Mtc gen2 clutch tuning

Mtc gen2 clutch tuning DEFAULT

Mtc Gen2 Clutch Instructions

Download Mtc gen2 clutch instructions Help+Manual User Community and Support Forums Mtc Gen2 Clutch Instructions Schnitz Racing has all the motorcycle performance parts you need to Stay in FRONT! Engine parts, swingarms, nitrous, turbo kits, chain, sprockets, air shifters, exhaust. This new clutch called the Gen II Multistage Clutch is designed and built with the same robustness as MTC has used for over 40 years in making the best products in the racing industry. This clutch significantly reduces clutch lever efforts and yet improves clutch adjustability through its multistage technology. Gen II Multistage Clutch Installation MTC Engineering s Gen II multistage is designed to provide you with improved reaction times and better E.T. s. This new generation of multistage clutch runs on motor RPM instead of input shaft RPM. The unit operates wet and is totally enclosed in the stock clutch cavity with the addition of a specially designed. Gen II Clutch Tuning. MTC gives you the tips you need to be successful on the track! Weight Change on Arms. Putting weight on the arms makes the clutch more aggressive. The rate of lock-up per RPM increases. Solves slippage at High RPM’s. Dynamic Spring Change. Installing higher spring numbers delays the timing of the arm engagement. Eric Hochstetler from MTC Engineering LLC gives us an up close look at the popular Hayabusa Gen 2 drag racing clutch. Several top bracket racers use this technology. If you would. MTC Engineering LLC products are the best but, their own people will tell you that the gen 2 will make an average rider look like a pro. Thereby taking the rider further away the equation. Thats why at least one sanction that I know of specifies clutch may NOT be engine driven The question becomes: How much rider input should be required. MTC started offering the Gen 2 Multistage in To a casual observer they probably look much the same but they have one major difference. The original Multistage Lockup was hub-driven and was completely reliant on rear wheel speed. The Gen 2 is driven off the outer clutch basket and that is connected to the crankshaft. I have gen 2 and 17 front 45 rear, my problem seems to be 2 fold, #1 I am leaving to low, and motor flashes up then arms hit and it wheelies, after speaking with MTC, and Ryan Schnitz and John Miffco on hear, they think with short wheel base to go with 5 and 7 springs, maybe 5 and 7 and 9 and 1 washer on each arm with bolt and nut and to under springs for static, leave holding. MTC -MTCEngineering has been developing, testing, refining and producing excellent quality high performance motorcycle components for almost 50 years. Connect with us Shearer Blvd, Cocoa.

This is a Hayabusa MTC Engineering Gen 2 Multistage Hand Slider Clutch. We installed and made 2 1/8 mile test passes with it then put full slider in bike and stretched it. We installed and made 2 1/8 mile test passes with it then put full slider in bike and stretched.

#GSXR #mtc Today on Brothers On A Budget Scotty talks you through the removal and install of his new MTC multi stage gen 2 Clutch. Please like subscribe and check out channel for more cool videos.

The MTC GEN II Clutch will lower your Reaction Times, lower your E.T. and Increase your M.P.H. Clutch comes as a complete assembly including forged aluminum clutch basket, forged slider plate assembly, 2 special hard chromed plated steel drive plates and clutch cover. All MTC GEN II clutch and components are covered under US patents.

TKCHaysSLR For use with Hays/MTC slider clutch $ TKCROCK - For use with MTC Gen2 slider and Rock Solid clutches. stack - $ MTC Lockup uses std clutch.

Valentine One Gen2 has an advanced version of the Radar Locator we invented for Valentine One. A red arrow points to the radar source, either ahead of you, beside you, or behind you. Please note: radar can’t get you from the side. Valentine One Gen2 also locates the laser source, either ahead or behind.

TKCHaySLR - for use with Hays/MTC slider clutch: TKCROCK - For use with MTC Gen2 slider and Rock Solid clutches. stack.

hayabusa drag bike. Stock motor. MTC Gen 2 clutch. Vance & Hines sidewinder exhaust. Walbro external fuel pump and aluminum fuel cell. Lithium battery. R1 wheels. Evil swingarm. Clear title.

This MTC Gen II Multistage Clutch significantly reduces clutch lever effort and yet improves clutch adjust ability through its multistage technology. The big improvement in clutch action is related to the drive and driven clutch plates operating at the same rpm for big improvements in initial engagement leading to quicker reaction.

Track King Clutch - Hayabusa. For use with MTC Gen2 slider and Rock Solid clutches. TKCGSX $ TRAC KING High performance clutch pack - Suzuki Hayabusa.

This Black Phosphate plated puller made by MTC, was a harder grade of steel, did not deform, and successfully removed the primary drive unit MTC Clutch Puller Tool for Kawasaki 14PCP 10 23 on our Kawasaki 4x4 Diesel Trans. The MTC unit was actually cheaper and performed better than the ATV Works.

MTC Gen II Lock Up Clutch for GSXR , Hayabusa and Kawasaki ZX Price: $1, The MTC GEN II Clutch will lower your Reaction Times, lower your E.T. and Increase your M.P.H.

Inspect for excessive clutch dust, broken clutch or spring material or other signs of clutch failure. 5. Ensure Release Bearing and Cross Shaft are ade-quately greased per the Heavy-Duty Clutch Service Manual (CLSM). † If physical signs of a failure are found, replace Heavy-Duty ECA Clutch and Cross Shaft.

With the MTC my runs were all over the place and the temp really affected the clutch. With the Hays my runs are very consitant, Last weekend I had 6 eighth mile runs all between and with 3 - s in a meivolteman.myddns.me bike is 63 long and usuall.

New from MTC is the Lock Up Gen II Clutch # Kawasaki ZX14 This new clutch called the Gen II Multistage Clutch is designed and built with the same robustness as MTC Engineering LLC has used for over 40 years in making the best products in the racing industry.

MTC Gen II Clutch Hand Slider Kawasaki ZX14 This new clutch called the Gen II Multistage Clutch is designed and built with the same robustness as MTC has used for over 40 years in making the best products in the racing industry. This clutch significantly reduces clutch lever efforts and yet improves clutch adjustability through its multistage technology. The new design runs on engine.

I have added this to the 1/4 mile and GenII forum for maximum response: I am using a MTC multi stage lock up on a stock motor. I am running 60’s launching at rpm with a launch controller. Prior to fitting the lock up I ran a best of 60’ launching at around with no launch.

