Kershaw 4 inch blade

Kershaw 4 inch blade DEFAULT

Article was originally published in May

Kershaw Knives has a long history that dates back to when Pete Kershaw left his job at Gerber to form his own company. More than 40 years later, the Oregon-based company continues to flex its muscle and show why it remains one of the best knife companies around.

The company has evolved over the years with popular and revolutionary knife models coming and going, but we wanted to take a look at the best knives currently in production at Kershaw.

Note: Best is obviously a very subjective term. While there will be some bias in which knives to include, I will try to select the knives that receive generally widespread acclaim from professional reviewers and customers. Some knives may also get some bonus points for being important to the company. New knives often need a few years to gain the stature needed to be called the best but there are always some that are obvious additions.

If you feel any knives have been slighted or want to mention a knife you feel is the best, let me know in the comments.

Kershaw Leek

I&#;m kicking off the list with the most iconic Kershaw knife ever made: the Leek. This Ken Onion design has always been lumped in with the historically important knives (it made our own list of most iconic knives) and for good reason.

The Leek is simple, effective, and is a gold standard for EDC knives. The knife features a 3-inch modified Wharncliffe blade made from quality C28N steel, a stainless steel handle with a frame lock, and the SpeedSafe assisted-opening mechanism.

Because the Leek is a staple of Kershaw, it&#;s available in tons of varieties and colors. For example, you can pick it up with an orange handle or with a composite D2/C28N steel blade. In my estimation, the best Leek is the newer carbon fiber Leek.

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Kershaw Blur

When people think of a Kershaw, they likely think of two knives. The first is the Leek, and the second is the Blur. Also a Ken Onion design, the Blur has been a part of Kershaw for years and acts as a sort of counterforce to the Leek.

Whereas the Leek is bright and light, the Blur is more brooding and workman-like. It has a longer inch assisted blade made of C28N steel and an aluminum handle with Trac-Tec inserts for a better grip. Odds are if the Leek doesn&#;t meet your EDC needs, the Blur will.

The best version of the Blur is the one in S30V steel.

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Kershaw Launch 1

This one is kind of a dark horse addition simply because it&#;s a knife not many people can carry. Why? It&#;s an automatic knife.

Kershaw has been killing it the last few years with its Launch line. Nearly all of the models in the Launch series have been excellent, but I still think the Launch 1 is a highlight of the series and Kershaw in general.

The blade is inches and uses CPM steel with a BlackWash finish. The handle is machined T6 anodized aluminum with a tip-up pocket clip. Of course, the knife engages with the push of a button in the blink of an eye. The design, manufacturing, and materials have helped propel this knife to become one of the best automatic knives on the market.

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Kershaw Cryo G10

We&#;ve arrived at our first knife on the list not made in the United States. Despite the overseas manufacturing, the Cryo has many great things to curry favor among knife fans everywhere — the first and foremost being that it&#;s a Rick Hinderer design.

The knife is a solidly built assisted flipper with a perfectly sized inch blade made of 8Cr13MoV steel. The first version of this article had the original Cryo in this spot, but the G version is significantly better because it offers a better grip and lighter weight.

Buy

Kershaw Lucha

Unfortunately, we had to knock off the Knockout from this list to add the new Kershaw Lucha. This inexpensive balisong is high quality and made in the United States. It&#;s well-designed and a perfect intro to butterfly knives.

The Knockout is still available in limited quantities of the olive drab version if you&#;re still interested.

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Kershaw Link

The goal of the Link was to bring affordable yet high-quality knives back to America. To say the Link — aptly numbered model — succeeded is an understatement. For less than $45, you can get an assisted flipper with a inch HC stainless steel blade and anodized aluminum handle. That is an insane value.

For even less you can get the Link with a glass-filled nylon handle, which offers a better grip. The Link comes in several different designs like the Tanto Link and if you look in the right places, you can get the knife in premium steel.

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Kershaw Bareknuckle

I was pretty shocked when Kershaw discontinued the Dividend because it was the beloved little brother of the Link. But they replaced it with the larger US-made Bareknuckle.

This model is essentially a better-built version of the Kershaw Natrix, which is featured a little later on this list. It has a inch blade and gray aluminum handle.

