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AMD Zen 3 reviewed: The best CPUs to buy in 2021 (Part I)

Anirudh RegidiAug 12, 2021 15:30:20 IST

2020-21 has been an interesting period for PCs. A pandemic-fueled spike in demand coupled with a severe parts shortage means that supply just couldn’t keep up with demand. Prices have been all over the place and parts are rarely in stock. As such, getting our hands on AMD’s new, Zen 3 based Ryzen 5000 chips has proven to be a challenge.

Now, 6 months after the launch of the chips, things are finally looking up and we’re seeing CPUs and GPUs on store shelves. If you, like myself, have been holding off on an upgrade for several years now, it’s a good time to look at where things stand and yet again mull over that long overdue upgrade.

Desktop-PC-CPU-Liquid-Cooler-Red (1)

AMD Zen 3

So… which CPUs should we be buying in 2021?

AMD vs Intel: Design

Before we dive in, it’s worth looking at how AMD and Intel have approached CPU design. This will help us understand the strengths and weaknesses of the chips, and inform our purchase decision.

If you’d like to skip straight to the data, head to part II of the review here.

If we think of a CPU as a factory, where data (raw material) is processed into a finished product, Intel’s approach is akin to Tesla’s Gigafactory where everything happens under one roof, and AMD’s to a more distributed approach involving smaller factories (called Core CompleX or CCX) and a complex system for communication (that AMD calls Infinity Fabric) between these mini factories. Zen 3 also introduced “chiplets”, where each component (Like the CCX) can be manufactured separately.

Intel’s monolithic architecture means that a CPU is essentially designed and manufactured as a single unit. This is great for efficiency and performance, since everything operates at the same frequency -- so to speak -- but the design is difficult to scale up and expensive to manufacture. A flaw in a single transistor could ruin an entire chip. Whether you’re buying a quad-core Intel CPU or a 10-core one, the entire CPU is, for all intents and purposes, functioning as a single unit.

AMD’s distributed approach, on the other hand, splits the CPU into two primary components: the CCX and IO dies. The CCX is a 6-core or 8-core unit that handles processing, while the IO die handles communication between the CPU and the rest of the components (RAM, storage, GPU, etc.). AMD’s Infinity Fabric handles internal communication between the CCXs and the IO die.

This design not only allows AMD to mix and match these CCXs as required, but it also allows AMD to scale up the design with relative ease and offer more cores at a relatively low cost. AMD could simply add more CCXs to the design and build 6 (1x 6-core CCX), 8 (1x 8-core CCX), 12 (2x 6-core CCX), 32 (4x 8-core CCX) CPUs with relatively minor modifications to the design. Do note that Zen 3 currently tops out at 16 cores, but previous designs did hit 64-core cores.

The downside to this approach is, of course, the difficulty in keeping these discrete modules in sync. Teething issues and developer support aside, this challenge played a significant role in keeping AMD’s earlier architectures — Zen and Zen+ — from offering real competition to Intel in 2017 and 2018. Their biggest achievement, I think, was forcing Intel to reduce prices and double the core counts in its CPUs.

Zen 2 vs Zen 3, and Intel’s response

Zen 2, which arrived in 2019, was a big upgrade, introducing chiplets, a 2nd Gen Infinity Fabric that was far more efficient, a larger cache (think of it like RAM, but on a CPU), a 7 nm manufacturing process, and support for PCIe Gen 4 (doubling bandwidth to GPUs and PCIe-based storage).

Chiplets are small chips that can be manufactured separately and integrated into a larger die. This, again, brings down the cost of manufacturing a CPU because yields are higher — a smaller chip has fewer points of failure.

Intel’s response was, for lack of a better phrase, a hot mess. Intel’s 10th Gen Core architecture called Comet Lake was fast, beating Zen 2 on the gaming front, but could only do so while running incredibly hot and consuming a tremendous amount of power. The Intel Core i9 10900K I tested in 2020, which was rated at 125 W TDP (Thermal Design Power, an indicator of the heat that needs to be dissipated by your CPU cooler),easily hit 300 W when pushed to the limit. My 240 mm liquid cooling loop could barely keep temperatures in check and operating at 90-95°C with fans screaming was… normal. I ran a 16-core 5950x on the same cooler with zero issues and minimal noise.

To add to this, Comet Lake lacked support for PCIe Gen 4, and was based on a heavily modified 6th Gen microarchitecture and venerable 14 nm manufacturing process that debuted in 2015.

While Comet Lake was the first of Intel’s chips to be competitively priced, any cost savings were offset by the need for expensive motherboards (for overclocking and faster RAM support) and cooling solutions to allow these chips to perform.

AMD was nipping at Intel’s heels, and Zen 2 was already proving to be very good value.

Then, mere months later, came Zen 3.

Zen 3: An overview

The name indicates that Zen 3 is a new architecture, and while that may be true, diving deep into the spec sheets and design documents for Zen 3 suggests that it’s more a redesign of Zen 2 — where each component was examined and re-engineered — than an entirely new architecture.

The biggest update here is to the CCX, which now goes up to 8-cores per CCX from the previous 4-core design. Previous gen 6- and 8-core CPUs used 2x 3-core CCXs and 2x 4-core CCXs respectively. Each Zen 3 CCX also gets up to 32 MB of L3 cache (an extremely fast data buffer), which is up from 16 MB on the previous gen.

Speaking of, here’s the full list of Zen 3 desktop CPUs currently available to consumers. Variations of these CPUs are currently available to OEMs, but not for retail purchase:

ModelCores/ThreadsBase Freq. (GHz)Turbo Freq. (GHz)L3 Cache (MB)TDP (W)
Ryzen 5 5600x6/123.74.61x 3265
Ryzen 7 5800x8/163.84.71x 32105
Ryzen 9 5900x12/243.74.82x 32105
Ryzen 9 5950x16/323.84.92x 32105

The base frequencies are what you’ll get at base TDP and will scale up based on your cooling solution. With my setup, these CPUs generally hit around 4.5 GHz on all cores under full load, with only the 5950x struggling to cross the 4 GHz mark. Given the number of cores it’s packing, this is understandable.

Another thing to note is that Intel’s CPUs easily cross the 5 GHz mark under light, single-threaded loads like gaming, and I’ve personally pushed the Intel 10700K and 10900K to an all-core turbo of 5.1 and 4.9 GHz respectively with minimal effort. This is primarily where Intel’s strength lies.

In effect, AMD claims that Zen 3 shows a 19 percent IPC improvement compared to Zen 2.

Neither of these CPUs has an integrated GPU.

11th Gen Intel (Rocket Lake) vs Zen 3

Intel’s response was… strange, to say the least.

We had high expectations from the Rocket Lake aka 11th Gen Intel Core architecture, but what we got instead was, well, a hack job. A hack job put together by some of the best engineers on the planet, but a hack job nonetheless.

Rocket Lake, Intel’s “2021” Core architecture, was essentially a 10 nm-based 2019 microarchitecture (designed for low-power laptops) back-ported to a 14 nm manufacturing process and infused with the GPU architecture from a 2020 CPU refresh. Yes, it’s exactly as confusing as it sounds.

But that’s not all. The 6- and 8-core CPUs are basically the same chip, with the 6-core ones having 2 cores disabled, and the quad-core 11th Gen i3 parts are actually just 10th Gen Comet Lake parts with some modifications.

You can’t just take something built for 10 nm and scale it up by 40 percent and expect things to work. The length of the processing pathways changes, latencies increase, voltages and power draw go up, heat increases, etc. The result, as expected, is a power-hungry chip that runs so hot that the flagship 11900K had to drop two cores, a significant increase in core-to-core latency, and a minuscule performance lead over Zen 3’s best in gaming.

The 8-core flagship is so bad, in fact, that it’s beaten by the previous gen 10-core 10900K in many workloads. Compared to the 12- and 16-core Zen 3 chips, Intel’s flagship pales.

I haven’t tested these 11th Gen Core desktop CPUs yet, so I’ll just summarize what dozens of reviewers online have reported:

  • When it comes to high-end desktop CPUs, Intel’s kinda lost the plot. The high price, low core count, and the need for expensive cooling and motherboards means there’s very little value to be had here. The lower end of the spectrum comprising Core i5 parts is still decent, but only if you already have an expensive motherboard or don’t intend to overclock. Even then, an overclockable Zen 2 CPU or 10th Gen Intel CPU is usually a better bet.
  • When it comes to gaming, only the 11700K and 11900K manage to beat the equivalent Zen 3 chips (5800x, 5900x, 5950x), but only by a small margin and, again, at a tremendous cost in terms of heat and power.

If you’re looking for a high-end desktop CPU in 2021, that only leaves you with Zen 3 aka Ryzen 5000.

In part II, we’ll put Zen 3 through its paces and take a closer look at its performance.

