Starz white queen order

Starz white queen order DEFAULT

Yesterday, the Starz network released the series finale of The Spanish Princess, concluding The White Queen trilogy of miniseries that began in Based on a book series called The Cousins' War by Phillippa Gregory, the trilogy covers the women who stood behind the men in power in the English monarchy from to the s, preceding the first sovereign queen, Elizabeth, in The White Queen, The White Princess, and The Spanish Princess grant us a rare opportunity to see what life was like for medieval monarchs. Watching them reminded me of why I prefer the fairy tale versions of royalty. Those stories do not contain the gory deaths, gruesome births, and invasive politics that historical dramatizations like these exemplify. In fact, I had very little interest in watching the second season of The Spanish Princess until I watched some historical videos and learned that the king that Catherine of Aragon was married to was none other than King Henry VIII, who was famous for being a sexist pig that killed wives who didn't give him male heirs. That made me curious about Queen Catherine's future. Unfortunately, the series ended before introducing Henry's relationship with Anne Boleyn, who played a significant role in Catherine's downfall.

King Henry VIII and Queen Catherine of Aragon sitting in their thrones hand-in-hand from The Spanish Princess

Of the three miniseries, my favorite was The White Queen, because it started out so innocent compared to the other two. It is about Elizabeth Woodville, a noble lady from the House of Lancaster who appealed to King Edward IV of the enemy House of York to recover her late husband's property. Instead of merely giving back her land, Edward decided to marry her and make her his queen even though they came from two households that stood against each other due to the Wars of the Roses. The "White" part of The White Queen part stems from the House of Lancaster's symbol being a white rose, while the House of York is represented by a red rose. This is the closest that the trilogy gets to a classic "Cinderella" love story in which a woman of lower rank rises to power because of a royal's love for her. However, there is no fairy tale ending for Queen Elizabeth. The rest of the miniseries spirals into a Game of Thrones-style race for power that forces Elizabeth to take drastic means to protect her children's claim to the throne. The White Princess premiered four years later in and picks up with Elizabeth's daughter, also named Elizabeth, who reluctantly marries into the throne and schemes to keep the royal bloodline in her family.

King Henry VII and Queen Elizabeth from The White Princess

The Spanish Princess premiered in and takes place 15 years after The White Princess took the throne when Princess Catherine of Aragon is summoned to England to marry Arthur, the son of Queen Elizabeth, who has noticeably aged. I found it amusing that the creators of the show did such a good job making Elizabeth and Henry VII look older, while Catherine and Henry VIII look exactly the same throughout both seasons of The Spanish Princess even though it spans over 20 years of their lives. A frumpy dress and updo do little to make Catherine appear to be a middle-aged queen, and the scruffy beard Henry grows at the end of the show looks laughable over his baby face. The Spanish Princess was the only one of the three miniseries to run for two seasons, spanning 16 episodes instead of the usual The first season covers Catherine's short-lived marriage to Prince Arthur and her subsequent attempts to marry his brother, Henry, by convincing everyone that her marriage with Arthur was never consummated before his untimely demise. The second season, which concluded yesterday, covers her unhappy marriage to Henry as he slowly descends into madness over his obsession with having a male heir.

Catherine of Aragon and her two ladies-in-waiting from The Spanish Princess

Catherine of Aragon is not a likable character, which made it difficult for me to enjoy this portion of the trilogy. She is introduced in the first episode of The Spanish Princess as a spoiled brat who expects everything to be handed to her on a silver platter. She becomes more sympathetic over time due to being cast aside after Prince Arthur's death and suffering a number of tragic miscarriages during her marriage to Henry. Her second marriage is built on love at first but degrades due to Henry's overwhelmingly sexist nature. The show is very dark with no humor and few to no pleasant moments for any of the characters. My favorite character, Lady Margaret Pole, suffered just as tragic of a downfall as everyone else in The Spanish Princess. I wouldn't recommend this show if you are looking for something uplifting. The numerous childbirth scenes are painful to watch, whether they end in miscarriages or not. The series ends on a hopeful note with Catherine placing her dreams for the future on her daughter, Mary, but anyone who studied history knows that the infamous Bloody Mary brings anything but hope for the future of the English monarchy.

Thus concludes a seven-year run of miniseries about the women behind the men in power that led up to the first sovereign queen. Personally, I found these miniseries more educational than enjoyable. The writers don't try to sugarcoat any aspect of medieval life and may have portrayed it as gloomier than it actually was. Surely people living in such extravagance must have had at least a few moments of happiness in their lives, right? I wouldn't recommend binge watching these series, as every episode is extremely heavy and usually involves some sort of death or trauma. If you are a fan of princesses and fairy tales, it serves as a nice reminder of why people from such a depressing era needed stories of magic and romance in their lives. It also reminds us to be grateful to live in a time where women are not seen as lesser beings, and having a daughter is no longer viewed as a curse from a higher power.

Sours: https://www.theprincessblog.org//11/review-spanish-princessthe-white-queen.html

Starz Orders &#;The White Queen&#; Follow-Up &#;The Spanish Princess&#;

Starz has added a third series from Philippa Gregory.

After The White Queen and The White Princess, the third installment will be called The Spanish Princess and, like the others, is based on Gregory&#;s global best-sellers The Constant Princess and The King&#;s Curse.

The Spanish Princess returns viewers to the world of royal court intrigue as seen uniquely through the perspective of the women, but also sheds light on a previously untold corner of history — the lives of people of color, living and working in 16th century London.

Emma Frost (The White Queen, The White Princess, The Man in the High Castle) and Matthew Graham (Life on Mars, Electric Dreams, Doctor Who) will pen the series, executive produce and serve as showrunners. Playground&#;s Colin Callender and Scott Huff will return as exec producers, while Charlie Pattinson and Charlie Hampton will oversee for All3Media&#;s New Pictures banner. Karen Bailey will oversee for Starz, which will retain domestic multiplatform pay TV and SVOD rights to the series. Lionsgate, which will co-produce, will retain international and domestic distribution and home entertainment rights.

“Starz is committed to its ongoing programming strategy to provide premium content highlighting the untold stories of strong women in history,” CarmiZlotnik, president of programming at Starz, said Thursday in a statement. “We have a passionate fanbase who embraces female-led stories like The White Queen and The White Princess and are excited to continue with Catherine of Aragon’s story in The Spanish Princess.”

