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Dead Rising

Release date

Xbox 360
NA August 8, 2006
EU September 8, 2006
AU September 14, 2006
JP September 28, 2006
Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Microsoft Windows
NA September 16, 2016
EU September 16, 2016

Dead Rising
Overview (cases/scoops) • Books • Clothing • Food • Psychopaths • Stores • Survivors • Weapons


Dead Rising (デッドライジング Deddo Raijingu) is an action-adventure, sandbox game published and developed by Capcom.

It was first released on the Xbox 360 on August 8, 2006, and was ported to the Nintendo Wii as Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop on February 24, 2009. A mobile version of the game was released in 2008 and was re-released with the Dead Rising Collection.

Dead Rising has spawned several sequels, including Dead Rising 2, Dead Rising 2: Off the Record, Dead Rising 3, and Dead Rising 4.

In July 2016, Capcom announced that the Dead Rising would be re-released on Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and Microsoft Windows. A remastered version was released on September 16, 2016 along with Dead Rising 2 and Dead Rising 2: Off the Record.

Plot[]

Main article: 72 Hour Mode (Dead Rising)

Dead Rising takes place in 2006 and follows Frank West, a freelance photographer looking for the "scoop of a lifetime", who finds himself in the fictional town of Willamette, Colorado.

As he enters the town via helicopter, he believes there may be a riot happening in the streets. Upon closer inspection, however, Frank realizes that something more sinister is happening in the town of Willamette. He asks to be dropped off at the Willamette Parkview Mall so that he can investigate details for his story.

Over the course of three days in Willamette, Frank will have to uncover the truth behind the zombie outbreak. Controlling Frank, the player will have the opportunity to rescue survivors, fight psychopaths, solve case files and take photographs.

Endings[]

Main article: Endings (Dead Rising)

Dead Rising features six endings. The ending that the player achieves is dependent on their actions throughout the three days spent in Willamette. There are a few endings one where Frank is left in the mall to die. And another where Frank and Isabella are left in a sewage area to “die”, but in after Frank yells into the sky the screen goes black showing that Frank and Isabella escaped the zombies wanting to eat them. They presumably escaped by tank.

Game Modes[]

Main article: Dead Rising Game Modes

There are three game modes in Dead Rising:

Story Mode[]

Story Mode, (also known as 72 Hour Mode) is the main story mode in Dead Rising. It follows Frank's three-day adventure in Willamette. The game has six different endings, depending on Frank's actions.

Completing 72 Hour Mode with Ending A will unlock Overtime Mode.

Overtime Mode[]

Main article: Overtime Mode (Dead Rising)

Overtime Mode is unlocked by completing all case files in the game and achieving Ending A. If these conditions are met, then the game will continue on after 72 Hour Mode.

Completing Overtime Mode will allow the player to see how Frank and Isabela escaped Willamette. Completing Overtime Mode will unlock Infinity Mode and provides the player with the canon ending of the game.

Infinity Mode[]

Main article: Infinity Mode

Infinity Mode is unlocked after completing Overtime Mode. Infinity Mode is a survival sandbox mode, where Frank is now pitted against psychopaths as well as survivors. The player must last as long as they can before they are killed or starve to death.

Changes from Beta[]

Downloadable Content[]

There are several clothing options to download from the Xbox Live Marketplace. After downloading one of the "keys", the player could use the key to unlock the lockers in the Security Room, with each unique key giving Frank a different piece of clothing. There are nine keys in total:

  • Accountant Key
  • Strike Key
  • Pure White Suit Key
  • Coldhearted Snake Key
  • Round Shades Key
  • Burgundy Wine Key
  • Grandpa Key
  • Pink Paparazzi Key
  • Man in Black Key
  • Weekender Key
  • Casual Key
  • Miami Nights Key

Trivia[]

  • Screw Attack called Dead Rising "Number One" on its "Top 10 Zombie Games". According to them, not only do you kill zombies, you "Frank West" them.
  • Dead Rising resembles the classic zombie movie Dawn of the Dead, taking place in a mall with survivors trying to stay alive. See this article for more details.
  • The name DEAD RISING was originally a working title in the beta stage but was kept in the end.
  • Dead Rising was banned in Germany due to its graphic nature.
  • A zombified Brad Garrison is seen on the box art. He is the only zombie who is not trying to attack Frank.
  • In the idle game menu, a cutscene will play of a woman and her daughter driving at night, and the mother kills a zombie. She tells her child to cover her eyes with a baseball cap, as a town, set ablaze, comes into view. Suddenly, an 18-wheeler comes and knocks the car to the side of the road. The mother and daughter are fine, but the driver of the 18-wheeler is turned into a zombie. After much effort, the mother stuns the zombie by knocking it down with the car door. She tries to start her car, but it stalls due to an empty gas tank. Suddenly, several zombies surround the car, and as the mother and child scream in terror, the zombies close in around the car, ready to feast, when the camera goes black. 
  • Dead Rising is the only game in the series to be made by Capcom. The other entries are made by the Canadian-based Capcom called Capcom Vancouver.
  • The Japanese release of Dead Rising was (oddly) censored, and all traces of blood and dismemberment are removed.

Gallery[]

Sours: https://deadrising.fandom.com/wiki/Dead_Rising

Dead Rising 3

Release date

XboxNovember 22, 2013

PC September 5th, 2014

Dead Rising 3
Missions • Attributes • PP Trials • Characters • Psychopaths • Weapons • Vehicles • Clothing • Food • Locations • Endings

Dead Rising 3 is the seventh installment in the Dead Rising series, released on November 22, 2013. It was developed by Capcom Vancouver, and was published by Microsoft for the Xbox One. In June 2014, Steam advertised the "Apocalypse Edition" for pre order on the PC, and was released on September 5, 2014.

The game was officially announced during Microsoft's E3 press conference on June 10, 2013.[1] A sequel, Dead Rising 4, was released on December 6, 2016.

Plot

Main article: Story Mode (Dead Rising 3)

Dead Rising 3 takes place in 2021, ten years after Dead Rising 2. It follows the game's protagonist, a young mechanic named Nick Ramos as he desperately attempts to find a way out of the city of Los Perdidos.

In 2017 the government began using Zombrex chips - a required chip that is placed inside infected people and administers Zombrex daily. This chip, however, also tracks them via GPS, which makes many refuse to have it administered.

During the events of Dead Rising 3, the Zombrex chips implanted in those infected malfunctioned, which causes this newest zombie outbreak. This outbreak forces Nick and other survivors to escape the city alive before the military performs a firebombing.

Endings

Main article: Endings (Dead Rising 3)

There are a total of five known endings that can be achieved depending on player choices. Ending S is the best ending, followed by C, D, and F. There is also an alternate ending to Chapter 8 that is not lettered in game (In the files it's labelled as "Ending E"). Ending S is considered to be the true, canon ending.

Game Modes

Story Mode

  • The "Normal Mode" of the game. This mode features a six-day time limit, utilizes checkpoints, and the player can save in the open world and do not have to visit a bathroom. With this mode, the player can complete every mission and master all content with no pressure.
  • There are 8 chapters in total (0-7).

Co-Op

  • Team up with a buddy for endless zombie-killing mayhem through online co-op over Xbox Live, with asynchronous matchmaking that allows you to jump in or out of the game at any time. Not only will you help your friend advance, you'll also contribute to your own story progression and earn experience points that will carry back into your own game.
  • Keep your progression! With Dead Rising 3's co-op system, you can jump into a friend's game and finish chapter three. If you jump back to your game and you're only in chapter one, you will already have chapter three completed, despite not being at that point yet.

Overtime Mode

  • A one-day extension of the story mode, also known as Chapter 8.
  • Filling up the King Zombies Harvested Bar in this mode will result in a different ending; however, you are able to start from a previous checkpoint after receiving this ending.

Nightmare Mode

  • In this mode, players get to experience a more "classic" Dead Rising experience. The 6-day time limit remains, there are no checkpoints, and players have to save in bathrooms or port-a-potties.
  • Time passes by four times faster than in the regular mode. 
  • Zombies and psychopaths are tougher and more aggressive. They can withstand more damage and will also deal more damage to Nick and survivors.
  • Days are shorter and nights last longer.
  • Weapon lockers and garages will only allow half the amount of weapons/vehicles to be generated at one time. 
  • By leveling up the 'smarts' attribute category, players can receive a PP bonus which allows them to gain more PP. 
  • More PP is awarded for good endings, especially Ending S! 

