Water cooling cpu temps

Water cooling cpu temps DEFAULT
  • Keep your system away from vents and windows.

    Consider where your computer is situated — is it in a particularly warm place? Make sure your system isn't near a heat vent or in a temperature-sensitive area (i.e. near a window). Often simply changing the location of your system can help keep it cool.

  • Give your system some breathing room.

    Take a look at where your computer is positioned and remove any obstacles that restrict airflow. For best performance, you'll want to leave two to three inches of space on all sides of your computer. Also, take a look at your computer desk – does it relegate your system to an enclosed cabinet or drawer? If your system is in an enclosed space, it faces an increased risk of overheating.

  • Close your system's case.

    While it may seem counterintuitive, an open case doesn't help regulate internal temperatures – it actually does the opposite and restricts them. A closed case helps your system remain cool because it reduces the impact of dust and debris on the cooling fans. Too much dirt can make your fans slow down or quit working altogether. Cases are designed for effective air handling, and with fans and proper intake, you can maintain the reliability of your system's components.

  • Clean your fans.

    Dust and dirt can wreak havoc on your first line of temperature defense: your fans. When you open your case, you should be able to find several fans: one on top of the CPU, one inside the power supply, and perhaps one or more on the front or back of the case. Simply power down your computer and use a canned air duster to remove the dirt from each fan. You'll want to avoid using vacuums when cleaning because the static they produce often does more damage than heat.

  • Upgrade your CPU fan.

    Your CPU is arguably one of the most sensitive (and expensive) components inside your computer, and it has the highest potential to overheat. Most CPUs come preinstalled with lower-end fans that are engineered to cool your processor just enough to keep it running—and nothing more. For this reason, you'll want to consider upgrading to a better CPU fan, which can help keep CPU temperatures down. Keep in mind, however, that your CPU fan can only cool to the lowest temperature in your case, regardless of how well-designed your CPU fan is.

  • Add a case fan.

    Upgrading your CPU fan is a start, but adding case fans can also be a big help.  Since performance-enhancing memory and graphic cards generate a lot of heat, case fans can help increase airflow to your components by attaching to the front and back of your system. Many of our Ballistix customers opt to install two case fans:  one to move cool air into the PC and another to move warm air out of the PC. If you decide to add case fans, make sure that the intake and exhaust levels match. Why? If you install an 80mm fan in the front of your case and a mm fan in the back, the differential will create dead air and negative pressure, leading to an increased potential to overheat.

  • Add a memory cooling fan.

    Memory is one of the components in your system that's most likely to overheat. To help keep temperatures down (especially when overclocking), we recommend a cooling fan, which helps eliminate dead spots of airflow within your system's memory area.

  • Check your system's power supply fan.

    A PC's power supply has an integrated fan, and if you don't have a case fan, the power supply fan is the only thing pushing hot air out of your system. If it's not working properly, your system will heat up quickly. If your power supply fan isn't working, replace it as soon as possible.

  • Get a water cooling kit.

    For gaming systems with high-end CPUs and overclocked components, often the fastest fans can't keep up with the increased temperatures. To solve this problem, many gamers opt for water cooling kits as a way to cool the CPU. In a water cooling kit, a pump cycles cold water down to the CPU in self-contained tubes, then pumps the water out of the system where it can be cooled before returning to the CPU for additional cooling. If you're comfortable performing a technical installation, water cooling kits are safe and relatively affordable.

  • Take extra precautions when overclocking.

    While overclocking can maximize the performance of your components, it also pushes your system's capabilities to the limit, which almost always results in higher temperatures. If you're overclocking with Ballistix modules, you can use our custom Ballistix M.O.D. utility to monitor temperatures in real-time. Regardless of how you're overclocking, make sure you take additional precautions to improve your system's cooling ability.

    It's not hard to keep your system cool, and with a few simple steps you can quickly have your system running at a more sustainable level than it was before. By taking action now to cool your system, you'll save money and increase the longevity of your system.

  • Sours: https://www.crucial.com/support/system-maintenance-cooling

    Are you facing performance issues with your Computer after few minutes of use?

    There may be many reasons. I will tell you only one reason now for which this problem happens 99% of the times.

    What’s a Good CPU Temperature?

    A good CPU temperature is anything under or around 50 degrees Celsius ( degrees Fahrenheit) when idle. Under load, the CPU temp resides under degrees. Some CPU’s may run hotter when they’re in laptops or small-form-factor (SFF) computers.

    aio-liquid-coolerscopes

    I think you will agree with me when I say:

    You start to feel undesirable performance & lags gradually after running the PC for some time.

    It’s very Simple.

    Your PC is getting hotter from time to time by overload.

    In fact, high temperature of your CPU and GPU can reduce your computer’s performance drastically.

    That’s why, I am here to help you out monitoring your computer’s CPU temperature and also to let you know about how to control it.

    3 Easiest Methods to Check CPU Temperature

    Do you know? High CPU temperature reduces your computer’s performance while multi-tasking, video editing & rendering. Sadly it can also cause bottlenecks and lags while playing your steam games.

    It’s obvious that:

    Your CPU will perform better if the temperature is tolerable.

    Moreover, you will be able to overclock your CPU according to your need if you can monitor it’s temperature easily.

    Here ​are the methods to check CPU temperatures.

