Product presentation powerpoint example

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23 great presentation examples that really work

From Tony Robbins to TedX talks, the power of a well-made presentation can’t be ignored. They’re one of the best ways to connect with an audience, change perceptions, and sell products and services.

Biteable allows anyone to create great presentations — no previous video-making skills required. We’ve created a treasure trove of easy-to-use templates for making video presentations that will give you the wow factor you need to make an impact on your audience.

Creating a presentation is exciting, but it can also feel a little daunting. When it comes to designing slides and videos, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed &#; especially if the success of your business depends on it. Check out our tips for advice on how to make a stand-out presentation.

Video presentation examples

Video presentations are our specialty at Biteable. We love them because they’re the most visually appealing and memorable way to communicate.

1. Animated characters

Our first video example is a Biteable template that uses animated characters. The friendly and modern style makes this the perfect presentation for engaging your audience.

2. Conference video

Videos are also ideal solutions for events (e.g. trade shows) where they can be looped to play constantly while you attend to more important things like talking to people and handing out free cheese samples.

For this event presentation sample below, we used bright colours, stock footage, and messaging that reflects the brand and values of the company. All these elements work together to draw the attention of passers-by.

For a huge selection of video presentation templates, take a look at our template gallery.

PowerPoint presentation examples

Striking fear into the hearts of the workplace since , PowerPoint is synonymous with bland, boring presentations that feel more like an endurance test than a learning opportunity. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

3. Design pointers

This PowerPoint presentation takes a tongue-in-cheek look at how the speakers and users of PowerPoint are the problem, not the software itself.

Even at a hefty 61 slides, the vintage theme, appealing colors, and engaging content keep the viewer interested. It delivers useful and actionable tips on creating a better experience for your audience.

4. Pixar

Pixar, as you’d expect, redefines the meaning of PowerPoint in their “22 Rules for Phenomenal Storytelling”. The character silhouettes are instantly recognizable and tie firmly to the Pixar brand. The bright colour palettes are carefully chosen to highlight the content of each slide.

This presentation is a good length, delivering one message per slide, making it easy for an audience to take notes and retain the information.

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Google slide examples

If you’re in business, chances are you&#;ll have come across slide decks. Much like a deck of cards, each slide plays a key part in the overall &#;deck&#;, creating a well-rounded presentation.

If you need to inform your team, present findings, or outline a new strategy, slides are one of the most effective ways to do this.

Google Slides is one of the best ways to create a slide deck right now. It’s easy to use and has built-in design tools that integrate with Adobe, Lucidchart, and more. The best part &#; it’s free!

5. Teacher education

Here’s a slide deck that was created to educate teachers on how to use Google Slides effectively in a classroom. At first glance it seems stuffy and businessy, but if you look closer it’s apparent the creator knows his audience well, throwing in some teacher-friendly content that’s bound to get a smile.

The slides give walkthrough screenshots and practical advice on the different ways teachers can use the software to make their lives that little bit easier and educate their students at the same time.

6. Charity awareness raiser

This next Google slide deck is designed to raise awareness for an animal shelter. It has simple, clear messaging, and makes use of the furry friends it rescues to tug on heartstrings and encourage donations and adoptions from its audience.

Prezi presentation examples

If you haven’t come across Prezi, it’s a great alternative to using static slides. Sitting somewhere between slides and a video presentation, it allows you to import other content and add motion to create a more engaging viewer experience.

7. Red Bull event recap

This Prezi was created to document the Red Bull stratosphere freefall stunt a few years ago. It neatly captures all the things that Prezi is capable of, including video inserts and the zoom effect, which gives an animated, almost 3D effect to what would otherwise be still images.

Prezi has annual awards for the best examples of presentations over the year. This next example is one of the winners. It was made to highlight a new Logitech tool.

8. Logitech Spotlight launch

What stands out here are the juicy colors, bold imagery, and the way the designer has used Prezi to its full extent, including rotations, panning, fades, and a full zoom out to finish the presentation.

Sales presentation examples

If you’re stuck for ideas for your sales presentation, step right this way and check out this video template we made for you.

9. Product sales template

Nothing captures the joys of a car audio system like watching people dance in the summer sun. Check. Happy people enjoying their favorite tunes wherever they go. Check.

If you’re selling a physical product or a service, video lets you capture your offerings in action for a more emotional connection to your customers.