Sours: https://www.firstpost.com/tech/news-analysis/amd-zen-3-reviewed-the-best-cpus-to-buy-in-2021-part-i-9882111.html

AMD Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 Price, Benchmarks, Specs and Release Date

With the Ryzen 5000 series, it's fair to say that AMD has finally, and fully, eclipsed Intel's performance dominance in desktop PCs. AMD's Zen 3 architecture has landed in the new Ryzen 5000 series, breaking the 5GHz barrier with a newer version of AMD's most successful architecture to date. We've got plenty of gaming and application benchmarks, power measurements, and thermal testing here in this article to serve as a guide to the performance you can expect from AMD's most dominant series of processors in more than a decade. We also have pricing guides and links to tips on where to find the chips at retail, and you can see how the Ryzen 5000 chips rank compared to Intel's chips in our CPU Benchmark Hierarchy.

The desktop PC was first on AMD's Zen 3 chopping block, but the new microarchitecture powers AMD's full lineup of next-gen processors, including the Ryzen 5000 "Vermeer" desktop processors that have taken over our list of Best CPUs and the EPYC Milan data center processors. AMD has also now announced its new Ryzen 5000 Mobile series, which is coming to retail soon in a host of new laptops. This base design also powers the promising new Ryzen 5000G 'Cezanne' APUs that are coming to a desktop PC near you later this year. 

The first four Ryzen 5000 series desktop PC models stretch from the $299 Ryzen 5 5600X up to the $799 Ryzen 9 5950X. Barring shortages, the CPUs are on shelves now and represent a massive shift in the AMD vs Intel CPU wars. At launch, the Ryzen 5000 processors finally eclipsed Intel's chips in every single metric that matters, like single- and multi-threaded workloads, productivity applications, and 1080p gaming performance, all by surprising margins. 

AMD's Zen 3 features a ground-up rethinking of the microarchitecture that finally allowed it to take the 1080p gaming performance lead from Intel. Paired with a 19% boost to instructions per cycle (IPC) throughput and peak rated boost speeds of up to 4.9 GHz, Zen 3 is the magic 7nm bullet that finally upsets Intel from its position at the top of our CPU gaming benchmarks. 

However, Intel recently released the Rocket Lake processors, like the Core i9-11900K and Core i5-11600K, that bring the company's chips back into striking range, at least at the comparable price points, in several key criteria. You can see dedicated coverage of the renewed battle in our AMD Ryzen 5 5600X vs Intel Core i5-11600K and AMD Ryzen 9 5900X vs Intel Core i9-11900K features that put the key chips head-to-head. 

Here's the Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 series processors that AMD has launched thus far, but we expect more to come to market soon:

Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 Series ProcessorsRCP (MSRP) Cores/ThreadsBase/Boost Freq. TDPL3 CacheGraphics
Ryzen 9 5950X$79916 / 323.4 / 4.9 GHz105W64MB (2x32)N/A
Ryzen 9 5900X$54912 / 243.7 / 4.8 GHz105W64MB (2x32)N/A
Ryzen 7 5800X$4498 / 163.8 / 4.7 GHz105W32MB (2x16)N/A
Ryzen 5 5600X$2996 / 123.7 / 4.6 GHz65W32MB (2x16)N/A
Ryzen 7 5700G?8 / 163.8 / 4.665W20MBRX Vega 8
Ryzen 7 5700GE?8 / 163.2 / 4.635W20MBRX Vega 8
Ryzen 5 5600G?6 / 123.9 / 4.465W12MBRX Vega 7
Ryzen 5 5600GE?6 / 123.4 / 4.435W12MBRX Vega 7
Ryzen 3 5300G?4 / 84.0 / 4.265W10MBRX Vega 6
Ryzen 3 5300GE?4 / 83.6 / 4.235W10MBRX Vega 6

AMD's Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 series begins with the impressive 16-core 32-thread Ryzen 9 5950X that has a recommended $799 price tag. This chip boosts up to 4.9 GHz, has 64MB of unified L3 cache, and a 105W TDP rating. As you'll see in the CPU benchmark comparisons below, AMD's Ryzen chip is faster than Intel's 10-core Core i9-10900K in pretty much everything, which isn't surprising — Intel has no equivalent for the mainstream desktop.

The $549 Ryzen 9 5900X slots in as the more mainstream contender, at least by AMD's definition of 'mainstream,' with 12 cores and 24 threads that boost up to 4.8 GHz. Intel's Rocket Lake Core i9-11900K exceeds the 5900X's AMD's single-threaded prowess while still trailing in gaming and multi-threaded work.

The 6-core 12-thread $299 Ryzen 5 5600X's base clocks come in at 100 MHz less than the previous-gen 3600XT, while boosts are 100 MHz higher at 4.6 GHz. AMD's previous-gen 6C/12T Ryzen 5 3600XT had a 95W TDP, but AMD dialed that back to 65W with the 5600X, showing that Zen 3's improved IPC affords lots of advantages. Despite the reduced TDP rating, the 5600X delivers explosive performance gains. 

The Ryzen 5 5600X's $300 price tag establishes a new price band for a mainstream processor, so Intel doesn't have chips with an identical price range; the Core i5-11600K is the nearest Intel comparable. This chip carries a $262 price tag for the full-featured model, while the graphics-less 11600KF weighs in at $237. 

But AMD does have a glaring hole in its product stack: You'll have to shell out an extra $150 to step up from the $300 6C/12T Ryzen 5 5600X to the $450 8C/16T Ryzen 7 5800X, which is a steep jump that leaves room for the 10700K to operate. Based upon product naming alone, it appears there is a missing Ryzen 7 5700X in the stack, but it remains to be seen if AMD will actually introduce that model. 

AMD also recently announced the Ryzen 9 5900 and Ryzen 7 5800 processors, but those are destined for OEMs, meaning you won't be able to find them at retail. The company also announced its Ryzen 5000 Mobile 'Cezanne' processors at CES 2021, bringing the power of Zen 3 to laptops for the first time, which we'll dive into further below. AMD has also announced its long-anticipated Ryzen 5000G chips that come armed with the Zen 3 architecture and Vega graphics. These chips are headed to OEMs now and will come to retail outlets soon, meaning enthusiasts will soon have a lower-cost path to entry-level gaming, which will be helpful in these times of shortages. 

As odd as it sounds, Intel may have one hidden advantage — pricing. AMD now positions the Ryzen 5000 series as the premium brand. As a result, AMD has pushed pricing up by $50 across the stack compared to its Ryzen XT models. However, the XT family doesn't really represent AMD's best value; its own Ryzen 3000 series, which comes at much lower price points, holds that crown. 

However, AMD still maintains the performance-per-dollar lead that justifies the price tag. Let's see below how that shakes out.  

AMD Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 Series At A Glance

  • 1080p gaming performance leadership
  • Ryzen 9, 7, and 5 models
  • CPUs from 6C/12T up to 16C/32T
  • Same optimized 7nm process as Ryzen XT models
  • Zen 3 microarchitecture delivers 19% IPC improvement
  • 24% gen-on-gen power efficiency improvement — 2.8X better than 10900K
  • Higher peak frequencies for most models — 4.9 GHz on Ryzen 9 5950X
  • Lower base frequency for all models, offset by increased IPC
  • L3 cache now unified in a single 32MB cluster per eight-core chiplet (CCD)
  • Higher pricing across the stack (~$50)
  • No bundled cooler with Ryzen 9 and Ryzen 7 models
  • Drop-in compatible with the AM4 socket
  • No new chipset/motherboards launched
  • Current-gen 500-series motherboards work now (caveats below)
  • Beta support for 400-series motherboards has already begun
  • All Zen 3 desktop, mobile, and APU CPUs will carry Ryzen 5000 branding
  • Same 142W maximum socket power for AM4 socket as previous-gen
  • Same 12nm GlobalFoundries I/O Die (IOD)

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Specifications

Here we can see the full Ryzen 5000 series product stack, and how the new CPUs stack up against Intel's Comet Lake. The first big thing you'll notice is the increased Precision Boost clock rates, which now stretch up to 4.9 GHz. However, we also see a broad trend of lower base frequencies for the Ryzen 5000 series compared to the previous-gen processors, but that isn't too surprising considering the much higher performance-per-watt that we'll outline below.

Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 Series ProcessorsRCP (MSRP)Cores/ThreadsBase/Boost Freq.TDPL3 Cache
Ryzen 9 5950X$79916 / 323.4 / 4.9105W64MB (2x32)
Core i9-10980XE$815 (retail) 18 / 363.0 / 4.8165W24.75MB
Ryzen 9 3950X$74916 / 323.5 / 4.7105W64MB (4x16)
Ryzen 9 5900X$54912 / 243.7 / 4.8 105W64MB (2x32)
RKL-S Core i9-11900K (KF)$539 (K) - $513 (KF)8 / 163.5 / 5.3125W16MB
Core i9-10900K / F$488 - $47210 / 203.7 / 5.3125W20MB
Ryzen 9 3900XT$49912 / 243.9 / 4.7105W64MB (4x16)
Ryzen 7 5800X$4498 / 163.8 / 4.7 105W32MB (2x16)
Core i9-10850K$45310 / 203.6 / 5.295W20MB
RKL-S Core i7-11700K (KF)$399 (K) - $374 (KF)8 / 163.6 / 5.0125W16MB
Core i7-10700K / F$374 - $3498 / 163.8 / 5.1125W16MB
Ryzen 7 3800XT$3998 / 163.9 / 4.7105W32MB (2x16)
Ryzen 5 5600X$2996 / 123.7 / 4.6 65W32MB (1x32)
RKL-S Core i5-11600K (KF)$262 (K) - $237(KF)6 / 123.9 / 4.9125W12MB
Core i5-10600K / F$262 - $2376 / 124.1 / 4.8125W12MB
Ryzen 5 3600XT$2496 / 123.8 / 4.595W32MB (1x32)

AMD obviously leans on its improved IPC rather than raw clock speeds, thus boosting its power efficiency and reducing heat generation. The Ryzen 5 5600X is the best example of that — despite only a slight reduction to the base frequency, the chip drops to a 65W TDP compared to its predecessor's 95W. 

What's not as impressive? AMD has continued with the precedent it set with its Ryzen XT series: Bundled coolers no longer come with processors with a TDP higher than 65W. That means the Ryzen 5 5600X will be the only Ryzen 5000 chip that comes with a cooler in the box. AMD said it decided to skip bundled coolers in higher-TDP models largely because it believes most enthusiasts looking for high-performance CPUs use custom cooling anyway. AMD also still specs a 280mm (or greater) AIO liquid cooler for the Ryzen 9 and 7 CPUs, which significantly adds to the overall platform costs.  

AMD continues to only guarantee its boost frequencies on a single core, and all-core boosts will vary based on the cooling solution, power delivery, and motherboard BIOS. The Ryzen 5000 series CPUs still expose the same 20 lanes of PCIe 4.0 to the user (another four are dedicated to the chipset) and stick with DDR4-3200 memory. Memory overclocking capabilities have also improved vastly, particularly regarding fabric clocking that allows tuners to run the memory in optimized 'coupled' 1:1 mode. We've seen plenty of reports of reaching DDR4-4000 in coupled mode, and we've done it ourselves. However, as with all overclocking, your mileage may vary – we could only achieve a stable DDR4-4000 overclocked in coupled mode with one of our four samples (the 5950X).

Ryzen 5000 Mobile

Before we jump to performance benchmarks for the desktop chips, AMD announced the 'Cezanne' Ryzen 5000 Mobile processors that bring the powerful Zen 3 architecture to the notebook market for the first time, opening the door for the company to finally have a larger presence in the highest-end gaming notebooks. That means that we'll finally see AMD's chips paired with the highest-end mobile GPUs when the new Ryzen 5000 Mobile processors come to market in February, which could shake up our Best Gaming Laptops rankings. 

Cores / ThreadsBase / BoostTDPGPU CU / BoostCache
Ryzen 9 5980HX8 / 163.3 / 4.845W+8 / 2.1 GHz20MB
Ryzen 9 5980HS8 / 163.0 / 4.835W8 / 2.1 GHz20MB
Ryzen 9 5900HX8 / 163.3 / 4.645W+8 / 2.1 GHz20MB
Ryzen 9 5900HS8 / 163.0 / 4.635W8 / 2.1 GHz20MB
Ryzen 9 4900H8 / 163.3 / 4.345W8 / 1.75 GHz12MB
Ryzen 9 4900HS8 / 163.0 / 4.335W8 / 1.75 GHz12MB
Ryzen 7 5800H8 / 163.2 / 4.445W8 / 2.0 GHz20MB
Ryzen 7 4800H8 / 162.9 / 4.245W7 / 1.6 GHz12MB
Ryzen 7 5800HS8 / 162.8 / 4.435W8 / 2.0 GHz20MB
Ryzen 7 4800HS8 / 162.9 / 4.235W7 / 1.6 GHz12MB
Ryzen 5 5600H6 / 123.3 / 4.245W7 / 1.8 GHz19MB
Ryzen 5 4600H6 / 123.0 / 4.045W6 / 1.5 GHz11MB
Ryzen 5 5600HS6 / 123.0 / 4.235W7 / 1.8 GHz19MB
Ryzen 5 4600HS6 / 123.0 / 4.035W6 / 1.5 GHz11MB

AMD says the new chips set the new standard for battery life in x86 notebooks and remain the only 8-core x86 chips for ultrathin laptops. The 13 new processors span from low-power 15W chips up to two new overclockable 45W+ HX-series models designed to bring desktop PC-like gaming performance to notebooks. The Ryzen 5000 mobile processors all come with threading enabled, the 7nm Vega graphics engine with higher graphics boost clocks than the prior-gen models, support CPPC (Collaborative Power and Performance Control) technology, which we’ll dive into shortly, and have higher CPU boost clocks than the previous-gen. 

As before, the H-series models are designed for notebooks that will use discrete graphics. The two 45W+ eight-core HX models carve out a new high-performance niche by bringing CPU, memory, and fabric overclocking to AMD-powered notebooks for the first time, but overclocking headroom will largely be dictated by the thermal and power characteristics of each notebook. Naturally, bulkier notebooks with more robust cooling and power delivery will unlock better overclockability.

The two H models slot in with eight- and six-core variants and a 45W TDP rating, with the former having eight CUs that boost to 2.0 GHz, while the latter has seven CUs that stretch up to 1.8 GHz.  

AMD also expanded its HS series with four chips with boost clocks that reach up to 4.8 GHz within the 35W TDP envelope. AMD segments the HS stack with three eight-core models with varying base and boost clocks, but these models have lower base clocks than the H-series models to accommodate the 35W TDP envelope. AMD also has a lone six-core twelve-thread model to round out the bottom of the H-Series stack. AMD also segments the HS models with either seven or eight Vega CUs, with peak boost clocks weighing in at 2.1 GHz.

Cores / ThreadsBase / BoostGPU CU / BoostCache
Ryzen 7 5800U - Zen 38 / 161.9 / 4.48 / 2.0 GHz20MB
Ryzen 7 4800U8 / 161.8 / 4.18 / 1.75 GHz8MB
Ryzen 7 5700U - Zen 28 / 161.8 / 4.38 / 1.9 GHz12MB
Ryzen 7 4700U8 / 162.0 / 4.17 / 1.6 GHz8MB
Ryzen 5 5600U - Zen 36 / 122.3 / 4.27 / 1.8 GHz19MB
Ryzen 5 4600U6 / 122.1 / 4.06 / 1.5 GHz8MB
Ryzen 5 5500U - Zen 26 / 122.1 / 4.07 / 1.8 GHz11MB
Ryzen 5 4500U6 / 62.3 / 4.06 / 1.5 GHz8MB
Ryzen 3 5400U - Zen 34 / 82.6 / 4.06 / 1.6 GHz10MB
Ryzen 3 4300U4 / 42.7 / 3.75 / 1.4 GHz4MB
Ryzen 3 5300U - Zen 24 / 82.6 / 3.86 / 1.5 GHz6MB

The 15W U-Series models slot in for thin and light devices and will often lean on the integrated graphics units. AMD recently chose to unify its Ryzen Mobile branding under the same Ryzen 5000 umbrella as its desktop chips to clear up the confusion with the Ryzen 4000 series processors that came with an older architecture than desktop Ryzen 3000 models. 

However, AMD also sprinkled in three Zen 2 'Lucienne' chips in the Ryzen 5000 Mobile stack, muddying the waters. AMD says this approach meets specific pricing criteria and customer (OEM) demand on the lower end of its product stack. These Zen 2-powered Ryzen 3, 5, and 7 models slot into the lowest-end 15W U-series category.

The Zen 2 variants come with the same design as their predecessors, but again, the targeted enhancements to the SoC (all of the same modifications listed below apply) and increased clock rates result in higher performance.

The Ryzen 7, 5, and 3 families also include one Zen 3 model apiece with either eight cores and 16 threads, or four cores and eight threads. Unlike the previous-gen Ryzen 4000 chips, all of the 15W models come threading enabled. 

We're primarily focused on the desktop PC chips for this article, but you can head to our AMD Announces Ryzen 5000 Mobile 'Cezanne' Processors, Zen 3 and Overclocking Comes to Laptops article for an overview of the mobile chips, including Ryzen 5000 Mobile benchmarks.  We also have our AMD Ryzen 5000 Mobile 'Cezanne' SoC Deep Dive: Zen 3 Powers Into Notebooks article that has all the deep-dive architectural details.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Zen 3 Performance Benchmarks and Comparisons 

AMD Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X Gaming and Application CPU Benchmarks 

Here you can see the geometric mean of our gaming tests at 1080p and 1440p, with each resolution split into its own chart. 

