch mode.

Firmware Upgrade V3.20 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 3.00 to 3.10:

  1. Improved Connect IQ experience and stability.
  2. Fixed issue with updating Barometer plot scale.

Firmware Upgrade V3.10 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 2.90 to 3.00:

  1. Added Foot Pod auto calibration support.
  2. Improved Connect IQ experience and stability.
  3. Fixed potential issue with heading data fields.

Firmware Upgrade V3.00 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 2.80 to 2.90:

  1. Fixed a potential issue with starting custom apps.

Firmware Upgrade V2.90 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 2.50 to 2.80:

  1. Added Music Controls widget.
  2. Added support for Connect IQ apps and widgets.
  3. Fixed an issue with power data fields.

Firmware Upgrade V2.80 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


Changes made from version 2.20 to 2.50:

  1. Added access to sensor-specific settings from Compass, Altimeter, and Barometer widgets (press the START key).
  2. Added lock keys feature (hold the LIGHT key).

Firmware Upgrade V2.50 (Please use Web-Updater to install the latest firmware)


GARMIN fenix 3 gray   GARMIN fenix 3 silver   GARMIN fenix 3 saphirCompact and very robust wrist top GPS device for outdoor navigation including barometrical altimeter and electronic compass. Supports various activities such as hiking, mountaineering, running, biking, geocaching, but also sailing or flying through individual profiles including user specific profiles. Stores waypoints, routes and travelled pathes (tracks). Map page with track, waypoints and points of interests (POIs) plus directions for navigation including back to start (TracBack) feature. Accepts data from compatible wireless devices, such as G-sensor, heart rate monitor, cadence and temperature sensors. Supports data exchange with computers and GARMIN Connect. Share information via Blue Tooth with Apps on compatible mobile phones. Very robust housing and scratch resistant mineral glass. Built-in rechargeable battery for long life time, see detailed description.


Sours: https://www.tramsoft.ch/gps/garmin_fenix3-firmware-upgrades_en.html

Issues 3 garmin fenix

The most common Garmin problems and how to fix them

Left to right: Garmin Vivoactive 4, Garmin Venu

Table of contents

Smartwatches and fitness trackers face loads of daily abuse. Strapped to our wrists, they brush off bumps and knocks, dirt and splashes. Understandably, they face the occasional problems and issues, but many of these can be rectified. Although Garmin makes some excellent smartwatches and fitness trackers, the company’s products are not immune to these issues, either. Below, we look at some of the common issues Garmin devices face and provide a list of possible fixes.

See also: The best Garmin smartwatches | The best Garmin running watches

Problem #1: My Garmin has syncing issues

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

Like most wearables, Garmin products sync with Android smartphones over Bluetooth. Often this connection is affected by several factors. As a result, you may not be able to sync your Garmin’s info with your smartphone. If this is something you experience, here are a few ways to remedy the issue.

Potential solutions:

  • Make sure Garmin Connect is installed on your smartphone. Also, ensure that Bluetooth is switched on on your phone (Settings > Bluetooth > On).
  • Double-check if your Garmin wearable is in pairing mode. To do this, head to your Garmin device’s Settings menu, tap Bluetooth, and select Pair mobile device.
  • Try switching Bluetooth off and on on your smartphone. It seems a simple fix, but a simple on/off cycle can often remedy most minor issues.
  • Power cycle your smartphone by switching it off and on, too.
  • Power cycle your Garmin device by switching it on and off. We cover this process further below in the “How to restart your Garmin” section.
  • Reinstall the Garmin Connect app on your phone. Head to your phone’s Settings, find the Apps menu, search for Garmin Connect, and uninstall it. To reinstall, head to Google Play, search for Garmin Connect, and install. You may need to log in to your Garmin Connect account once again after installing, so be sure to have those details on hand.
  • Check if your Garmin device has the latest software installed.
    • To do this, head to Settings > About. Compare the software version on your device to that listed by Garmin.
    • If the software is outdated, try to connect your device’s software by heading to Settings > System > Software Update.
    • If the update didn’t complete, you might have to connect your wearable to a PC or Mac and manually update it. Install Garmin Express and connect your device to the PC or Mac via a USB cable to update the software.
    • You can also check if syncing works via Garmin Express to eliminate an issue beyond Bluetooth connectivity.
  • Try removing your Garmin device from your Garmin Connect account and re-adding it. To do this, open Garmin Connect. Tap on the Menu button. Scroll down and select the device you want to remove.
    • To add your device again, follow the same steps but tap Add Device instead.

Problem #2: My Garmin is not receiving notifications

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

You may experience notification problems from time to time. If you’re in this boat, you may need to tweak a few settings on your smartphone or Garmin.