Joey Gladstone Crushes Real Street Record. Joey Gladstone is known for riding the fastest no wheelie bar bikes on the planet! With a best of at mph on two wheels, that’s less than a second away from the Top Fuel record.

MTC Engineering Billet Inner Clutch Hub - #GMS-HYB GSXR for use with Gen 2 Multistage Lockup $ (USD) MTC Engineering Dual Stage Lock Up Clutch - #ZX ZX14R.

I have a Busa with motor and a MTC Multi-stage lock up clutch with MTC Light Springs (static) ( lbs pressure I believe). In your FAQs section you mentioned that you have used your Cushion Kit with a Lock-up Clutch.

What should clutch stack height be with your clutch cushion kit installed in a Gen 1 Busa? I have a Busa with motor and a MTC Multi-stage lock up clutch with MTC Light Springs (static) ( lbs pressure I believe). In your FAQs section you mentioned that you have used your Cushion Kit with a Lock-up Clutch.

2. Support the Clutch during the removal of the 8 mounting bolts. 3. Remove the clutch from the flywheel. Note: Mark the proper position of the discs and intermediate plate (for reinstallation). 4. Reinstall the clutch using the original installation instructions for Eaton Solo Medium Duty Clutches or you can reach.

I have a MTC Gen 2 Multistage clutch for sale for a ZX This will not work with the because of the gear in back. However it can be sent to MTC and changed over for about $ I have a couple different options on how to sell this: 1. Complete setup for you to drop in and go, minus clutch plates.

new sws chevy aluminum bellhousing, flywheel inspection cover, clutch fork boot & clutch pivot ball, gm replacement for sbc & bbc for 11 manual clutch applications out of 5 stars.

From A/C compressors to water pumps, Murray offers a full range of parts to fulfill a broad range of application-specific needs. When you install a Murray branded product on your import or domestic car, truck or SUV, you are installing some of the highest quality parts available in the automotive aftermarket - all meeting or exceeding the Original Equipment Manufacturer s specifications.

Scion TC Factory/ Repair/ Maintenance/ Workshop/ Owners/ Troubleshooting/ Service FSM PDF Manual Disclosure: meivolteman.myddns.me has financial relationships with some affiliate links to products,services mentioned here,which enables us to offset the cost of maintenance and to keep this site free for everyone.

Mercedes-AMG has unveiled the mighty E63, and it only comes with an AMG Speedshift MCT transmission. Some of you are probably wondering what’s behind the marketing name chosen by Mercedes-Benz.

In order to rule out that the problem was not the clutch mod, I put it back to stock. No clutch mod and all 6 stock springs. Same problem, bike doesn t move in gear when releasing the clutch. Really need some help, it sucks that I can t even ride it now even though I removed the clutch.

The slider clutch is designed strictly for racing and gives the rider a very repeatable, fast engaging clutch to control the horsepower to the rear wheel. The second clutch, is the new ZX14 Gen II multistage clutch which falls in line with the series of new Gen II clutches coming.

Generation 2 & 3 - Has clutch boost valve 6T40 Generation 2 & 3 Figure 2 Control Valve Body Assembly Figure 3 TCM Identifier is 8th digit from left. TCM Identifier Figure 4 Generation 1 Number Generation 2 & 3 Letter GM 6T Gen. 2 6T Gen. 3 6T40 IP IT ® PART NUMBER 6TGENZIP INSTALLATION & TESTING BOOKLET.

The throwout bearing or clutch release bearing rides on the Guide Tube which is a wear item that should be replaced during a clutch service. For a Kit including these items, see the Mini Cooper Clutch Service.

RIPP Supercharger GEN-2 Stage 2 JEEP Wrangler Rev10 Cooppyyrriigghhtt 0RRIIPPP tSSuuppeerrcchhaarrggeerrss aallll rriigghhtss rreesseerrvveedd 1 INSTALLER: Read and understand entire instruction manual before starting installation of system. Take note of the following before proceeding.

MegaSquirt PNP Gen2 Manual For models with the v revision main board Note that this is the main documentation that is applicable to all MSPNP2 Platform ECUs. For each individual model there is a model-specific addendum to this documentation which addresses the particular installation needs and other unique features of each model of MSPNP2.

Mini Cooper clutch repair: A Mini Cooper’s clutch cost will vary widely, depending on the model. On average clutch repair will cost about $ – $ if you need to replace the flywheel. Ford clutch repair: Clutches on Ford F and Ranger pickups will range between $ – $, but these vehicles also have an internal slave cylinder.

Clutch Kits (15) Miscellaneous Clutch (5) Brand. Driven (1) EBC (6) Genuine Yamaha Accessories (1) Graves (1) Koso (3) PSR (1) Rekluse (6) Suzuki Genuine Accessories (1) SW-MOTECH (1) Vesrah Racing (1) Yana Shiki (1) This will adjust the number of options and put focus to the top of the list above + 1 More Brand. Fast Cash. Fast Cash Products.

$ OEM Single Mass Flywheel Manual MINI Cooper Non-S R55 R56 R57 R58 R59 R60 R61 Gen2 $ OEM Clutch Kit MINI Cooper Non-S R55 R56 R57 R58 R59 R60 R61 Gen2 MINI Factory OEM Clutch and Flywheel Service for the 2nd generation + Mini Cooper non-S models.

Buy a Subaru Impreza Clutch Pedal Pad at discount prices. Choose top quality brands.

Kawasaki Zx14 Zx Clutch Mtc Gen 2 Clutch Hand Slider.

Sep 17, · Gen II Clutch Tuning. MTC gives you the tips you need to be successful on the track! Weight Change on Arms. Putting weight on the arms makes the clutch more aggressive. The rate of lock-up per RPM increases. Solves slippage at High RPM’s. Dynamic Spring Change. Installing higher spring numbers delays the timing of the arm engagement.

Mar 29, · Eric Hochstetler from MTC Engineering LLC gives us an up close look at the popular Hayabusa Gen 2 drag racing clutch. Several top bracket racers use this technology. If you would.

Sep 02, · MTC Engineering LLC products are the best but, their own people will tell you that the gen 2 will make an average rider look like a pro. Thereby taking the rider further away the equation. Thats why at least one sanction that I know of specifies clutch may NOT be engine driven The question becomes: How much rider input should be required.

Nov 25, · MTC started offering the Gen 2 Multistage in To a casual observer they probably look much the same but they have one major difference. The original Multistage Lockup was hub-driven and was completely reliant on rear wheel speed. The Gen 2 is driven off the outer clutch basket and that is connected to the crankshaft.