We're accustomed to Intel dominate the gaming charts, so these cumulative measurements are quite shocking: AMD's stock Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X lead Intel's heavily-overclockedCore i9-10900K and Core i7-10700K in our 1080p gaming suite in average frame rates (Intel's overclocked chips hold a slight lead in 99th-percentile measurements). 

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To put things in perspective, take a glance at the delta in 1080p gaming between the previous-gen Ryzen 9 3900XT, which basically runs overclocked right out of the box, compared to the Ryzen 9 5950X. That's a huge generational leap. AMD has made big gains in a single generation.

Flipping over to the 1440p chart improves things a bit for Intel, but only slightly — the overclocked Core i9-10900K returns to its normal spot at the top of the chart, and it still has better 99th percentile frame rates after overclocking. However, AMD still beats Intel in both average and 99th-percentiles at stock settings, cementing the company's lead.    

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Here are the individual results of our Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X real-world game benchmarks at both 1080p and 1440p resolutions. For further analysis of each title, and to see our synthetic gaming benchmarks, head to our review. 

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These measurements include the geometric mean of both the most important lightly- and heavily-threaded tests in our application suite, which gives us a broad sense of overall performance. We're quite accustomed to AMD's chips leading in the multi-threaded rankings while trailing, sometimes by a big amount, in the single-threaded performance ranking. Zen 3 changes that entirely and easily leads both rankings. This is the underpinnings of the solid performance we see in nearly every workload we throw at the Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. 

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Sours: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-zen-3-ryzen-5000-release-date-specifications-pricing-benchmarks-all-we-know
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List of AMD Ryzen processors

Wikipedia list article

The AMDRyzen family is an x86-64microprocessor family from AMD, based on the Zen microarchitecture. The Ryzen lineup includes Ryzen 3, Ryzen 5, Ryzen 7, Ryzen 9, and Ryzen Threadripper with up to 64 cores. All consumer Ryzens have an unlocked multiplier and all support Simultaneous Multithreading (SMT) except earlier Zen/Zen+ based desktop Ryzen 3 and Zen/Zen+/Zen 2 (Lucienne excluded) based mobile Ryzen 3.

Features overview[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Desktop processors[edit]

Zen based (1st generation)[edit]

CPUs[edit]

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory support[ii]TDP
Base PBO

XFR[1]
L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200[2]July 27, 2017
US $109
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD4 (4) 2 × 2 3.1 3.4
(3.1)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 1200 [3]July 27, 2017
OEM
3.1 3.4
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 Pro 1300 [4]July 27, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
?
Ryzen 3 1300X[5]July 27, 2017
US $129
3.5 3.7
(3.5)
3.9
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 1400 [6]April 11, 2017
US $169
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD4 (8) 2 × 2 3.2 3.4
(3.4)
3.45 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 4 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 1500 [7]April 11, 2017
OEM
3.5 3.7
(?)
? 2 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen 5 1500X[8]April 11, 2017
US $189
3.5 3.7
(3.6)
3.9
Ryzen 5 1600 [9]April 11, 2017
US $219
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.2 3.6
(3.4)
3.7
Ryzen 5 Pro 1600 [10]April 11, 2017
OEM
3.2 3.6
(?)
?
Ryzen 5 1600X [11]April 11, 2017
US $249
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1 95 W
Performance
Ryzen 7 1700 [12]March 2, 2017
US $329
GloFo
14LP
1 × CCD8 (16) 2 × 4 3.0 3.7
(3.2)
3.75 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 1700 [13]March 2, 2017
OEM
3.0 3.8
(?)
?
Ryzen 7 1700X [14]March 2, 2017
US $399
3.4 3.8
(3.5)
3.9 95 W
Ryzen 7 1800X [15]March 2, 2017
US $499
3.6 4.0
(3.7)
4.1
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 1900X [16]August 31, 2017
US $549
GloFo
14LP
2 × CCD[iii]8 (16) 2 × 4 3.8 4.0
(3.9)
4.2 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
2 × 8 MB
per CCX
TR464 (60+4) DDR4-2667
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 1920X [17]August 10, 2017
US $799
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.0 4.2 4 × 8 MB
per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper 1950X [18]August 10, 2017
US $999
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.4 4.0
(3.7)
4.2
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^Official Support per AMD. CPU's are unlocked for different memory speeds.
  3. ^Processor package actually contains two additional inactive dies to provide structural support to the integrated heat spreader.

APUs[edit]

Zen+ based (2nd generation)[edit]

CPUs[edit]

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core Config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)
Memory
support
TDP
Base PB2L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 1200 AF
(12 nm refresh)[31]
April, 2020
US $60
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD4 (4) 1 × 4 3.1 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 2300X [32]September 10, 2018
OEM
3.5 4.0
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 2500X [33]September 10, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD4 (8) 1 × 4 3.6 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600E [34]September 2018
OEM
6 (12) 2 × 3 3.1 4.0 16 MB
8 MB per CCX
DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 5 1600 AF
(12 nm refresh)[35]
October 11, 2019
US $85
3.2 3.6 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 2600 [36]April 19, 2018
US $199
3.4 3.9
Ryzen 5 2600X [37]April 19, 2018
US $229
3.6 4.2 95 W
November 23, 2018
UK £221.99
Performance
Ryzen 7 2700E [38]September 11, 2018
OEM
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
1 × CCD8 (16) 2 × 4 2.8 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-2667
dual-channel
45 W
Ryzen 7 2700 [39]April 19, 2018
US $299
3.2 4.1 DDR4-2933
dual-channel
65 W
November 23, 2018
UK £285.49
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700 [40]April 2018
OEM
3.2 4.1
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700X [41]September 6, 2018
OEM
3.6 4.1 95 W
Ryzen 7 2700X [42]April 19, 2018
US $329
3.7 4.3 105 W
High-end desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 2920X [43]October 2018
US $649
GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
2 × CCD12 (24) 4 × 3 3.5 4.3 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
8 MB per CCX
TR464 (60+4) DDR4-2933
quad-channel
180 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2950X [44]August 31, 2018
US $899
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5 4.4
Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX [45]October 2018
US $1299
4 × CCD24 (48) 8 × 3 3.0 4.2 64 MB
8 MB per CCX
250 W
Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX [46]August 13, 2018
US $1799
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.0 4.2
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX

APUs[edit]

Zen 2 based (3rd generation)[edit]

CPUs[edit]

Model Release date
and price
FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocketPCIe lanes
(User accessible+Chipset link)[ii]
Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1L2L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 3100[54]April 21, 2020
$99
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
4 (8) 2 × 2 3.6 3.9 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 3300X[55]April 21, 2020
$120
1 × 4 3.8 4.3 16 MB
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 3500 November 15, 2019
OEM (West)
Japan ¥16000[56]
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
6 (6) 2 × 3 3.6 4.1 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
16 MB
8 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 3500X[57]October 8, 2019
China ¥1099
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen 5 3600[58]July 7, 2019
US $199
6 (12) 3.6 4.2
Ryzen 5 Pro 3600[59]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 5 3600X[60]July 7, 2019
US $249
3.8 4.4 95 W
Ryzen 5 3600XT[61]July 7, 2020
US $249
4.5
Performance
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700[62]September 30, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.6 4.4 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W[iii]
Ryzen 7 3700X[64]July 7, 2019
US $329
Ryzen 7 3800X[65]July 7, 2019
US $399
3.9 4.5 105 W
Ryzen 7 3800XT[66]July 7, 2020
US $399
4.7
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 3900[67]October 8, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.1 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
AM424 (20+4) DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 Pro 3900[68]September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 9 3900X[69]July 7, 2019
US $499
3.8 4.6 105 W[iv]
Ryzen 9 3900XT[70]July 7, 2020
US $499
4.7
Ryzen 9 3950X[71]November 25, 2019
US $749
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5
High-End Desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 3960X[72]November 25, 2019
US $1399
TSMC
7FF
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
24 (48) 8 × 3 3.8 4.5 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
128 MB
16 MB per CCX
sTRX464 (56+8) DDR4-3200
quad-channel
280 W[v]
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X[74]November 25, 2019
US $1999
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.7 4.5
Ryzen Threadripper 3990X[75]February 7, 2020
US $3990
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.9 4.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
Workstation
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3945WX[76]July 14, 2020
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/O
12 (24) 4 × 3 4.0 4.3 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
64 MB
16 MB per CCX
sWRX8 128 (120+8) DDR4-3200
octa-channel
280 W
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX[77]July 14, 2020
OEM
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.9
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX[78]July 14, 2020
OEM
4 × CCD
1 × I/O
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.5 4.2 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX[79]July 14, 2020
OEM
8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.7 4.2 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
  1. ^Core Complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^The chipset itself provides additional user-accessible PCIe lanes and integrated PCIe devices, see AM4 chipsets.
  3. ^Ryzen 7 3700X may consume over 90 W under load.[63]
  4. ^Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X may consume over 145 W under load.[63]
  5. ^Ryzen Threadripper 3990X may consume over 490 W under load.[73]

APUs[edit]

Although AMD has retired the term "APU", it is traditionally used to describe a CPU with an integrated GPU. Systems using a Ryzen APU will not need a dedicated or discrete graphics card.