New Gameplay Features

  • Unlike previous games, Dead Rising 3 features a longer time limit, but features a Nightmare Mode for players who want the more traditional Dead Rising experience.
  • The game's world is immense, being able to fit the map from both Dead Rising and Dead Rising 2 inside of Los Perdidos with room to spare. There are no loading screens and virtually no loading time, making for a sleek transition between the various areas.
  • Zombies now have more intelligent AI. With Kinect, the zombie horde can hear beyond the screen and will react to you calling out for a more immersive experience.
  • All zombies have been uniquely modeled with great detail, and accessories (such as earbuds or skirts) have been randomly generated onto pre-existing models. No two zombies look alike!
  • Use motion controls to point and command your survivor posse and even yell insults to taunt your enemies.
  • Anatomically correct gore, allows you to tear into zombies and see parts of them you have never seen in a Dead Rising game before.
  • New driving physics and tons more vehicles. Combo Vehicles can be created with blueprints, and if zombies are on your car while you're driving, it will affect your driving ability and will try to pry you from the wheel.
  • Nick will no longer need to use a maintenance room to make combo weapons. He can combine weapons anytime, anywhere, granted that he has the materials and there are over 100 combinable weapons!
  • The game features a clothing locker to try on and customize clothing and accessories. Any clothing the player has tried on will go into the clothing locker. The clothing can be mixed and matched to create a custom look.
  • In addition to a clothing locker, there is also a weapon locker which will store any of the weapons that you've found or created.
  • Combo Weapons are created using blueprints instead of Combo Cards.
  • Larger items are able to fit into Nick's inventory, although some items will still not be able to be stored in the inventory. Heavy items will cause Nick to walk slower.
  • Money has been removed from the game.
  • Nick does not wear a watch like the previous protagonists, and the notebook is also not used. 
  • The saving system is greatly improved and it only takes less than a second to save game progress.
  • There are seven psychopaths who each represent the "seven deadly sins".
  • 'Saveable' survivors that don't join your posse have been introduced. They save themselves after you clear out the zombies around them, similar to Case West. There are some survivors that are part of missions; even if you do what they want, when the mission is over they stay where they are and won't follow you. Some survivors even become hostile and must be killed to complete the mission.

Downloadable Content

  • Protagonist Bundle: Content that goes to those who pre-order the game, Nick will be able to dress up as Frank West and Chuck Greene from Dead Rising 1 & 2 respectively, along with two custom skill moves each, and two new combo weapons, the Zombie Slugger and the Paddlesaw.
  • Season Pass Bundle: for $28.99 players will get four new playable characters including an anarchist biker, an illegally infected survivor, a special forces agent, and a military operative each with four new missions, combo weapons, vehicles, and costumes!
  • Operation Broken Eagle: A DLC package available for individual purchase for $9.99, but is also included in the season pass. This DLC follows Adam Kane, a Special Forces Commander who is tasked with hunting down and capturing the president. This DLC package includes five new weapons, one new combo weapon, a new vehicle and a new costume.
  • Fallen Angel: A DLC package available for individual purchase for $9.99, but is also included in the season pass. This DLC follows Angel Quijano, an illegally infected survivor who tries to stop the special forces from killing survivors. This DLC package includes five new weapons, one new combo weapon, a new vehicle and a new costume.
  • Chaos Rising: A DLC package available for individual purchase for $9.99, but is also included in the season pass. This DLC follows Hunter Thibodeaux, an anarchist biker who is out to seek revenge on those who put him in jail. This DLC package includes five new weapons, one new combo weapon, one new vehicle and a new costume.
  • The Last Agent: A DLC package available for individual purchase for $9.99, but is also included in the season pass. This DLC follows Brad Park, a ZDC agent who attempts to uncover the truth about the zombie outbreak. This DLC package includes five new weapons, one new combo weapon, one new vehicle and a new costume.
  • Super Ultra Dead Rising 3' Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX + α: Xbox One exclusive. A DLC package for $9.99. It is an arcade DLC featuring various Capcom media such as Street Fighter, Darkstalkers, and Power Stone. The DLC features classic a beat-em-up arcade gameplay with power-ups, bonus stages, and arcade boss fights.[2]

Apocalypse Edition

On September 5, 2014, the Apocalypse Edition (entitled Dead Rising 3 Apocalypse Edition) was released for the Xbox One and PC. It includes Dead Rising 3 along with the Season Pass.

Trivia

  • Dead Rising 3 is the first game in the Dead Rising series to feature the f-word in dialogue. However, Tyrone King in Dead Rising 2 said "effing" and in Dead Rising it was used multiple times in the soundtrack.
  • Similar to Dead Rising and Dead Rising 2: Off the Record, hostile survivors are present in Dead Rising 3. However, while they attacked you at first sight and were meant to be killed for their items in the other two games, in this game, they are involved in some of the story mode missions, and their reasons for attacking you will be revealed as you complete the mission. Just like any other survivor, when killed, the only item they will drop is whatever weapon they were using.
  • This is the second game of the series that does not have an Ending A, the first being Off the Record.
  • It is the first game in the series that doesn't occur in the month of September; Dead Rising 3 occurs in the month of March and Dead Rising 4 occurs in December.
  • If you leave the "Press Enter" screen alone for 3-4 minutes, you will learn what happened on the plane that crashed in Chapter 0. There were two pilots, and one was stung by an infecting bee on the tarmac. He begins to cough, thinking that he is allergic to the sting. He then proceeds to attempt a landing in Los Perdidos, with his partner telling him to stop because of a number of zombies in the area. The co-pilot realizes that the captain pilot is infected, so he pulls out a gun. The scene ends with the co-pilot pointing the gun at the captain pilot's head.
  • In Dead Rising: Watchtower, during the scene where Amy bites the biker gang leader, another gang member is momentarily seen playing Dead Rising 3.

Media

SweetFX_enabled_in_-_Dead_Rising_3_-_gameplay_PC_Win_8.1_Improved_graphics_mod-0

Gallery

References

Sours: https://deadrising.fandom.com/wiki/Dead_Rising_3
  1. Black tension rod shower
  2. Dr dray dermatologist
  3. Tattoo filler stencils

Dead Rising (video game)

2006 action-adventure game

2006 video game

Dead Rising[a] is a 2006 action-adventure game developed by Capcom Production Studio 1 and published by Capcom. The game's story sees players controlling Frank West, a photo journalist who becomes trapped in a shopping mall within the fictional town of Willamette, Colorado, that is suffering from a zombie outbreak and finds himself not only surviving by salvaging various items for weapons, but also rescuing survivors trapped in the complex and dealing with crazed psychopaths, while attempting to stay alive to uncover the truth behind the incident. While players must complete major missions to advance the main story, the sandbox element of the game means that optional tasks can be done, with several additional endings available if the player does not complete certain conditions towards the true ending of the story.

Originally released for the Xbox 360 video game console on August 8, 2006,[1][2] the game became a commercial success, leading it to being introduced as part of the Xbox 360 "Platinum Hits" lineup, while also spawning three sequels – Dead Rising 2 in September 2010, Dead Rising 3 in November 2013, and Dead Rising 4 in December 2016. A remake of the game was made for the Wii, entitled Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop, and released in February 2009,[3] with a mobile phone version also created. As part of its tenth anniversary, the game was re-released on September 13, 2016 for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.[4]

Gameplay[edit]

West attacking zombies with a 2x4 plank. There are approx. 30 enemies onscreen.

Players can operate the game in one of two modes. 72 Hour Mode is the main mode and the only one available to players to begin with, in which the main objective is to investigate the Willamette Parkview Mall within 3 days, before Frank can be rescued by helicopter, completing a series of "Case Files" - major missions that, when completed, advance the game's main story. If the player fails a Case File, the game does not end, allowing the player to merely explore the mall instead until the mode is up, though failure to comply to certain conditions (primarily associated with Case Files) will result in then earning a different ending. Completing all the Case Files by the time 72 Hour Mode is over, will unlock "Overtime Mode" which players automatically begin, where the main objective to complete has Frank given one more day to complete an additional set of objectives within the mall. The second mode, ∞ (Infinity) Mode, is unlocked after completing Overtime Mode and allows players to roam around the mall in sandbox mode without any time limit, with Frank merely trying to survive as long as possible.