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flying tiger

MTC Engineering has been developing, testing, refining and producing excellent quality high performance motorcycle components for almost 50 years.  Whether it’s on the Drag Strip or Street, their products continue to be the performance product of choice for companies, teams, and individuals building the quickest and fastest motorcycles in the world.  Their high performance Clutches have been a key ingredient to help many racers win championships.

MTC Engineering is widely recognized for Experience Driven Proprietary Solutions.  They develop advanced product performance qualities by partnering with championship race teams; to run, test, and optimize their components with feedback from track proven results. In other words, they hear what went right and what needs improving and do it now and not later.  When new products have passed all the extreme rigors of the race track, they are introduced to you, the end user, as a proven leading edge product.  They utilize the latest analysis, manufacturing and inspection technologies available to assure the consistency and reliability of their manufacturing process and to expedite the delivery of the most robust component solutions to you, with confidence.

To earn your trust and long-term confidence, they are committed to continuous improvement of their comprehensive customer service systems.  They understand that having the right product, at the right time and with full technical support is the key to establishing a mutually beneficial long-term relationship.  By working closely with their customers, they bring together the necessary inventory investments and special support services to be an effective contributor for assisting in the attainment of your goals of going fast and quick.


Eric Hochstetler is almost 50 years old (a youngster) and is a degreed Mechanical Engineer. So... how does this make him a genius at MTC Engineering, the maker of some the greatest items in the motorcycle performance world? Great question. Did you know that Eric was a Director of Engineering for an injection molding company in Florida?

No? Then did you know that Eric was originally from Indiana (in the Middle) and moved to Florida after school, moved up thru the ranks of corporate america and finally decided to go out on his own and became the proud owner of MTC Engineering that was once run by Top Fuel Racer Tony Lang? For a man who had exactly zero experience in motorcycle performance products, not only did he get a fast track learning course in motorcycles, but he turned MTC into a powerhouse of speed, quickness and just damn good performance clutches. Tiger Racing has been using MTC clutches for over 12 years on most every project bike we have ever built. Eric worked hard on improving manufacturing processes and at the same time moved most every manufacturing process in house to save time and money. In these last few years of economic uncertainties, MTC Engineering has continued to grow and prosper because of the guidance and direction of Eric and his team of dedicated employees.

Eric has also made major investments in new equipment and better processes allowing for new products to be innovated and produced which allows them to stay on the cutting edge of motorcycle performance technologies.

 

Eric attends most every major race so that he is available for his customers and their special needs trackside.

 

 

Which brings me to the product we are highlighting on the "Flying Tiger".

This new clutch called the "Gen II Multistage Clutch" is designed and built with the same robustness that MTC has used for over 40 years in making the best products in the racing industry.

This clutch significantly reduces clutch lever efforts and improves clutch adjustability through its "multistage" technology.

The new design runs on engine RPM and demonstrates a quicker reaction time and more repeatability between passes. The new design also allows for easier dynamic spring replacement with its quick access cover plate over the springs. This allows for adjustments of the clutch right in the bike. Now what could be better than that?

MTC Engineering’s clutch products have a proven history of quality, reliability, setting records, and getting racers to the winner’s circle. For the last 8 years, of AMA/Dragbike, MTC paid more contingency claims in the series than any other aftermarket parts manufacturer.

 

 

 

 

 

In 2009, more than 70% of the AMA Dragbike champions used MTC Engineering clutch components.

The making of Gen II Multistage clutches start with automated CNC machining on state of the art 4 and 5 axis CNC milling machines. All programming is done by Eric and his staff using the latest CAD/CAM design programming.

 

As you can see from the tray of hat covers, MTC wastes little space or material when using the CNC to make their parts. Another part of the process is to keep everything in house when making clutches.

The moment the clutch arrived, I was like a kid under the tree at Christmas time and I just couldn't wait to unwrap my new toy. I carefully removed the packing and removed all the materials from the box (or so I thought). Once I Iaid everything onto the work table, I happened to notice that I didn't have a clutch O-ring gasket for the new MTC clutch cover plate. I searched high and low with no success. I called MTC and talked with Eric and the first thing out of his mouth was"can't find the clutch cover O-ring?" To which I said"yep, it's missing", Eric calmly said "you still have the box?"To which I replied"Yep, in the trash". Eric then calmly said,"go look at the bottom of the box, there is a piece of cardboard taped shut that has your O-ring." Sure enough, there it was in all it's glory. Now my ego had been bruised and I couldn't just leave it alone and take all the blame for my own ignorance so I said sheepishly, "it needs to be marked with BIGRED lettersO-Ring Inside". I figured that would be a good answer for my lack of eye sight when I should have noticed the cardboard taped to the bottom of the box.

The MTC Gen II multistage for Drag Racing is designed to provide you with improved reaction times and better ET's. Although in LSR racing, you don't need a good reaction time but you do need the ability to get out of the hole quickly and this new Gen II clutch will do that for us. This new generation of multistage clutch runs on motor RPM instead of input shaft RPM. The unit operates wet and is totally enclosed in the stock clutch cavity with the addition of a specially designed cover plate.
All MTC Gen II multistage clutches and components are covered under U.S. Patents. That means don't try and duplicate this at your own CNC somewhere because Patent infringements can be costly.

We have installed the clutch basket just like a stock one except for the fact that we replaced the hardened steel spacer that goes between the face of the clutch basket and the inner hub with the four (4) piece needle bearing spacer supplied with the clutch. After that, you can check the clutch basket endplay after you install the lock nuts and washers like a standard clutch. I have set up my digital indicator to check the clutch basket movement and found that I have only 0.005" of endplay which is a good thing. You can't have more or less than 0.003"-0.006" of endplay clearance or the inner hub will not rotate when the nut on the input shaft is tight. If the basket has too much endplay, it could cause damage to the clutch or engine.

The Gen II design uses a bottom spacer on the bottom of the basket instead of using the lip on the back of the inner hub. This allows the clutch pack to be pressed down to the bottom of the basket instead of the inner hub.  This design reduced the forces put on the basket springs and gives the basket a longer life cycle.

We have installed the bottom spacer into the basket, carefully making sure the dowel pins are in the holes drilled at the bottom of the basket. We then made sure the spacer was sitting flat on the bottom of the inside of the basket and proceeded to install the steels and fibers into the clutch.
I opened my new pack of clutch plates and realized I had forgotten to to tell you about them.