Model Release date
and price
FabCPU GPU Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel Config[a]Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[b]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 4300G July 21, 2020

(OEM only)

TSMC

7nm FinFET

4 (8) 3.8 4.0 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB RX Vega 6 384:24:12
6 CU
1700 MHz 1305.6 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G
Ryzen 5 4600G 6 (12) 3.7 4.2 8 MB RX Vega 7 448:28:14
7 CU
1900 MHz 1702.4
Ryzen 5 Pro 4650G
Ryzen 7 4700G 8 (16) 3.6 4.4 RX Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU
2100 MHz 2150.4
Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G
Ryzen 3 4300GE 4 (8) 3.5 4.0 4 MB RX Vega 6 384:24:12
6 CU
1700 MHz 1305.6 35 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 4350GE
Ryzen 5 4600GE 6 (12) 3.3 4.2 8 MB RX Vega 7 448:28:14
7 CU
1900 MHz 1702.4
Ryzen 5 Pro 4650GE
Ryzen 7 4700GE 8 (16) 3.1 4.3 RX Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU
2000 MHz 2048
Ryzen 7 Pro 4750GE 2100 MHz 2150.4

Zen 3 based (4th generation)[edit]

CPUs[edit]

  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX.

APUs[edit]

Mobile processors[edit]

Zen based[edit]

Model Release
date
FabCPU GPU Memory supportTDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel Config[a]Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[b]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 2200U[101]January 8, 2018 14 nm 2 (4) 2.5 3.4 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 3 192:12:4
3 CU [102]
1100 MHz 422.4 DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 3 3200U[103]January 6, 2019 2.6 3.5 1200 MHz 460.8
Ryzen 3 3250U[104]January 6, 2020
Ryzen 3 2300U[105]January 8, 2018 4 (4) 2.0 3.4 Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU [106]
1100 MHz 844.8
Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U[107]May 15, 2018
Ryzen 5 2500U[108]October 26, 2017 4 (8) 3.6 Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU [109]
1126.4
Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U[110]May 15, 2018
Ryzen 5 2600H[111]September 10, 2018 3.2 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W
Ryzen 7 2700U[112]October 26, 2017 2.2 3.8 Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU [113]
1300 MHz 1664 DDR4-2400
dual-channel
12–25 W
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U[114]May 15, 2018
Ryzen 7 2800H [115]September 10, 2018 3.3 Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1830.4 DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35–54 W

Zen+ based[edit]

Model Release
date
FabCPU GPU Memory supportTDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel Config[i]Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[ii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 3300U[116]January 6, 2019 GloFo
12LP (14LP+)
4 (4) 2.1 3.5 64 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB Vega 6 384:24:8
6 CU[117]
1200 MHz 921.6 DDR4-2400
dual-channel
15 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 3300U[118]April 8, 2019
Ryzen 3 3350U[119]January 6, 2019
Ryzen 5 3450U[120]June 2020 4 (8) Vega 8 512:32:16
8 CU[121]
1228.8
Ryzen 5 3500U[122]January 6, 2019 3.7
Ryzen 5 PRO 3500U[123]April 8, 2019
Ryzen 5 3500C[124]September 22, 2020
Ryzen 5 3550H[125]January 6, 2019 35 W
Ryzen 5 3580U[126]October 2019 Vega 9 576:36:16
9 CU
1300 MHz 1497.6 15 W
Ryzen 7 3700U[127]January 6, 2019 2.3 4.0 Vega 10 640:40:16
10 CU[128]
1400 MHz 1792.0
Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U[129]April 8, 2019
Ryzen 7 3700C[130]September 22, 2020
Ryzen 7 3750H[131]January 6, 2019 35 W
Ryzen 7 3780U[132]October 2019 Vega 11 704:44:16
11 CU
1971.2 15 W

Zen 2 based[edit]

Renoir (4000 series)[edit]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU SocketPCIe
lanes
Memory supportTDP
FabTransistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 4300U[133][134]March 16, 2020 TSMC
7FF
9,800 156 4 (4) 1 × 4 2.7 3.7 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
320:20:8
5 CU
1400 MHz 896 FP6 16 (8+4+4) DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 4450U[135]May 7, 2020 4 (8) 2.5
Ryzen 5 4500U[136][137]March 16, 2020 6 (6) 2 × 3 2.3 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152
Ryzen 5 4600U[138]6 (12) 2.1
Ryzen 5 PRO 4650U[139]May 7, 2020
Ryzen 5 4680U[140]April 13, 2021 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1344
Ryzen 5 4600HS[141]March 16, 2020 3.0 AMD Radeon Graphics
384:24:8
6 CU
1152 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H[142][143]35–54 W
Ryzen 7 4700U[144]8 (8) 2 × 4 2.0 4.1 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U[145]May 7, 2020 8 (16) 1.7
Ryzen 7 4800U[146]March 16, 2020 1.8 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792
Ryzen 7 4980U[147]April 13, 2021 2.0 4.4 1950 MHz 1996.8
Ryzen 7 4800HS[148]March 16, 2020 2.9 4.2 AMD Radeon Graphics
448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 35 W
Ryzen 7 4800H[149][150]35–54 W
Ryzen 9 4900HS[151]3 4.3 AMD Radeon Graphics
512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792 35 W
Ryzen 9 4900H[152]3.3 4.4 35–54 W

Lucienne (5000 series)[edit]

Zen 3 based[edit]

Cezanne[edit]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU SocketPCIe
lanes
Memory supportTDP
FabTransistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 5400U[157][158]January 12, 2021 TSMC
7FF
4 (8) 1 × 4 2.6 4.0 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
6 CU
1600 MHz 1228.8 FP6 16 (8+4+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200 64GB
LPDDR4-4266 32GB
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 5450U[159]March 16, 2021 15 W
Ryzen 5 5600U[160]January 12, 2021 6 (12) 1 × 6 2.3 4.2 16 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
7 CU
1800 MHz 1612.8 10-25 W
Ryzen 5 PRO 5650U[161]March 16, 2021 15 W
Ryzen 5 5600H[162][163]January 12, 2021 3.3 35–54 W
Ryzen 5 5600HS[164]3.0 35 W
Ryzen 7 5800U[165]10,700 180 8 (16) 1 × 8 1.9 4.4 AMD Radeon Graphics
8 CU
2000 MHz 2048 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U[166]March 16, 2021 15 W
Ryzen 7 5800H[167][168]January 12, 2021 3.2 35–54 W
Ryzen 7 5800HS[169]2.8 35 W
Ryzen 9 5900HS[170]3.0 4.6 2100 MHz 2150.4
Ryzen 9 5900HX[171]3.3 35–54 W
Ryzen 9 5980HS[172]3.0 4.8 35 W
Ryzen 9 5980HX[173]3.3 35–54 W

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_AMD_Ryzen_processors

AMD Zen 3 Ryzen Deep Dive Review: 5950X, 5900X, 5800X and 5600X Tested

When AMD announced that its new Zen 3 core was a ground-up redesign and offered complete performance leadership, we had to ask them to confirm if that’s exactly what they said. Despite being less than 10% the size of Intel, and very close to folding as a company in 2015, the bets that AMD made in that timeframe with its next generation Zen microarchitecture and Ryzen designs are now coming to fruition. Zen 3 and the new Ryzen 5000 processors, for the desktop market, are the realization of those goals: not only performance per watt and performance per dollar leaders, but absolute performance leadership in every segment. We’ve gone into the new microarchitecture and tested the new processors. AMD is the new king, and we have the data to show it.

New Core, Same 7nm, Over 5.0 GHz!

The new Ryzen 5000 processors are drop-in replacements for the Ryzen 3000 series. Anyone with an AMD X570 or B550 motherboard today, with the latest BIOS (AGESA 1081 or above), should be able to buy and use one of the new processors without a fuss. Anyone with an X470/B450 board will have to wait until Q1 2021 as those boards are updated.