Zuroa sales deck

If you’re after a sales deck, you can’t go past this example from Zuora. What makes it great? It begins by introducing the worldwide shift in the way consumers are shopping. It’s a global phenomenon, and something we can all relate to.

It then weaves a compelling story about how the subscription model is changing the face of daily life for everyone. Metrics and testimonials from well-known CEOs and executives are included for some slamming social proof to boost the sales message.

Pitch presentation examples

Pitch decks are used to give an overview of business plans, and are usually presented during meetings with customers, investors, or potential partners.

Uber pitch deck

This is Uber’s original pitch deck, which (apart from looking a teensy bit dated) gives an excellent overview of their business model and clearly shows how they intended to disrupt a traditional industry and provide a better service to people. Right now, you’re probably very grateful that this pitch presentation was a winner.

You can make your own pitch deck with Biteable, or start with one of our video templates to make something a little more memorable.

Video pitch template

This video pitch presentation clearly speaks to the pains of everyone who needs to commute and find parking. It then provides the solution with its app that makes parking a breeze.

The video also introduces the key team members, their business strategy, and what they’re hoping to raise in funding. It’s a simple, clear pitch that positions the company as a key solution to a growing, worldwide problem. It’s compelling and convincing, as a good presentation should be.

Fyre Festival pitch deck

The most epic example of a recent pitch deck is this one for Fyre Festival &#; the greatest event that never happened. Marvel at its persuasion, gasp at the opportunity of being part of the cultural experience of the decade, cringe as everything goes from bad to worse.

Despite the very public outcome, this is a masterclass in how to create hype and get funding with your pitch deck using beautiful imagery, beautiful people, and beautiful promises of riches and fame.

Business presentation examples

Need to get the right message out to the right people? Business presentations can do a lot of the heavy lifting for you.

Simply press play and let your video do the talking. No fumbling your words and sweating buckets in front of those potential clients, just you being cool as a cucumber while your presentation does the talking.

Check out two of our popular templates that you can use as a starting point for your own presentations. While they’re business-minded, they’re definitely not boring.

Business intro template

Modern graphics, animations, and upbeat soundtracks keep your prospects engaged as they learn about your business, your team, your values, and how you can help them.

Business explainer template

Research presentation examples

When you’re giving a more technical presentation such as research findings, you need to strike the perfect balance between informing your audience and making sure they stay awake.

As a rule, slides are more effective for research presentations, as they are used to support the speaker’s knowledge rather can capture every small detail on screen.

With often dry, complex, and technical subject matter, there can be a temptation for presentations to follow suit. Use images instead of walls of text, and keep things as easy to follow as possible.

Trackmaven research deck

TrackMaven uses their endearing mascot to lighten up this data-heavy slide deck. The graphs help to bring life to their findings, and they ensure to only have one bite-size takeaway per slide so that viewers can easily take notes.

Wearable tech research report

Obviously, research can get very researchy and there’s not a lot to be done about it. This slide deck below lays out a ton of in-depth information but breaks it up well with quotes, diagrams, and interesting facts to keep viewers engaged while it delivers its findings on wearable technology.

Team presentation examples

Motivating your team can be a challenge at the best of times, especially when you need to gather them together for….another presentation!

Team update template

We created this template as an example of how to engage your team &#; in this case, it’s for new season products for a retail store. Using colorful animation and product action shots, all the new stock and store information is presented in a captivating way, with a quick team pep talk message to wrap it up. Much better than a printed spreadsheet, right?

Officevibe collaboration explainer

This short slide deck is a presentation designed to increase awareness of the problems of a disengaged team. Bright colors and relevant images combine with facts and figures that compel viewers to click through to a download to learn more about helping their teams succeed.

Recruitment presentation examples

Recruiting the right people can be a challenge. Presentations can help display your team and your business by painting a dynamic picture of what it’s like to work with you.

Videos and animated slides let you capture the essence of your brand and workplace so that the right employees can find you.

Company culture explainer

If you’re a recruitment agency, your challenge is to stand out from the hundreds of other agencies in the marketplace.

Kaizen culture

Showcasing your agency using a slide deck can give employers and employees a feel for doing business with you. Kaizen clearly displays its credentials and highlights its brand values and personality here (and also its appreciation of the coffee bean).

Explainer presentation examples

Got some explaining to do? Using an explainer video is the ideal way to showcase products that are technical, digital, or otherwise too difficult to explain with still images and text.

