Poplar wood for drawers

Poplar wood for drawers DEFAULT

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Homeowners who are looking to remodel their kitchens are often puzzled and confused about the type of wood to select when it comes to constructing the drawers, specifically the drawer boxes. It is easy to select the cabinetry from the attractive hardwoods available on the market. But what about the drawer boxes?  Should the interior sides, back, and bottom of the drawers be made from the same wood as the face of the drawers and the rest of the cabinet? After all, this will give the drawer sides a uniform look when they are opened, perfectly matching the face of the drawer. However, the advantages of building drawers this way may well be outweighed by the merits of using different wood. In this article, we will look at the factors to consider when selecting what type of wood to use in constructing drawer boxes.

Is Plywood Good For Making Drawers?

Drawer boxes, even handcrafted 9 times out of 10 will have a plywood bottom. This is due to the fact that plywood is easier to cut a single piece of plywood to fit a drawer box than to glue up a bunch of hardwood planks. Plywood is flat, strong, and stable in all directions. It retains its shape better than most solid wood and it expands and contracts much less than solid wood.

Plywood for most drawers is 1/4 inch thick but can be 1/2 inch thick on large drawers. You can find these materials in many different types of hardwood so that one or both of the outer veneers can match your drawer boxes and/or fronts. However, not all wood species are available in veneer plywood. If you can’t find plywood that matches or complements your drawer box material, you can consider using a wood stain and or varnish to attain the required finish.

How Much Will Cabinets Drawers Cost?

Cost depends on several factors including but not limited to the size of the kitchen, type of wood, and how many drawers needed. Hardwoods like mahogany, cherry, or fine maple are can be on the pricy side. On a big project like a full-wall entertainment center, the added cost of building solid-cherry drawers could add up to hundreds of extra dollars. Using a less expensive, but equally suitable, wood won’t affect the look of the finished piece and it also won’t affect the structural integrity of the piece.

Can I Mix and Match Different Types of Wood? 

There’s nothing wrong with using a contrasting wood for the drawer sides. In fact, this can be a stylistic advantage. For example, combining a dark hardwood front with a lighter-colored wood like poplar for the drawer box can really highlight the joinery and workmanship. Contrasting wood colors look particularly good with joints like half-blind dovetails.

Is Poplar Good For Making Drawers

Poplar is a great all-around choice for drawer box construction. It is stable, durable, and much less expensive than most hardwoods. The color of poplar heartwood ranges from a creamy white to a yellowish tan or brown. It is very easy to work with and has straight, uniform grain. The overall look of popular blends well with birch plywood, which is an excellent choice for the drawer bottoms.

Hire The Drawer Dude Today For Your Custom Pullout Drawers Today!

When you want the absolute best drawers in all of Palm Beach County, you can best believe that The Drawer Dude is the go-to choice. The Drawer Dude has provided his quality work to many residents of South Florida, and through each job he’s taken on, he’s only ever guaranteed complete satisfaction. We feel more than confident that when you hire The Drawer Dude, you’ll be able to enjoy the inclusion of your new drawers as you’re added to his growing list of satisfied customers. For any inquiries, you may call us at 561.313.7275 or visit our contact us today

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Sours: https://www.thedrawerdude.com/what-is-the-best-wood-for-making-drawers/

Premium Quality Poplar Board Drawer Fronts

CAD Drawing of Board Drawer Fronts

Elegant Poplar Board Replacement Drawer Fronts

Is it time to update your kitchen or replace your existing drawers? If so replacement drawer fronts are an excellent way to cut costs and keep existing drawers all while updating the look of your kitchen. Estate Millwork offers replacement drawer fronts in a variety of styles and wood species to match your new or existing kitchen design. Match a new drawer front to one of our cabinet doors for the perfect upgrade look.

Premium Quality Solid Drawer Fronts

Estate Millwork manufactures premium quality solid wood drawer fronts for refacing and new construction projects. We do not use veneers or particle board, our drawer fronts are top quality solid hardwood lumber including Maple, Mahogany, Oak and many other species. Drawer fronts can be ordered in any size, and we offer several common styles including solid board, raised panel, beadboard, V-Groove. Our site is set up to quickly design and spec large projects easily, but if need help or have a custom drawer front requirement, we are here to help.