To survive in all modes, players need to find and seek out weapons scattered around the mall that they can use against the zombies. Over 250 items are available to use in combat; they can be found anywhere, such as in stores, and fall under two categories, melee and ranged, with all ranging from the powerful, to the near-useless.[5] The weapons and other items are firearms, sports equipment, children's toys, furniture, construction tools, electronic devices, and various bladed objects. Frank can carry only a limited number of weapons - baseball bats, 2x4 planks, hammers, pistols, shotguns, and so forth, though he can carry multiple versions of the same type. Also, he can use them only a limited number of times before he must find new ones, as melee weapons eventually deteriorate and break, while guns must be discarded when out of ammunition. Some weapons can be changed by the environment - frying pans can be heated on a stove both to increase damage and grant access to a special move - while others are large objects that Frank cannot store in his inventory and which he will drop if he picks up or switches to another item. Many of the less useful weapons exist purely for humorous effect. For example, the toy Megabuster, from Capcom's Mega Man, shoots tennis balls; traffic cones are simply put over a zombie's head, causing it to stumble about blindly.

Items other than weapons are available. Frank can try out various outfits from the mall's clothing stores - such as a Special Forces uniform, wrestling boots, a hockey mask and Mega Man X's armor. He can carry around certain books that can confer bonuses, such as increasing the durability of weapons. He can consume food and drink scavenged while exploring to recover health, or blend them together to make different "juices", which have temporary effects on the player. In Infinity Mode, players need to eat food to stay alive, as Frank's health drops every 100 seconds. They cannot access the supermarket within the mall, and food items are limited, but they can acquire weapons and food items from all characters; survivors are hostile to them in this mode.

Dead Rising incorporates an element of RPGs in the form of an experience system, in which completing various actions will reward Frank with "Prestige Points" (PP). While in both modes, killing large number of zombies can earn PP, so too can taking photographs. Any photograph that Frank takes in the game is automatically scored based on five "genres" - horror (zombies and graphic gore), outtakes (humorous events or scenes), erotica (photos of female survivors or zombies, particularly those focusing on the breasts and crotch), drama (dramatic events, such as the survivors' reactions while in the security room), or brutality (deaths of zombies and other characters) - with the score converted into PP. In addition to these actions, both 72 Hour Mode and Overtime Mode award PP for completing Case Files, and completing the optional task of rescuing survivors within the mall, and defeating "psychopaths" - boss characters who have either been driven insane by the zombie attacks, or are using the outbreak as cover for their own purposes. Once enough PP is earned, Frank will level up, resulting in upgrades to either attack power, running speed, throw distance, health, or to the number of items Frank can carry in his inventory, while new moves can also be unlocked, which boost his effectiveness with hand-to-hand combat. Any experience, levels, and unlocked moves earned in a playthrough will automatically be carried over into a new game should the player choose to restart, which can make subsequent playthroughs much easier.

An in-game HUD is provided, which displays information on Frank's health, his prestige level and the amount of PP progress he has made towards the next one, his inventory of weapons and their condition/amount of ammo left, a counter for the number of zombies the player has killed during a playthrough, and objective counters for both major and optional tasks, which consists of a bar that counts down the amount of time a player has to reach where the objective is located within the mall and complete it, before it is considered to be failed. Players also have access to a map to help them make their way around the mall and pinpoint where they must go in the main game mode, can receive calls on a transceiver about anything suspicious that Frank can investigate (he cannot jump, attack, switch weapons, or pick up/use any item when taking a call), and can view Frank's watch to determine what time it is; in-game time progresses faster than real time, with a day in the game taking two hours of real time, while the time of day also affects the behaviour of the zombies - during the day, they are sluggish and weak, but become more active, tougher, and more numerous at night.[6] Players may save by using green couches or the mall's various restrooms, though the original Xbox 360 version allows only one game-in-progress save to be made per memory device and player profile; the save system is disabled for Infinity Mode. When Frank is killed, the player may reload from the last save or restart from the beginning.

Plot[edit]

In 2006, photojournalist Frank West is alerted by a source that something is happening in the town of Willamette, Colorado. Flying into the town with helicopter pilot Ed DeLuca, he learns that the town is subject to a military quarantine and observes several violent incidents throughout the town. He is dropped onto the Willamette Parkview Mall's helipad, after asking Ed to return in three days.

Arriving in the mall, he learns that the quarantine is due to an outbreak of zombies. The mall is breached, forcing Frank to take refuge in the mall's security room. With the help of janitor Otis Washington, he travels into the mall. After helping D.H.S. agent Brad Garrison in a firefight against an unknown assailant, the two strike an alliance. Person of interest to Brad, Russell Barnaby is located by the two, hidden in a bookstore. Barnaby refuses to be escorted to safety, forcing the two to return to the security room. Unable to call for assistance due to a communications jammer, the two rescue Barnaby from the unknown assailant. Brad is injured, forcing Frank to search for medicine.

In his search, he comes across a woman he met during the mall's breach. The woman rebukes him, mentioning Santa Cabeza. Frank learns from Barnaby that Santa Cabeza was ostensibly a Central American town linked to the drug trade; which distributed drugs that had a zombifying effect. Locating the woman again on security monitors, he questions her. Revealing herself to be Isabela Keyes, sister of the unknown assailant, Carlito, she promises to set up an interview between the two.

Isabela comes to the meeting alone, after being shot in a rage by Carlito. Frank escorts Isabela to the security room, where she reveals that Santa Cabeza was home to an American research facility experimenting on cattle and that Barnaby was its head. Isabela, as a research assistant, was privy to the fact that a species of native wasp was used in an attempt to boost the performance of cattle, but instead had a zombifying effect. The wasps escaped and infected humans, forcing a U.S. military cleanup of all life in the town, with few escapees. Barnaby begins to zombify and attacks Brad's partner, Jessie McCarney, and is killed.

Isabela reveals that Carlito is planning to use the mall as a staging point to spread the parasites across the country, using bombs located in trucks. Brad and Frank disable the bombs. Brad and Carlito engage in a firefight, and Carlito is mortally wounded. Carlito manages to kick Brad out of the room, where he is injured by zombies off-screen. Frank can find him in the tunnels, where he tells Frank not to tell Jessie, and slides his handgun to Frank, implying that he wants Frank to shoot him. He will then fully turn.

Frank locates Carlito and receives his locket, before Carlito dies. The locket causes Isabela to realize the password of Carlito's computer, allowing her to shut down the jammer. However, U.S. Special Forces arrive in the mall regardless, and have cleanup orders. Jessie is allowed to live, but she zombifies. Otis escapes with a helicopter and possible survivors that Frank rescued. Frank returns to the helipad alone, and DeLuca's helicopter arrives, but crashes into the mall's clock tower.

Isabela arrives, but Frank passes out. Isabela realises that Frank has been infected by the wasp larval parasite. Frank gathers supplies for a drug that can suppress the parasite, and discovers an exit from the mall created by DeLuca's crash. Isabela learns from Carlito's computer that he has manufactured the drug before, and used it on fifty infected orphans, spreading them across the country. After exiting the mall, Frank encounters the cleanup operation's commander, Brock Mason, who also commanded Santa Cabeza's operation. The two fight, until Mason is knocked into a crowd of zombies.

Frank and Isabela escape from Willamette, but Isabela is taken into custody as a perpetrator of the incident. Frank manages to report on the incident and Santa Cabeza, but the truth of Carlito's orphans remain unknown.