These clutch kits are designed for the most severe race track abuse. Whether you run a nitrous or turbo pro street drag bike, radical race car, or just a hot rod streetbike, this is one of the best clutches available.

Absolutely one of the best for hand clutch, single and multi stage lock ups, or sliders.

All of you racers that say that the OEM clutch works the best in your bike, you owe it to yourself to try a Trac King. You will never go back to OEM, or any other brand.  The kits contain all frictions and steels, with pack height set.

 

 

 

 

MTC Lockup uses std clutch pack.

6.99 New Nitrous Pro Street Record with Trac King

"I picked up big time with my APE Trac King clutches!! 1.33s 60 ft times :) I will be using these from now on! Thanks APE!!"
Crystal Dickerson Racing
"I started my season with the APE Trac King clutch, steels and fibers and immediatly my 60' time improved by .05

I was using the stock clutch pack for my 08 Hayabusa and the 60' times where 1.62/1.60. Now 60' time are down to 1.57/1.55, my et's are more consistant, and we also won our 1st race using Trac King clutches. When the time comes for a new clutch I will be using Trac King."
Henry Charyk
"After several frustrating issues with the clutch on Ben Knight's Busa, we switched over to Trac King clutches. The immediate improvement carried me to a 3rd place finish in Street ET and 1/4 finals in Streetfighter at the Thunder Valley Dragbike Shootout. Super consistent 60' times never varied by more than .010!!! Thanks!"
Darren Burnett - Psychobike Forums

Here I am measuring the air gap of my pressure plate to make sure I have stacked the fibers and steels correctly and it looks as though I am right on the money with a gap of 0.110" between the top of the basket and the pressure plate. This is where you get the gap between your arms and the buttons. Now I can place the hat on the clutch and remove the six (6) hew head screws which were holding the static springs in compression. You need to save these screws whenever you remove your hat from the clutch.

Here is where you change the springs for the pressure plate and the weights on the arms. You are given a complete spring and weight kit with your clutch so that you have hundreds of combinations to choose from and tune to. Although I have been told

"DO NOT TOUCH THE SCREWS THAT ARE PAINTED".

The painted screws are used to level the arms in their home position and should never be moved.

 

All springs on the Gen II are compression type and are enclosed inside of the unit, so that no damage can be caused by the springs.

 


These are the ultimate clutch tools! Strong magnets in the ends of the handles to pull out the steel plates, hardened picks on the other end for the fibers.

  • Aluminum Construction
  • Knurled Grips
  • Strong Magnets in the ends
  • Hardend Picks
  • Sold in Pairs

You'll have to hide them when your friends come over!!

Only $29.95 from Schnitz Racing Motorsports.

All together and ready for the custom cover plate from MTC to make this installation complete.

This quick access cover allows you to make clutch adjustments without draining the oil out of the motor.  The “split” on the cover is half way down the side so that the lock up is sticking out when you remove the top hat making it very easy to work on.  These covers can be custom engraved with your logo. But for me, having a Tiger on the cover from MTC is just perfect.

http://www.1st-to-the-finish-line.com/images/mtc_clutch-010.jpg

The MTC Gen II Multistage Lockup clutch is going to supply the power generated from our Nitrous Turbo to the output shaft, then thru the Robinson Industries Gear sets, onward to the MRE offset sprockets and finally to our Sandy Kosman custom wheel which in turn lays rubber to the runway.
Whew!!! That was a mouthful.
It's our hope to be able to propel to a speed of 300 MPH in future racing of this beautiful motorcycle at Wilmington, OH., at the ECTA Land Speed Racing events.

I can' say enough about our sponsors who know what it takes to go fast and who also know that their products are what will help us go the distance.

MTC Engineering can be found at www.MTCENG.com on the web or by calling
800-827-9210    321-636-9480
or email them at [email protected]

Tiger Racing just loves it when you put a Tiger on my new clutch. Did you know that Tiger Racing was named after famed Top Fuel Driver Tony Lang? I so loved the MTC Tiger Top Fuel bike that I named my company after it. The honest truth. Now you know the rest of the story.

To read other articles about the Flying Tiger, Click here.



Custom Bodywork - AirTECHStreamlining
Custom Windshield -Gustaffson Plastics
Chassis Retrofit -McIntosh Machine
Wheels Retrofit -Kosman Specialty Wheel Services


Air Flow Specialist -Ward Performance
Cams - Web Cams Inc.
Crankshaft / Head & Crank Studs / Cam Sprockets-APE Racparts
Fuel Injectors / Rail / Pump / Regulator - MPS Racing
Motor Builder -Tiger Racing
Motor Ceramic Bearings - WorldWideBearings
Pistons & Rods - Wossner, USA
Transmission O.D. Gears -Robinson Industries
Clutch/Clutch Mgmt. -MTC Engineering
Valve Train components -Kibblewhite Precision Machine
Misc. Motor Parts - Schnitz Racing


Plenum (custom) -RPM Cycle Performance
Turbo - Noonan/Derwin Racing
Turbo Mentorship and custom turbo parts -

MPS Racing
Digital Gauges and Sensors -Dyno Tune
Misc. Electronic Parts - Schnitz racing
Holly Data Acquisition - MPS RacingTires -Richies Tires

Braking System -Beringer Brakes
Wheels, Ceramic Bearings -WorlWideBearings


Custom Paint - Centerfold Customs Inc.

 

 

Sours: http://www.1st-to-the-finish-line.com/articles/articles-The-Flying-Tiger-Build-Clutch.html
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After yet another early finish to a day’s racing due to inconsistent reaction times and equally sporadic sixty-foot times, the thought occurred that maybe it was time to search out a better way to do this.

In this case, ‘this’ was letting go of the clutch lever in a controlled and repeatable manner. Sounds easy, and it is if your fingers don’t open at random intervals. My problem is the middle finger on my left hand. Due to a condition called trigger finger, it doesn’t always straighten when told. Sometimes it opens like a factory finger, and then for no reason, it remains half-closed while the other three were fully extended. One day I’ll have surgery to correct it. One day.

The MTC Multistage Lockup clutch that was fitted to The Short Bus is a fine piece of engineering. Since being designed and developed by MTC, it has formed the basis for most of the aftermarket replica clutches being fitted to drag bikes all over the planet. Mine came second-hand from a racer in the US. It was complete and in brand-new condition. As soon as I saw it for sale, I was on it like a seagull on a hot chip. The price was good, the seller was honest and the deal was done.