    1. Check the BIOS Settings

    The simplest way to check the CPU temperature from a computer without installing any app is using BIOS.

    While starting or restarting your PC you need to enter the BIOS by simply clicking the Bios key (usually “F2” key or the “Del” key).

    rog-bios

    Different motherboard’s bios have different interfaces.

    But it’s nothing to worry about.

    You will see a “Hardware Monitor” tab in the bios where you will find the CPU temperature.

    2. Use the CPUID HWMonitor Software

    It is a hardware monitoring application that reads system data like voltages, temperatures, fans speed.

    After downloading and installing this application you can check the temperature just by opening the application.

    hw-moinitor

    3. Download CPU utilities

    Intel and AMD have individual app to overclock and check the status of their Processors.

    For Intel processors, You will need the app Extreme Tuning Utility.

    intel-extreme

    For AMD processors you will require Ryzen Master.

    ryzen-master

    Both of these utility apps are easy to use and you can check your CPU temperature just by opening the app.

    Optimal Temperatures of Intel/Amd CPUs with Stock Cooler

    The optimum or suitable temperatures of some popular CPUs (without overclocking) are shown below:

    What Causes High Temperatures in CPU?

    Computers overheat due to the CPU being too hot. There are many reasons for high temperatures of CPU like drying up of the thermal paste used in CPU after a certain period of time. If the computer is hotter than the usual temperature, quickly monitor the CPU temperature.

    Additionally some other reasons include:

    1. Stock coolers cannot handle much heat.

    2. Bad air flow inside the case of the PC.

    3. Lack of ventilation inside the case.

    4. Lack of intake and exhaust fans in the case.

    5. Bad cable management inside the case blocking air flow.

    6. Keeping the case in a congested place.

    How to Lower the CPU Temperatures

    You can take the following measures to get an instant result in preventing high CPU & GPU temperatures.

    Here are the steps to lower CPU temperatures:

    1. Use a good CPU cooler for processors (air cooler/liquid cooler).

    2. Apply good quality thermal paste every year.

    3. Keep more intake and exhaust fans for better air flow inside the casing.

    4. Control the fan speed of CPU cooler, GPU and case fans according to need.

    5. Keep the cables in such a manner that they don’t create obstructions to air flow.

    6. Make sure to build the PC in such a way that heat of GPU doesn’t reach the CPU.

    7. Build the PC in a well-ventilated casing.

    8. Clean the interior part of the pc in a regular basis of 3 months at least.

    Bonus Tip for Reducing Temperatures:

    From BIOS or from other tweaking apps set the speed of the intake and exhaust fans to 75%.

    While playing games or running load giving apps, set the fan speed of the GPU to 90%.

    Try to use at least one liquid cooled component (either CPU or GPU) which will save one component’s heat from another.

    I will recommend you to get atleast an AIO cooler for your CPU as these are more convenient and price worthy.

    The Basics of PC Cooling Solutions Explained

    First of all you need to understand how the cooling solution for your PC should be. Before advancing further, we will first divide the cooling system into 5 types.

    Which are:

    1. Stock CPU & stock GPU cooler2. Third party Air cooler CPU & stock GPU cooler AIO liquid cooler for CPU & stock GPU cooler Custom liquid cooling system for both CPU and GPU Custom liquid cooling systems for CPU & GPU separately.

    Now it is time to:

    Choose the right cooling system for your PC.

    First of all you need to know the type of PC you are using. Accordingly you will choose the right cooling solution.

    If you are using a PC of normal configuration like, non-overclocked CPU & GPU and you are not doing any hardcore stuff then you don’t need to expend on coolers. You are good to go with the stock CPU and GPU coolers.

    But if you are using a gaming/workstation /editing PC then you must have a good cooling system for your PC.

    Graphics cards can be overclocked easily with their stock coolers but the PC need to have good ventilation facilities.

    But the problem is:

    Most of the processors can’t be overclocked by the stock coolers. So, you need a third party air or liquid cooler for that.

    And if you are running a beast gaming PC then you need a custom liquid cooling system.

    Air Cooling Vs Liquid Cooling

    I believe you’ll agree when I say, “Efficient PC cooling can give you an instant change in the performance of your PC.” Right?

    Well, I’ve been there myself, getting confused with thousands of coolers.

    A good PC always needs a good cooling solution to give the best overclocking results.

    Not only this, coolers can:

    Turn your PC into a Piece of Art.

    But it might be confusing to you that, which type of cooling components to use for your system.

    In this article I will be giving you some fantastic ideas to cool your PC’S CPU and GPU.

    I will also give some instructions on your PC’s cooling system according to its need.

    Then I will suggest you which cooler is for you.

    At the end, there is a comparison of different coolers

    Before going to the instructions and suggestions, you can have a look at some of the most popular air and liquid CPU coolers for your PC given here:

    What is Better Air cooled or Liquid Cooled?

    Before going to any comparison you need to know which is best for your PC case.

    Air coolers can perform their best if there is a good ventilation inside your case. It will perform better for more fans in your PC case

    On the other hand liquid coolers are suitable for those PC cases which have radiator mounting options.

    The best thing about AIO Liquid coolers is:

    The hot air coming from the GPU can’t effect the cooling of the CPU. But AIO liquid cooler needs more power and more space inside the case as their tubing are hard to bend.