Explainer videos help you present the features and values of your product in an engaging way that speaks to your ideal audience and promotes your brand at the same time.

Product explainer template

Lucidchart explainer

Lucidchart does a stellar job of using explainer videos for their software. Their series of explainers-within-explainers entertains the viewer with cute imagery and an endearing brand voice. At the same time, the video is educating its audience on how to use the actual product. We (almost) guarantee you’ll have more love for spiders after watching this one.

Creating a winning presentation doesn’t need to be difficult or expensive. It just needs to be clear and concise with a message that speaks to your target audience.

Modern slide decks and video software make it easy for you to give compelling presentations that sell, explain, and educate &#; without sending your audience to snooze town.

Check out the full range of Biteable presentation templates to get your creative brain juices flowing and turn your next presentation into gold.

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Recommended reads

17 creative video presentation ideas that’ll win over your audience

7 min readRead moreVideo tips

How to make a good presentation with 8 pro tips

7 min readRead moreVideo tips

Sours: https://biteable.com/blog/presentation-examples/

Example Presentation Of Product Powerpoint Presentation Slides

Content of this Powerpoint Presentation


Slide 1: This slide introduces Example Presentation of Product. State Your Company Name and begin.
Slide 2: This is an Agenda slide. State your agendas here.
Slide 3: This slide shows Outline as- Product Idea Screening, New Product Analysis, Product Lifecycle, Tools & Techniques, Market Analysis, Development Plans, Branding & Repositioning, Cost Analysis, Product Feasibility & Review.
Slide 4: This slide presents Product Idea Screening describing- New Product Introduction, New Product Detailed Overview, Understanding Customer Needs, External Sources of Ideas, Internal Sources of Ideas, Product Roadmap.
Slide 5: This slide displays New Product Introduction. Explain the product idea in detail for e.g. Requirement of the product, Technology used etc.
Slide 6: This slide represents New Product Detailed Overview.
Slide 7: This slide showcases Understanding Customer Needs describing- What they do: Understand their occupation and interest? Understand your customer: are they a small private company or a big MNC? When they buy: Understand the purchasing cycle of your customer What they expect of you: if your customers expect reliable delivery and you don't disappoint them, you stand to gain repeat business How they buy: Website, App, in-person?
Slide 8: This slide shows External Source of New Product Ideas describing- Overseas experience transferring foreign products, Learning From, Competitors, Long Range Studies, Market Gap Analysis, Consumer Activity Analysis, Market Research.
Slide 9: This slide presents Internal Sources of New Product Ideas describing- Management, Employee Suggestions, Stockholders, Innovation Group Meetings, Sales Force, Research and Engineering.
Slide 10: This slide displays Product Roadmap as- Product Launch, Data Logging Module, Bootstrap upgrade, Teach support portal, Chrome Support, Public API.
Slide 11: This slide represents New Product Analysis describing- Detailed Analysis, Category Analysis - Example Slide, Category Analysis, Porter’s Five Forces Analysis.
Slide 12: This slide showcases Detailed Analysis with- Strengths, Weaknesses, Features, Benefits.
Slide 13: This slide shows Category Analysis with Positioning Claims/trends, Price, Packing formats types & materials, Consumption Drivers.
Slide 14: This slide presents Category Analysis – Example Slide.
Slide 15: This slide displays Porter’s Five Forces Model describing- Intensity of Rivalry, Barriers to Entry, Substitutes, Bargaining Power of suppliers, Bargaining Power of Buyer.
Slide 16: This slide represents Product Life Cycle as- Introduction Stage, Maturity Stage, Repositioning a Product, Growth Stage, Decline Stage.
Slide 17: This slide showcases Product Life Cycle Stages describing- Introduction, Growth, Maturity, Decline.
Slide 18: This slide shows Introduction Stage with- Cost, Targets, Competition, Profits, Sales.
Slide 19: This slide presents Growth Stage with following points- Promotions, Distribution Channels, Pricing, Product Quality.
Slide 20: This slide displays Maturity Stage.
Slide 21: This slide represents Decline Stage.
Slide 22: This slide showcases Tools & Techniques as- BCG Matrix, Empathy Map, Ansoff Matrix, Kano Model.
Slide 23: This slide shows BCG Matrix.