The series will revolve around Catherine of Aragon, the beautiful teenage princess of Spain who had been promised the English throne since she was a child. She arrives in a gray, rain-lashed England with her glorious and diverse court including her lady-in-waiting Lina, an African Moor. She is Princess of Wales now, but when her husband Prince Arthur dies suddenly, the throne seems lost to Catherine — until she claims her marriage was never consummated and that as a virgin she may set her sights on the new heir, the charismatic and headstrong Prince Harry, who will one day rule as King Henry VIII.

The White Queen ranked as a top 10 cable show, averaging million multiplatform viewers per episode and ranks as the first Starz original series to attract more women to the cable network than men as the former comprised 55 percent of the viewership.

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'The White Princess' & 'The White Queen' Are Connected

Starz's The White Princess is easily one of the most anticipated new shows of , largely thanks to its obvious similarities to Game of Thrones (albeit without all of the fantasy trappings and with direct historical elements). The upcoming show is based on the historical novel of the same name by Philippa Gregory, who also wrote The White Queen, another book that was adapted for television. Given the similarity of the names, many viewers are wondering — how are The White Princess and The White Queen connected?

The White Queen was a part British miniseries (starring Rebecca Ferguson as the titular queen, Elizabeth Woodville) that aired on BBC One in the United Kingdom and Starz in the United States back in The one-season drama was based on the fictionalized historical events (set during the time of the Wars of the Roses, from the women's point of views) retold in Gregory's novels The White Queen, The Red Queen, and The Kingmaker's Daughter. Each of the three novels that formed the basis of The White Queen is part of Gregory's The Cousins' War series of novels.

The White Princess serves as a direct sequel to The White Queen — the novel that the new show is based on is the fifth in the Cousins' War series, chronologically following the three that informed the plot of The White Queen.

Though the new series is technically a sequel, it seems to be fairly distinct from the earlier BBC show (despite the fact that the two shows have the same showrunner and writer, Emma Frost). Some of the same characters (historical figures) will appear in the upcoming show, but none of the same actors are returning — the role of Margaret Beaufort, the King's mother, for instance, was played by Amanda Hale in the first show and will now be played by Game of Thrones' Michelle Fairley. For all intents and purposes, it's a fresh start on a continuation of the old story.

The White Queen ended with the battle between Henry Tudor and King Richard III, Elizabeth of York's lover/uncle, in which Richard III died and the "White Princess" had to marry into the House of Tudor — her family's enemies — in order to secure a tenuous peace. According to Deadline, The White Princess picks up just three days after the conclusion of The White Queen, "as a new generation ascends to the throne in a tale of power political divides, family, love, and betrayal."

If you're still a little shaky on the history and the who's who/what's what of it all (to be fair, there are a lot of characters with the same name), the Starz video below on the history behind The White Queen might clear some things up as you head into The White Princess. It shouldn't be too hard to just jump straight into the new show without having seen the old, though — as with any historically-based drama (The Crown, for one), you can kind of pick up on the historical background as you watch.

With its focus on the women "behind the scenes" of one of history's most tumultuous times, The White Princess will surely be one to watch and become your next new obsession.

Sours: https://www.romper.com/p/how-are-the-white-princess-the-white-queen-connected-the-new-starz-series-is-a-sequel

Starz Greenlights &#;The White Princess&#; Followup Series &#;The Spanish Princess&#;

Starz has given the green light to The Spanish Princess limited series, a followup toThe White Princess and The White Queen, based on Philippa Gregory&#;s bestselling books The Constant Princess and The King&#;s Curse.

The Spanish Princess is the third series drawn Gregory’s bestselling novels. The first, critically-acclaimed Starz original miniseries event The White Queen, was followed by the 8-episode limited series drama The White Princess.

The Spanish Princess, from All3 Media’s New Pictures and Playground, the latest chapter in the dynastic saga of Tudor England, is described as a powerful, epic story that not only returns the audience to the world of royal court intrigue as seen uniquely through the perspective of the women, but also sheds light on a previously untold corner of history – the lives of people of color, living and working in 16th century London.

Related Story

&#;Heels&#; EP Mike O&#;Malley Talks Tonight&#;s Belt-Clinching Season 1 Finale, Prospects For Season 2 & Playing Both Sides Of The Camera

The Spanish Princess centers on Catherine of Aragon, the beautiful teenaged princess of Spain who was promised the English throne since she was a child. She arrives in a grey, rain-lashed England with her glorious and diverse court including her lady-in-waiting Lina &#; an African Moor. She is Princess of Wales now, but when her husband Prince Arthur dies suddenly, the throne seems lost to Catherine. Until she claims her marriage was never consummated and that as a virgin she may set her sights on the new heir, the charismatic and headstrong Prince Harry who will one day rule as King Henry VIII.

Writers Emma Frost (The White Queen, The White Princess, The Man in the High Castle”) and Matthew Graham (Life on Mars, Electric Dreams, Dr. Who) serve as showrunners and executive producers.

Executive producing with Frost and Graham are Colin Callender (The White Queen, The Dresser, Wolf Hall) and Scott Huff (Howards End, The White Princess, The Missing) from Playground and Charlie Pattinson (The White Queen, Requiem, The Missing 1 & 2) and Charlie Hampton (Shameless, Wild at Heart) from All3 Media’s New Pictures.

Both The White Queen and The White Princess were strong ratings performers for Starz. The White Queen averaged million multiplatform viewers per episode in the U.S., according to Starz. The White Princess also attracted 57 percent women viewership and averaged million U.S. multiplatform viewers per episode.

 

 

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A Guide to the World of the Spanish Princess

In recent years, STARZ has produced three shows that take place during the height of England's Wars of the Roses and that continue into the Tudor period. The series started with "The White Queen," followed by "The White Princess," and the first season of "The Spanish Princess."

The shows are full of royal intrigue, coups, backstabbing, affairs, and ruthless machinations, and the best part is, it's all based on real history, which makes the narratives that much more entertaining. There's a reason TV and filmmakers keep coming back to this time period for shows and movies — the real-life events are more fantastical than anything a fiction writer could invent, and the plot points get juicier with every passing series.

If you've always wanted to jump in on these STARZ period pieces, here is a guide to the world of the Tudors and don't forget to tune into "The Spanish Princess" Sundays @ 8 PM ET.