The last pic of the MTC Multistage before it was removed and packed away.

Shortly after it landed, I had it modified by a mate so that I could change the dynamic springs quickly and easily. The dynamic springs are the ones that control the movement of the lockup arms.

The original method of changing these springs was painful and took a good 20 minutes along with the added opportunity to strip threads and drop small bolts. My method was a direct copy of what MTC started offering on new Multistage Lockup clutches from 2012 onwards. I’m quite happy to recognise good ideas and adopt them.

In reality, I haven’t changed those springs very often but when I have it’s been a quick and easy operation.

MTC started offering the Gen 2 Multistage in 2012. To a casual observer they probably look much the same but they have one major difference. The original Multistage Lockup was hub-driven and was completely reliant on rear wheel speed. The Gen 2 is driven off the outer clutch basket and that is connected to the crankshaft. With the original, if you miss your clutch’s happy zone and it starts slipping, the rear wheel speed will not increase, the clutch throwout arms won’t apply clamping pressure to the clutch pack and you stand a good chance of destroying the clutch plates. The Gen 2 differs in that you can have a bit of clutch slip and as the engine rpm increases, the arms will throw out and lock the clutch pack.

A Gen 2 was considered but two things stopped me. The first was the need to still release a clutch lever, and the second was that to make a Gen 2 work in my application, I’d have to run minimal base spring pressure and riding it back to the pits after a run would seriously shorten clutch life.

In an attempt at making the clutch release less dependant on my gammy fingers, I fitted an electric linelock in the hydraulic clutch line. In simple terms, a linelock is an electric solenoid that holds line pressure in a hydraulic line while power is applied. Remove the electrical power and the solenoid releases the pressure. In practice, it worked like this: Stop before the startline and squeeze the clutch lever; while holding the lever in, push the button in front of my left thumb and hold it while releasing the clutch lever. As long as I held the button, the clutch was engaged but as soon as I released the button, the clutch was also released. Because I like doing things like this, I also had the two-step revlimiter activated by the same button and an eight-pole relay. The theory was great but getting the clutch release and soaring engine rpm to work together was easier to describe than control. Looking at the datalogger, I could see that if I could hold engine rpm constant for a very short period of time after the release of the button, I could make it all work. After looking at an MSD SB6, I saw that it would do what I wanted. But MSD stopped making this unit due to falling sales.

Back to square one.

A quiet half-hour sitting in the shed brought forth an amazing memory from my days racing Harleys in P/CB in the 1990s. A thing called a slipper clutch: the world’s simplest motorcycle clutch. Turn the throttle and go. MTC were the originators and the slider clutches that they offer use the exact same principles as the originals.

FROM THE TOP: Clutch basket, inner hub and slider hat and pressure plate. Anodised MTC billet goodness.

The outer hat and pressure plate of the slider clutch are held in contact by spring pressure. In the MTC Slider, five 8mm studs are locked into the pressure plate. They extend out through the hat and then five springs with locknuts are threaded onto those studs. The base of the springs press on the outer hat. Spring pressure resists the application of clamping pressure being applied by the throwout arms. Securing the MTC slider hat to the billet basket are 12 cap screws.

There’s no clutch lever for my fingers to hang on to. Twist and go.

Simple in concept and almost as simple in design yet very well made in MTC’s in-house CNC machining centres. The outer basket is machined from a solid chunk of high-grade aluminium, as is the inner hub, pressure plate and outer hat. All of those components are anodised before shipping.

When I placed my order with Scott from Rapid Motion, the MTC dealer I chose for this particular exercise, he recommended that I also invest in MTC’s own clutch plates. I’ve had great success in the past with APE Trac King fibres but their steel plates weren’t as long-lived. Scott had previously recommended the hard-chromed steels from MTC and I started using them. Instead of throwing warped steels away every couple of meetings, they lasted much longer. Based on that experience, two sets of MTC hard-chromed steel and fibre clutch plates were added to the order.

The box of happiness included an MTC Slider and spare clutch packs.

Starting the ball rolling, I sent my original Suzuki clutch basket over to MTC Engineering in Florida. The option was there to have them supply one at a reasonable cost but I already had one that I’ll never use again. The original basket is dismantled and the backing plate with drive gear is attached to the MTC billet outer basket. Smart move. Suzuki spend a lot of time and effort making sure that their stock components fit and work well together. Makes perfect sense to re-use those parts.

Original Suzuki drive gear. Fitted to MTC billet basket, complete with new springs.

Watching my parcel on USPS tracking was a joy until it hit Sydney Airport and disappeared into the depths of Customs. Because Scott from Rapid Motion is a friend, he’d organised for my Slider to be shipped direct to me from MTC. That meant that I was also liable for the customs clearances and fees. After submitting the relevant paperwork, and paying the 10% GST and a $90 clearance fee, my box of clutch happiness was finally delivered.

A happy day.

Machining is a thing of beauty.

After re-reading the seven steps of the MTC installation instructions, the MTC Multistage was quickly removed and packed away. There are no tricks to installing the MTC slider. You will need a 30mm socket for the clutch hub nut. I’ve got a cordless 18v Ryobi rattle gun and it made short work of the clutch hub nut. Because I’m a fussy-type of bloke, I used brand new genuine Suzuki clutch hub nut and washer. Less than $20, it’s cheap insurance.

Clutch basket removed. Look carefully and you can still see evidence of an engine that has been overheated and run on old oil earlier in its 92,000km life.

 

Oil pump drive gear. Make sure you’ve got it facing the right way.

With the outer basket and hub fitted, the end float on the basket had to be measured. MTC specify 3 to 6-thou, any less and the basket could start binding up on the hub when the hub nut is tightened. Any more than that and the excessive movement could cause other problems. Mine was right in the middle of the range. Cool. The oil restrictor plug was tapped into the end of the input shaft.

Dial gauge used to measure end float of clutch outer basket.

With all of the spinny bits tightened, it was time to measure the step on the clutch pressure plate. Right on .042”, I wrote that number on the bench with a texta before measuring the depth of the clutch basket and writing 1.992” next to the .042”. Simple maths was needed to work out the clutch stack height. MTC specify an airgap of .050”. So, 1.992 – .050 (airgap) makes it 1.942. Take .042 (step in pressure plate) away from that and the resultant 1.900 is the stack height I need. That works out at 48.26mm for you younger types.