Slide 24: This slide presents Ansoff Matrix.
Slide 25: This slide displays Empathy Map to come up with all the possible customer segments to whom you might want to sell your product.
Slide 26: This slide represents Kano Map.
Slide 27: This slide represents Market Analysis describing- Market Segmentation, Competitive Strategies, Product Market Mapping, Market Attractiveness.
Slide 28: This slide showcases Market Segmentation with factors as- Geographic, Demographic, Psychographic, Behavioral.
Slide 29: This slide shows Product Market Mapping.
Slide 30: This slide presents Competitive Strategies in a matrix form.
Slide 31: This slide displays Market Attractiveness.
Slide 32: This slide represents Development Plans describing- Manufacturing Plan, Marketing Launch Plan, Digital Marketing Plan, Operations Plan, Marketing Communication Plan, Budgeting Plan.
Slide 33: This slide displays Manufacturing Plan.
Slide 34: This slide represents Operations Plan.
Slide 35: This slide showcases Marketing Launch Plan as- Create Press Release, Update The Website, Use Twitter, Garner Endorsements, Attend Tradeshows, Create Email Contest, Build Demand, Use Advertising.
Slide 36: This slide shows Marketing Communication Plan as- Direct Marketing, Public Relations, Personal Selling, Sales Promotion, Advertising.
Slide 37: This slide presents Digital Marketing Plan.
Slide 38: This slide displays Budgeting Template in a tabular form.
Slide 39: This slide represents Branding & Repositioning as- Repositioning Strategy, Maturity Stage, Repositioning a Product, Growth Stage, Decline Stage.
Slide 40: This slide displays Repositioning a Product To new Consumers and Among Existing Customers.
Slide 41: This slide represents Repositioning Strategy in a matrix form.
Slide 42: This slide displays Building Brand Preference in a tabular form.
Slide 43: This slide represents Cost Analysis as- Marketing & Launch Cost Analysis, Production & Operation Cost Analysis, Business & Financial Analysis.
Slide 44: This slide showcases Production & Operation Cost Analysis in a tabular form.
Slide 45: This slide shows Marketing & Launch Cost Analysis.
Slide 46: This slide presents Business & Financial Analysis.
Slide 47: This slide displays Product Feasibility & Review with- Evaluating Scores, Product Quality Check, Feasibility Review, Alpha & Beta Testing Timelines, Launch Monitoring Dashboard.
Slide 48: This slide represents Feasibility Review describing- Operational Feasibility, Economic Feasibility, Legal Requirement Feasibility, Scheduling Requirement Feasibility, Technical Feasibility.
Slide 49: This slide showcases Evaluating Scores in a tabular form.
Slide 50: This slide shows Alpha & Beta Testing Timelines.
Slide 51: This slide presents Product Quality Check to rate the product’s quality as per the alpha/ beta testing done in the previous slide.
Slide 52: This slide displays Launch Monitoring Dashboards of Return On Investment, Target Units Sold, Customer Satisfaction.
Slide 53: This slide reminds about 30 minutes Coffee Break.
Slide 54: This slide shows Example Presentation of Product Icons.
Slide 55: This is another slide continuing Example Presentation of Product Icons.
Slide 56: This slide is titled as Additional Slides for moving forward.
Slide 57: This is Our Mission slide with related imagery.
Slide 58: This is Our Team slide with names and designation.
Slide 59: This is About us slide to show company specifications etc.
Slide 60: This is Our Main Goal slide. Show your important goals here.
Slide 61: This is a Comparison slide to state comparison between commodities, entities etc.
Slide 62: This is Our Main Target slide. Show your targets here.
Slide 63: This slide displays Australia Map.
Slide 64: This is a Hierarchy slide with member's names and designation.
Slide 65: This is a Location slide with USA map.
Slide 66: This is Contact Us slide with Building Address, Telephone, Email and Business Hours.

Example Presentation Of Product Powerpoint Presentation Slides with all 66 slides:

Our Example Presentation Of Product Powerpoint Presentation Slides are like a fuselage. They will carry your thoughts aloft.

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7 Amazing Sales Presentation Examples (And How to Make Them Your Own)

A brilliant sales presentation has a number of things going for it.

Being product-centered isn’t one of them. Or simply focusing on your sales pitch won’t do the trick.

So what can you do to make your offer compelling?

From different types of slides to persuasive techniques and visuals, we’ve got you covered.

Below, we look at data-backed strategies, examples, and easy steps to build your own sales presentations in minutes.