 

***Spoilers for The White Queen, The White Princess, and season one of The Spanish Princess follow***

 

Begin with "The White Queen"

 

 

"The White Queen" follows three women—Elizabeth Woodville (Rebecca Ferguson), Margaret Beaufort (Amanda Hale), and Anne Neville (Faye Marsay)—as they battle for power behind the scenes in Britain's royal family. 

Elizabeth Woodville, known as the titular "White Queen," was married to King Edward IV (Max Irons) from to When he died suddenly in , his young son, Edward V (Sonny Asbourne Serkis), becomes king, with the late Edward's brother Richard (Aneurin Barnard) installed as Lord Protector due to Edward V's young age.

However, the Lord Protector seizes the throne for himself just a few months later, crowning himself King Richard III. Helping orchestrate all of this is Richard's wife, Anne Neville, who becomes queen when he takes the throne. Other villains include Henry Tudor, who eventually became King Henry VII. and his mother, Margaret Beaufort, also known as the "Red Queen," pulling strings behind the scenes to get her son on the throne. 

"The White Queen" was an incredible start to the series about Tudor England and sets the stage for the series to follow. Richard III was a famously villainous figure, and he and Anne Neville make quite the pair of foils for the "White Queen," especially when they conspire to have her two young sons murdered. In real life, young Edward V and his younger brother (also named Richard) were imprisoned in the Tower of London — earning the nickname of the "Princes in the Tower" — and were never seen again. Historians generally believe that Richard III had them killed, though "The White Princess" posits another theory that is quite juicy.

Anyway, the young King Henry VII (Michael Marcus) earns his place as a hero by taking Richard out at the Battle of Bosworth Field. The next entry in the Tudor series, "The White Princess", is set up nicely when Henry VII marries King Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth of York (Freya Mavor), uniting the Houses of Lancaster and York and ending the Wars of the Roses.

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Continue the Story with "The White Princess"

 

 

The next entry in the series follows Elizabeth "Lizzie" of York (Jodie Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) as they navigate an arranged, loveless marriage while being forced to present a united front to fend off threats from all sides. Two of the biggest hurdles to their happiness are their own mothers — Lizzie's mother Elizabeth Woodville (Essie Davis) and Henry's mother Margaret Beaufort (Michelle Fairley) are constantly at odds, with Woodville plotting against the Tudor family to return British control to the House of York.

However, as time goes on, Lizzie and Henry grow fond of one another, and they begin to work together to form an alliance with Spain. The one sticking point is that Lizzie's aunt, Margaret of Burgundy (Joanne Whalley), is rallying support for a man saying he is King Edward IV's youngest son, a long-disappeared heir apparent. Lizzie and Elizabeth Woodville are convinced he is their long-lost brother and son, but Lizzie realizes that in order to protect her sons, she must have him executed, after which she and Henry VII are able to betroth their eldest son to the "Spanish Princess."

At its heart, "The White Princess" is a love story — albeit an unusual one. The contempt between Lizzie and Henry is front and center at the onset of the series, and it's fascinating to watch how they come to care for one another. Comer, a future Emmy winner for "Killing Eve," is particularly strong in this piece as a woman torn between family, duty, and love. 

 

Catch Up with "The Spanish Princess"

 

 

The third series might be the most exciting yet, as it starts at the beginning of a very famous period in British history — that of King VIII and his six wives. In this series, Catherine of Aragon (Charlotte Hope) is the titular "Spanish Princess" and Henry's first wife. The daughter of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella (Alicia Borrachero) of Spain has been betrothed to the eldest son of King Henry VII (Elliot Cowan) and Elizabeth of York (Alexandra Moen), but Catherine finds out on her wedding day that the man she has been in a romantic correspondence with is, in fact, Arthur's younger brother, Harry (Ruairi O'Connor), pretending to be her betrothed. 

When Arthur suddenly falls ill and dies, followed shortly by the death of his mother, Catherine finds herself stuck between wanting to marry the Harry she knows and the machinations of his father, King Henry VII, who announces that he will wed Catherine himself. However, when Henry VII dies, Harry assumes the throne and becomes known as King Henry VIII, while Catherine of Aragon becomes the ill-fated queen. 

Stories about Henry VIII and his wives are often told from the King's point of view, and it's a refreshing change of pace for the narrative of "The Spanish Princess" to center the perspective of one of the only women who survived being married to him. The second season promises to get into some of the dangerous intrigue that led to Catherine and Henry's famous divorce. Look out for Henry's second wife, Anne Boleyn (the subject of many other fictionalized Tudor accounts) to make an appearance. 

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The Novels That Started It All 

 

 

The reign of the Tudors had a lot going on that made it a fascinating time in history — coups, executions, affairs, and intrigue.  STARZ does an excellent job bringing this time period to life, but if you want even more medieval dirty laundry, you're best served by going right to the (fictional) source on which the shows are based.

British historical fiction writer Philippa Gregory wrote the basis for much of the Tudor-centric media viewers have come to love, compiling her many works into an extensive series called "The Plantagenet and Tudor novels". While there has been some criticism of Gregory's use of creative license, the gist of the stories are accurate and the novels serve as supplemental reading for fan of the STARZ series. 

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Critical Acclaim for the Tudors 

The San Francisco Chronicle called "The White Queen" an "entertaining romp through a complicated and fascinating period of English history," while Entertainment Weekly said "The White Princess" "grounds itself in the journey of its titular heroine with a sharp understanding of a new queen's difficult, often precarious position."

As for "The Spanish Princess,"  the Los Angeles Times praised the first season as "an elegant and powerful tribute to a queen who's all too often been defined by the gluttony of her husband but whose influence changed the very fabric of England."

Season two of "The Spanish Princess" airs Sundays, at 8 p.m. ET/PT on STARZ. 

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MAY PASURPRISE NA PHILODENDRON WHITE PRINCESS SAKIN! -- Maagang Papasko Ito :)

The White Princess (miniseries)

British-American historical fiction television series, based on Philippa Gregory's novel of the same name

The White Princess is a historical drama television miniseries developed for Starz. It is based on Philippa Gregory's novel of the same name and, to a lesser extent, its sequel The King's Curse. It is a sequel to the miniseries The White Queen, which adapted three of Gregory's previous novels, and begins immediately where The White Queen finished.

In the eight episode series, the marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York effectively ends the Wars of the Roses by uniting the houses of Lancaster and York. However, their mutual enmity and distrust, as well as the political plots of their mothers, threaten to tear both the marriage and the kingdom apart.