Another dated but beloved design that was on a previous version of this list was the now discontinued Kershaw Skyline.

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Kershaw Emerson CQC-6K D2

There is a trend among the best knives from Kershaw. If they&#;re not American-made, they&#;re designed by a legend. The Kershaw Emerson CQC-6K is no exception.

The legendary Ernest Emerson has been in the knife business for a long time and has built quite the reputation for making excellent knives, including those with the pioneering Wave feature. Many companies have tried to work something out with Emerson, but he&#;s insisted on doing things independently — until he came to an agreement with Kershaw.

The result has been a line of affordable Emerson designs under the Kershaw umbrella. It doesn&#;t seem like these knives should be so awesome but here we are. The Kershaw Emerson CQC-6K is the perfect example. Based on the iconic Emerson CQC-6, this version of the knife has a inch blade with wave and G10/stainless steel handle. The knife has been praised from all parts of the knife community.

The original version was discontinued but the new D2 version is just as great.

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Kershaw Natrix

I originally wrote and published this post back in May and while nearly all the knives stayed the same, I had to quick off the budget brawler for the newer Kershaw Natrix.

The Natrix is a budget version of the old Zero Tolerance from back in the day. This version has quickly risen to become one of Kershaw&#;s best. But perhaps the best version of the knife is the Kershaw Natrix in copper.

It has a inch D2 blade with copper handles and a sub-frame lock. The great thing about the Natrix is that there are tons of variations already too, so you can get exactly what you want.

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Kershaw Launch 4

I know we already have one Launch on this list, but the Launch 4 is probably one of the most popular from Kershaw. It is a tiny California-legal automatic knife with a subinch blade. You might think it&#;s a bit silly, but it works well and it&#;s unassuming.

Despite its small size, it excels as a lightweight EDC or tool around the house for opening boxes and whatnot.

Buy

Sours: https://blog.knife-depot.com/best-kershaw-knives/

 

Kershaw Knives started its journey in and aimed at designing and manufacturing tools that knife users would love to own, carry and use. Kershaw knives are known for their high-quality products. The brand offers a variety of different knives; all made from superior-quality materials and is dedicated to intensive craftsmanship. Apart from tough materials and trusted manufacturing techniques, Kershaw provides the knife lovers with knives that ensure a lifetime of performance.

 

Kershaw Clearwater II Series features a variety of fixed blade knives that are loved by knife enthusiasts from different corners of the world. These blades are constructed using J2 stainless steel that has good corrosion resistance qualities. These knives have black task force handle with different colored neon trim that provides a comfortable grip while working. It is a valuable knife, must-have for outdoor enthusiasts, tool lovers, and every home cook. Kershaw fillet knife is so sharp and thin that it ensures absolute cutting precision. Kershaw Clearwater series features knives with Black ABS plastic sheath that provides impact resistance and ensures the safety of these knives. These knives are widely popular among travel enthusiasts who require these knives for various purposes like cutting, tearing, insertion and more. One can explore a wide range of knives through Kershaw’s different series. One can visit Knife Country’s online portal to pick different knives that cater to their needs.

 

Explore Historically-enriched Product Options at Knife Country

Knives sourced from the best global brands remain the specialty at Knife Country. The assortment of gear options for the hunter, gamer, trekker, climber, shooter, adventurer, and outdoorsmen continues to expand. Within this demographic, there is an increasing demand for items that are more suited for grooming collections and displaying rather than heavy-duty usage. Knife Country regularly finds queries about arms like spears that are now used to the deck-up knife or firearm collections. Flags with a real rendition of historic colors and patterns help people set-up exciting role-plays or add a nationalistic flair to their collection. Spears mimic historic designs while swords are the emerging favorite at Knife Country. Expect some of the finest sword handles & hangers at genuine prices.

 

Sours: https://www.knifecountryusa.com/shop/manufacturer/product-group//kershaw-kitchen-knives.html
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Review: Can the inexpensive Kershaw Shuffle II make the cut?