As we’ve previously covered, AMD is launching four processors today for retail, ranging from six cores up to sixteen cores.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Processors
Zen 3 Microarchitecture
AnandTechCores
Threads
Base
Freq
Turbo
Freq
L3
Cache
TDPMSRP
Ryzen 9 5950X16c/32t3400490064 MB105 W$799
Ryzen 9 5900X12c/24t3700480064 MB105 W$549
Ryzen 7 5800X8c/16t3800470032 MB105 W$449
Ryzen 5 5600X6c/12t3700460032 MB65 W$299*

*Comes with Bundled CPU Cooler

All the processors have native support for DDR4-3200 memory as per JEDEC standards, although AMD recommends something slightly faster for optimum performance. All the processors also have 20 lanes of PCIe 4.0 for add-in devices.

The Ryzen 9 5950X: 16 Cores at $799

The top processor is the Ryzen 9 5950X, with 16 cores and 32 threads, offering a base frequency of 3400 MHz and a turbo frequency of 4900 MHz – on our retail processor, we actually detected a single core frequency of 5050 MHz, indicating that this processor will turbo above 5.0 GHz with sufficient thermal headroom and cooling!

This processor is enabled through two eight core chiplets (more on chiplets below), each with 32 MB of L3 cache (total 64 MB). The Ryzen 9 5950X is rated at the same TDP as the Ryzen 9 3950X, at 105 W. The peak power will be ~142 W, as per AMD’s socket design, on motherboards that can support it.

For those that don’t read the rest of the review, the short conclusion for the Ryzen 9 5950X is that even at $799 suggested retail price, it enables a new level of consumer grade performance across the board. The single thread frequency is crazy high, and when combined with the new core design with its higher IPC, pushes workloads that are single-core limited above and beyond Intel’s best Tiger Lake processors. When it comes to multi-threaded workloads, we have new records for a consumer processor across the board.

The Ryzen 9 5900X: 12 Cores at $549

Squaring off against Intel’s best consumer grade processor is the Ryzen 9 5900X, with 12 cores and 24 threads, offering a base frequency of 3700 MHz and a turbo frequency of 4800 MHz (4950 MHz was observed). This processor is enabled through two six-core chiplets, but all the cache is still enabled at 32 MB per chiplet (64 MB total). The 5900X also has the same TDP as the 3900X/3900XT it replaces at 105 W.

At $549, it is priced $50 higher than the processor it replaces, which means that for the extra 10% cost it will have to showcase that it can perform at least 10% better.

The Ryzen 7 5800X: 8 Cores at $449

After AMD showcased a quad core processor under $100 in the last generation, it takes a lot of chutzpah to offer an eight core processor for $449 – AMD stands by its claims that this processor offers substantial generational performance improvements. The new AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, with eight cores and sixteen threads, is set to go up against Intel’s Core i7-10700K, also an eight core / sixteen thread processor.

The Ryzen 7 5800X has a base frequency of 3800 MHz and a rated turbo frequency of 4700 MHz (we detected 4825 MHz), and uses a single eight-core chiplet with a total 32 MB of L3 cache. The single core chiplet has some small benefits over a dual chiplet design where some cross-CPU communication is needed, and that comes across in some of our very CPU-limited gaming benchmarks. This processor also has 105 W TDP (~142 W peak).

The Ryzen 5 5600X: 6 Cores for $299

The cheapest processor that AMD is releasing today is the Ryzen 5 5600X, but it is also the only one that comes with a CPU cooler in box. The Ryzen 5 5600X has six cores and twelve threads, running at a base frequency of 3700 MHz and a peak turbo of 4600 MHz (4650 MHz measured), and is the only CPU to be given a TDP of 65 W (~88 W peak).

The single chiplet design means 32 MB of L3 cache total (technically it’s still the same that a single core can access as the Ryzen 9 parts, more on that later), and will be put up against Intel’s six-core Core i5-10600K, which also retails in a similar ballpark.

Despite being the cheapest and technically the slowest processor of the bunch, I was mightily surprised by the performance of the Ryzen 5 5600X: similar to the Ryzen 9 5950X, in single threaded benchmarks, it completely knocks the socks off of anything Intel has to offer – even Tiger Lake.

Why Ryzen 5000 Works: Chiplets

At a high level, the new Ryzen 5000 'Vermeer' series seem oddly familiar to the last generation Ryzen 3000 ‘Matisse’ series. This is actually by design, as AMD is fully leveraging their chiplet design methodology in the new processors. 

To introduce some terminology, AMD creates two types of chiplets. One of them has the main processing cores, and is called a core complex die or CCD. This is the one that is built on TSMC's 7nm process. The other chiplet is an interconnect die with I/O, known as an IO die or IOD - this one has the PCIe lanes, the memory controllers, the SATA ports, the connection to the chipset, and helps control power delivery as well as security. In both the previous generation and the new generation, AMD pairs one of its IO dies with up to two 8-core chiplets.


Ryzen 3000 processor without heatspreader, showing two core chiplets and one IO die.

This is possible because the new core chiplets contain the same protocols for interconnect, physical design, and power constraints. AMD is able to leverage the execution of the previous platform and generation such that when the core connections are identical, despite the different internal structures (Zen 3 vs Zen 2), they can still be put together and executed in a known and successful fashion.

As with the previous generation, the new Zen 3 chiplet is designed with eight cores

Zen 3 is a New Core Design

By keeping the new 8-core Zen 3 chiplet the same size and same power, this obviously means that AMD had to build a core that fits within those constraints but also affords a performance and performance efficiency uplift in order to make a more compelling design. Typically when designing a CPU core, the easiest thing to do is to take the previous design and upgrade certain parts of it – or what engineers call tackling ‘the low hanging fruit’ which enables the most speed-up for the least effort. Because CPU core designs are built to a deadline, there are always ideas that never make it into the final design, but those become the easiest targets for the next generation. This is what we saw with Zen 1/Zen+ moving on to Zen 2. So naturally, the easiest thing for AMD to do would be the same again, but with Zen 3.

However, AMD did not do this. In our interviews with AMD’s senior staff, we have known that AMD has two independent CPU core design teams that aim to leapfrog each other as they build newer, high performance cores. Zen 1 and Zen 2 were products from the first core design team, and now Zen 3 is the product from the second design team. Naturally we then expect Zen 4 to be the next generation of Zen 3, with ‘the low hanging fruit’ taken care of.

In our recent interview with AMD’s Chief Technology Officer, Mark Papermaster, we were told that if you were to look at the core from a 100,000 foot level, you might easily mistake that the Zen 3 core design to be similar to that of Zen 2. However, we were told that because this is a new team, every segment of the core has been redesigned, or at the very least, updated. Users who follow this space closely will remember that the branch predictor used in Zen 2 wasn’t meant to come until Zen 3, showing that even the core designs have an element of portability to them. The fact that both Zen 2 and Zen 3 are built on the same TSMC N7 process node (the same PDK, although Zen 3 has the latest yield/consistency manufacturing updates from TMSC) also helps in that design portability.

AMD has already announced the major change that will be obvious to most of the techies that are interested in this space: the base core chiplet, rather than having two four-core complexes, has a single eight-core complex. This enables each core to access the whole 32 MB of L3 cache of a die, rather than 16 MB, which reduces latency of memory accesses in that 16-to-32 MB window. It also simplifies core-to-core communication within a chiplet. There are a couple of trade-offs to do this, but overall it is a good win.

In fact there are a significant number of differences throughout the core. AMD has improved:

  • branch prediction bandwidth
  • faster switching from the decode pipes to the micro-op cache,
  • faster recoveries from mispredicts,
  • enhanced decode skip detection for some NOPs/zeroing idioms
  • larger buffers and execution windows up and down the core,
  • dedicated branch pipes,
  • better balancing of logic and address generation,
  • wider INT/FP dispatch,
  • higher load bandwidth,
  • higher store bandwidth,
  • better flexibility in load/store ops
  • faster FMACs
  • A wide variety of faster operations (including x87?)
  • more TLB table walkers
  • better prediction of store-to-load forward dependencies
  • faster copy of short strings
  • more AVX2 support (VAES, VPCLMULQD)
  • substantially faster DIV/IDIV support
  • hardware acceleration of PDEP/PEXT

Many of these will be explained and expanded upon over the next few pages, and observed in the benchmark results. Simply put, this is something more than just a core update – these are genuinely new cores and new designs that required new sheets of paper to be built upon.

A number of these features, such as wider buffers and increased bandwidth, naturally come with the question about how AMD has kept the power the same for Zen 3 compared to Zen 2. Normally when a core gets wider, that means more silicon has to be turned on all the time, and this influences static power, or if it all gets used simultaneously, then there is higher active power.

When speaking with Mark Papermaster, he pointed to AMD’s prowess in physical implementation as a key factor in this. By leveraging their knowledge of TSMC’s 7nm (N7) process, as well as updates to their own tools to get the best out of these designs, AMD was able to remain power neutral, despite all this updates and upgrades. Part of this also comes from AMD’s long standing premium partner relationship with TMSC, being able to enable better design technology co-optimization (DTCO) between floorplan, manufacturing, and product.