Cast and characters[edit]

Main[edit]

  • Jodie Comer as Elizabeth "Lizzie" of York, the Queen of England
  • Rebecca Benson as Margaret "Maggie" Plantagenet, the Queen's paternal cousin, sister of Teddy
  • Jacob Collins-Levy as Henry VII, the King of England, Elizabeth's husband
  • Kenneth Cranham as Bishop (later Cardinal) John Morton, a confidant of the King's mother
  • Essie Davis as Dowager Queen Elizabeth Woodville, the Queen's mother
  • Michelle Fairley as Margaret Beaufort, the King's mother
  • Rossy de Palma as Isabella I of Castile, the Queen of Castile
  • Richard Dillane as Thomas Stanley, Margaret Beaufort's husband
  • Anthony Flanagan as Francis Lovell, a Yorkist supporter
  • Patrick Gibson as Richard of York, a pretender to the English crown and husband of Cathy Gordon.
  • Caroline Goodall as Cecily Neville, Duchess of York, the Queen's paternal grandmother. Goodall is the only actor appearing in both The White Queen and The White Princess.
  • Amy Manson as Catherine "Cathy" Gordon, wife of Richard of York
  • Adrian Rawlins as John de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, husband of Eliza de la Pole
  • Vincent Regan as Jasper Tudor, the King's uncle
  • Suki Waterhouse as Cecily of York, the Queen's sister
  • Joanne Whalley as Margaret, Duchess of Burgundy, the Queen's paternal aunt
  • Andrew Whipp as Sir Richard Pole, husband of Maggie Plantagenet

Recurring[edit]

  • Nicholas Audsley as Lord Strange
  • Rhys Connah (child) and Albert de Jongh (teen) as Edward "Teddy" Plantagenet, Earl of Warwick, the Queen's cousin, brother of Maggie
  • Heidi Ely as Princess Bridget, the Queen's sister
  • Oliver Hembrough as John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, the Duke of Suffolk's son
  • Rosie Knightley as Princess Anne, the Queen's sister
  • Ava Masters as Princess Catherine, the Queen's sister
  • Rollo Skinner as Ned, a stable boy
  • Susie Trayling as Elizabeth "Eliza" de la Pole, Duchess of Suffolk, the Queen's paternal aunt
  • Guy Williams as William Stanley, Lord Thomas's brother
  • Iain Batchelor as Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor
  • Dorian Grover as Philip
  • Zazie Hayhurst as Rettie
  • Billy Barratt as Prince Arthur, the King's first son
  • Woody Norman as Prince Harry, the King's second son
  • Philip Arditti as Rodrigo de Puebla, the Spanish ambassador

Guest[edit]

Episodes[edit]

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

The part television series The White Queen adapted Gregory's previous novels The White Queen (), The Red Queen () and The Kingmaker's Daughter ().[13] The series was broadcast on BBC One in the United Kingdom and on Starz in the United States, and features Freya Mavor as a young Elizabeth of York.[13] Despite initial plans for a second series, on 20 August the BBC announced they were not commissioning one, possibly due to the lukewarm reception the series received.[14]

However, in October , The Telegraph reported that Starz was planning to develop a sequel miniseries called The White Princess, based on Gregory's novel.[15] Starz CEO Chris Albrecht announced in January that the network was working with White Queen screenwriter Emma Frost on the project.[16] Starz would produce the White Princess miniseries without involvement from the BBC.[16] Gregory confirmed that the project was underway in August [17] On 7 February , Gregory announced on Facebook that the sequel was officially confirmed to be in production, with the scripts being written.[18] The series was confirmed to be eight episodes in May [19][20]

Jamie Payne, who directed three episodes of The White Queen, directed episodes 1, 2, 3, 7, and 8. Frost was the showrunner and executive producer. Lachlan MacKinnon is served as producer, with Gregory as executive producer. Playground's Colin Callender and Scott Huff also executive produced with Company Pictures' Michele Buck.[21]

Casting[edit]

Jodie Comer was cast in the title role of Elizabeth of York in April ,[22] with Michelle Fairley added as Margaret Beaufort in May.[19] In June , Starz announced the casting of Essie Davis as Dowager Queen Elizabeth, Jacob Collins-Levy as Henry VII, Suki Waterhouse as Cecily of York, Rebecca Benson as Margaret Plantagenet, and Joanne Whalley as Margaret, Duchess of Burgundy.[23] The remaining cast includes Caroline Goodall as Duchess Cecily, Kenneth Cranham as Bishop Morton, Vincent Regan as Jasper Tudor and Rhys Connah as Teddy Plantagenet.[24]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography began in June ,[23][24] with locations including Bradford on Avon,[25]Bristol,[21]Berkeley Castle, Gloucester Cathedral,[26]Lacock,[27]Salisbury Cathedral,[28] and Wells.[29]

Release[edit]

In early January , the producers released a video clip from the series as a teaser trailer.[30] In February , Starz announced that The White Princess would premiere on 16 April [31] In the UK the series began its satellite and terrestrial broadcasts on the Drama channel on 18 November

Reception[edit]

The miniseries received generally favorable reviews. On Rotten Tomatoes, it has an approval rating of 76% based on reviews from 17 critics, with an average rating of / The website's critics consensus indicated the series was "well-acted and enlivened by its fresh perspective" and "delivers more than enough intrigue to satisfy fans of period British royal court drama."[32] On Metacritic, the show has a weighted average score of 71 based on reviews from 9 critics.[33]

Continuation[edit]

On 15 March , Starz announced that it will create a continuation of The White Queen and The White Princess to be titled The Spanish Princess, which will be based on Gregory's novels The Constant Princess and The King's Curse and center on Catherine of Aragon.[34]

References[edit]