My favorite knives have fixed blades (looking at you, Mora), but that leaves out a lot of choices. Let’s face it: a knife is only useful or practical if it’s on you when you need it, and something like the Mora isn’t going to cut it in an office setting or even a unit standup. Fixed knives are nearly always better than folding knives, but they aren’t appropriate to carry most of the time. Folding knives take care of visibility problems and generally aren’t as intimidating to your cubicle mate or those “combat” finance people working on your travel voucher. 

While I did unspeakable things to knives as a loadmaster on Cs and in force protection as an airman, it doesn’t seem right to baton a small folder like the Kershaw Shuffle II or throw it at anything. The Kershaw shuffled its way past some of my other abusive tests by having built-in features for opening bottles and driving slotted fasteners. I’m definitely in a cubicle these days and I don’t get to carry large fixed-blade knives. Because I go through security several times each day, I can’t even keep one in my briefcase. I can, however, keep a small pocket knife around, and they come in handy frequently for slicing open packages or breaking down cardboard boxes. 

The Kershaw Shuffle II is great for doing that: opening packages and stabbing cardboard. That said, I’m not sure who this knife is for or why it exists. It’s not a bad knife, it just has some confusing properties that seem contradictory.

Unboxing

I like Kershaw’s packaging. The Shuffle II came in a little red-orange box and shipped with a manual. Yes, a manual. For a folding knife. And frustratingly, the manual didn’t explain all of the features of the knife, like the not-quite-intuitive ambidextrous bottle opener or how the clip can be mounted on either side of the knife (more on that later). Overall, it’s unconventional, but it looks useful and I like it. 

The knife itself comes in three colors, and mine is good old OD green. I was having trouble placing the aesthetics of the scales but eventually it hit me. The scales of the Kershaw Shuffle II are molded out of glass-filled nylon to look like G10 or Micarta with cut grooves for a cord wrap. Sit back a bit and think about that. Remember that the Kershaw Shuffle II is a folding knife. I’ll wait. Design contradiction number one. 

Review: Can the inexpensive Kershaw Shuffle II make the cut?

The only decoration on the scales is an embossed “CHINA” on the clip side. There’s an all-metal lanyard or keychain loop on the butt-end of the closed knife that ends in a flathead screwdriver. Looking at it, it seems perfect for dzus fasteners, scope or RDS adjustment, or the battery compartment screws on gear like night-vision goggles or active earpro. Then there are two little tabs on either side of the keychain loop that turn the loop into a bottle opener, another really handy feature. The last two external parts are a pocket clip and a two-sided thumb stud for easy one-handed opening. Closed, the knife is 4 inches long, which is about right for a pocket knife. 

Opening the Shuffle II rewards you with a view of the inch tanto point blade and the worn-in dark oxide coating that Kershaw calls “BlackWash.” I’m a fan of the BlackWash finish. I love sandblasted or tumbled blades and the dark color on a tumbled blade works well here. Opened up, the Shuffle II is a hair over 6 ¼ inches long. The blade has a liner lock and a spring-loaded ball and cup closing keeper.

Review: Can the inexpensive Kershaw Shuffle II make the cut?

How we tested the Kershaw Shuffle II

Despite the Kershaw Shuffle II’s small size, it seemed sturdy enough to test hard. I had a bonfire to start and some kindling to make. We had a wax log and a torch handy, but I’m stubborn and wanted to do it the hard way to get a good impression of this little knife. 

Part of the reason the knife is so sturdy is the tanto-style blade. The tanto was invented by feudal warlords in Japan to puncture samurai armor. This style puts a lot more meat at the tip of the blade compared to a drop point, but tantos have drawbacks too. Tantos are exceptionally good for stabbing, but don’t slice particularly well because of the sharp angle in the belly of the blade. The angle creates two separate sections where a drop point blade would have a gentle curve and a continuous blade. Any design choices between the two are a trade-off between good slicing performance and good stabbing performance. 

I started by splitting out some smaller pieces from good dry firewood until I had a fistful of straw-sized sticks. I used this exercise to test blade strength, sharpness, repeatability, and grip comfort. Because the tanto blade doesn’t slice particularly well, testing the Kershaw Shuffle II’s sharpness needed a long, straight stroke. The knife performed well here, but it was around this point I noticed I was starting to get a blister at the base of my index finger. I had been using the knife for about two minutes. The pocket clip was digging in and pinching my finger as I cut. 