AMD’s Claims

The CPU marketing teams from AMD, since the launch of first generation Zen, have been very accurate in their performance claims, even to the point of understating performance from time to time. Aside from promoting performance leadership in single thread, multi-thread, and gaming, AMD promoted several metrics for generation-on-generation improvement.

+19% IPC

The key metric offered by AMD was a +19% IPC uplift from Zen 2 to Zen 3, or rather a +19% uplift from Ryzen 5 3800XT to Ryzen 5 5800X when both CPUs are at 4.0 GHz and using DDR4-3600 memory.

In fact, using our industry benchmarks, for single threaded performance, we observed a +19% increase in CPU performance per clock. We have to offer kudos to AMD here, this is the second or third time they've quoted IPC figures which we've matched.

In multithreaded SPECrate, the absolute gain was only around 10% or so, given that faster cores also require more bandwidth to main memory, which hasn’t been provided in this generation. This means that there are some bottlenecks to which a higher IPC won’t help if more cores require the same resources.

For real-world tests, across our whole suite, we saw an average +24% uplift. For explicitly multithreaded tests, we saw ranges from even performance up to +35%, while for explicitly single threaded tests, this ranged from even performance up to +57%. This comes down to execution/compute bound tests getting bigger speedups over memory bound workloads.

Best Gaming

For gaming, the number was given as a +5 to +50% uplift in 1920x1080 gaming at the high preset, comparing a Ryzen 9 5900X against the Ryzen 9 3900XT, depending on the benchmark.

In our tests at CPU limited settings, such as 720p or 480p minimum, we saw an average +44% frames-per-second performance uplift comparing the Ryzen 9 5950X to the Ryzen 9 3950X. Depending on the test, this ranged from +10% to +80% performance uplift, with key gains in Chernobylite, Borderlands 3, Gears Tactics, and F1 2019.

For our more mainstream gaming tests, run at 1920x1080 with all the quality settings on maximum, the performance gain averaged around +10%. This spanned the gamut from an equal score (World of Tanks, Strange Brigade, Red Dead Redemption), up to +36% (Civilization 6, Far Cry 5).

Perhaps the most important comparison is the AMD Ryzen 9 5950X against the Intel Core i9-10900K. In our CPU limited tests, we get a +21% average FPS win for the AMD at CPU-limited scenarios, ranging from +2% to +52%. But in our 1080p Maximum settings tests, the results were on average neck-and-neck, swaying from -4% to +6%. (That result doesn’t include the one anomaly in our tests, as Civilization 6 shows a +43% win for AMD.)

Head-to-Head Performance Matchups

Based on core counts and pricing, the new Ryzen 5000 series processors closely align with some of Intel’s most popular Comet Lake processors, as well as the previous generation AMD hardware.

Q4 2020 Matchups
AMD
Ryzen 5000
CoresSEP Tray
1ku
CoresIntel
Core 10th Gen
Ryzen 9 5950X16C$799vs.$99918CCore i9-10980XE*
Ryzen 9 5900X12C$549vs.$48810CCore i9-10900K
Ryzen 7 5800X8C$449vs.$45310CCore i9-10850K
$3748CCore i7-10700K
Ryzen 5 5600X6C$299vs.$2626CCore i5-10600K

*Technically a high-end desktop platform processor, almost unavailable at MSRP.

Throughout this review we will be referencing these comparisons, and will eventually break-out each processor into its own analysis breakdown.

More In This Review

As this is our Deep Dive coverage into Zen 3, we are going to go into some nitty-gritty details. Over the next few pages, we will go over:

  • Improvements to the core design (prefetchers, buffers, execution units, etc)
  • Our microbenchmark tests (core-to-core latency, cache hierarchy, turbo ramping)
  • New Instructions, Improved instructions
  • SoC Power and Per-Core Power
  • SPEC2006 and SPEC2017 results
  • CPU Benchmarks (Office, Science, Simulation, Rendering, Encoding, Web, Legacy)
  • Gaming Benchmarks (11 tests, 4 settings per test, with RTX 2080 Ti)
  • Conclusions and Final Remarks
Sours: https://www.anandtech.com/show/16214/amd-zen-3-ryzen-deep-dive-review-5950x-5900x-5800x-and-5700x-tested

Zen 3 ryzen

Zen 3

2020 AMD 7-nanometre processor microarchitecture

Zen 3 is the codename for a CPUmicroarchitecture by AMD, released on November 5, 2020.[1][4] It is the successor to Zen 2 and uses TSMC's 7 nm process for the chiplets and GlobalFoundries's 14 nm process for the I/O die on the server chips and 12 nm for desktop chips.[6] Zen 3 powers Ryzen 5000 mainstream desktop processors (codenamed "Vermeer") and Epyc server processors (codenamed "Milan").[7][5] Zen 3 is supported on motherboards with 500 series chipsets; 400 series boards will also see support on select B450 / X470 motherboards with certain beta BIOSes.[8] Zen 3 is expected to be the last microarchitecture before AMD switches to DDR5 memory and new sockets.[4] According to AMD, Zen 3 has a 19% higher instructions per cycle (IPC) on average than Zen 2.

Features[edit]

Zen 3 is a significant incremental improvement over its predecessors, with an IPC increase of 19%,[9] and being capable of reaching higher clock speeds.

Like Zen 2, Zen 3 is composed of up to 2 core complex dies (CCD) along with a separate IO die containing the I/O components. A Zen 3 CCD is composed of a single core complex (CCX) containing 8 CPU cores and 32 MB of shared L3 cache, this is in contrast to Zen 2 where each CCD is composed of 2 CCX, each containing 4 cores each as well as 16 MB of L3 cache. The new configuration allows all 8 cores of the CCX to directly communicate with each other and the L3 Cache instead of having to use the IO die through the Infinity Fabric.[9]

Zen 3 (along with AMD's RDNA2 GPUs) were also the first implementation of Resizable BAR, an optional feature introduced in PCIe 2.0, that was branded as Smart Access Memory (SAM). This technology allows CPU to directly access all of compatible video card's VRAM.[10] Intel and Nvidia have since implemented this feature as well.[11]

  • A de-lidded Ryzen 5 5600X. Only one CCD is present. The contacts for a second CCD are visible.

  • Close-up of the CCD, taken under infrared lighting. This die was damaged by the de-lidding process.

In Zen 3, a single 32MB L3 cache pool is shared among all 8 cores in a chiplet, vs Zen 2's two 16MB pools each shared among 4 cores in a core complex, of which there were two per chiplet. This new arrangement improves the cache hit rate as well as performance in situations that require cache data to be exchanged among cores, but increases cache latency from 39 cycles in Zen 2 to 46 clock cycles and halves per-core cache bandwidth, although both problems are partially mitigated by higher clock speeds. Total cache bandwidth on all 8 cores combined remains the same due to power consumption concerns. L2 cache capacity and latency remain the same at 512KB and 12 cycles. All cache read and write operations are done at 32 bytes per cycle.[2]

Improvements[edit]

[icon]

This section needs expansion with: list of improvements, paraphrased. You can help by adding to it. (November 2020)

Zen 3 has made the following improvements over Zen 2:[2][12]

  • An increase of 19% in instructions per clock
  • The base core chiplet has a single eight-core complex (versus two four-core complexes in Zen 2)
  • A unified 32MB L3 cache pool equally available to all 8 cores in a chiplet, vs Zen 2's two 16MB pools each shared among 4 cores in a core complex.
    • On mobile: A unified 16MB L3
  • A unified 8-core CCX (from 2x 4-Core CCX per CCD)
  • Increased branch prediction bandwidth. L1 branch target buffer size increased to 1024 entries (vs 512 in Zen 2)
  • New Instructions
    • VAES - 256-bit Vector AES instructions
    • INVLPGB - Broadcast TLB flushing
    • CET_SS - Control-flow Enforcement Technology / Shadow Stack
  • Improved integer units
    • 96 entry integer scheduler (up from 92)
    • 192 entry physical register file (up from 180)
    • 10 issue per cycle (up from 7)
    • 256 entry reorder-buffer (up from 224)
    • fewer cycles for DIV/IDIV ops (10...20 from 16...46)
  • Improved floating point units
    • 6 µOP dispatch width (up from 4)
    • FMA latency reduced by 1 cycle (down from 5 to 4)

Feature tables[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Products[edit]

On October 8, 2020, AMD announced four Zen 3-based desktop Ryzen processors, consisting of one Ryzen 5, one Ryzen 7, and two Ryzen 9 CPUs and featuring between 6 and 16 cores.[1]

Desktop CPUs[edit]

Vermeer[edit]

  1. ^Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX.