    Other than that of a air cooler and AIO liquid cooler, there is another way to cool the system. And this is by Custom Liquid Cooling.

    Custom liquid cooling turns your PC into a piece of art.

    And this gives you the best overclocking results.

    But the main problems are:

    It is very expensive and requires a lot of time and hard work to setup up.

    Benchmarks for Air Cooler Vs Liquid Cooler 

    To tell you which is the best among air and AIO cooler in case of performance we have make some benchmarking tests.

    So, for this comparison I have used NZXT S elite as our case in the benchmarking PC. 4 fans are at rpm speed.

    Specifications:

    Core i7 k overclocked to GHz,evga gtx GPU clock +MHZ memory Clock +MHz,Corsair dominator Platinum 16GB Ram overclocked to MHz, PSU w gold rated.

    Coolers:

    Air cooler: Cooler Master MAp

    AIO liquid cooler: Cooler Master MLR

    Stress test tools used:

    CPU stress Testing, Memtest 64, Furmark, Unigine Heaven

    Test results:

    Clearly, AIO liquid cooler is the winner here but it’s not like that AIO is the most suitable for your PC.

    What’s the bottom line?

    It may vary from PC to PC for different parts in them.

    Here are the things that really matters:

    Other than performance, you might find some issues from both air and AIO liquid coolers.

    It gets worse:

    When the tubing of AIO liquid cooler is not long enough according to the need of your PC’s case.

    On the other hand, most of the smaller air coolers easily fit inside the case. But few of the coolers are very big to be fit in smaller compact cases.

    It gets even worse:

    When larger air coolers make clearance issues with the memory modules. Fitting an AIO liquid in some cases may be very hard. But they mostly don’t have problem in clearance issues with the rams.

    One the other hand cleaning of an air cooler is easier than that of an Aio liquid cooler as the radiator gets filled with dust within few months.

    Want to know the best part?

    You can be totally risk free using an Air cooler. If you get an air cooler you will not have to worry about any leakage.

    AIO liquid coolers are often heard to get leaks. This can completely ruin some of the expensive major parts of your PC.

    It’s your choice now to:

    Select the most suitable cooler for your PC.

    If you have a big budget and you want the best of the bests in your PC then custom liquid kit is your thing.

    Else you can go for an AIO liquid cooler to have a beauty with beast performance.

    And if the only thing that matters to you is performance and risk free PC then Air cooler is what you need.

    How to Choose the Right Type of Cooler?

    So, after reading all these information, are you feeling a lil bit confused?

    The best 3 coolers options are Air, Liquid and AIO . I discussed everything in this article

    Truth be told, It’s a wild confusing world out there when it comes to choosing the right type of cooler.

    Air? Liquid? AIO? Let’s pick the right type of cooler…

    Air coolers

    Air coolers are the easiest to install. They the cheapest and they give good performance too. Air coolers are the best if you want to stay relaxed thinking that, there will be no leaking of liquid.

    The best thing is:

    A good Air cooler can perform more or less like a liquid cooler and it is of reasonable price too.Now there are many coolers which also look very gorgeous.

    Want to know the best part?

    Now the some good air coolers perform similar to aio liquid coolers or better in a low budget. Such a cooler is the “be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4”

    Some people may find problems for larger CPUs like the AMD Threadripper. And for this reason many people don’t buy an air cooler although supporting it the most.

    So, here’s the kicker:

    Air cooler: ​Pros & Cons

    Advantage
    • »Risk free
    • »Easy to install
    • »Power Consumption is relatively less.
    Cons
    • »Can have clearance issues with the Ram modules.
    • »Is not efficient for compact cases.
    • »Absorbs the hot air form GPU.

    AIO Liquid coolers

    Liquid coolers look very amazing and they are also of reasonable price than that of custom liquid kits.

    But your question might be:

    Are AIO coolers worth it?

    To answer this question I will say:

    They perform the best and they also separate the hot air of GPU from the CPUs’ cooling.

    There are a variety AIO coolers on market now which gives stunning performance.

    This is crazy:

    When you find some budget AIO liquid coolers and they perform very well.

    Such a price worth cooler is the gorgeous ML R by cooler master.

    We have an article of it’s in depth review. Be sure to check it out.

    Liquid Cooler: Pros & Cons

    Advantage
    • »Doesn’t absorb the hot air form GPU.
    • »Efficient for compact cases.
    • »Doesn’t have clearance issues with the Ram modules.
    Cons
    • »There is risk of leaking of the tubes.
    • »Hard to install.
    • »Power consumption is relatively high.

    Custom liquid coolers

    Now you are looking for a Beast cooling system.

    Disclaimer:

    There is nothing best than a custom liquid cooler in Performance, Aesthetics and High Price.

    It is obvious that:

    Liquid can cool a metal better than that of air.

    And if you can cool that liquid or remove its heat to a good level then your PC will be cool enough for overclocked to bigger numbers of clocks and memory speeds.

    The good thing is:

    You can build custom liquid system according to your wish. You can add solutions of various coolers too.

    The minimum parts you will need for building a liquid system are:

    Water block, reservoir, pump, radiator & fans, fittings, tubings, cooling solutions and thermal paste.

    You can buy this separately.