Perfect for Refacing Kitchen Cabinets, Vanities and Built In Cabinets

Because our products can be ordered in any size, stile and material, they are ideal to upgrade the look of existing cabinets and casework, without the expense of replacing the existing structural cabinet frames. You can simply measure the sizes of the existing drawer fronts, and order beautiful new custom drawer fronts in a wide variety of styles, premium woods and finishes including painting any color you desire. Our drawerfronts are manufactured in our state of the art plant in Pennsylvania (Not China), and lead teams are very short. Our precision milling equipment will insure that your drawer fronts come in the size you order and will be carefully packed and inspected for prompt delivery

We also manufacture premium cabinet doors that match our drawer fronts

How to Install Custom Drawer Fronts

Our drawer fronts come ready to install. Some customers may prefer to have us finish the drawer fronts, or to finish on site, but once the drawer front is ready for installation, it is extremely simple. Our drawer fronts will work with any cabinet system, legacy traditional hand built kitchens or European Face Frame cabinets. Most installations just require you to remove the existing drawer fronts and reuse hardware to mount our drawer fronts onto the drawer boxes, typically with 2 bolts and one or 2 pulls or knobs. In minutes you can order a whole new look for your kitchen or bathroom and in a few days time, you can begin the installation process, which typically takes only minutes per drawer front and requires only a screw driver and possibly a drill.

Excellent Pricing and Rapid Turn Around to support other Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers.

Because of our highly automated manufacturing process, we are able to provide premium quality custom drawer fronts at below box store prices. For this reason we manufacture drawer fronts for home owners as well as for other kitchen manufacturers who look to Estate Millwork for rapid turn around, solid drawer fronts at very reasonable pricing. Contact us for large volume pricing or supply chain integration.


Poplar the Poor Man's Cherry

Poplar Wood Grain

Poplar hardwood lacking bold coloration or an exciting grain pattern has a pale olive-yellow brown heartwood and sapwood is lighter off-white or gray with greenish hues and doesn't often get the respect we feel it deserves. The Poplar tree is widespread across all of North America and Europe, and it grows very rapidly and to large sizes, making it very easy to sustain.

Because the wood is often painted or used in secondary applications where it isn’t visible, it is very easy to find wide, clear sections of Poplar for a variety of uses.

Poplar lumber is pretty soft and very easy to work. But botanically speaking it is a hardwood meaning it is a deciduous tree. But it is highly stable, easily available in width and length, and takes paint and stain famously well. However using Poplar as a stain grade species is often overlooked. Some will call Poplar wood "poor man's Cherry" as it oxidizes over time to a much darker shade of brown.

Sours: https://www.estatemillwork.com/board-poplar-drawerfronts.html
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The Best Wood for Drawer Construction

Woodworkers who are making cabinetry out of expensive, attractive hardwoods are often uncertain about what to use when it comes to constructing the drawers. Or more specifically, the drawer boxes. Should the interior sides, back, and bottom of the drawers be made from the same wood as the face of the drawers and the rest of the cabinet? After all, this will give the drawer sides a uniform look when they are opened, perfectly matching the face of the drawer. However, the advantages of building drawers this way may well be outweighed by the merits of using different wood. 

Consider Cost

Hardwoods like cherry or fine maple are expensive. On a big project like a full-wall entertainment center, the added cost of building solid-cherry drawers could add up to hundreds of extra dollars. Using a less expensive, but equally suitable, wood won't affect the look of the finished piece unless you like to leave the drawers open for some reason.

Consider Compatability

Drawer boxes, even high-quality handmade boxes, typically have plywood bottoms. This is because plywood is flat, strong, and dimensionally stable (it expands and contracts much less than solid wood). It's also much easier to cut a single piece of plywood to fit a drawer box than to glue up a bunch of hardwood planks.

Plywood for most drawers is 1/4 inch thick but can be 1/2 inch thick on large drawers. You can find these materials in many different types of hardwood so that one or both of the outer veneers can match your drawer boxes and/or fronts. However, not all wood species are available in veneer plywood. If you can't find plywood that matches or complements your drawer box material, you might be faced with gluing up stock to create the bottoms. That's a pretty time-consuming undertaking. 

Why Be Matchy-Matchy?

There's nothing wrong with using a contrasting wood for the drawer sides. In fact, this can be a stylistic advantage. For example, combining a dark hardwood front with a lighter-colored wood like poplar for the drawer box can really highlight the joinery and workmanship. Contrasting wood colors look particularly good with joints like half-blind dovetails.

You Can't Go Wrong With Poplar

Poplar is a great all-around choice for drawer box construction. It is stable, durable, and much less expensive than most hardwoods. The color of poplar heartwood ranges from a creamy white to a yellowish tan or brown. It is very easy to work with and has straight, uniform grain. The overall look of popular blends well with birch plywood, which is an excellent choice for the drawer bottoms.