Alternate Endings[edit]

Although completing all Case Files and Overtime Mode leads to the game's canon ending, in terms of the game's lore, the player may encounter different endings in Dead Rising, depending on certain actions that they perform, as listed below:

  • Ending B (Fail to complete all the Case Files, but be at the helipad when time expires)
    Frank returns for his pickup by Ed, and convinces him to airlift the survivors he rescued out of the mall (Ed's dialogue will vary depending on how many survivors the player has rescued). An epilogue reveals that the cause of the outbreak remained unknown, and that other outbreaks shortly occurred within other cities in the United States.
  • Ending C (Method 1: Complete all the Case Files, but do not reach the helipad when time expires) (Method 2: Complete all the Case Files, but do not talk to Isabela at 10am on the third day)
    Frank fails to appear on the rooftop helipad, much to Ed's disappointment. Ed, watching from another rooftop through binoculars, is killed by a zombie. An epilogue reveals that Willamette was quarantined because of an unspecified disease, though with no one able to contradict this with the true story.
  • Ending D (Be captured by the Special Forces, and do not escape when time expires)
    Frank is taken away in a military helicopter by Special Forces. An epilogue reveals that the military's presence was later revealed in a cover-up story, which cited they were there to clean up a series of incidents in Willamette, though no disclosure is given to what these were.
  • Ending E (Fail to complete all the Case Files, and do not reach the helipad when time expires)
    Ed lands to await for Frank's arrival, but is about to leave when he fails to show up, only to spot Otis open the roof access door and step out alongside Jessie, and any survivors who Frank had rescued, leading Ed to transporting them to safety. An epilogue reveals the survivors credited Frank for saving them, but that his whereabouts remain unknown.
  • Ending F (Fail to gather all of Carlito's bombs in time during Case 7-2)
    A bomb's timer counts down to zero before a white-out follows, and a photo is shown of an explosion occurring within the mall. An epilogue reveals that Carlito's plan with the explosives was successful, effectively leading the United States to suffer under a widespread zombie pandemic a few days later.
  • Hidden Ending (Fail to complete Overtime Mode before time expires)
    Frank eventually succumbs to his infection and transforms into a zombie. An epilogue states that his undead condition brought about a "humane" end to his hopeless situation.

Development[edit]

Despite the game's similarities to Romero's Dawn of the Dead, Capcom asserted that the concept of "humans battling zombies in a shopping mall" is a "wholly unprotectible idea" under the present copyright laws. While the company wanted to have the game follow on from its other zombie-centered game series, its development team opted to design the game with a more comical view of zombies in the horror genre, particularly in the way that players interacted with the zombies in the game, allowing them to be able to do anything against them in terms of what weapons they could use against them,[7] while they also based the mall upon the stereotypical design of American shopping malls. One particular area that was keenly worked on by the team was the number of zombies that could appear onscreen during the game in order to give the feel that it was a major outbreak; when Electronic Gaming Monthly reviewed the game, they reported that up to 800 zombies could appear on screen at once.[8] As the development team consisted of members who had worked on Capcom's role-playing video gameBreath of Fire: Dragon Quarter, it helped greatly in incorporating one of the game's elements borrowed from it, towards the developing the mechanics structure of Dead Rising - the ability to roll over anything earned in terms of experience, levels and abilities, towards making a new playthrough, was implemented so that players would have a sense of responsibility for their decisions and actions.[9]

After making changes to the beta of the game, a playable demo was released via the Xbox Live Marketplace on August 4, 2006, prior to its release over the next two months.[10][11]

Soundtrack[edit]

Dead Rising Original Soundtrack was released in Japan on March 30, 2007 in a 2,000-copy limited edition, bundled with a T-shirt. It was packaged with a T-shirt that showcased Frank, Isabella, and an outline of the mall. A non-limited edition of the same soundtrack was released on June 20, 2007.

Downloadable content[edit]

Soon after Dead Rising was released in the United States, Capcom released nine downloadable "keys" to Xbox Live Marketplace that would unlock different lockers in the Security Room, providing the player with nine new outfit options,[12] adding three more keys for players to download and use on May 31, 2007.

Reception[edit]

Reception

Dead Rising received "generally favorable" reviews, according to review aggregatorMetacritic,[13] with most reviewers commending the "sandbox"-style of gameplay, the amount to explore within the mall, and the sheer number of ways to kill the thousands of zombies, with GameSpot stating it was "a great piece of entertainment",[16] while two reviewers on Australian video game talk show Good Game gave the title a 6-7/10 score.[22] However, general consensus amongst reviews was towards criticising the game's save system mechanic and the AI of the survivors; while IGN considered the game to be "one of the more unique and entertaining titles on the Xbox 360", its review notably indicated that improvements were needed with both the save system and NPCs, along with offering "a more forgiving story progression, and tighter controls".[5] One point of contention in reviews was the operation of the game's transceiver, specifically on how persistent it is when ringing, how vulnerable Frank is while answering any calls on it, and how if the telephone call is somehow interrupted (such as being attacked), it would end abruptly and be repeated again when the player answers the transceiver a few seconds later and hears Frank being scolded by Otis for disrupting him;[23][24] the use of the transceiver in the game led to numerous gamer-oriented webcomics and blogs parodying the use of it.[25][26][27] Despite this, Capcom reported around 500,000 copies had been shipped out in the first month after its release, and one million copies worldwide by the end of 2006.[28] It received a "Gold" sales award from the Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA),[29] indicating sales of at least 200,000 copies in the United Kingdom.[30]

One notable complaint that Dead Rising received, was from players who ran the game through either a standard-definition or small high-definition set, only to find themselves having difficulty reading the on-screen text, an issue caused due to Capcom deciding to develop the game exclusively for high-definition televisions, particularly as it had been touted as one of the first truly "next generation" titles available for the Xbox 360. In response to the complaints about the issue, a representative of the company posted the following on Xbox.com:

Dear Everyone, I have heard your concerns and passed them to every source within Capcom possible. I feel your pain as I, myself, have a large SDTV and am having trouble reading the mission objectives, item names, etc. Unfortunately it does take time to resolve any issue and we would want to fix the issue appropriately as any changes to any game can create additional problems from the result of change; that's just how game programming works and that's why games go through extensive game testing programs and approvals.[31]

A week later, Capcom released a statement saying they would not be fixing the problem, and suggested some DIY solutions to resolve the issue.[32]

Awards[edit]

Along with being ranked #2 in gaming magazine Gamesmaster's Top 50 of 2006, Dead Rising won several awards:

Reaction in Germany[edit]

Because of the graphical nature of the violence portrayed in Dead Rising, the BPjM in Germany felt that game fulfilled at least one of their indexing criteria, documenting that the title glorified violence. As a direct result, the Unterhaltungssoftware Selbstkontrolle, the board responsible for rating entertainment software for Germany, refused to rate the game, and effectively put a halt to Microsoft publishing a German version, as the company does not allow unrated games to be released for the Xbox 360, though the game was made available for import to players of a legal age.[37] However, after a decision by Hamburg's county court in June 2007, it was prohibited within the country from late August 2007, making sales of the title illegal in Germany; anyone caught selling the game would be sentenced to imprisonment or a monetary penalty according to §131 of the German criminal code, with all copies confiscated by the German police.[38]

Legal issues[edit]

The MKR Group, who holds the copyright to both the 1978 Dawn of the Dead film and its 2004 remake, sent letters on February 6, 2008 to Capcom, Microsoft, and Best Buy, claiming that Dead Rising infringes on the copyrights and trademarks of these films. In a complaint filed February 12, 2008, to seek an injunction that would pre-emptively counter an anticipated complaint from MKR, Capcom asserted that "humans battling zombies in a shopping mall" is a "wholly unprotectable idea" under today's copyright laws; Capcom further pointed to the warning "label" on the box cover as a preemptive measure that was intended to separate the game from the films and avoid any customer confusion.[39][40][41] The MKR Group subsequently filed a lawsuit in February 2008 after failing to reach an agreement with Capcom over the dispute.[42]

The lawsuit was dismissed in October 2008, with United States Magistrate Judge Richard G. Seeborg stating that MKR failed to demonstrate the similarity of any protected element of Dawn of the Dead to that of Dead Rising, with many of the elements MKR claimed were similar being part of the "wholly unprotectable concept of humans battling zombies in a mall during a zombie outbreak".[43]

Legacy[edit]

Wii version[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop

A remake of Dead Rising was released for the Wii in February 2009, titled Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop, and was developed by Capcom and published by THQ in Australia.[3] Built upon the same engine used for the Wii version of Resident Evil 4, which had been positively received by reviewers, the remake incorporated additional features to that of the Xbox 360 original, including the use of an over-the-shoulder camera approach and utilising the motion control system of the Wii Remote,[3] yet lacked some of the features of the original, including showing large number of zombies on screen and the photography system.[44][45][46] The Wii version ultimately earned mixed reviews, though was praised for having an improved aiming system to that of the original.