The clutch-side of the MTC slider pressure plate. Look carefully and you can see the 42-thou step.

Putting a clutch pack together that matched that stack height was easy with the new MTC plates and it was fitted, fibre first and last.

New clutch plates fitted after their dip in the Silkolene Pro 4 XP. Look carefully and you’ll see the oil restrictor plug in input shaft.

There are people who swear by soaking the plates in oil for a day before you fit them. My method is to dunk each fibre plate in an ice cream container full of Silkolene Pro 4 XP before sliding it into the basket. Make your own decision. This works for me.

Ice cream container and SIlkolene Pro 4 XP oil. Gotta dip those plates!

Because I like to have spares of consumables, I also added a spare set of clutch springs to the order. There are three different spring packs available but I chose to stick with their standard fitment. They’ll give me the stall rpm that I want. Apparently the springs last for years, but I’ve got spares if they ever start to lose their tension.

Spare regular stall springs.

Increasing spring pressure increases the rpm required before the arms start to apply pressure. The standard springs are reportedly good up to 5500rpm in a Busa, so I’ve got plenty of margin before they’re going to coil-bind. I started off with .800” of spring height. This is a measurement from the surface of the clutch hat to the top of the purple nuts on top of the clutch springs. I’ve done this before and bought a digital depth gauge specifically for the job. Dial calipers are good but in my hands, not as accurate or repeatable.

Using digital depth gauge to measure clutch spring heights before installation.

As it arrived from MTC, the slider’s throwout arms were all carrying a nut, bolt and four washers. On my scales, they weighed in at 12.75g apiece. Based on the info I had at the time, I took two washers off each arm for my first pass.

The hat and pressure plate are held in place by a dozen little cap-screws that go through the hat and lock it to the outer rim of the clutch basket. Don’t over-tighten these screws (or leave them loose), or your day will quickly turn brown and smelly.

On the right is an original MTC slider clutch hat and on the left is a lightened version.

The Australian-made LAE quick-access clutch cover I fitted at the same time as the MTC Multistage Lockup clutch was perfect for use with the slider. So it’s still there. Undo six cap-screws and the o-ringed cover is off. With that off, the stall springs and the throwout arms are right there in front of you.

After checking that nothing was touching anything that it shouldn’t, the outer cover went on and it was time to fire the Short Bus up. A couple of quick shed-skids showed that the clutch was doing its thing.

Shed skid to make sure everything was working.

With no need for a clutch lever, I decided to re-purpose the left-hand master cylinder to operate the rear brake. A new Venhill braided line was plumbed in from the linelock to the rear caliper. The clutch switch is still in place and operated by the rear brake lever, or the button under my left thumb. The same circuit controls the two-step rev limiter. MTC recommend that the two-step be set 250 to 400rpm below the stall speed set by the clutch. This is the rpm where the bike tries to start driving away. For example, stall speed is 3400rpm, the two-step needs to be set at 3000 to 3150rpm. The standard Busa tacho is accurate within 500rpm so I plugged the laptop in and watched the on-screen tacho from the WEGO 3 to set the two-step.

Gotta get some heat into that Shinko Hook-Up!

With all of this done, it was time to put theory into practice. The previous meeting was also my last with the MTC Multistage. Consistency? I could barely spell it that day. My 60-footers varied from 1.99 to 2.12 and the ETs were no better. It was not a good day. First meeting with the Slider and I was squeezing out little drops of brown adrenalin. The first run was a 10.12 with a 1.72-second 60-foot. That was with just enough throttle to activate the two-step. I added another washer to each of the throwout arms and lifted the two-step 100rpm for a 10.01 with a 1.70 shot time. With a whisper more throttle, the third qualifier was a 9.85 with a 1.65 sixty-foot. In the first round, I redlighted but still ran 1.64 in the sixty and 10.00. You can’t really draw any solid conclusions from that meeting because I was tentative at best with the throttle but the indications were good.

A week later I was back and the first five passes netted a best of 9.85 with a slowest of 10.06. Again, I was tentative about leaving the line with the throttle wide open but decided to give it a go on the last pass of the day. With the throttle on the stop, I let go of the button and the front wheel started to climb straight away, so I squeezed the rear brake and rolled the throttle off. I know what the sky looks like from the seat of the Short Bus.

The next meeting was more of the same. I was sure that I was doing something wrong and that it was my fault that the front wheel was climbing.

Leonard from Azzopardi Racing is responsible for the Short Bus’s driveline. We spent a lot of time going back and forth with ideas on how to keep the nose down, mainly directed at suspension and chassis setup.

The key ingredient we were missing was information. Neither of us had experience with a slider in a no-bar bike and we were looking at it with a combination of our combined and varied experiences. Then an old mate offered to help at Sydney Dragway’s Nitro Thunder meeting. Ken Peatey is his name. He’s been around and owns Rascal Race Engines. Straight away he told me to add weight to all five throwout arms: A total of 40% more weight than I’d been running. Last time I put more weight on was when it tried to wheelstand so I’d been pulling weight off in the hope that I was going the right way. I wasn’t.

With a brand-new Shinko Hook-Up on the back wheel and Ken’s heavy arms, the stall was 3500rpm and the two-step was on 3200. Complete with heart in throat, I let go of the button. The Short Bus felt very lazy off the line and I was disappointed. A time card showing a 1.57 sixty-footer and a 9.72 stopped that thought. With a bit more spring pressure, the stall increased and the two-step reset, I ran a 1.58 sixty-foot and a PB 9.599 on the next pass.

Ken looked at the data and suggested taking a washer off. We won’t mention the third qualifier because my head fell off and I rode like shit. But we will talk about the first round of eliminations. With no changes, I dialled up WOT and let go of the button. Everything seemed to go into slow motion, probably because of the adrenalin coursing through my system. The shiftlight was taking forever and I shortshifted to second after deciding that the light must be broken. The light came on at the top of second, and did for each gear from then to the finish line. I was tucked in as tightly as a 140kg bloke can and crossed the finishline with a new PB of 9.535. According to the timecard I lost but personally, I’d won. PBs and confidence will do that.

The missing ingredient: To keep the nose down, add weight to the throwout arms. If it’s not lifting, take a washer off at a time until it does and then back up a step. No one had told me that and I couldn’t find it written anywhere.

With the right amount of weight on the MTC slider throwout arms, the front wheel stays on the ground.