    Or else you can buy custom liquid cooling kits which are a package of all the things you will need.

    The best thing is:

    You can bend the tubes as you like to make it more gorgeous.

    You need to note that you need a good powerful PSU to run this kind of cooling system.

    There are two types of tubing:

    Hard tubing and Soft/Flexible tubing.

    Hard tubing looks better but the problem is it needs all the fittings of the same size.

    Some major problems are:

    If you have hard tubing over the ram modules or the m.2 SSD then you will find difficulty to add or remove them.

    If you don’t want those problems then you can use flexible tubes. It also makes the process of its installation easy and worth it. For the people who are upgrading their components frequently, I will not recommend the custom liquid cooling.

    So, here’s the deal:

    For those, to whom nothing really matters more than a Beast PC, custom liquid cooling is a must have for them.

    Gamers can’t take their satisfaction to the highest level without having a custom Liquid cooled PC.

    If are confused about which parts to buy for custom liquid cooling, and you want a simple solution for your problem. And if you don’t want to sacrifice the the beauty of RGB for any means then, I will suggest you to buy the thermaltake pacific m plus RGB kit.

    It comes with almost everything you need to build the custom cooling system including the solution. And most of the parts have RGB illuminations on them too.

    Final Thoughts

    You might be wondering:

    Which method will be the best for you to check both CPU and GPU temperatures at the same time?

    My answer will be to use CPUID HWMonitor.

    This app will let you see both CPU and GPU temperatures at the same time.

    You also might be thinking:

    Which will be the best pick among those methods for checking only CPU or GPU temperatures?

    Then I will say:

    Go for Bios for checking the CPU temperature only unless you are overclocking the processor.

    And for checking GPU temperatures I will suggest you to use MSI After Burner as it supports all the graphics cards.

    Sours: https://10scopes.com/monitor-cpu-gpu-temperature/
    1. Preterite vs imperfect
    2. Fire burner ring
    3. Comcast hd dta box
    4. Olyphant, pa directions

    Wait, how do you check your CPU temperature?

    Processors need a cooling solution for a reason, whether it's air or liquid. They can get hot. Like, really hot. Most desktops CPUs will run in the °C (that's °F) range under load, and a combo of good cooling and carefully-applied thermal paste should keep your CPU in that range. It's possible you'll see 80°C or higher if you're overclocking, but that should only be a cause for concern if you're running at stock speeds. So, how do you check your CPU temp?

    How hot your PC case gets on the outside isn't a reliable indicator of the state of your components. (Although you should be regularly dusting the inside. Every nook and cranny, fans especially.) Thankfully, it's easy to monitor your CPU temperature in real time, whether that's with third party software or RGB components that change color to indicate different temperature ranges. Monitoring software is going to be your best bet, since it will give you detailed information.

    How hot is too hot?

    Anything in the 90°C range and over is cause for concern, whether you're overclocking or not. Overheating can adversely affect the longevity of your CPU, shortening its life-span to under a year, or cause other issues like throttling. If your PC abruptly shuts down, inexplicably reboots itself, gives you a beep code at start-up, or a blue screen error, those are all signs you are pushing your processor beyond its limits. 

    Fixing overheating issues can be as simple as applying new thermal paste, dusting the fans, or upgrading from an air cooler to a liquid cooler, as liquid cooling transfers heat more effectively than air. On average, liquid cooling can lower your CPU temp by degrees. Not everyone needs liquid cooling, but one thing to watch out for with air cooling is overloading the cooler; if you have a CPU doing W with a W air cooler, it could overheat and throttle.

    What monitoring software should I use?

    HWMonitor

    Our favorite software tool for monitoring your CPU temperature, HWMonitor is geared toward those who really want to dig into their gaming PC's temperature stats. It doesn't have the prettiest user interface around, but not only does it real-time monitor the value, minimum, and maximum temperatures of your CPU, but it measures other things like per-core utilization and clock speed.

    HWMonitor also keeps track of the temperature, fan speed, and utilization of your other hardware components, too. It may seem like a lot, but if you only want to focus on you CPU, you can collapse the other categories so you don't get overwhelmed with rows and columns of numbers. You can also view you components by device or sensor type, and change the labels under every category—so you could rename every CPU core in the powers category to a Power Ranger if you really wanted to. (No? Is that just me?)

    CAM

    For those who want to simply track their temperatures without much fine tuning, NZXT's CAM software is great because of its visually pleasing user interface. It has a mode that tells you the temp, load, clock and fan speed of your CPU, as well as your GPU, in real-time. You can also adjust the clock speeds from CAM.

    It comes with certain cases, like the Hi, but even if you don't have any NZXT components in your build, you can still download it for free. The user interface will look different, but it still clearly conveys the information you need.

    HWiNFO 64

    If you want even more data, HWiNFO 64 is the way to go. When you first start the program, it will give you the option to run it in two modes: sensors-only and summary-only. Sensors-only is a long list of numbers like HWMonitor, but presented in a different way. Most of the information it gives you is the same as HWMonitor, but instead of collapsing categories to minimize how much you have to scroll, HWiNFO 64 give yous the option to open your PCs vitals in horizontal boxes, like so:

    Of course, having it open like that is not practical while gaming if you have only one or two monitors, but it's a nice alternative to scrolling and collapsing categories manually.