Hand-held versions[edit]

In 2008, Capcom Interactive Canada released a hand-held spin-off of the game for mobile phone, announcing on 4 October 2010 that an iOS version of the game was also announced.[47] In this version, players have access to a new game mechanic in which they can call upon their friends via Twitter and Facebook to help revive them, with their refusal causing them to appear as a zombie within their friend's game, while complex operations in the game are performed through context-based buttons. Similar to Infinity Mode in the console version, the game features a hunger meter, with Frank now required to eat food within the mall in order to survive.[48] The hand-held spin-off was generally well received by reviewers, earning a B+ from 1UP.com,[49] and a 7.3/10 from IGN, with praise given for staying true to the sandbox design and plot of the Xbox 360 version, despite being pared down for the smaller screen and platform.

Remastered version[edit]

On 18 July 2016, Capcom announced that work was underway for a remastered version of the original Dead Rising, alongside its sequel Dead Rising 2 and its spin-off title, aiming for these to be released for the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC, prior to the release of the fourth game in the series. These were released on 13 September that year, both separately and in a bundle pack, with the developers improving the game's graphics to high-definition, increasing the number of save slots and improving the frame-rate.[4]

Sequels[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising 2

Following the game's commercial success, plans were made to create a sequel, with it aimed to operate on multiple platforms. On 28 September 2010, Dead Rising 2 was released for Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, and Microsoft Windows, and while it followed the basic setup of gameplay mechanics as the original, it featured a new character, a currency system, a weapon creation system that involved finding "Combo Cards" to know what to make, and online multiplayer modes, including zombie-killing minigames and two-player cooperative play, whilst also featuring improvements to address some of the negative feedback that Dead Rising received. Since its release, two downloadable episodes were released for the game - one a prologue set before the main story of Dead Rising 2, the other taking place after it and featuring Frank West, who is also controllable in it - and a re-imagined version was released in October 2011, with a new story and Frank West being the main protagonist.

The game eventually spawned two more sequels, developed by Capcom's Canadian branch, Capcom Vancouver - Dead Rising 3 was released on 22 November 2013 for Xbox One and on 5 September 2014 for Microsoft Windows, while Dead Rising 4 was released on 6 December 2016. Capcom Vancouver was also developing another sequel to the franchise, which was cancelled when the studio closed down in September 2018.[50]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Capcom Release Dates". GAMbIT Mag. February 2014. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  2. ^"Game Profile: Dead Rising". xbox360.ign.com. Archived from the original on June 8, 2012. Retrieved June 17, 2006.
  3. ^ abcLinde, Aaron; Faylor, Chris (July 21, 2008). "Dead Rising Wii Screenshots Have Few Zombies, Details and Release Info Arrive (Updated)". Shacknews. Archived from the original on July 23, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2008.
  4. ^ abPereira, Chris (August 9, 2016). "1080p/60FPS Dead Rising 1 and 2 Remasters' Pricing, Release Dates Confirmed". CBS Interactive Inc. GameSpot. Archived from the original on August 14, 2016. Retrieved August 20, 2016.
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  6. ^Pereira, Chris (May 28, 2006). "Dead Rising Preview for Xbox 360". www.VGcore.com. VGcore. Archived from the original on October 18, 2006. Retrieved June 17, 2006.
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  12. ^Berardini, César A. (August 9, 2006). "Capcom releases first content download for Dead Rising". Teamxbox.com. IGN Entertainment. Archived from the original on December 18, 2007. Retrieved January 7, 2008.
  13. ^ ab"Dead Rising for Xbox 360 Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on April 3, 2011. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
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  16. ^ ab"Dead Rising Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on December 5, 2006. Retrieved December 1, 2006.
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  20. ^"Dead Rising Review - Xbox 360 Review at IGN". IGN. Archived from the original on February 9, 2009. Retrieved August 7, 2006.
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  22. ^"Good Game stories - Dead Rising and Caesar IV". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. October 10, 2006. Archived from the original on June 24, 2010. Retrieved June 11, 2010.
  23. ^Ahearn, Nate "NateDog" (August 6, 2006). "Dead Rising Review (Xbox 360)". Team Xbox. Archived from the original on December 5, 2006. Retrieved April 3, 2007.
  24. ^Martins, Andrew "Warlock". "Dead Rising — Xbox 360 Review". XGP. Archived from the original on January 3, 2007. Retrieved April 3, 2007.
  25. ^Ramsoomair, Scott. "You've got Red on you". VG Cats. Archived from the original on February 10, 2010. Retrieved September 4, 2010.
  26. ^Buckley, Tim (August 12, 2006). "Steve's Day at the Mall Pt. 4". Ctrl+Alt+Del. Archived from the original on May 23, 2010. Retrieved September 4, 2010.
  27. ^Parsons, Zack "Geist Editor" (August 11, 2006). "Otis Rising". Something Awful. Archived from the original on January 6, 2008. Retrieved January 9, 2008.
  28. ^Gantayat, Anoop (January 10, 2007). "A Million Dead Have Risen: Dead Rising reaches Platinum Status". ING.com. ING Entertainment. Archived from the original on January 11, 2008. Retrieved January 8, 2008.
  29. ^"ELSPA Sales Awards: Gold". Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association. Archived from the original on March 19, 2009.
  30. ^Caoili, Eric (November 26, 2008). "ELSPA: Wii Fit, Mario Kart Reach Diamond Status In UK". Gamasutra. Archived from the original on September 18, 2017.
  31. ^Gauger, Eliza (August 11, 2006). "Capcom Responds to Tinytext Dead Rising Whining". Kotaku.com. Gawker Media. Archived from the original on January 10, 2008. Retrieved January 8, 2008.
  32. ^Kuo, Li C. (August 17, 2006). "Capcom Tips For Dead Rising on SDTV". gamespy.com. IGN Entertainment. Archived from the original on January 7, 2008. Retrieved January 8, 2008.
  33. ^"IGN.com presents The Best of 2006: Xbox 360 - Most Innovative Design". IGN. Archived from the original on January 10, 2008. Retrieved January 11, 2008.
  34. ^"GameSpot's Best Action Adventure Games of 2006". GameSpot. December 20, 2006. Archived from the original on January 5, 2007. Retrieved December 21, 2006.
  35. ^GameSpot.com – Best of 2006Archived January 7, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  36. ^GameSpot.com – Best of 2006Archived January 12, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  37. ^"Dead Rising is not banned (yet)". dreisechzig.net. Archived from the original on August 10, 2006. Retrieved August 9, 2006.
  38. ^Dead Rising - Beschlagnahmung offiziell bestätigt auf Xbox360Welt.com - Das inoffizielle Xbox 360 MagazinArchived February 9, 2013, at archive.today
  39. ^Gardner, Eriq (February 13, 2008). "Zombies Attack!!: Is a Japanese Video Game Too Similar To 'Dawn of the Dead'?". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on February 15, 2008. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  40. ^Miller, Ross (February 14, 2008). "Dead Rising, Dawn of the Dead similarities spark legal filings". joystiq.com. Archived from the original on February 15, 2008. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  41. ^Aaron Linde and Chris Faylor (February 14, 2008). "Capcom Sues to End Dead Rising Trademark Dispute". Shacknews. Archived from the original on May 17, 2008. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
  42. ^"Producer, game firm in rights battle over zombies". Reuters. February 26, 2008. Archived from the original on March 3, 2008. Retrieved February 27, 2008.
  43. ^Sinclair, Brendan (November 19, 2008). "Dead Rising wins copyright case". GameSpot. Archived from the original on February 12, 2009. Retrieved November 19, 2008.
  44. ^"Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop". Nintendo Power. September 2008.
  45. ^Faylor, Chris (July 15, 2008). "Dead Rising Heading to Wii". Shacknews. Archived from the original on June 8, 2012. Retrieved July 16, 2008.
  46. ^Gifford, Kevin (July 17, 2008). "What's New in Wii Dead Rising". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved July 17, 2008.
  47. ^Ahearn, Nate. "Dead Rising Coming to iPhone This Holiday". Archived from the original on October 8, 2010.
  48. ^Sadler, Keith (October 12, 2010). "Dead Rising Screens for iOS Devices". VG Chartz. Archived from the original on April 15, 2011. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  49. ^"Dead Rising (Wireless)". 1up.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2009. Retrieved June 12, 2008.
  50. ^Frank, Allegra (September 19, 2018). "Capcom Vancouver, studio behind Dead Rising, has shut down". Polygon. Retrieved November 16, 2020.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Rising_(video_game)

Dead Rising Wiki Guide

In this Dead Rising strategy guide, you'll find:


BASICS // General strategies to assist you on your way, as well as a breakdown of some of the more efficacious weapons in the game. WALKTHROUGH // Complete Dead Rising Walkthrough covering all of the game's missions. SCOOPS // A breakdown of when, where, and how each of the game's many optional scoops will need to be tackled. SECRETS // Learn the method for unlocking any of the game multiple endings as well as the various drink mixes that can be made.