When faced with knife-based adversity, I take the same approach as I used to with enemy combatants or reticent airmen as an NCO: these colors don’t run, and I don’t negotiate with terrorists. I forged ahead after a grip adjustment and tested fine control of the blade by making a feather stick. By the time I was done, I was thirsty and found a great opportunity to test the bottle opener on the cap of a Topo Chico on my way to a Whiskey Collins. 

Review: Can the inexpensive Kershaw Shuffle II make the cut?

I made my first mistake around this time. Well-lubricated with proof rye and annoyed at my blister, I bragged about a one match fire. I carefully set up my kindling and smaller sticks with an assortment of other sticks and firewood arranged by size at arm’s length. I lit my kindling and it went up as expected, but when I put my larger feathered stick on, the feathers burned off and the log extinguished itself. No surrender, no defeat!

Cursing, I pulled the Shuffle II out and made twice the kindling with it. I made another perfect little pyramid of straw-sized sticks with a puff of dried grass and heartwood shavings under it, but set a second pyramid of full-sized firewood over the starter this time instead of trying to feed a log in. It lit right up and this time kept going. I mumbled something about it being take two of my single match fire, but deep down, we all knew it was a two-match fire and I was a failure. 

The final test was as unsurprising as it was uninteresting. I needed to remove the tripod plate from a camera, and while I normally use a quarter for the flathead screw, I had the Kershaw Shuffle II handy. It worked well as a large screwdriver, to nobody’s surprise.

What we like about the Kershaw Shuffle II

The Kershaw Shuffle II is an interesting little knife. It’s compact and manages two useful features out of non-moving parts. The bottle opener is functional, if weird, and the screwdriver is basically a hidden treasure. You wouldn’t know either of those existed by just looking at the knife if someone else was using it. They become apparent after touching the Shuffle II for yourself. I love that. It feels like a spy’s tool in that regard. 

I also like the finish on the blade. Kershaw got their BlackWash finish really right here, and it works both on its own and as part of the whole knife. I like how when it’s closed the Shuffle II is just a small non-descript oval. 

When open, the knife feels solidly made and plenty sturdy. It’s decently sharp and has a wicked point to it. The thumb studs work exactly like they should and you can open the knife with one hand even if you’re a lefty (I’m assuming, because I’m a righty). 

For me, a pocket knife should always have one-handed opening as a baseline feature. Think about it, you’re probably already holding something in your hands, and you just dug through your pocket or ruck with your free hand. Why would you want to set something down when it’s already in your hand? Kershaw hits the mark here. 

Review: Can the inexpensive Kershaw Shuffle II make the cut?

What we don’t like about the Kershaw Shuffle II

The design contradictions are puzzling for me. I’m not sure who Kershaw made the Shuffle II for, but it wasn’t made for me. It’s small but has a design-heavy grip section with scalloping for fingers and a blade-integral finger guard. That’s in keeping with the tanto blade, which are made for stabbing specifically. What are you going to stab with a 2-inch blade though? You’re certainly not going to be piercing armor with this knife. 

Doing finger cutouts on a knife this small seems pointless. Cutouts remove grip area without adding anything but looks. They’re really not necessary on a knife this size. Cutouts aren’t my only gripe. The size of the grip, the comfort of the grip, and the overall size of the knife are also problems. No one is going to do much stabbing with this knife except office supplies. It’s great for stabbing cardboard and breaking down recycling, but doesn’t seem useful in the “EDC” jack-of-all-trades way that it’s marketed for. 

What I want in a pocket knife is a comfortable handle, small size, a blade with maximum utility, corrosion resistance, and a strong locking mechanism. While I see how some people would love the Kershaw Shuffle II, it’s not for me. The grip doesn’t make much sense. It’s a folding knife and yet looks like it’s meant to be wrapped in cord. 