7 Types of Slides to Include In Your Sales Presentation

  1. Title slide: Company name, topic, tagline
  2. The “Before” picture: No more than three slides with relevant statistics and graphics.
  3. The “After” picture: How life looks with your product. Use happy faces.
  4. Company introduction: Who you are and what you do (as it applies to them).
  5. The “Bridge” slide: Short outcome statements with icons in circles.
  6. Social proof slides: Customer logos with the mission statement on one slide. Pull quote on another.
  7. “We’re here for you” slide: Include a call-to-action and contact information.

Many sales presentations fall flat because they ignore this universal psychological bias: People overvalue the benefits of what they have over what they’re missing.

Harvard Business School professor John T. Gourville calls this the “9x Effect.” Left unchecked, it can be disastrous for your business.

the psychology behind a sales presentation

According to Gourville, “It’s not enough for a new product simply to be better. Unless the gains far outweigh the losses, customers will not adopt it.”

The good news: You can influence how prospects perceive these gains and losses. One of the best ways to prove value is to contrast life before and after your product.

Luckily, there’s a three-step formula for that.

Before-After-Bridge: The Only Formula You Need To Create A Persuasive Sales Presentation

  1. Before → Here’s your world…
  2. After → Imagine what it would be like if…
  3. Bridge → Here’s how to get there.

Start with a vivid description of the pain, present an enviable world where that problem doesn’t exist, then explain how to get there using your tool.

It’s super simple, and it works for cold emails, drip campaigns, and sales discovery decks. Basically anywhere you need to get people excited about what you have to say.

In fact, a lot of companies are already using this formula to great success. The methods used in the sales presentation examples below will help you do the same.

Facebook — How Smiles and Simplicity Make You More Memorable

We’re all drawn to happiness. A study at Harvard tells us that emotion is contagious.

You’ll notice that the “Before” (pre-Digital Age) pictures in Facebook’s slides all display neutral faces. But the cover slide that introduces Facebook and the “After” slides have smiling faces on them.

This is important. The placement of those graphics is an intentional persuasion technique.

Studies by psychologists show that we register smiles faster than any other expression. All it takes is milliseconds (1/20th of a second). And when participants in a study were asked to recall expressions, they consistently remembered happy faces over neutral ones.

What to do about it: Add a happy stock photo to your intro and “After” slides, and keep people in “Before” slides to neutral expressions.

Here are some further techniques used during the sales presentation:

Tactic #1: Use Simple Graphics

Use simple graphics to convey meaning without text.

Example: Slide 2 is a picture of a consumer’s hand holding an iPhone — something we can all relate to.

Why It Works: Pictures are more effective than words — it’s called Picture Superiority. In presentations, pictures help you create connections with your audience. Instead of spoon-feeding them everything word for word, you let them interpret. This builds trust.

Tactic #2: Use Icons

Use icons to show statistics you’re comparing instead of listing them out.

Example: Slide 18 uses people icons to emphasize how small 38 out of people is compared to 89 out of

Why It Works: We process visuals 60, times faster than text.

Tactic #3: Include Statistics

Include statistics that tie real success to the benefits you mention.

Example: “71% lift driving visits to retailer title pages” (Slide 26).

Why It Works: Precise details prove that you are telling the truth.

Contently — How to Build A Strong Bridge, Brick By Brick

Just like how you can’t drive from Marin County to San Francisco without the Golden Gate, you can’t connect a “Before” to an “After” without a bridge.

Add the mission statement of your company — something Contently does from Slide 1 of their deck. Having a logo-filled Customers slide isn’t unusual for sales presentations, but Contently goes one step further by showing you exactly what they do for these companies.

sales presentation

They then drive home the Before-After-Bridge Formula further with case studies:

sales presentation

Before: Customer’s needs when they came on

After: What your company accomplished for them

Bridge: How they got there (specific actions and outcomes)

Here are some other tactics we pulled from the sales presentation:

Tactic #1: Use Graphics/Diagrams

Use graphics, Venn diagrams, and/or equations to drive home your “Before” picture.

Why It Works: According to a Cornell study, graphs and equations have persuasive power. They “signal a scientific basis for claims, which grants them greater credibility.”

Tactic #2: Keep Slides That Have Bullets to a Minimum

Keep slides that have bullets to a minimum. No more than one in every five slides.

Why It Works: According to an experiment by the International Journal of Business Communication, “Subjects exposed to a graphic representation paid significantly more attention to, agreed more with, and better recalled the strategy than did subjects who saw a (textually identical) bulleted list.”