Wood for Drawer Box Bottoms

Assuming you're going with plywood for the drawer bottoms, you'll get the best results with real hardwood plywood, which is made entirely with thin plies of real hardwood. Conventional plywood has inner plies of various softwoods, even if the outer veneers are hardwood. In general, more, thinner plies make for stronger, flatter panels. For birch plywood, you can't go wrong with Baltic birch, true hardwood plywood sold in 60 by 60-inch sheets as well as various cut sizes. 

Sours: https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/best-wood-for-drawer-construction-3970454
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  1. 02-21-2005, 11:13 AM#1
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    Which wood for drawer boxes

    When building furniture what is your prefered species for drawer sides and backs? Soft maple? Poplar? In the past I have used Baltic Birch, but want to use a nice, but not expensive solid wood. The main wood of the dresser will be red oak. I am looking for an economical hardwood for the drawer boxes.

    Thanks,
    John

  2. QS Sycamore is my choice if it needs to look fancy. Otherwise I like maple and poplar.
    "When we build, let us think that we build forever." - Ruskin

  3. 02-21-2005, 11:22 AM#3
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    Around here the best deal on a wood for drawer boxes is poplar, which I buy in 5/4 and resaw and plane to 1/2"--howerve I have used western red cedar when I can find it without too many knots. I will use baltic for cabinets but not for better furnature.

  4. 02-21-2005, 11:46 AM#4
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    I generally use poplar since I have so much of it, but maple would be my second choice. I never use plywood for drawers other than in the shop...I just prefer solid wood. I also like using solid stock as I can make it the thickness that is appropriate for the size of the drawer. Much of the time, 1/2" is just fine, but sometimes 9/16" or 5/8" or even 3/8" is best proportionally or strength-wise.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. 02-21-2005, 11:51 AM#5
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    Hard maple....resaw to 1/2" for normal size drawers. If front is darker wood you will highlight the dovetails...(and and flaws)
    "All great work starts with love .... then it is no longer work"

  6. 02-21-2005, 11:58 AM#6
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    I'm with Mark. I like hard maple the best, and then soft maple, and then poplar if all else fails. Poplar can have some green coloration that dosen't look the best on a drawer IMHO. That's why it's the last resort for me.

  7. 02-21-2005, 12:02 PM#7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Tuinstra
    Poplar can have some green coloration that dosen't look the best on a drawer IMHO. That's why it's the last resort for me.
    Unless you have a piece with mineral staining, the greenish heartwood browns out quite nicely from UV and oxidation. Only freshly exposed heart has that greenish tinge.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. 02-21-2005, 1:49 PM#8
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    Whatever leftover wood is around. Sometimes ash, sometimes cherry. I'd rather use small pieces as drawer sides than throw them out. I do use plywood for the drawer bottoms because it is stable in thin stock.

  9. 02-21-2005, 3:01 PM#9
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  10. 02-21-2005, 8:13 PM#10
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    Tuplip poplar ( what most call poplar ) is nice to work with, and the straw/pail green is decent looking. Other woods like soft maple are also nice and a little stronger than poplar. If you want the look of hard maple without the weight or expense then "aspen" or white poplar is nice. It is very white and easy to work with.

  11. 02-21-2005, 8:50 PM#11
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    I use mostly poplar,some times soft maple.

    Russ

  12. 02-21-2005, 9:19 PM#12
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    I buy #2 red oak already @ 5/8. When my mill has it (not real offen) I pick up 100 bdft for next to nothing.

  13. 02-21-2005, 9:32 PM#13
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    Out here in the Pacific NW I use either alder or big leaf maple. Local sawmill, real cheap wood.

  14. 02-21-2005, 9:58 PM#14
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    I use what my sawer calls red maple. I belive that it is a soft maple. It mills nicely and is CHEAP to boot Good luck!

  15. 02-21-2005, 10:21 PM#15
    One thing to consider is your finish.

    I recetly built a nice sofa table out of cherry and built the drawer out of poplar.

    I finished the piece with a Danish Oil type finish, which looked great on the cherry, but the poplar drawers sucked up the oil finish and turned way too yellow for my taste. (Especially next to the dark rich cherry)

    Just my 2cents.

    -jj

Sours: https://sawmillcreek.org/

Wood drawers poplar for

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Making This Screw Organizer - 30 Drawers 120 Compartments

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