Keep notes. Write everything down. My runs from the Nitros show sixty-foots of 1.578, 1.584, and 1.557. Half-track numbers were 6.29, 6.19 and 6.13 with speeds of 115.88, 117.25, and 117.57mph. Nothing else has been changed except for leaving the line at WOT, the weights on the throwout arms, spring tension and the two-step rpm to achieve consistent, repeatable short times and improving PBs.

It’s not a cheap exercise but if you’re chasing repeatability and consistency, my results prove what you can expect. If you want to know more, ask me a question and I’ll give you an honest answer.Machining is a thing of beauty.

 

 

Like a tiger.

WHAT’D IT ALL COST?

The final price depends on the exchange rate of the Australian peso on the day you do the deal. If you allow $3000, that’ll get you a complete ready-to-run MTC Slider clutch with a set of plates. That price includes freight, GST and all customs clearances.

If you need a clutch cover, I’d recommend the Australian-made LAE Quick Access cover, which is $310. Sending your cover to the US is an option but the local job is better.

WHERE’D YA GET IT?

MTC Slider Clutch. Supplied by Rapid Motion, Brisbane, Australia. Phone: 0412 907 924

LAE Quick Access clutch cover. Supplied by Dragbike Parts Australia. Phone: 0404 147 095

 

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE

Eric and Kevin, MTC Engineering; Leonard and Deanne, Azzopardi Racing; Ken Peatey, Rascal Race Engines; Scott, Rapid Motion; John and Deidre, Warrian Enterprises; Dave, Sydney Dyno; All at Kenma; Ken and Mary, Racing is Life; Rod, CutGrafix; Nick, Teknik Racing; Chris, Moto National; Terry, IM Composite Technologies; Aaron, Earmold Australia; Graham, Australian Moto Gear; Will and all from Bastards’ Corner.

Sours: http://www.theshortbus.com.au/index.php/easyslider-mtc-slider-clutch-the-beginning/

Rob Bush Motorsports

MTC Gen II Suzuki Hayabusa 99-19 "Hand Slider"

* RBM provides Tuning Support and At Track Assistance on all GENll Purchases. Our race teams use the clutch's and know what it takes to get you where you need to be.

This new clutch called the "Gen II Multistage Clutch" is designed and built with the same robustness as MTC has used for over 40 years in making the best products in the racing industry.

This clutch significantly reduces clutch lever efforts and yet improves clutch adjustability through its "multistage" technology.

The new design runs on engine RPM, and demonstrates a quicker reaction time and more repeatability between passes. The new design also allows for easier dynamic spring replacement with its quick access cover plate over the springs.
  • Tuner Kit Included
  • *Cores Required. You must send us your Stock Clutch Basket.
  • Ship Cores to RBM 169 Rabon Rd. Columbia SC 29223

**Quantities are not guaranteed. Products may be on backorder from manufacturer. Special order and custom items are subject to wait times for production.**

Sours: https://robbushmotorsports.ecwid.com/MTC-Gen-II-Suzuki-Hayabusa-99-19-Hand-Slider-p163231225

Tuning clutch mtc gen2

dubious

2 stage lock up clutch ? adjusting it?

I am new to this piece of equipment.
I have a new MTC 2 stage, they suggest 0.100" to .0125" clearance.
I am getting .060.

My stack height changes the rpm it enguages, and the shimming the spring changes how aggressive it locks?

I guess I need to reduce the stack height to get the clearance?

Anyone willing to give me a tutorial on stacj height, shimming springs, and adding weight to the arms?

Would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Lyle
____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    dubious

Also, can I pull in the clutch at higher rpm?
The bike will be street ridden as well as strip, turbo 300-500 Hp depending on fuel tune and traction etc.
I need a lockup for sure....
____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    almost_les

talk to nox. he's the lockup guru. here's the dumbed down kindergarten version:

if its a two stage with no stall springs, it starts engaging as soon as the wheel starts to turn.

shimming the springs changes the static pressure. this is the amount of force that the clutch applies with nothing is moving, or in a static state. its what gets the bike moving off the line. if you toss the lever and it leaves to aggressively, you need less static pressure, and vice versa for anemic launches. get it just right and all you have to do is cut a decent light and the clutch will take care of itself.

too much weight on the arms will cause a rapid increase in pressure and cause a wheelie or a bog. too little will allow the clutch to slip and kill both fibers and mph. multistage clutches are better since they can control when each arm sarts to engage, therefore, more precise tuning.

generally, a two stage has all the arms engaging at once, you need to be extended to keep it under control when doing clutch tossing launches

as for pulling the lever at speed, opinions vary as to whether you should or not (much of it depending on how the lockup is set up), but it will take more force as rpms rise.
  Ignore this member    NINJA12

Dub ,
If you want to be in control of the clutch and use the lock-up to hold the power , you can set it with no weights and forget it. If you want the slider effect , talk to NOX
  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

What springs did you get with it? Blue super soft?
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    dubious

No springs with kit. Supposed to use the stockers.
Just .025, and .050 shims,

Its a gen1, 2 stage

I guess I will need to look at the stack and get the height around .100-.125
____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

If you are not planning on throwing the clutch away the stockers will work. They are 65lb springs in the stock setup. If the MTC has the .220 spring reliefs cut into it, it will put the stock springs at 42lb each. The super soft blues are supposed to be 23lb with the MTC lockup. Just depends on what you want to do with it. If you want to chuck the lever go with the blues and shim them until it is where you want it. The .050 shims are 4-5 lb each of static and the .025 are 2 lb each. when used with the blue springs.
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    NOX

All of my guages have never shown them to be quite that much on the static, as far as the shims.......

different guages may be different though.


____________
42 Wins
21 Runner-ups
2010 TMRC Super Street Points Champion
2010 PMRA Super Street #3 Points
2009 PMRA Super Street Points Runner-Up
6 Time Centerville Dragway Points Champion
Sponsored by:
Scorpion Helmets
Galfer Braking
AMSOIL
Steve's Speed Shop
Kawasaki Sports Center
Mickey Thompson Tires
Catalyst Racing Composites
Conway Cycle
Syed Leathers
  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

Nox, that is MTC shim specs for the blue springs. A guage would be a more accurate spec.
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    NOX

Yeah, I thought so too.

There is a WAY more accurate way of testing it.