Tactic #3: Use Visual Examples

Follow up your descriptions with visual examples.

Example: After stating “+ vetted, ready to work journalists searchable by location, topical experience, and social media influence” on Slide 8, Contently shows what this looks like firsthand on slides 9 and

Why It Works: The same reason why prospects clamor for demos and car buyers ask for test drives. You’re never truly convinced until you see something for yourself.

Yesware — How To Go Above And Beyond With Your Benefits

Which is more effective for you?

This statement — “On average, Yesware customers save ten hours per week” — or this image:

sales presentation

The graphic shows you what that 10 hours looks like for prospects vs. customers. It also calls out a pain that the product removes: data entry.

Visuals are more effective every time. They fuel retention of a presentation from 10% to 65%.

But it’s not as easy as just including a graphic. You need to keep the design clean.

sales presentation

Can you feel it?

Clutter provokes anxiety and stress because it bombards our minds with excessive visual stimuli, causing our senses to work overtime on stimuli that aren’t important.

Here’s a tip from Yesware’s Graphic Designer, Ginelle DeAntonis:

“Customer logos won’t all necessarily have the same dimensions, but keep them the same size visually so that they all have the same importance. You should also disperse colors throughout, so that you don’t for example end up with a bunch of blue logos next to each other. Organize them in a way that’s easy for the eye, because in the end it’s a lot of information at once.”

Here are more tactics to inspire sales presentation ideas:

Tactic #1: Personalize Your Final Slide

Personalize your final slide with your contact information and a headline that drives emotion.

Example: Our Mid-Market Team Lead Kyle includes his phone number and email address with “We’re Here For You”

Why It Works: These small details show your audience that:

  1. This is about giving them the end picture, not making a sale
  2. The end of the presentation doesn’t mean the end of the conversation
  3. Questions are welcomed

Tactic #2: Pair Outcome Statements With Icons in Circles

Example: Slide 4 does this with seven different “After” outcomes.

Why It Works: We already know why pictures work, but circles have power, too. They imply completeness, infiniteness, and harmony.

Tactic #3: Include Specific Success Metrics

Don’t just list who you work with; include specific success metrics that hit home what you’ve done for them.

Example: 35% New Business Growth for Boomtrain; 30% Higher Reply Rates for Dyn.

Why It Works: Social proof drives action. It’s why we wait in lines at restaurants and put ourselves on waitlists for sold-out items.

Uber How to Cater Your Content for Readers Quick To Scan

People can only focus for eight seconds at a time. (Sadly, goldfish have one second on us.)

This means you need to cut to the chase fast.

Uber’s headlines in Slides tailor the “After” picture to specific pain points. As a result, there’s no need to explicitly state a “Before.”

sales presentation

Slides then continue touching on “Before” problems tangentially with customer quotes:

sales presentation

So instead of self-touting benefits, the brand steps aside to let consumers hear from their peers — something that sways 92% of consumers.

DealTap — How To Use Leading Questions To Your Advantage

Leading questions may be banned from the courtroom, but they aren’t in the boardroom.

DealTap’s slides ask viewers to choose between two scenarios over and over. Each has an obvious winner:

sales presentation example

Ever heard of the Focusing Effect?

It’s part of what makes us tick as humans and what makes this design move effective. We focus on one thing and then ignore the rest. Here, DealTap puts the magnifying glass on paperwork vs. automated transactions.

Easy choice.

Sure, DealTap’s platform might have complexities that rival paperwork, but we don’t think about that. We’re looking at the pile of work one the left and the simpler, single interface on the right.

Here are some other tactics to use in your own sales presentation:

Tactic #1: Tell a Story

Tell a story that flows from one slide to the next.

Example: Here’s the story DealTap tells from slides 4 to 8: “Transactions are complicated” → “Expectations on all sides” → “Too many disconnected tools” → “Slow and error prone process” → “However, there’s an opportunity.

Why It Works:Storytelling in sales with a clear beginning and end (or in this case, a “Before” and “After”) trigger a trust hormone called Oxytocin.

Tactic #2: This vs. That

If it’s hard to separate out one “Before” and “After” vision with your product or service because you offer many dissimilar benefits, consider a “This vs. That” theme for each.

Why It Works: It breaks up your points into simple decisions and sets you up to win emotional reactions from your audience with stock photos.