  1. ^"The White Princess: Episode Guide". Screener. Retrieved 1 May
  2. ^ ab"The White Princess – Crew". Starz. Retrieved 15 March
  3. ^"The White Princess – Listings". The Futon Critic. Retrieved 15 March
  4. ^Metcalf, Mitch (18 April ). "Updated: Showbuzzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on 19 April Retrieved 18 April
  5. ^Metcalf, Mitch (25 April ). "Updated: Showbuzzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on 26 April Retrieved 25 April
  6. ^Metcalf, Mitch (2 May ). "Updated: Showbuzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on 3 May Retrieved 2 May
  7. ^Metcalf, Mitch (May 9, ). "Updated: Showbuzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on May 10, Retrieved May 9,
  8. ^Metcalf, Mitch (May 16, ). "Updated: Showbuzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on May 21, Retrieved May 16,
  9. ^Henry mentions that "three months have passed" since Jasper died.
  10. ^Metcalf, Mitch (May 23, ). "Updated: Showbuzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on May 24, Retrieved May 23,
  11. ^Metcalf, Mitch (May 31, ). "Updated: Showbuzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on June 1, Retrieved May 31,
  12. ^Metcalf, Mitch (June 6, ). "Updated: Showbuzdaily's Top Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: ". Showbuzz Daily. Archived from the original on June 6, Retrieved June 6,
  13. ^ ab"BBC – Media Centre: The White Queen, a new ten-part drama for BBC One". BBC. 31 August Archived from the original on 24 November Retrieved 6 October
  14. ^"Reign over for The White Queen". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 20 August
  15. ^Walker, Tim (17 October ). "The White Queen is to make a comeback". The Telegraph. Retrieved 6 October
  16. ^ abAndreeva, Nellie (10 January ). "TCA: Starz's Chris Albrecht On Plans, White Queen Sequel, Magic City Demise". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 8 December
  17. ^Walker-Arnott, Ellie (10 August ). "A sequel to The White Queen is definitely in the works". Radio Times. Retrieved 7 February
  18. ^"Philippa Gregory". Facebook. 7 February Retrieved 7 February
  19. ^ abPetski, Denise (10 May ). "Game Of Thrones Michelle Fairley Joins Starz's The White Princess". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 14 June
  20. ^Bradley, Laura (13 June ). "Two More Game of Thrones Actors Just Joined Starz's The White Queen Follow-Up". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 30 December
  21. ^ abLesnick, Silas (13 June ). "White Princess Miniseries: Production Begins on Starz Show". ComingSoon.net. Retrieved 14 June
  22. ^Jaafar, Ali (15 April ). "Doctor Foster Star Jodie Comer Lands Lead Role In Starz Sequel The White Princess". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 14 June
  23. ^ abBradley, Laura (13 June ). "Two More Game of Thrones Actors Just Joined Starz's The White Queen Follow-Up". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 14 June
  24. ^ abPetski, Denise (13 June ). "The White Princess: Essie Davis, Joanne Whalley, More Join Cast". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 14 June
  25. ^"Bradford on Avon is centre stage for filming of White Princess". Wiltshire Times. Newsquest. 3 September Retrieved 4 January
  26. ^Hawkins, John (16 June ). "Film friendly cathedral provides setting for another blockbuster". Gloucester Review. Gloucester Review. Retrieved 4 January
  27. ^"Lacock goes back to for filming of The White Princess". The Wiltshire Gazette and Herald.
  28. ^"TV crew filming historical drama at cathedral". Salisbury Journal.
  29. ^Magistrates Reporter (25 December ). "Dunkirk, The White Princess, Broadchurch, Poldark: when will scenes shot in Somerset be on screen?". Somerset Live. Local World. Retrieved 4 January [permanent dead link]
  30. ^Lesnick, Silas (5 January ). "STARZ's The White Princess Teaser Walks the Line". ComingSoon.net. Retrieved 16 January
  31. ^Petski, Denise. "Starz's The White Princess Sets Premiere Date, Unveils Key Art & Trailer". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 9 February
  32. ^"The White Princess". Rotten Tomatoes.
  33. ^"The White Queen". Metacritic.
  34. ^Otterson, Joe (15 March ). "Starz Greenlights Limited Series Spanish Princess Based on Philippa Gregory Novels". Variety. Retrieved 16 March

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_White_Princess_(miniseries)

Now discussing:

The White Queen (TV series)

British historical drama television series

The White Queen is a British historical drama television drama serial developed for BBC One. It is based on Philippa Gregory's historical novel series The Cousins' War (The White Queen, The Red Queen, and The Kingmaker's Daughter).[4] The first episode premiered on BBC One on 16 June in the United Kingdom.[5] It was first broadcast in the United States on Starz on 9 August [6][7][8]

The drama is set against the backdrop of the Wars of the Roses and presents the story of the women involved in the long conflict for the throne of England. It starts in ; the nation has been at war for nine years fighting over who is the rightful king as two sides of the same family, the House of York and the House of Lancaster, contest the throne. The story follows three women, Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville, who manipulate events behind the scenes of history to gain power.[9] Elizabeth Woodville is the protagonist in the novel The White Queen, and Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville are the focus of the novels The Red Queen and The Kingmaker's Daughter; the three characters appear in the three novels that make up the television drama.

The final episode of The White Queen aired on 18 August and the drama was released on DVD and Blu-ray Disc the following day. Two days later, it was confirmed that The White Queen would not be returning for a second series. In a statement to Broadcast, the BBC stated that the show was always planned as a one-series serial miniseries.[10] In October , The Telegraph reported that Starz planned to develop a sequel called The White Princess, based on Gregory's novel of the same name.[11] Gregory confirmed that the project was underway in August [12] On 7 February , Gregory announced on Facebook that the sequel was officially confirmed to be in production, with the scripts being written.[13] On 15 March , Starz announced that it would create a continuation of The White Queen and The White Princess to be titled The Spanish Princess, which would be based on Gregory's novels The Constant Princess and The King's Curse and centre on Catherine of Aragon.

The White Queen was nominated for three Golden Globe Awards, four Primetime Emmy Awards and a People's Choice Award.

Cast[edit]

Main[edit]