    Core Temp

    Core Temp keeps it simple, only monitoring the temperature and load of your CPU. Not only does it display these stats in real time, and for each individual core, but the temp for each core is also added under the 'show hidden icons' button in your task bar. Hover over each colorful number and it will tell you which core that temperature is associated with. However, those numbers will only be there if the program is open.

    On another note, do watch out for the bloatware that comes along with the installation file. It comes with a management sim mobile game called Goodgame Empire. Be sure to un-check that box before you install, as well as the box for a shortcut to Core Temp Addons, which is basically the same program just a different version of it. The main application will give you everything you nee.

    SpeedFan

    Yet another option for monitoring the temperature of your CPU and other components, SpeedFan focuses on giving you manual control over fan speed to keep your CPU as cool as possible. It's a bit more complicated than the previous monitoring programs listed here, but if you really like fine-tuning fan speed, especially of you have an air cooler, this is the program you need.

    Open Hardware Monitor

    Open Hardware Monitor looks and feels similar to HWMonitor, but it comes in a standalone zip and you don't need to actually install it on your PC. Other than that, it does almost everything that HWMonitor does.

    When Joanna's not writing about gaming desktops, cloud gaming, or other hardware-related things, she's doing terrible stuff in The Sims 4, roleplaying as a Malkavian, or playing horror games that would give normal people nightmares. She also likes narrative adventures.
    Sours: https://www.pcgamer.com/how-to-check-cpu-temp/

    Thread: New PC w/ Liquid Cooling - What should my temps be?

  • ,  PM#1

    Alcsaar is offline
    Herald of the Titans

    New PC w/ Liquid Cooling - What should my temps be?

    Hello everyone. I've recently built my new pc, and for the first time ever I've done a liquid cooling set up for the CPU.

    My CPU is an Intel i5 k and the cooler is a Corsair H

    My question is, what temps would you expect with this set up?

    CPUID HWMonitor is listing my package CPU temp as 37C Min, 56C Max. This is not really under load (Just installing some updates).


  • ,  PM#2

    chazus is offline
    Moderator chazus's Avatar

    Have you overclocked it at all?

    Gaming: Dual Intel Pentium III Coppermine @ mhz + Blue Orb | Asus CUVD | GeForce 2 Ti + ZFCu | mb Crucial PC | Whistler Build
    Media: Dual Intel Drake Xeon @ mhz | Intel Marlinspike MSGX | Matrox G | mb Crucial PC @ mhz | Windows Pro
    IT'S ALWAYS BEEN WANKERSHIM | Did you mean: Fhqwhgads

    "Three days on a tree. Hardly enough time for a prelude. When it came to visiting agony, the Romans were hobbyists." -Mab


  • ,  PM#3

    Alcsaar is offline
    Herald of the Titans

    No, not as of yet. I wanted to make sure it was running stable first.


  • ,  PM#4

    chazus is offline
    Moderator chazus's Avatar

    Those temps seem about normal. You really won't be able to get a good idea until you do some stress testing though.

    Gaming: Dual Intel Pentium III Coppermine @ mhz + Blue Orb | Asus CUVD | GeForce 2 Ti + ZFCu | mb Crucial PC | Whistler Build
    Media: Dual Intel Drake Xeon @ mhz | Intel Marlinspike MSGX | Matrox G | mb Crucial PC @ mhz | Windows Pro
    IT'S ALWAYS BEEN WANKERSHIM | Did you mean: Fhqwhgads

    "Three days on a tree. Hardly enough time for a prelude. When it came to visiting agony, the Romans were hobbyists." -Mab


  • ,  PM#5

    Steve the Sloth is offline
    Stood in the Fire Steve the Sloth's Avatar

    Download and run Prime95 on your system to stress test it. Shouldn't break ~60C on water.


  • ,  PM#6

    chazus is offline
    Moderator chazus's Avatar

    Haswell get's pretty toasty, even on water.

    Gaming: Dual Intel Pentium III Coppermine @ mhz + Blue Orb | Asus CUVD | GeForce 2 Ti + ZFCu | mb Crucial PC | Whistler Build
    Media: Dual Intel Drake Xeon @ mhz | Intel Marlinspike MSGX | Matrox G | mb Crucial PC @ mhz | Windows Pro
    IT'S ALWAYS BEEN WANKERSHIM | Did you mean: Fhqwhgads

    "Three days on a tree. Hardly enough time for a prelude. When it came to visiting agony, the Romans were hobbyists." -Mab


  • ,  PM#7

    Alcsaar is offline
    Herald of the Titans

    I was finally able to get into my bios to check settings after installing windows updates.

    Auto-speed adjustment was on, so I disabled it for my fan headers. Now I'm averaging C idle. Seems MUCH better. Still couldn't find out if my CPU_OPT header is getting the full 12v that it needs though.

    Also had a really weird blue screen when windows tried to start once Started fine after that, but scarey.


  • ,  PM#8

    Papi is offline
    The Patient Papi's Avatar

    The temps sound normal, and like Chazus stated, the Haswell's are a little toasty. I also had an H60 in the past and if its not set up with a push/pull, the radiator tends to get a little warm when Oc'ing.