Potential solutions:

  • Double-check if Bluetooth is switched on on your phone and that it’s connected to your Garmin.
  • Check if Garmin Connect has notification access. On your Android phone, head to Settings > Apps, tap on Garmin Connect, and select the Notifications option. Ensure Allow Notifications is toggled on.
    • If your phone’s UI is presented a little differently, you can also search for “Notifications” on your Android phone’s Settings page search bar.
  • Check if the notifications you wish to receive are enabled in Garmin Connect. Open the app, select the Menu button, then Settings > Notifications > App Notifications. You can then toggle to enable or disable the apps you wish to receive notifications.
  • If you own a Huawei device, you may need to set Garmin Connect to run in the background. Head to Settings > Battery > App Launch. Toggle Garmin Connect to Manage manually. This should allow the app to run in the background and auto-launch.
  • Double-check if Do Not Disturb is set to “off” on your smartphone.
  • Check if Sleep Time settings are correct on your Garmin. This feature on Garmin devices prevents notifications and alerts from disrupting your sleep, but it could disable all notifications if the time isn’t set correctly.

Problem #3: My Garmin won’t charge or power on

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

If your Garmin smartwatch or fitness tracker doesn’t switch on, there are a few ways to check if it’s a simple fault.

Potential solutions:

  • Check if the device is fully charged by plugging it into its charger and a power source.
  • Check if the charging points on the Garmin device or charger are damaged or corroded. They may also need a clean. You can do so with a dab of rubbing alcohol and a cotton swab.
  • Still no power? Check if the power cable you’re using is damaged.
  • Try force rebooting your Garmin. To do this, plug it into a power source via the charger, press and hold the power button for between 15-60 seconds until the display lights up. This is only applicable if your Garmin device can be rebooted or restarted.
  • It could be a software issue if the device is charging, but the screen doesn’t light up. Try to update your device’s software by connecting it to a PC or Mac and using Garmin Express (instructions above).
  • If your device’s display does light up but doesn’t acknowledge touches, you could try cleaning it.
    • Use device cleaning spray and a microfibre cloth to clean the surface. Dry it as soon as possible with another cloth.
    • Still nothing? If you have a screen protector on your device, try removing it and replacing it with a new protector.

Problem #4: My Garmin has trouble connecting to GPS

Watches with GPS connectivity will often take a moment to lock on to satellites. The time it takes depends on your location and other factors. But here are a few steps to remedy the issue.

Potential solutions:

  • Try syncing your Garmin. Syncing to Garmin Connect should prompt the device to scan for available satellites and, therefore, speed up the GPS signal acquisition.
  • Begin your activity in an open area outdoors devoid of trees and buildings. The lack of physical interference should help your wearable acquire GPS signal a little quicker. Heavy cloud coverage may also affect the signal.
  • Are you still having issues? Double-check your device’s software version. If it’s not current, be sure to update it.
  • Some Garmin devices support multiple positioning systems, including GLONASS. Double-check if it’s on by heading to System > Sensors > GPS on your device. Toggle on the switch for the systems you wish to use alongside GPS.

Problem #5: Garmin Pay isn’t working on my device

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

Garmin Pay is Garmin’s wireless payments system that is compatible with many Garmin devices. It allows users to pay for products using their wearable. While it’s convenient, it may also face a few issues from time to time.

Potential solutions:

  • Check if Garmin Pay is supported in your country and by your bank. Although the service plays nice with Mastercard and Visa cards, Garmin Pay will only work if your bank is supported. Garmin lists the supported institutions here.
  • If you can’t add a card to your Garmin Pay Wallet, you’ll need to be connected to mobile data or Wi-Fi.
  • Double-check that your smartphone meets the Garmin Pay minimum device requirements. You’ll need at least Android 6.0 Marshmallow, and the device is required to support the Google Play Store natively. Android Go phones are not supported.

Problem #6: I’m having trouble with VO2 max readings on my Garmin

Most recent Garmin wearables can track VO2 max, an important metric for cardio trainers. However, you may not get a VO2 max reading unless your device is properly set up and that your activities meet some criteria.

Potential solutions:

  • Garmin suggests completing the User Profile with birth year, height, weight, and power zone settings. This data will be used to calculate VO2 max figures better.
  • The company also suggests completing the Heart Rate Zones setup too. Find these settings under Settings > User Profile > Heart Rate on your device. You can also tweak these settings later in Garmin Connect.
  • Garmin support documents suggest activities need to meet the following criteria to provide a VO2 max estimate:
    • For running, walking, and trail running, the activity must last for at least 10 minutes on some devices and 15 minutes on the Vivosport.
    • For cycling, the activity must last for at least 20 minutes without any stoppages.
    • The activity must be recorded outside with GPS connected.
    • Heart rate must be elevated to at least 70% of your maximum for at least 10 minutes on some devices and 15 minutes on the Vivosport.
    • Some newer Garmin watches can provide VO2 max estimates from all-day heart rate data.
  • Finally, it may take a few days for your VO2 max estimate to display in Garmin Connect.