  • Juliet Aubrey as Lady Anne Beauchamp, Countess of Warwick, wife of Warwick and mother to Lady Isabel and Lady Anne
  • Veerle Baetens as Margaret of Anjou, queen consort to Henry VI of England
  • Aneurin Barnard as Richard III of England
  • Leo Bill as Sir Reginald Bray
  • Emily Berrington as Jane Shore, Edward IV's mistress
  • Ashley Charles as Thomas Grey, the eldest son of Elizabeth Woodville and Sir John Grey of Groby
  • Dean-Charles Chapman as Richard Grey, son of Elizabeth Woodville and Sir John Grey of Groby
  • Arthur Darvill as Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham
  • Shaun Dooley as Sir Robert Brackenbury
  • Rebecca Ferguson as Elizabeth Woodville, the "White Queen" and consort to Edward IV
  • James Frain as Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, "the Kingmaker"
  • Caroline Goodall as Cecily Neville, Duchess of York, mother of Edward, George, and Richard
  • Andrew Gower as Lord Strange, son of Lord Stanley
  • Rupert Graves as Lord Stanley, the fourth husband of Lady Margaret Beaufort
  • Amanda Hale as Lady Margaret Beaufort, "the Red Queen", mother of Henry Tudor, a great-granddaughter of John, Duke of Lancaster
  • Max Irons as Edward IV of England
  • Michael Jenn as Dr Lewis
  • Ben Lamb as Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers
  • Michael Maloney as Sir Henry Stafford, third husband of Lady Margaret Beaufort
  • Michael Marcus as Henry Tudor, later Henry VII of England; son and heir of Lady Margaret Beaufort by Sir Edmund Tudor
  • Faye Marsay as Lady Anne Neville, "the Kingmaker's Daughter" and queen consort to Richard III
  • Freya Mavor as Elizabeth of York, eldest daughter and child to Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville
  • Lizzy McInnerny as Lady Sutcliffe
  • Tom McKay as Jasper Tudor, half-brother of Henry VI, brother-in-law to Lady Margaret Beaufort and uncle to Henry Tudor
  • Janet McTeer as Jacquetta, Lady Rivers, Elizabeth Woodville's mother
  • David Oakes as George, Duke of Clarence, brother of Edward IV
  • Eve Ponsonby as Mary Woodville
  • Robert Pugh as Baron Rivers (later Earl Rivers), father of Elizabeth Woodville
  • Frances Tomelty as Lady Beauchamp, mother of Lady Margaret Beaufort
  • Eleanor Tomlinson as Lady Isabel Neville, Duchess of Clarence, wife of George, Duke of Clarence and elder sister of Lady Anne Neville
  • Rupert Young as Sir William Herbert, Lord Pembroke

Supporting[edit]

The large majority of the cast is British, but since the drama was shot in Belgium, several local actors are featured: Veerle Baetens,[14] Jurgen Delnaet, Joren Seldeslachts, Elsa Houben, Ben Forceville and Ben Van den Heuvel all appear in the serial.[15] Rebecca Ferguson who portrays Elizabeth Woodville, the White Queen, is from Sweden (her mother is originally from England).[16]

Production[edit]

The budget was £25 million and took days to shoot, consisting of sets including: dungeons, palaces, castles, 12 state banquets and at least two coronations.[17]

Filming began in September and lasted until March [18]

Two versions were made, one for the BBC and a more sexually explicit version for the US.[19]

A companion two-part documentary series, The Real White Queen and Her Rivals, presented by Philippa Gregory, was made to accompany the series. It was broadcast on BBC Two on 17 and 24 July [20]

Credits[edit]

Locations[edit]

The White Queen was filmed on location in Belgium, where several landmarks in Bruges and Ghent represent locations in London and elsewhere:[26]

Episodes[edit]

The Starz episode title is shown below the original BBC title if different. Final UK episode ratings from Broadcasters' Audience Research Board.

Historical accuracy[edit]

A number of anachronisms and historical inaccuracies received attention, especially in the costumes and locations used.[43] Pat Stacey of the Irish Evening Herald, said that "the historical howlers are piling up like bodies on a battlefield, week after week", comparing it to the "flaws" spotted by "nitpickers" in Downton Abbey and Foyle's War.[44]

Bernadette McNulty, of The Daily Telegraph, commented that in the final episode, the Battle of Bosworth Field appears to take place in a forest rather than a field.[45] Mary McNamara, of the LA Times, states that in order to fit thirty years of history into ten episodes, "years collapse into minutes, intricate policy is condensed into cardboard personalities, and the characters are swiftly categorized as good or evil".[46]

Others questioned the depiction of the major characters. Amy Licence, Cecily's biographer, states that Cecily Neville, Duchess of York, is portrayed in the first episode as "straight from the pages of a novel rather than the actual proud aristocrat who asserted her own right to rule".[47] Historian Michael Hicks commented, "They've fiddled with the chronology" but added, "I can see why they decided to restrict the cast of characters, and play up the rivalry between Elizabeth and the Earl of Warwick", and also said "As with Philippa Gregory's source novels, they've done their research".[48]

In response to criticisms of the series being "ahistorical", Gregory stated that

"What [BBC One and Starz] wanted was not a historical series based on the documents from the War of the Roses. They wanted my take on it, so that's what they got."[49]

Aneurin Barnard (who played Richard) stated, with regard to inaccuracies,

"the truth can be pretty boring. You have to up the stakes and make something up or twist it to make it a little bit more exciting".[50][51]

Reception[edit]

On Metacritic the show has a score of 70 based on reviews from 14 critics.[52]

Reception in the UK[edit]

In the UK the critical reception was described as “mixed at best” and 'mostly scathing'.[54] Sam Wollaston of The Guardian praised the characters, suggesting Janet McTeer (Jacquetta) stole the show. He also praised the romantic elements, commenting "Mmmm, steamy".[55] Gerard O'Donovan of The Daily Telegraph praised the casting of the supporting characters and the exciting "lust and vengeance" fuelling the drama, but objected to the prettified portrayal of 15th century England.[56]The Independent's Tom Sutcliffe found it "less historically plausible than Game of Thrones", but concluded that "I’m sure it will give innocent pleasure to many".[57] Barbara Ellen in The Observer, compared the show to "a strange Timotei advert, featuring fornication, shouting, horses, armour", whilst commenting that the sex scenes, toned down in the British version, "were so vanilla, I ended up fancying an ice cream".[58]

Reviewing the final episode for The Daily Telegraph, Bernadette McNulty stated that the series, "fell between two stools—not serious enough for the scholars nor glitzy enough for the Game of Thrones fans".[45] The ratings were however good. The first episode received 6 million viewers, stabilising at around the 4– million mark from the second episode,[59][60] although occasionally it dipped below this on first broadcast figures.[61]

Reception in the US[edit]