  • ,  PM#9

    Skalm is offline
    Dreadlord
    QuoteOriginally Posted by ClassiccsView Post

    Download and run Prime95 on your system to stress test it. Shouldn't break ~60C on water.

    An H60 won't really give the performance of an actual custom water loop. Corsair Hydro Series Coolers are just like putting a mid/high end air cooler on your CPU. The only difference is that it is quieter.

    The unit (mainly the radiator) is just too small. Also the liquid does not cool as well as distilled water. Also the CPU block is small, so it does not absorb as much heat (and dissipate it into the air) compared to custom blocks. Also, because the pump is built into the block, and is so compact, the flow rate is too low (and the tubing is too thin and the pump isnot the best) to allow for a really good flow, which would greatly increase the cooling capacity.

    He is probably experiencing temperatures within an expected range. I would replace the thermal paste as soon as you can. Clean the crappy corsair thermal pad off the block/CPU and put some good thermal paste onto the CPU and then reseat the block onto it. The thermal paste will probably give you a C drop in temperatures, maybe more. You could use ArcticSilver 5, Arctic MX-2 or MX-4 or something else if you prefer.

    - - - Updated - - -

    QuoteOriginally Posted by AlcsaarView Post

    I was finally able to get into my bios to check settings after installing windows updates.

    Auto-speed adjustment was on, so I disabled it for my fan headers. Now I'm averaging C idle. Seems MUCH better. Still couldn't find out if my CPU_OPT header is getting the full 12v that it needs though.

    Also had a really weird blue screen when windows tried to start once Started fine after that, but scarey.

    Leave it on for your header that is running your pump. Otherwise you will run the pump at full blast all the time, which will cause it to wear out faster. Just set up a custom speed setting so that at xxC temp the pump will go at xx% speed. You should do the same for the fans that are on the radiator.

  • ,  PM#10

    Tomec is offline
    The Patient Tomec's Avatar
    QuoteOriginally Posted by AlcsaarView Post

    Also had a really weird blue screen when windows tried to start once Started fine after that, but scarey.

    Increase your voltage slightly. When I was working on an OC I got that, and soon as I upped the voltage it went away.

    QuoteOriginally Posted by SkalmView Post

    An H60 won't really give the performance of an actual custom water loop. Corsair Hydro Series Coolers are just like putting a mid/high end air cooler on your CPU. The only difference is that it is quieter.

    The unit (mainly the radiator) is just too small. Also the liquid does not cool as well as distilled water. Also the CPU block is small, so it does not absorb as much heat (and dissipate it into the air) compared to custom blocks. Also, because the pump is built into the block, and is so compact, the flow rate is too low (and the tubing is too thin and the pump isnot the best) to allow for a really good flow, which would greatly increase the cooling capacity.

    This. While I suppose it technically IS liquid cooling, performance wise it's heads and tails BELOW what "true" liquid cooling is. Just to put it in perspective, in a sense, I'm running a custom loop consisting of a 3x Radiator (3 mm fans vs the h60's 1) with a custom CPU block and stand alone pump. (Note that this is slightly over kill for just a CPU, but it's leftover from a larger cooling system in the past) Earlier today I ran prime95 on a I7 k (Ivy Bridge - E, not % sure I'm currently on stock bios or my OC'd though) for a couple hours. My max temp, according to Real Temp? 41c. It's also currently idling at about 20c. I'm also in California, so it's fairly warm here and I think the room temp is around 72f.

  • ,  PM#11

    glo is offline
    Immortal glo's Avatar
    QuoteOriginally Posted by TomecView Post

    Increase your voltage slightly. When I was working on an OC I got that, and soon as I upped the voltage it went away.



    This. While I suppose it technically IS liquid cooling, performance wise it's heads and tails BELOW what "true" liquid cooling is. Just to put it in perspective, in a sense, I'm running a custom loop consisting of a 3x Radiator (3 mm fans vs the h60's 1) with a custom CPU block and stand alone pump. (Note that this is slightly over kill for just a CPU, but it's leftover from a larger cooling system in the past) Earlier today I ran prime95 on a I7 k (Ivy Bridge - E, not % sure I'm currently on stock bios or my OC'd though) for a couple hours. My max temp, according to Real Temp? 41c. It's also currently idling at about 20c. I'm also in California, so it's fairly warm here and I think the room temp is around 72f.

    It's not possible for your chip to run cooler than your room temperature. Either your room temperature is 60f or your chip is running around 25c idle.

    ik - GTX Ti - 16GB DDR3 Ripjaws - (2) HyperX s / Vertex 3
    ASRock Extreme3 - Sennheiser Momentums - Xonar DG - EVGA Supernova G - Corsair H80i

    build pics


  • ,  PM#12

    Alcsaar is offline
    Herald of the Titans
    QuoteOriginally Posted by gloView Post

    It's not possible for your chip to run cooler than your room temperature. Either your room temperature is 60f or your chip is running around 25c idle.

    Why would that not be possible?

    To me thats like saying "It isn't possible for a refrigerator to cool below room temperature".

  • ,  PM#13

    Skalm is offline
    Dreadlord
    QuoteOriginally Posted by AlcsaarView Post

    Why would that not be possible?

    To me that's like saying "It isn't possible for a refrigerator to cool below room temperature".