Zuora — How To Win Over Your Prospects By Feeding Them Dots

Remember how satisfying it was to play connect the dots? Forming a bigger picture out of disconnected circles.

That’s what you need to make your audience do.

commonthread

Zuora tells a story by:

  1. Laying out the reality (the “Before” part of the Before-After-Bridge formula).
  2. Asking you a question that you want to answer (the “After”)
  3. Giving you hints to help you connect the dots
  4. Showing you the common thread (the “Bridge”)

You can achieve this by founding your sales presentation on your audience’s intuitions. Set them up with the closely-set “dots,” then let them make the connection.

Here are more tactical sales presentation ideas to steal for your own use:

Tactic #1: Use Logos and Testimonials

Use logos and testimonial pull-quotes for your highest-profile customers to strengthen your sales presentation.

Example: Slides 21 to 23 include customer quotes from Schneider Electric, Financial Times, and Box.

Why It Works: It’s called social proof. Prospects value other people’s opinions and trust reputable sources more than you.

Tactic #2: Include White Space

Pad your images with white space.

Example: Slide 17 includes two simple graphics on a white background to drive home an important concept.

Why It Works: White space creates separation, balance, and attracts the audience’s eyes to the main focus: your image.

Tactic #3: Incorporate Hard Data

Incorporate hard data with a memorable background to make your data stand out.

Example: Slide 5 includes statistics with a backdrop that stands out. The number and exciting title (‘A Global Phenomenon’) are the main focuses of the slide.

Why It Works: Vivid backdrops are proven to be memorable and help your audience take away important numbers or data.

LinkedIn Sales Navigator — How to Create Excitement With Color

Psychology tells us that seeing colors can set our mood.

The color red is proven to increase the pulse and heart rate. Beyond that, it’s associated with being active, aggressive, and outspoken. LinkedIn Sales Navigator uses red on slides to draw attention to main points:

red

You can use hues in your own slides to guide your audience’s emotions. Green gives peace; grey adds a sense of calm; blue breeds trust. See more here.

Tip: You can grab free photos from Creative Commons and then set them to black & white and add a colored filter on top using a (also free) tool like Canva. Here’s the sizing for your image:

canvaimage

Caveat: Check with your marketing team first to see if you have a specific color palette or brand guidelines to follow.

Here are some other takeaways from LinkedIn’s sales presentation:

Tactic #1: Include a CTA on Final Slide

Include one clear call-to-action on your final slide.

Example: Slide 9 has a “Learn More” CTA button.

Why It Works: According to the Paradox of Choice, the more options you give, the less likely they are to act.

How To Make A Sales Pitch In 4 Straightforward Steps

Step One: Ask marketing for your company’s style guide (color, logo, and font style).

Step Two: Answer these questions to outline the “Before → After → Bridge” formula for your sales pitch:

  • What are your ICP’s pain points?
  • What end picture resonates with them?
  • How does your company come into play?

Step Three: Ask account management/marketing which customers you can mention in your slides (plus where to access any case studies for pull quotes).

Step Four: Download photos from Creative Commons. Remember: Graphics > Text. Use Canva to edit on your own — free and fast.

7 Embarrassing Pitfalls To Avoid In Your Presentation

pitfalls-to-avoid-sales-presentation

Over to you

What are the sales presentation strategies that work best for your industry and customers? Tweet us: @Yesware.

Sours: https://www.yesware.com/blog/sales-presentation/

Well, so on. The bell rang, and when I opened the door I saw a girl. a brunette, shoulder-length hair, with green eyes, a rather slender girl. height somewhere 165, with a second breast size.

Powerpoint example presentation product

Off dogs. We lay half-naked, wet and covered with grass, breathing like two driven horses. My ears were ringing. Little by little, a sense of the reality of what was happening began to return to me. I raised my head and looked around with growing horror.

How To Give A Product Presentation

I felt like a fool. I got used to being fucked to the fullest, and then the devil knows what, I didn't even really suck it. Finally, the bus came up, Dimka immediately said, so that I stand on the back platform. the bus was packed with all sorts of summer residents, everyone sat and stood like herrings in a bank. As planned, I stood in the corner on the back platform, Dimka.

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Vasily smiled with amusement, still feeling in himself the accelerated rhythm of the heart. "Does this mean that I passed your sex-attestation. Yes, I did. " the mature blond smiled in reply.



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