The White Queen received generally mixed reviews after airing on the Starz network on 10 August Joanne Ostrow of The Denver Post described the drama as "Sexy, empowering and violent".[62] Linda Stasi of the New York Post agreed that the programme was a hit, saying "The White Queen [is] a royal winner".[63] It was again unfavourably compared to HBO's high budget and fast-paced Game of Thrones. In comparison to Game of Thrones Neil Genzlinger speculated that "even if dragons were allowed, they’d mostly be lounging around and, between bouts of relatively tame dragon sex, talking about eating people rather than actually eating them".[64] The performances of Janet McTeer and James Frain were praised by several American reviewers. Amanda Hale, despite receiving praise for her performance by British reviewers,[65] was unfavourably reviewed by US critic Matthew Gilbert. He said "There were moments when I rolled my eyes—Amanda Hale, as the mother of young Henry Tudor, looks as if she is going to explode with ill intent. Really, her performance could be transposed into a Mel Brooks spoof".[66] Louise Mellor of Den of Geek added "Why does Lady Margaret Beaufort constantly look like she is sucking on a Murray Mint?"[67]TV Guide writer Matt Roush praised Hale's performance as "intense", and favoured the drama, labelling it as "fun", and on a one to ten scale, ranking it at seven.[68]

The White Queen was nominated three times at the 71st Golden Globe Awards, with acting nominations for Ferguson and McTeer and an overall nomination for the miniseries in the Best Miniseries or Television Film category.[69]

Accolades[edit]

The White Queen was nominated for several awards including three Golden Globe Awards, four Primetime Emmy Awards and a People's Choice Award for Favorite TV Movie/Miniseries.

71st Golden Globe Awards ()

  • Best Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television – (Rebecca Ferguson)
  • Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television – (Janet McTeer)

66th Primetime Emmy Awards ()

66th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards ()

  • Outstanding Music Composition for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special (Original Dramatic Score) – For episode: " The Final Battle"
  • Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special – For episode: "The Price of Power"
  • Outstanding Hairstyling for a Miniseries or Movie

40th People's Choice Awards ()

  • Favorite TV Movie/Miniseries

Saturn Awards – Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films

  • SBest Television Release on DVD/Blu-ray

ASC Award – American Society of Cinematographers

  • Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography in Television Movie/Mini-Series – David Luther for Episode: "War at First Hand" (nomination)[25]

OFTA Television Awards – Online Film & Television Association

Satellite Awards

  • Best Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television

Home media releases[edit]

DVD title Discs Year Episodes DVD release Notes
Region 1Region 2Region 4
The complete series4 10 4 February 19 August n/a BBC version in region 2
Blu-ray title Discs Year Episodes Blu-ray Disc release Notes
Region ARegion BRegion C
The complete series3 10 4 February 19 August n/a BBC version in region B

Sequels[edit]

The White Princess[edit]

Main article: The White Princess (miniseries)

Despite initial plans for a follow-up series, on 20 August the BBC announced they were not commissioning one, possibly due to the lukewarm reception the series received.[70] However, in October ,The Telegraph reported that Starz was planning to develop a sequel miniseries called The White Princess, based on Gregory's novel of the same name.[11]

Starz CEO Chris Albrecht announced in January that the network was working with White Queen screenwriter Emma Frost on the project.[71] Starz would produce the White Princess miniseries without involvement from the BBC.[71] Gregory confirmed that the project was underway in August [12] On 7 February , Gregory announced on Facebook that the sequel was officially confirmed to be in production, with the scripts being written.[13] Production on the eight-episode miniseries began in June [72][73] It aired weekly on Starz from 6 April to 4 June

The Spanish Princess[edit]