    It is not possible because a water loop is not cooling the water with a compressor and such, like a refrigerator does. All a water loop does is remove heat from a CPU or whatever and use a radiator to dissipate the heat (Think Car Engine/Radiator).

    - - - Updated - - -

    Well you are cooling the water in a sense

    You are cooling it with the fans on the radiator, which is passing 'Room Temperature' air across it. That's why it won't go below room temperature.

  • ,  PM#14

    Tomec is offline
    The Patient Tomec's Avatar
    QuoteOriginally Posted by gloView Post

    It's not possible for your chip to run cooler than your room temperature. Either your room temperature is 60f or your chip is running around 25c idle.

    72f is 22c. I said "around" as the temps are hovering in that range and swapping between like 22/23/21 frequently. However, I will admit that I may be slightly off on room temp. I don't have a thermometer in here, but it is near the main thermostat for the house. That reads 70 right now, but this room is smaller and with the computer and stuff generally runs a few degrees warmer. But the case is also right at the door. So it's hard to say for sure. But keep in mind a rad is a big hunk of metal, and if you put fans blowing on it you're going to cool it down

    QuoteOriginally Posted by AlcsaarView Post

    Why would that not be possible?

    To me thats like saying "It isn't possible for a refrigerator to cool below room temperature".

    Computer cooling works slightly different in that it isn't actually "chilling" things. It's using room air to wick heat off the components. So you really can't fall below room temp. Also, that could lead to issues with condensation and stuff if it drops below room temp. Though some people DO use actual chilled setups, like ice in loop or fridge units or something.

  • ,  PM#15

    Skalm is offline
    Dreadlord

    If you want the CPU to go below room temperature, you either have to use a TEC Unit or Actively Cool the water in the loop using a compressor and such like a car would use for A/C


  • ,  PM#16

    Majesticii is offline
    Brewmaster Majesticii's Avatar

    With haswell it's not really about raw cooling power. The chip itself doesn't produce allot of heat to be dissipated. A H60 with a single fan is enough to keep it below thermal throttle though. But just don't expect sandy/lynnfield temperatures. The small chipsize and the on-die VRM's just cause the chip to heat up below the IHS. Not much a powerful cooling system can do about it.


  • ,  PM#17

    Skalm is offline
    Dreadlord
    QuoteOriginally Posted by MajesticiiView Post

    With haswell it's not really about raw cooling power. The chip itself doesn't produce allot of heat to be dissipated. A H60 with a single fan is enough to keep it below thermal throttle though. But just don't expect sandy/lynnfield temperatures. The small chipsize and the on-die VRM's just cause the chip to heat up below the IHS. Not much a powerful cooling system can do about it.

    As Mejesticii said, you will see higher 'CPU' temperatures because of the VRM that is now under the IHS with the CPU Die.

    Why?

    Because of how a VRM works (Lamens Terms: Think of it as a mini surge protector for your CPU). Say your CPU is v. Without the VRM it would get like 5v or 12v, whatever your PSU is providing. With the VRM it takes that 5v or 12v and only lets out ~v. That extra voltage is converted to Heat because it does not get redirected somewhere else. Since this VRM is now under the IHS it heats up the entire CPU die more than CPU's that have external VRM on the MoBo.

    Think of it like this. Car Engine = VRM, You = CPU Die.

    External VRM (Engine Under the Hood) = You (CPU Die) don't get as hot. A/C Cools you off good.
    Internal VRM (Engine is in Passenger Seat) = You (CPU Die) get Hot easy, and same A/C does not cool you off as good.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Here is what a Haswell looks like with the IHS off. The TIM is part of the issue with temps. Using solder to attach the IHS would provide better temperatures (better heat transfer from Die to IHS) But it is probably just cheaper to squirt some TIM there than to Solder them together. Also less chance for a DoA chip. Squirting TIM doesn't have the same chance to damage a Die as Melting Metal onto it has.

  • ,  AM#18

    Majesticii is offline
    Brewmaster Majesticii's Avatar

    Why always the car analogies, why not use examples that are more computer related. And that's not how a VRM works, it's not some voltage divider with resistances that transfers the excess into heat. It's usually a switched unit.
    Haswell has roughly the same temps delidded (yes i speak from experience, see sig), only thing that happens is a little less deviance between the cores. The TIM isn't the issue, it's the glue that 'lifts' the IHS a bit.

    Last edited by Majesticii; at AM.

  • ,  PM#19

    Tomec is offline
    The Patient Tomec's Avatar
    QuoteOriginally Posted by MajesticiiView Post

    Why always the car analogies, why not use examples that are more computer related.

    Maybe it's assumed more people will get car analogies since pretty much everyone will have, at one point in their life, used/been in a car. Plus lots more people "understand" how they work in a sense.

  • ,  AM#20

    Skalm is offline
    Dreadlord
    QuoteOriginally Posted by MajesticiiView Post

    Why always the car analogies, why not use examples that are more computer related. And that's not how a VRM works, it's not some voltage divider with resistances that transfers the excess into heat. It's usually a switched unit.
    Haswell has roughly the same temps delidded (yes i speak from experience, see sig), only thing that happens is a little less deviance between the cores. The TIM isn't the issue, it's the glue that 'lifts' the IHS a bit.

    Car analogya lot easier to understand for more people.