In This Wiki Guide

Dead Rising

Dead Rising

A survival horror game that brings new meaning to the phrase "retail hell."
Sours: https://www.ign.com/wikis/dead-rising/

Wiki dead rising

Dead Rising

This article is about the series. For the first game in the series, see Dead Rising (video game).

Video game series

Video game series

Dead Rising
Dead Rising logo.png
Genre(s)Action-adventure
Developer(s)
Publisher(s)
Creator(s)Keiji Inafune
Platform(s)Xbox 360, Wii, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, Shield Android TV, Shield Portable, Shield Tablet, Steam Machine, iOS
First releaseDead Rising
August 8, 2006
Latest releaseDead Rising 4: Frank's Big Package
December 5, 2017

Dead Rising (Japanese: デッドライジング, Hepburn: Deddo Raijingu) is a series of action-adventure games created by Keiji Inafune. It was originally developed by Capcom until Capcom Vancouver took over developing the franchise. As of March 31, 2021, the game series has sold 14 million units worldwide.[1]

Setting[edit]

The games in the franchise take place in fictional cities, although real cities are mentioned, the first game takes place in a large shopping mall in the town of Willamette, Colorado. The prequel for the second game Case Zero takes place in Still Creek, a small town near Las Vegas, while the main game takes place in Fortune City, a casino mall, the epilogue downloadable content Case West takes place in a Phenotrans facility nearby. The third game takes place in Los Perdidos, California. Dead Rising 4 takes place again in Willamette with a zombie outbreak happening in the Willamette Memorial Megaplex which was constructed to honor the victims of the first game's outbreak.

Phenotrans is a multimillion-dollar pharmaceutical company. It creates and distributes Zombrex, a medicine which can, if taken daily, prevent an infected person from turning into a zombie. The company serves as the main antagonist of the series. There are also organizations like C.U.R.E. (Citizens for Undead Rights and Equality) which fights for the rights of the zombies.

Protagonists[edit]

Main article: Frank West (Dead Rising)

Voiced by Terence J. Rotolo (Dead Rising, Dead Rising 2: Case West, Dead Rising 2: Off the Record, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite), Ty Olsson (Dead Rising 4), Peter von Gomm (Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars), Rikiya Koyama (Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Project X Zone), Scott McNeil (Puzzle Fighter), and portrayed by Rob Riggle (Dead Rising: Watchtower).

Frank West is the protagonist of Dead Rising, Dead Rising 2: Off the Record and Dead Rising 4, and also appears in the downloadable content of Dead Rising 2: Case West, and the film Dead Rising: Watchtower. Frank West is a freelance photographer and photojournalist who has covered many world events, wars, and other big stories. Looking for the next big scoop, he stumbles onto some strange events happening in the small town of Willamette, Colorado. While not the most polished and professional person in his field, he is strong, genuinely kind and decent, and always operates on instinct. Frank is capable of handling himself in combat and helping other survivors to safety.[2]

In his non-canonical appearances, Frank West is the main protagonist of the remakes Dead Rising: Chop till you Drop (Wii remake of the original Dead Rising) and Dead Rising 2: Off the Record (remake of the second game), as well as of the mobile game, and he is also a playable character in Super Ultra Dead Rising 3′ Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha.

Voiced by Peter Flemming and portrayed by Victor Webster (Dead Rising: Endgame).

The protagonist of Dead Rising 2 and all of its downloadable contents as well as a supporting character in Dead Rising 3, and having a cameo in the film Dead Rising: Endgame. Chuck is introduced in Dead Rising 2 as a former motocrosschampion and an extremely resourceful mechanic, able to repair and construct anything he can imagine. Chuck arrives at Fortune City, Nevada, to take part in Terror Is Reality, a controversial sports entertainment game show where contestants kill zombies for cash prizes. Chuck wants the prize to have money to buy an expensive medicine called Zombrex, which only if taken daily is able to suppresses the zombification process of his daughter Katey, who was bitten by her zombified mother during a previous outbreak in Las Vegas.[3]

In his non-canonical appearances, the co-op player of Dead Rising 2: Off the Record always controls Chuck, within the same game a second Chuck appears as a psychopath having gone crazy after the death of his daughter, Chuck is also playable in the downloadable content Super Ultra Dead Rising 3′ Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha.

Voiced by Andrew Lawrence. The protagonist of Dead Rising 3. Nick is an orphan-turned-mechanic who works for Wrench O' Rama in the city of Los Perdidos. While he has excellent mechanical skills, Nick has difficulties formulating plans and acting under pressure. Many details of his life remain a mystery, but a distinctive physical trait is a tattoo of the number 12 on his neck (This is later revealed that he is one of the test subjects of Carlito in the Santa Cabeza outbreak, along with his friend Diego. And his blood contained the cure for the zombie infection). Despite his shortcomings, Nick is a friendly young man who holds his friends in high regard, especially his boss Rhonda, who is about the closest thing he knows to a mother. Nick also has a crush on a girl named Annie.[4] The co-op player of Dead Rising 3 controls a character called Dick.

Chase Carter is the protagonist of the films Dead Rising: Watchtower and Dead Rising: Endgame. The character is also a journalist.

Games[edit]

Main series[edit]

The game displays the health bar, the level, the number of zombies killed, depleting bars telling how much time until each mission becomes unavailable, and the current item (which turns red when the weapon is about to break). The games work within a 72-hour schedule which happens in an in-game time, every event happens within a specific hour. The story happens within a city infected by hordes of zombies and various hostile survivors, and each subsequent game has allowed for more zombies to be displayed on screen, at the same time.

The melee combat system consists of using everything as a weapon, most of the items in the game can be used, as some weapons are very effective, but others are comedically inefficient, in addition weapons constantly break forcing the player to constantly use different weapons. Dead Rising 2 introduced a "Combo Weapons" system, where the player can combine certain items into more powerful weapons, some of which are over-the-top, such as a lightsaber, made by combining a flashlight with jewelry.[31]Dead Rising 3 enhanced the mechanic by introducing "Combo Vehicles" allowing players to combine items with vehicles and even vehicles with other vehicles to make more powerful vehicles, for instance a motorcycle with a chainsaw creates the "slicecycle", a motorcycle with two chainsaws at the sides.[32]

Players can level up by performing mission objectives, which consist of progressing on the main story, rescuing and leading survivors to safety by guiding them to the safe house, and also fighting psychopaths whom are civilians who either have become criminally insane after the zombie outbreak or are taking advantage of it for their own purposes. Leveling up increases the health bar, walking speed, unlocks melee combos, and reveals weapon combinations. Customization allows the player to use different clothes, spread all around the mall, which vary from a sports fan attire, to pajamas, to dresses, to a male stripper outfit, to a Megaman cosplay.

All games feature multiple endings, completing all the missions in the main story is the only way to get the true ending. Since the second game, all games except for Dead Rising 4 feature two player co-oponline multiplayer in the story mode, with the fourth main game only including a competitive multiplayer mode.

Dead Rising (2006)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising (video game)

The first game in the Dead Rising series. The game centers on Frank West, a photojournalist who ends up trapped in a shopping mall in the fictional town of Willamette, Colorado, that is infested with zombies. Players can use everything as a weapon. The game story works in a 72-hour clock, with another in-universe 24 hour post game chapter. In total, there are six endings, titled F through A, with Ending A being the only one to unlock the aforementioned post-game; rendering it the game's canon finale.