Desktop APUs[edit]

Cezanne[edit]

Mobile APUs[edit]

Cezanne[edit]

Model Release
date
SOC CPU GPU SocketPCIe
lanes
Memory supportTDP
FabTransistors

(million)

Die Size

(mm²)

Cores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheModel,
config[ii]
Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
L1L2L3
Ryzen 3 5400U[34][35]January 12, 2021 TSMC
7FF
4 (8) 1 × 4 2.6 4.0 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
6 CU
1600 MHz 1228.8 FP6 16 (8+4+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200 64GB
LPDDR4-4266 32GB
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 3 PRO 5450U[36]March 16, 2021 15 W
Ryzen 5 5600U[37]January 12, 2021 6 (12) 1 × 6 2.3 4.2 16 MB AMD Radeon Graphics
7 CU
1800 MHz 1612.8 10-25 W
Ryzen 5 PRO 5650U[38]March 16, 2021 15 W
Ryzen 5 5600H[39][40]January 12, 2021 3.3 35–54 W
Ryzen 5 5600HS[41]3.0 35 W
Ryzen 7 5800U[42]10,700 180 8 (16) 1 × 8 1.9 4.4 AMD Radeon Graphics
8 CU
2000 MHz 2048 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 PRO 5850U[43]March 16, 2021 15 W
Ryzen 7 5800H[44][45]January 12, 2021 3.2 35–54 W
Ryzen 7 5800HS[46]2.8 35 W
Ryzen 9 5900HS[47]3.0 4.6 2100 MHz 2150.4
Ryzen 9 5900HX[48]3.3 35–54 W
Ryzen 9 5980HS[49]3.0 4.8 35 W
Ryzen 9 5980HX[50]3.3 35–54 W

Epyc microprocessors[edit]

The Epyc server line of chips based on Zen 3 is named Milan and is the final generation of chips using the SP3 socket.[5] Epyc Milan was released on March 15, 2021.[51]

Model Price FabChipletsCores
(threads)
Core config[i]Clock rate (GHz) CacheSocket &
configuration
TDP
Base Boost L1L2L3
EPYC 7763 US $7890 7 nm8 × CCD
1 × I/O
64 (128) 8 × 8 2.45 3.50 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
256 MB
32 MB per CCX
SP3
2P
280 W
EPYC 7713 US $7060 2.00 3.675 225 W
EPYC 7713P US $5010 SP3
1P
EPYC 7663 US $6366 56 (112) 8 x 7 2.00 3.50 SP3
2P
240 W
EPYC 7643 US $4995 48 (96) 8 x 6 2.30 3.60 225 W
EPYC 75F3 US $4860 32 (64) 8 x 4 2.95 4.00 280 W
EPYC 7543 US $3761 2.80 3.70 225 W
EPYC 7543P US $2730 SP3
1P
EPYC 7513 US $2840 2.60 3.65 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
SP3
2P
200 W
EPYC 7453 US $1570 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
28 (56) 4 x 7 2.75 3.45 64 MB
16 MB per CCX
225 W
EPYC 74F3 US $2900 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
24 (48) 8 x 3 3.20 4.00 256 MB
32 MB per CCX
240 W
EPYC 7443 US $2010 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
4 x 6 2.85 4.00 128 MB
32 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7443P US $1337 SP3
1P
EPYC 7413 US $1825 2.65 3.60 SP3
2P
180 W
EPYC 73F3 US $3521 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
16 (32) 8 x 2 3.50 4.00 256 MB
32 MB per CCX
240 W
EPYC 7343 US $1565 4 × CCD
1 × I/O
4 x 4 3.20 3.90 128 MB
32 MB per CCX
190 W
EPYC 7313 US $1083 3.00 3.70 155 W
EPYC 7313P US $913 SP3
1P
EPYC 72F3 US $2468 8 × CCD
1 × I/O
8 (16) 8 x 1 3.70 4.10 256 MB
32 MB per CCX
SP3
2P
180 W
  1. ^Active Core Complexes (CCX) × Active cores per CCX.
  1. ^ abcSu, Lisa (October 8, 2020). Where Gaming Begins, AMD Ryzen™ Desktop Processors.
  2. ^ abcdCutress, Ian; Frumusanu, Andrei (November 5, 2020). "AMD Zen 3 Ryzen Deep Dive Review: 5950X, 5900X, 5800X and 5600X Tested". www.anandtech.com. Retrieved December 7, 2020.
  3. ^"https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/amd/packages/fp6"
  4. ^ abcJoel Hruska (January 10, 2020). "AMD's Lisa Su Confirms Zen 3 Coming in 2020, Talks Challenges in Notebooks". ExtremeTech.
  5. ^ abcAlcorn, Paul (October 5, 2019). "AMD dishes on Zen 3 and Zen 4 architecture, Milan and Genoa roadmap". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  6. ^Dr. Ian Cutress (October 9, 2020). "AMD Ryzen 5000 and Zen 3 on Nov 5th: +19% IPC, Claims Best Gaming CPU". AnandTech.
  7. ^Mark Knapp (October 8, 2020). "AMD Zen 3 release date, specs and price: everything we know about AMD Ryzen 5000". TechRadar.
  8. ^Hruska, Joel (May 20, 2020). "AMD Will Support Zen 3, Ryzen 4000 CPUs on X470, B450 Motherboards". ExtremeTech. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  9. ^ ab"AMD "Zen 3" Core Architecture". AMD. Retrieved November 8, 2020.
  10. ^Alcorn, Paul (November 6, 2020). "AMD Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 Price, Specs, Release Date, Performance, All We Know". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved November 8, 2020.
  11. ^"GeForce RTX 30 Series Performance Accelerates With Resizable BAR Support | GeForce News". NVIDIA. Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  12. ^Alcorn, Paul (November 26, 2020). "AMD Ryzen 9 5950X and 5900X Review: Zen 3 Breaks the 5 GHz Barrier". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved December 25, 2020.
  13. ^"AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Desktop Processor". AMD.
  14. ^"AMD Ryzen 7 5800". AMD.
  15. ^"AMD Ryzen 7 5800X Desktop Processor". AMD.
  16. ^"AMD Ryzen 9 5900". AMD.
  17. ^"AMD Ryzen 9 5900X Desktop Processor". AMD.
  18. ^"AMD Ryzen 9 5950X Desktop Processor". AMD.
  19. ^"AMD Ryzen 3 5300GE". AMD.
  20. ^ abcdefg"AMD Ryzen 5000G APUs: OEM Only For Now, Full Release Later This Year". AnandTech.
  21. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 3 PRO 5350GE". AMD.
  22. ^ abcdef"AMD Announces Ryzen 5000G and PRO 5000G Desktop Processors". TechPowerUp. June 1, 2021.
  23. ^"AMD Ryzen 3 5300G". AMD.
  24. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 3 PRO 5350G". AMD.
  25. ^"AMD Ryzen 5 5600GE". AMD.
  26. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 5650GE". AMD.
  27. ^"AMD Ryzen 5 5600G". AMD.
  28. ^ ab"AMD Ryzen 5000G: Zen 3 APUs for Desktop Coming August 5th". AnandTech.
  29. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 5650G". AMD.
  30. ^"AMD Ryzen 7 5700GE". AMD.
  31. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 7 PRO 5750GE". AMD.
  32. ^"AMD Ryzen 7 5700G". AMD.
  33. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 7 PRO 5750G". AMD.
  34. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 3 5400U". AMD.
  35. ^"AMD Ryzen 3 5400U Mobile processor - 100-000000288". www.cpu-world.com. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  36. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 3 PRO 5450U". AMD.
  37. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600U". AMD.
  38. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 5650U". AMD.
  39. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600H". AMD.
  40. ^"AMD Ryzen 5 5600H Mobile processor - 100-000000296". www.cpu-world.com. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  41. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 5 5600HS". AMD.
  42. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800U". AMD.
  43. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 7 PRO 5850U". AMD.
  44. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800H". AMD.
  45. ^"AMD Ryzen 7 5800H Specs". TechPowerUp. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  46. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 7 5800HS". AMD.
  47. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 9 5900HS". AMD.
  48. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 9 5900HX". AMD.
  49. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 9 5980HS". AMD.
  50. ^"AMD Ryzen™ 9 5980HX". AMD.
  51. ^Alcorn, Paul (March 15, 2021). "Watch AMD's EPYC 7003 Milan Launch Here". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved July 23, 2021.

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zen_3
AMD BEATS Intel - Zen 3

Force of the blows increased significantly. Long boots flashed back and forth alternately like two metronomes. The prisoner roared in agony. His tormentor laughed. She squatted down in front of the man and, picking up the edge of the tape with her fingernail, tore it.

Now discussing:

Mostly we lived on the fifth floor of the building and, since we drove in first, it was the best - just renovated, with cool. Arches in the room. I moved in with a guy from their company, and two girls lived right below us.



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