    For the VRM, my bad, for whatever reason I was thinking they were a Linear Regulator (Converts excess energy to heat).

  • Sours: https://www.mmo-champion.com/

    Cooling cpu temps water

    water temps not very good

    petedread said:

    That kink is on a drain port. This build is temporary. I am waiting on a delivery of some PETG, a rad, two fans, and a distro plate. I may return the rad as suggested by EarthDog. What do you think now that you can see the whole rig, does it look restrictive?
    View attachment

    Ok so I have had some time to do a bit of testing with Prime Granted I only ran it for an hour and ten minutes but after that, I ran valley benchmark over and over for two hours. Prime95 never went above 55c and Valley would go to 65c. Fans and pumps run at 65% up to 64c then they slide up to 75%.
    When my delivery arrives there will be a lot of '90s added to this loop.

    Click to expand



    You have serious airflow issues. Pay attention to intake and exhaust airflow as others have mentioned. What is your water temp btw?

    Here's my with 2 HWL Black Ice Nemesis L series Stealth rads, GT AP15 fans, x, Titan XP, etc etc. You'll notice it is setup with equal intake and exhaust fans. Temps wise, the system is very cool. GPU does not break 45c no matter the bench or load. CPU stays under 60c on average in benches or games, and only rises above that under P95 avx. Also, just as important is setting up hwinfo64 in combination with afterburner and rtss which will give you proper temp monitoring w/o creating observer effect issues. Also, the loop runs off the water temp, not cpu temp. Btw, the Stealth rads I use are the highest performing thin rads you can get. The new XSPC skinnies come close. I used to always run thicker rads, from Monstas to EK XE but the is seriously limited in rad thickness so I got the best skinny rads I could and they were cheap as heck too. Win win

    I suggest ya take a gander at this link if you want use hwi/ab/rtss.

    At 95c the chip throttles down. That&#;s kind of the point to the test.

    hardforum.com


    _jpg

     

    Sours: https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/water-temps-not-very-good/
    Air Cooling vs. Liquid Cooling: The Ultimate Showdown (feat. Noctua NH-D15 vs. NZXT Kraken X72)
    Seems I have a brother in arms with watercooling as well :)
    but lets try and clear up some of your problems, shall we ?

    1| Temps,
    IDLE - 43 deg C
    LOAD deg C

    Are those temps with an overclock or at stock clocks? What are your respective voltages if you've(or not) overclocked the processor?

    2| Alot of the AMD processors run at those temps, however I see those temps as normal for the situation you've left your system in. Reason?
    a|You have waytoo long of tubing runs going on for your loop. You could've had a good amount of tubing leftover for a few maintenance runs there.
    b|The butterfly block isn't that good of a performer in terms of performance waterblocks
    c|Although you haven't posted specs on your fans, they look like cougar fans? They are in pull, which means, you're dumping that hot cpu air inside your case and recycling part of that heat. How are you coping with the exhaust inside that case? The EX is also a semi high FPI rad which means you'd need good static pressure fans to get air through those fins thus see some drop in temps. Speaking of temps
    d|What are your ambient temps? In watercooling you can't reach sub-ambient temps with conventional means so practically speaking, you're temps will be reflected upon via the ambient air temps. The cooler the ambient temps the more heat your rad can cool.

    Ifyou're looking towards making changes, here are my suggestions:
    1| Clean up that tubing run and shorten it all out to the length that is needed instead of snaking around your case. While you're at it, try relocating the pump to a better position instead of the absolute bottom of the case. This would mean to plan out the layout of your loop properly.

    2| Make sure your airflow is sorted out with the case in taking cool air from the front and bottom while exhausting the hot air from rad out the back or top. Mind you the way you place the rads around the exhaust points will also reflect your temps. I have mine hung off the back and I see great temps. I previously had the rads internally mounted on the roof, which I later found out causes my rad to recycle its hot air and thus translate to hotter temps.

    3| If they're not, getting fans that are spec'd for radiators like:
    Bitfenix Pro's
    Scythe GT AP15/45's
    Noctua NF F's
    Silverstone AP's
    Corsair SP's
    Noisblocker Eloop's
    (or any fans that have good static pressure)

    would give you better temps.

    4| Make sure your mounting to the CPU IHS is proper. You can tell by applying TIM on your block and apply pressure with the mounting screws as if you were installing the block. Remove the block and note the spread of the TIM and if there are any bubbles between the TIM.

    Tip on applying the proper amount of pressure is to turn the screws diagonally opposite each other.
    a| Top right, lower left
    then
    b|Top left, lower right

    and continue doing this until the screws present resistance.

    5| Now that we're on the subject of TIM's, which one do you use and how did you apply it to your block?

    6| Try getting a block like the Raystorm and you should see a few deg drop. But getting a new block is warranted when you've tried all of the above.

    7| lastly an inspiration to how you can come out of this situation :)

    ^ courtesy of AMS build log in my sig

    Hope these help.
    :)
    * don't forget to tidy up those cables to help with your airflow.

     

    Sours: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/cpu-temp-after-water-cooling/

    Similar news:

    It's all good. I love you. Diyana turned to her and with tear-stained bright green eyes stared without blinking at the girl. Isn't it. Well, of course it's true, "Christina said.



    30910 30911 30912 30913 30914