Dead Rising 2 (2010)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising 2

The second game in the Dead Rising series. Set in the fictional casino town of Fortune City, Nevada, five years after the events of Dead Rising, the game follows former motocross champion Chuck Greene trying to clear his name after being framed for starting the outbreak in Fortune City, while simultaneously trying to keep his daughter alive with a drug that lags the zombification process. The "72-hour" system returns. The major gameplay improvement over its predecessor is the Combo Weapons system, allowing Chuck to combine certain items by using crafting tables. In addition survivors AI was also improved. The Main story can be played in 2 player online co-op, with the second player controlling a second Chuck. Players can earn money by playing the online multiplayer mode "Terror is Reality".

  • Standalone downloadable games: two downloadable standalone expansions were released for the game, for Xbox 360. Since March 2017, both are retro compatible with Xbox One, although unlike the main game, none of the expansions were remastered.:[33] The first Case Zero (2010): Released a month before the main game, Dead Rising 2: Case Zero serves as a prologue to the main game. Set a few years before Dead Rising 2, Chuck Greene is stranded in a small town named Still Creek and has to fight his way out with his daughter Katey. While the second, Case West (2010): The downloadable content serves as an epilogue for Dead Rising 2, Chuck with the help of Frank West, go to a Phenotrans facility to get evidence to clear Chuck's name.

Dead Rising 3 (2013)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising 3

The third game in the Dead Rising series. Set ten years after Dead Rising 2, the story follows a young mechanic named Nick Ramos and his attempt to survive a massive zombie outbreak in the fictional city of Los Perdidos, California. The time system returns. Combo Weapons can be fused anywhere, as crafting tables were removed, and the crafting system was also expanded by introducing "Combo-Vehicles". While there is no sandbox mode, like in "Off the Record", similar challenges can be found during the Story Mode. Survivors were upgraded to be able to use "Combo Weapons". Like in the previous game, the main story can be played in 2 player Co-op Online Mode where the second player controls a character named Dick.

  • Downloadable content: There are 5 downloadable content packs, the first 4 are known as Untold Stories of Los Perdidos. Each one focuses on exploring the zombie outbreak in Los Perdidos depicted in the main story, through the point of view of a different survivor, whom Nick met during the main story. The first, Operation Broken Eagle, is the story of Adam Kane, a psychopath that is a Special Forces Commander on a mission to capture the president, (whom Nick kills in the main story). The second Fallen Angel, is the story of Angel Quijano, an illegally infected survivor. She appears in the main story as part of Annie's group of survivors. The third Chaos Rising, tells the story of Hunter Thibodeaux, a biker seeking revenge on the people who incarcerated him. He is a psychopath, whom Nick kills using a molotov cocktail in the main story. And the fourth The Last Agent, is the story of Brad Park, a ZDC agent searching for the truth about the outbreak. Brad also appears in the side missions played through the Smart Glass companion application and returns as a supporting character in Dead Rising 4. The fifth expansion is the non-canon Super Ultra Dead Rising 3′ Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha. It focuses on beat 'em up action with four-player co-op, in it players can control Frank West, Chuck Greene, Katey "Annie" Greene and Nick Ramos, it also features exclusive costumes which serve as an homage to other Capcom franchises.[34]

Dead Rising 4 (2016)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising 4

The fourth game in the Dead Rising series. Set one year after Dead Rising 3, the game features an older Frank West, returning to Willamette, Colorado during the Christmas season,[35] where the newly constructed "Willamette Memorial Megaplex" has fallen under another zombie outbreak. "Combo Weapons" and "Combo Vehicles" return, and camera mechanics from "Dead Rising 2: Off the Record" also return improved. The game introduces an exo-suit. Unlike previous games, the 72-hour timer system has been dropped, to encourage exploration. The main story does not support online cooperative multiplayer, making it a single player experience like in the original game. To address player complaints of the game being too easy, a month after its release Capcom released an update which added the much requested Hard and Ultra-Hard difficulties, in which the items break more easily and the food restores less health, bringing the difficulty closer to that of the previous games, five new Street Fighter themed costumes were also included within the update.[36][37] A further update was released on December 5, upgrading the game with a new game mode called Capcom Heroes, the new mode allows Frank to don 17 new outfits based on Capcom's video game franchises, each with their own moveset.[38][39][40]

There is four player cooperative play, but it does not feature Frank West, as it features four characters from the main story and the cooperative mode is separate from the story. The cooperative mode has the player completing various tasks in the Willamette Memorial Megaplex, while working as a team, and earning scores by doing various tasks (e.g. kill zombies, plant bombs, etc.). The player must survive until 9 pm that night and make it back to the safe room.[citation needed]

  • Downloadable content: Three add-ons were confirmed within the game's season pass: the Stocking Stuffer Holiday Pack only added holiday themed weapons, while the multiplayer Super Ultra Dead Rising 4 Mini Golf added a mini golf multiplayer mode. Released in April 2017, the third and sole story DLC titled Frank Rising, continued the story after the end of the main game, picking up right after its ending, with an infected Frank West, trying to prevent his own zombification and helping survivors. The gameplay is rumored to involve the return of the timer mechanic and have a higher difficulty than that of the main game.[41]

Remakes[edit]

Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop (2009)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop

A reimagining of the original Dead Rising for the Wii. This version was built with the same engine used for the Resident Evil 4 Wii Edition. While still set in a mall and able to save survivors, there is a greater emphasis on firearms and the game is structured around individual timed missions instead of free roam. Various elements were tailored to the Wii's weaker hardware or limitations of the different engine. These included smaller maps, reduced enemy counts and the removal of the photo system, but new enemy types were added.

Dead Rising 2: Off the Record (2011)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising 2: Off the Record

A non-canonical remake of Dead Rising 2, which replaces protagonist Chuck Greene, with Frank West (the protagonist of the original game), and also features some slight plot alterations. Fortune City remains mostly the same, but now adds a new place, a small alien thematic park called "Uranus Zone". The "72-hour" system returns, but the game also adds a "Sandbox Mode", where Frank can explore Fortune City without a time limit, and also complete challenges which require the players to use their creativity and crafting the necessary weapons to succeed. More Combo Weapons were added. Camera mechanics from Dead Rising also returned improved. Both the main story and the sandbox mode can be played in two player co-operative online mode, with the second player controlling Chuck.

Re-release compilations[edit]

Dead Rising Collection (2014)[edit]

Dead Rising Collection is a compilation for Xbox 360 containing the games from the Dead Rising franchise released on Xbox 360: Dead Rising, Dead Rising 2 and its downloadable content Case Zero and Case West, and Dead Rising 2: Off the Record. It was released on March 7, 2014 in Europe.

Dead Rising Triple Pack (2016)[edit]

Triple Pack is a compilation pack featuring the original Dead Rising, Dead Rising 2, and Dead Rising 2: Off the Record. It was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on September 13, 2016. Physical copies of the first two games were released on September 13, 2016 and September 27, 2016 (North America only) respectively.[42] The ports themselves were praised; but the collection was criticized for not including Dead Rising 2 expansions Case Zero and Case West. Each game includes all of its DLC costumes.[43]

Mobile game[edit]

Dead Rising Mobile (2010)[edit]

A spin-off was released on iOS on December 9, 2010. It received negative reviews.[44]

Canceled sequel[edit]

An investigation into the series by game journalist Liam Robertson revealed that a fifth game in the series, Dead Rising 5, was being developed at Capcom Vancouver between 2016 and 2018 for Windows and Xbox One. The game was planned to be set between the events of Dead Rising 2 and 3, and would have focused on Chuck and Katey Greene who are caught in the middle of a zombie outbreak in a fictional Mexican city during the Day of the Dead. The project entered early development alongside Dead Rising 4 and was canceled when Capcom Vancouver was closed in September 2018.[45]

Films[edit]

Zombrex: Dead Rising Sun[edit]

In 2010, a Japanese film based on the Dead Rising universe titled Zombrex: Dead Rising Sun was released directed by Keiji Inafune. The film featured a new cast of characters set in the same world as Dead Rising.[46]

Dead Rising: Watchtower (2015)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising: Watchtower

Legendary Digital Media released a digital feature film titled Dead Rising: Watchtower directed by Zach Lipovsky. Crackle had the initial U.S. rights of the film and while it was internationally distributed by Content Media Corp.[47][48]

The film stars Jesse Metcalfe, Dennis Haysbert, Virginia Madsen, Meghan Ory, Harley Morenstein, Aleks Paunovic, Keegan Connor Tracy and Carrie Genzel with Rob Riggle as Frank West.[49][50] The film takes place between Dead Rising 2 and Dead Rising 3.