Problem #7: My Garmin device’s battery drains quickly

Lily Katz / Android Authority

Garmin Lily Sport Edition

Battery drain issues can happen to all devices, be it buggy software or aging components. There are a few ways to manage your Garmin’s battery life better if you find it’s draining too quickly for your liking.

Potential solutions:

  • If you don’t train regularly, you can switch off your GPS. Find these settings on your watch by heading to System > Sensors > GPS. Toggle off systems you don’t use.
  • Notifications can also play a role in reducing the battery life of your device. Be sure to curate which apps are allowed to send through notifications. Open your Garmin Connect app on your phone, select Settings, and toggle off the apps you don’t need.
  • Adjust the brightness, length of the timeout, gesture controls, and other features of your display.
    • You can find these controls in your watch’s Settings > System > Display menu if you own a Garmin Venu series device.
    • Garmin Fenix 6 users can find the setting by holding Menu and selecting System > Backlight. You can then set the backlight to activate upon button presses or alerts.
    • On most recent Garmin Forerunner devices, hold Menu, then head to Settings > System > Backlight to activate the backlight settings on your device.
    • The Garmin Vivosmart 4 automatically scales the backlight, but users can pick a number between 1 and 7 for more granular control. Find these settings by tapping the capacitive button at the bottom of the display, tapping the Settings cog, then swipe to and tap the Brightness icon.

Problem #8: Garmin band breaks

No watch strap or band is indestructible. If your Garmin band breaks, you have a few options.

  • Garmin explains on its Shipping page that merchandise can be returned for a refund within 30 days of receiving the order.
  • Garmin’s Consumer Limited Warranty page explains that non-aviation products are guaranteed to be “free from defects in materials or workmanship for one year from the date of purchase.” If you believe your Garmin watch strap (or Garmin device in general) is defective, you can contact Garmin to get the defective part replaced at no extra cost.

Looking for replacement bands for your device? You can, of course, head to Garmin’s website to buy a replacement or head to the Amazon links below for a cheaper alternative:

How to restart your Garmin device

  • Garmin Venu 2: Press and hold the Action button at the top-right of the device for 15 seconds to switch the watch off. Press the button again for one second to switch it on.
  • Garmin Venu: Press and hold the Action button at the top-right of the device for 15 seconds to switch the watch off. Press the button again for one second to switch it on.
  • Garmin Venu Sq: Press and hold the Action button at the top-right of the device for 15 seconds to switch the watch off. Press the button again for one second to switch it on.
  • Garmin Fenix 6 series: Press and hold the Light button at the top-left of the device until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Vivoactive 4/4S: Press and hold the Action button at the top-right of the device for 15 seconds to switch the watch off. Press the button again for one second to switch it on.
  • Garmin Forerunner 945: Press and hold the Power button at the top-left of the device for 15 seconds, or until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Forerunner 745: Press and hold the Power button at the top-left of the device for 15 seconds, or until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Forerunner 645: Press and hold the Light button at the top-left of the device for 15 seconds, or until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Forerunner 245/Music: Press and hold the Light button at the top-left of the device for 15 seconds, or until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Forerunner 55: Press and hold the Light button at the top-left of the device for 15 seconds, or until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Forerunner 45/45S: Press and hold the Light button at the top-left of the device for 15 seconds or until the watch switches off. Power it back on by pressing this button once more.
  • Garmin Lily: There’s no way to switch off or restart the Lily physically.
  • Garmin Instinct: Press and hold the CTRL button until the device switches off. Hold CTRL to switch it back on again.
  • Garmin Vivomove 3: There’s no way to switch off or restart the Vivomove 3 physically.
  • Garmin Vivofit 4/Jr 3: There’s no way to physically switch off or restart the Vivofit 4 or Jr. 3.

Are you still having issues? Is there any problem you think we didn’t cover? Be sure to let us know in the comments.

How ToFitness, fitness trackers, Garmin, smartwatches, Wearables

Sours: https://www.androidauthority.com/garmin-problems-issues-1223598/
Garmin fenix 3 REVIEW (after 6 months)

Everything's cool, dude, - he solemnly voiced. - The German agreed with both the price of the land and the estimate. We are signing a contract next week.

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Fuuuf. I was tired. - she was breathing hard and often, and her arms and neck glistened with sweat. The tonic mike stuck to the front of the wet body, repeating the curves of.



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