You have to make a small tool to go in where a spring is......, to get the TRUE installed height of the spring, that tells you the exact static pressure, and that is what you work with, instead of what some guy on the phone tells you........
____________
42 Wins
21 Runner-ups
2010 TMRC Super Street Points Champion
2010 PMRA Super Street #3 Points
2009 PMRA Super Street Points Runner-Up
6 Time Centerville Dragway Points Champion
Sponsored by:
Scorpion Helmets
Galfer Braking
AMSOIL
Steve's Speed Shop
Kawasaki Sports Center
Mickey Thompson Tires
Catalyst Racing Composites
Conway Cycle
Syed Leathers
  Ignore this member    dubious

I got a killer deal on a (20 passes used) gen1 slider too-$200! , but will get my feet wet on getting the 2 stage set up, then move on to the slider.

____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

How are you planning on using the 2 stage?
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    dubious

Drag race and street for the 2 stage,
I want it to be streeteable with the 2 stage. Basically I need the lockup for the HP, without a gorilla lever the big springs give.

What is the best way top set it up for the street?
I read the instructions from MTC but they are pretty vague... I need to order 6 thinner springs to get my stack height .100 -,125 from the weights when they are parallel to the pressure plate.

I am totally new to this.
What I understand is the slider/ multistage is strictly track use due to clutch slippage right?

So am I thinking right to set up the 2 stage stiff for the street.
The bike should start making boost around 3500 rpm, so I am thinking I could get away with an early lock like a stock clutch , and just have it tighten up with RPM and boost so the packs survive.

Am I right in my thinking?

Yesterday was a holiday, and today i was flying to work most of the day.
I should probably call MTC tomorrow...?
____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

Good luck getting a lot of info from MTC. Nice guys but they dont give a lot of good info imo.

You mean thinner steels for the stack height?

A slider is not streetable at all. Even at the track someone will have to come get you at the finish line. A multi can be streetable.

I forgot about you being turbo. If you have Brock's springs in it now and use them with the MTC, it should feel like stock springs because the spring recess will allow them to be almost a 1/4 inch longer in installed height. If you weight that MTC too much you will not be pulling the lever in at higher rpm. I know a buddy who had a hard lever at 7000 on his turbo busa. The MTC has heavy arms and they hold well by themselves without weight on milder hp motors. Unlike a six arm set-up where you can remove 3-4 arms, you have to do equal weight changes on all 5 for a 14's.

I dont have the MTC on mine but have been messing with the busa one. I was considering getting the MTC for mine but have almost got my Cycle Logic where I want it. It is a helluva learning experience for sure.

____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    dubious

yes,
Sorry I meant thinner steels.
I only have .050" clearance right now, and they ask for .100 to .125

Funny thing is my clutch is stock,( I don't believe much in wasting the clutch on a bike with so much torque... I throw the clutch away and pin the throttle at about 4000-5500 and let it drive out of the hole )
my stack is not what is listed in the manual... I do not have the 2 thick plates listed, all are .103-.100 thick!

Thanks for the info on springs and shims,
I will have to try what I have and go from there, but the info you provided should point me in the right direction.

____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

The steels are all one thickness. The fibers have two that are different.
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    KZScott

use the stock springs and go very light on the weight. ive heard the mtc is much more agressive than the cycle logic. if you want to get into fine tuning go lighter on the springs

____________
01 ZX-12R 8.84 @ 156.3 no bars, DOT tires. Pump Gas, NA.... turbo 8.47 @ 164.
00 ZX-12R 8.62 @ 165.2 no bars, slicks, Pump Gas, 55 shot.... turbo 8.32 @173
00 ZX-12R Fastest NA Kawasaki in the world 1: 222.046 1.5: 226.390 Loring AFB
00 ZX-12R street turbo 1: 227.9 1.5: 234.1 Loring AFB
00 ZX-12R LSR turbo 1: 263.1 1.5: 266.5 Loring AFB Worlds fastest ZX-12R
CMG Racing RCC Turbos
  Ignore this member    NINJA12

Dub ,
Try it with the current stack height, and no weights.
I think it will give you what you are looking for.
  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey


Dub ,
Try it with the current stack height, and no weights.
I think it will give you what you are looking for.
It wont hurt anything to try it.
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member    dubious

10-4
thanks guys
____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    rquinn

Good information there
____________
RON QUINN
  Ignore this member      starchild

alright need help deciding to use my lock-up mtc 2-stage -stock motor?. probably not needed the 14s clutch seems bulletproof. but it's here calling me.thinking no shims and of course stock springs. any opinions on this would be very helpful. thanks guys
____________
jay
  Ignore this member    dubious

start off with stack height around .100 and .125 clearance to begin with I have been told
____________
natural selection.....
destiny will overcome intervention.
Some are not worthy of the effort.

  Ignore this member    starchild

thank dub used it once last year, for a short time. but that was with a motor that had some issues. and this motor is alot stronger not sure i need it but damn do i want to use it lol
____________
jay
  Ignore this member    kawasakijockey

with the stock springs it wont need any weights either.
____________
Get on the shortbus boys 'cause its time to get schooled.
2007 ZX-14
1.38 60ft
9.03 @ 149mph
8.95 @153 small shot n2o
8.68 @160mph 5lbs boost
  Ignore this member   
Sours: http://bikeland.org/board/viewthread.php?FID=13&TID=47364
Zx14r testing Mtc gen2 clutch , 5:68 pass

For the most part they are compatible, but there are some exceptions. If you have an old KZ900/1000 or GS1100/1150 slider basket equipped with the steel inner backing plate, it is not possible to use that with a Gen II multistage. The Gen II uses a plate which is pinned to the inside of the basket, it is not possible to install that into one of these old baskets. The GSXR 1000 does not use a pinned plate due to the factory design of the clutch and isn’t restricted, any MTC GSXR 1000 slider basket can be used with a Gen II.

Later model KZ and GS slider baskets have eliminated the need for the inner plate and are solid aluminum, which can be drilled for the pin holes if not already equipped. The newer bikes didn’t have these plates and are not subject to this restriction.

If you are not sure if you basket has the holes, look inside the bottom for 3 blind holes drilled next to the rivet heads. If those are present, the slider basket is ready to use with a Gen II. Don’t worry if the holes are not in there, we can put those holes in your later model MTC slider basket, just send it in with your order.

Sours: https://www.mtceng.com/faq/faq-clutch-gen-ii-multistage/

Now discussing:

Realized that something was about to happen, but she could not believe that everything would be exactly like this. Get out and put your hands behind your back.- said D.taking out the handcuffs and again shackled her hands.



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