Dead Rising: Endgame (2016)[edit]

Main article: Dead Rising: Endgame

The sequel, Dead Rising: Endgame was released on Crackle in 2016 with Metcalfe, Haysbert and Tracy returning for their roles from the previous film, with Victor Webster as Dead Rising 2 hero Chuck Greene, and Billy Zane, Marie Avgeropoulos, Ian Tracey, Jessica Harmon, Camille Sullivan as new characters.[51][52][53][54] The film takes place between Dead Rising: Watchtower and Dead Rising 3.

Future[edit]

Jesse Metcalfe told Digital Spy that depending of the success of the second film Crackle is debating between continuing the franchise with a third film, or developing a Crackle Original series in real time action, in the style of 24, and with zombie drama like The Walking Dead.[55]

In other games[edit]

Frank West is a playable character in the fighting games Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars,Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite. with his special moves revolving around the use of zombies and the makeshift weapons from Dead Rising.[56] He has special dialogue with Nova, the Hulk, and Spider-Man, the latter of which he tries to compete with as a rival photographer.[57] Frank also appears as one of the characters at player's disposal in the tactical role-playing game Project X Zone, where he is paired with Hsien-Ko from the Darkstalkers series.[58] Frank West also appears as a multiplayer character in Capcom's Lost Planet: Extreme Condition,[59] and in the sequel, Lost Planet 2.[60]

In Valve's add-on content "The Passing" for Left 4 Dead 2, a message from Frank directed to Otis appears among other pop culture messages graffitied on the wall of a bar.[61]

He appeared in the discontinued mobile game Puzzle Fighter.

On April 2021, the Dead Rising franchise was introduced to Teppen alongside Ace Attorney with the "Ace vs. The People" expansion.[62]

References[edit]

  1. ^CAPCOM | Game Series Sales
  2. ^"Dead Rising 1 | Introducing Frank West – Freelance Photojournalist". Deadrising.com. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  3. ^"Dead Rising 2 | Chuck Greene – Reckless playboy turned family man". Deadrising.com. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  4. ^"Dead Rising 3 | Nick Ramos – Young mechanic with a mysterious past". Deadrising.com. May 14, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  5. ^"Dead Rising Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  6. ^"Dead Rising Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  7. ^"Dead Rising: Chop Till You Drop Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  8. ^"Dead Rising 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  9. ^"Dead Rising 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  10. ^"Dead Rising 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  11. ^"Dead Rising 2 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  12. ^"Dead Rising 2: Case Zero Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  13. ^"Dead Rising 2: Case West Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  14. ^"Dead Rising Mobile Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  15. ^"Dead Rising 2: Off the Record Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  16. ^"Dead Rising 2: Off the Record Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  17. ^"Dead Rising 2: Off the Record Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  18. ^"Dead Rising 3 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  19. ^"Dead Rising 3: Apocalypse Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  20. ^"Dead Rising 3: Operation Broken Eagle Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  21. ^"Dead Rising 3: Fallen Angel Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  22. ^"Dead Rising 3: Chaos Rising Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  23. ^"Dead Rising 3: The Last Agent Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  24. ^"Super Ultra Dead Rising 3' Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  25. ^"Dead Rising Triple Pack Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  26. ^"Dead Rising Triple Pack Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  27. ^"Dead Rising 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  28. ^"Dead Rising 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  29. ^"Dead Rising 4: Frank's Big Package Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  30. ^"Dead Rising 4: Frank Rising Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  31. ^Meikleham, Dave. "How Dead Rising 2 embraced the ridiculous to make zombie slaying fun again | GamesRadar". Gamesradar.com. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  32. ^Meikleham, David. "Dead Rising 2's most WTF weapons, costumes and vehicles | GamesRadar". Gamesradar.com. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  33. ^http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2017/03/02/dead-rising-cars-2-meet-the-robinsons-backward-compatible-xbox-one.aspx
  34. ^"Super Ultra Dead Rising 3 Arcade Remix Hyper Edition EX Plus Alpha Is Actually a Thing – Xbox Wire". News.xbox.com. June 11, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  35. ^Alexander, Julia (June 15, 2016). "Dead Rising 4 is the non-Christmas Christmas game". Polygon.com. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  36. ^"Dead Rising 4 update adds new difficulty modes and Street Fighter costume DLC". destructoid.com.
  37. ^"Dead Rising 4 Is Getting Street Fighter Clothes And Harder Difficulties With Free DLC". gameinformer.com.
  38. ^"Dead Rising 4's new Capcom Heroes mode looks wild". polygon.com.
  39. ^"Capcom Heroes Mode Announced As Free Update For Dead Rising 4". gameinformer.com.
  40. ^"Dead Rising 4 'Capcom Heroes Mode' adds Jill Valentine, Arthur, Morrigan, Bass, Viewtiful Joe, and Amaterasu – Gematsu". gematsu.com. November 1, 2017.
  41. ^http://www.gameinformer.com/themes/blogs/generic/post.aspx?WeblogApp=news&y=2016&m=10&d=19&WeblogPostName=dead-rising-4-season-pass-detailed&GroupKeys=
  42. ^Sarker, Samit (August 9, 2016). "Last-gen Dead Rising games coming to PS4 and Xbox One next month". Polygon. Retrieved August 10, 2016.
  43. ^"Dead Rising Triple Pack Review". IGN. September 13, 2016. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  44. ^"Dead Rising Mobile for iPhone/iPad Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved September 22, 2013.
  45. ^"Dead Rising 5 development". Siliconera. June 8, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2021.
  46. ^"Zombrex: Dead Rising Sun". IMDb. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  47. ^Graser, Marc (June 19, 2014). "Legendary to Bring Videogame 'Dead Rising' to Life". Variety. Retrieved June 19, 2014.
  48. ^Barton, Steve (August 20, 2014). "Dead Rising Feature Film for Crackle Finds a Director". Dreadcentral. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  49. ^"Cast Announced for Dead Rising: Watchtower". September 30, 2014. Retrieved September 30, 2014.
  50. ^"Riggle, Morenstein, Tracey and Paunovich to Lead Dead Rising: Watchtower". comingsoon.net. October 20, 2014. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  51. ^"Dead Rising: Endgame on Twitter: 'The #DeadRisingWatchtower sequel is underway. #DeadRisingEndgame streams this summer on @Crackle! #watchdeadrising'". Twitter. February 18, 2016. Retrieved November 15, 2016.[non-primary source needed]
  52. ^"Timeline Photos – Dead Rising Watchtower". facebook.com.[non-primary source needed]
  53. ^"DeadRisingWatchtower on Twitter". Twitter.[non-primary source needed]
  54. ^Petski, Denise (February 18, 2016). "'Dead Rising: Endgame': Billy Zane, Jessica Harmon Among New Cast For 'Watchtower' Sequel". Deadline Hollywood.
  55. ^Jeffery, Morgan. "Dead Rising could get an ongoing TV series on Crackle, reveals Endgame star Jesse Metcalfe". Digital Spy. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  56. ^Henry, G. R. (October 9, 2009). "The 28 characters of Tatsunoko vs Capcom". GamesRadar. Retrieved April 21, 2013.
  57. ^"Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 roster leaked". GameSpot. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved April 21, 2013.
  58. ^"Project X Zone Recreates Resonance Of Fate's Opening Scene As A Special Attack". Siliconera. April 26, 2012. Retrieved May 2, 2012.
  59. ^Branwell, Tom (July 16, 2007). "Lost Planet PC getting Mega Man". Eurogamer. Retrieved October 4, 2011.
  60. ^Dan Webb. "Frank West spotted in Lost Planet 2". Xbox360Achievements.org.
  61. ^Glasser, AJ (April 22, 2010). "Frank West makes a cameo in L4D2 The Passing". GamePro. Archived from the original on August 29, 2010. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  62. ^"Check out the latest information on the new card set "Ace vs. The People"! | Teppen -Official Site-". teppenthegame.com. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Rising
Wiki Weekdays - Capcom Tried To Save Dead Rising With The Wrong Frank West

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