Main article: The Spanish Princess

On 15 March , Starz announced that it would create a continuation of The White Queen and The White Princess to be titled The Spanish Princess, which would be based on Gregory's novels The Constant Princess and The King's Curse and centre on Catherine of Aragon.[74] It premiered on 5 May [75]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Composers: John Lunn". Coolmusicltd.com. Archived from the original on 3 April Retrieved 23 June
  2. ^ abFilothea: BBC: Films "The White Queen" television series in Belgium/Ghent Linked
  3. ^BBC Media Centre: The White Queen Linked
  4. ^"BBC – Media Centre: The White Queen, a new ten-part drama for BBC One". BBC.co.uk. 31 August Retrieved 6 October
  5. ^"Media Centre – Programme Information – The White Queen". BBC. Retrieved 23 June
  6. ^"Breaking News – Starz to Air Advance Screening of "The White Queen" Following "Magic City" Season Two Finale on Friday, August 9 at 10PM ET/PT". The Futon Critic. 26 July Retrieved 9 August
  7. ^"'The White Queen' advance screening on Starz TV". RedEye Chicago. 31 July Retrieved 9 August
  8. ^"Starz acquires All3Media's The White Queen". TBI Vision. 5 September Retrieved 9 June
  9. ^ ab"Media Centre – The White Queen, a new ten-part drama for BBC One". BBC. 31 August Retrieved 23 June
  10. ^"'The White Queen' ditched by BBC: It is axed too soon?". Digital Spy. 20 August Retrieved 20 August
  11. ^ abWalker, Tim (17 October ). "The White Queen is to make a comeback". The Telegraph. Retrieved 6 October
  12. ^ abWalker-Arnott, Ellie (10 August ). "A sequel to The White Queen is definitely in the works". Radio Times. Retrieved 7 February
  13. ^ ab"Philippa Gregory". 7 February Retrieved 7 February &#; via Facebook.
  14. ^Auteur: jdr, fvv (6 November ). "Veerle Baetens start opnames in BBC-serie 'The White Queen' – Het Nieuwsblad". Nieuwsblad.be. Retrieved 23 June
  15. ^Filothea Web Team (27 September ). "BBC: Films "The White Queen" television series in Belgium / Ghent &#; Filothea Blog Area". Filothea.com. Retrieved 23 June
  16. ^Stockholm TT Spektra (1 September ). "Rebecca Ferguson får drömroll på BBC &#; Kultur &#; SvD". Svenska Dagbladet (in Swedish). Svd.se. Retrieved 23 June
  17. ^Ben Stephenson (29 May ). "Media Centre – The White Queen". BBC. Retrieved 23 June
  18. ^"Bruges gears up for BBC filming". 20 August
  19. ^Wurm, Gerald. "The White Queen With Two Versions - BBC Costume Series With More Nudity in the US - Movie-Censorship.com". www.movie-censorship.com.
  20. ^"BBC Two". Retrieved 18 July
  21. ^Ellen, By (18 November ). "Lisa pens pilot for new C4 show – Entertainment". Derry Journal. Retrieved 23 June
  22. ^"James Kent". United Agents. 3 February Retrieved 23 June
  23. ^"Editors". Creativemediamanagement.com. Archived from the original on 15 February Retrieved 23 June
  24. ^ abLowry, Brian (5 August ). "The White Queen Review". Variety. Retrieved 14 July
  25. ^ abChagollan, Steve (20 November ). "Starz Network Shines in ASC TV Noms". Variety. Retrieved 14 July
  26. ^ ab"Belgium: Hollywood on the North Sea &#; Presseurop (English)". Presseurop.eu. 12 October Retrieved 23 June
  27. ^BBC episode gallery, Episode titles and dates as broadcast by BBC.
  28. ^ abWhite Queen on Starz, Episode titles and dates as broadcast by Starz.
  29. ^"BBC One – The White Queen – Episode Guide". BBC. Retrieved 23 June
  30. ^Tartaglione, Nancy (17 June ). "In UK Debut, Starz/BBC Drama The White Queen Wins Sunday Night Ratings Crown". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 14 June
  31. ^Szalai, Georg (17 June ). "The White Queen Draws More Than 5 Million Viewers in BBC Debut". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 14 June
  32. ^Kissell, Rick (13 August ). "Discovery Has Bite With Sharks as CBS Tops Week Despite Blackout". Variety. Retrieved 30 May
  33. ^Opening caption as Elizabeth appears on screen reads: "London, 26th May "
  34. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings: Lifetime's "Baby Sellers" Tops Viewers, Demos". The Futon Critic. 20 August Retrieved 30 May
  35. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings: Nickelodeon's "Swindle," Lifetime's "Escape from Polygamy" Top Charts". The Futon Critic. 27 August Retrieved 30 May
  36. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings: ESPN Dominates with Notre Dame/Michigan Coverage". The Futon Critic. 10 September Retrieved 30 May
  37. ^"Saturday Cable Ratings: College Football, "Sam & Cat" Top Charts". The Futon Critic. 17 September Retrieved 30 May
  38. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings & Broadcast Finals: College Football, "Sam & Cat" Lead Viewers". The Futon Critic. 24 September Retrieved 30 May
  39. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings & Broadcast Finals: College Football, "48 Hours" Lead the Pack". The Futon Critic. 1 October Retrieved 30 May
  40. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings & Broadcast Finals: College Football Snares Top Spots". The Futon Critic. 8 October Retrieved 30 May
  41. ^"Saturday Cable Ratings & Broadcast Finals: ALCS, NASCAR & College Football Top Charts". The Futon Critic. 15 October Retrieved 30 May
  42. ^"Saturday's Cable Ratings & Broadcast Finals: ALCS Finale Triumphs Over College Football". The Futon Critic. 22 October Retrieved 30 May
  43. ^"The White Queen brings zips, bricks and manicures to the 15th century", The Telegraph, 18 June Accessed 11 September
  44. ^"Off with the White Queen's head", Irish Evening Herald, 4 July
  45. ^ abThe Telegraph, "The White Queen, final episode, review", 18 August Accessed 11 September
  46. ^"Television review: 'The White Queen' courts confusion", Los Angeles Times, 10 August Accessed 12 September
  47. ^Licence, Amy (17 June ). "The White Queen: romance, sex, magic, scowling, social snobbery and battles". New Statesman. Retrieved 30 September
  48. ^"A medieval historian's view on The White Queen", The Guardian, 24 June Accessed 14 September
  49. ^"INTERVIEW: The White Queen writer Philippa Gregory", The Week, 9 August Accessed 11 September
  50. ^"'White Queen's Aneurin Barnard defends show's historical inaccuracies – TV News – Digital Spy". Digitalspy.com. 14 July Retrieved 27 February
  51. ^Lazarus, Susanna (12 July ). "The White Queen's Aneurin Barnard on why historical accuracy can be "pretty boring"". Radio Times. Retrieved 27 February
  52. ^"The White Queen". Metacritic.
  53. ^McNamara, Mary (10 August ). "Television Review: The White Queen". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 14 April
  54. ^Sam Wollaston, "The White Queen; Agatha Christie's Marple – TV review", The Guardian, 17 June
  55. ^TV and Radio (16 June ). "The White Queen, BBC One, review The Telegraph, 16 June, ". The Telegraph. London. Retrieved 27 February
  56. ^Tom Sutcliffe (17 June ). "TV review: The White Queen is less historically plausible than Game of Thrones (despite being ostensibly true), The Independent, 17 June, ". The Independent. London. Retrieved 27 February
  57. ^Barbara Ellen (23 June ). "Rewind TV: The White Queen; Mad Men; Long Lost Family; Rick Stein's India – review, The Observer, 23 June, ". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 27 February
  58. ^Stacey, Pat (4 July ). "Off With the White Queen's Head". The Herald. Retrieved 21 December
  59. ^Sweeney, Mark (24 June ). "The White Queen's audience drops". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 December
  60. ^Midgley, Neil (15 July ). "Bravo to BBC One for The White Queen". The Daily Telegraph. London. Retrieved 21 December
  61. ^Ostrow, Joanne (9 August ). "The White Queen Review". The Denver Post. Retrieved 20 August
  62. ^Stasi, Linds. "Starz's White Queen a Royal Winner". New York Post. Retrieved 20 August
  63. ^Genzlinger, Neil (9 August ). "In this Game of Thrones, Ladies Play Hardball". The New York Times. Retrieved 20 August
  64. ^Harvey, Chris (18 August ). "The White Queen: Amanda Hale on the visions of Margaret Beaufort". The Telegraph. London. Retrieved 20 August
  65. ^Gilbert, Matthew. "The White Queen Scratches the Itch". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 20 August
  66. ^Mellor, Louise (18 August ). "The White Queen Finale Review". Den of Geek. Retrieved 20 August
  67. ^TV Guide Volume 61 Num 33, Issue #–
  68. ^"Golden Globes full list of nominations", The Guardian, 12 December Accessed 5 January
  69. ^"Reign over for The White Queen". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 20 August
  70. ^ abAndreeva, Nellie (10 January ). "TCA: Starz's Chris Albrecht On Plans, White Queen Sequel, Magic City Demise". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 8 December
  71. ^Bradley, Laura (13 June ). "Two More Game of Thrones Actors Just Joined Starz's The White Queen Follow-Up". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 14 June
  72. ^Petski, Denise (13 June ). "The White Princess: Essie Davis, Joanne Whalley, More Join Cast". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 14 June
  73. ^Otterson, Joe (15 March ). "Starz Greenlights Limited Series Spanish Princess Based on Philippa Gregory Novels". Variety. Retrieved 16 March
  74. ^"The Spanish Princess (TV Series –) - IMDb".

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_White_Queen_(TV_series)


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