The blade doesn’t make sense either. It’s a stabbing-specific shape which is so short at inches that the forward perpendicular edge makes up nearly half of the blade length. The slicing edge is only an inch and change. Pocket knives are for slicing and cutting, not for armor piercing, and this knife doesn’t really slice. What’s the purpose of the tanto point other than looks? I’m definitely a form follows function kind of guy, and this knife wasn’t designed for me. 

I have two more gripes, one minor, one not so minor. The first is that the knife has a liner lock. There’s nothing wrong with a well-designed liner or frame lock, I just don’t like them. I prefer lock backs and mechanical (button, lever, or switch) locks. I didn’t have any trouble with this liner lock slipping or bending, but I didn’t like that the lock is dead level with the liner and hard to get at if your nails are trimmed. I’d expect some knurling or serrations on the release and a little bit of extension so that it works well in the wet and cold. If this is an EDC knife, it’s likely to be the only knife on you, and it needs to work in every season.

My last gripe is the most serious. I don’t like the grip. It’s too small, has weird angles to it (almost karambit like), is pokey in the wrong places, and that damn pocket clip falls into exactly the wrong place on my hand. Keep in mind that I’m particular and have monster hands. The closed knife is smaller than my palm, and I don’t think that’s going to be a problem for everyone. 

Verdict

While the Kershaw Shuffle II looks interesting at first glance, it winds up getting in its own way. For $20, it’s worth trying if you have smaller hands and work with a lot of cardboard boxes. Otherwise, it’s too small for my hands and has an uncomfortable grip. The tanto point is plenty strong, but doesn’t have much utility when it comes to the pocketknife’s cutting and slicing tasks. There isn’t enough of a guard for real stabbing duty and the blade isn’t long enough to do serious damage. The breaking point for me is the blister after only a few minutes of use. With 90 percent of the world being right-handed, why would it ship from the factory with the clip set up for lefties? It’s clearly swappable, and yet here we are. 

Kershaw is known for excellent knives and I like a bunch of their current range as serious tools. This isn’t one of them. It’s more akin to a stocking stuffer or an add-on gift than something you’d want to get for its intended purpose. I was sad to write this review because I genuinely like how sturdy the knife is, that it has an unobtrusive bottle opener, and how it has a built-in dzus fastener tool. It stayed sharp through testing too, which impressed me for something so small and inexpensive. The facts are simple though: It’s a pocket knife, and as a pocket knife it’s not as useful as some other products out there. 

A FAQ about the Kershaw Shuffle II

More questions? Here’s Task & Purpose’s additional brief.

Q. How much does the Kershaw Shuffle II cost?

A. The Kershaw Shuffle II is about $20 shipped depending on where you are.

Q. Do Kershaw knives have a warranty? 

A. Yes, Kershaw offers a limited lifetime warranty on all of their knives. They’ll even sharpen your Kershaw blade for free if you send it to them. 

Q. How long is the blade of the Kershaw Shuffle II? 

A. The blade itself is only inches. When the Kershaw Shuffle II is closed, it’s about 4 inches long, and when open, the whole knife is inches long.

Q. Where is the Kershaw Shuffle II made?

A. The Kershaw Shuffle II was designed in the U.S. but manufactured in China. Kershaw still makes plenty of knives in the U.S., check here for a current list.

We’re here to be expert operators in everything How-To related. Use us, compliment us, tell us we’ve gone full FUBAR. Comment below and let’s talk! You can also shout at us on Twitter or Instagram.

Drew Shapiro served two enlistments in the Air Force riding around on Cs. Thanks to the GI Bill, he now rides a desk in the Pacific Northwest. When he&#;s not wearing a suit, Drew&#;s usually out getting his hands dirty. He tests gadgets the hard way so you don&#;t have to.

Task & Purpose and its partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links.

Sours: https://taskandpurpose.com/reviews/kershaw-shuffle-ii-review/

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Sours: https://www.flashaholics.co.uk/knives/kershaw/

Inch kershaw blade 4

The Very Best Kershaw Knives

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Kershaw Knives is a subsidiary of the Japanese KAI Group, one of the biggest knife manufacturers in existence.  KAI also owns the Zero Tolerance brand (which I liken to a Lexus to Kershaw’s Toyota) producing high end heavy duty knives, as well as Shun, a high end kitchen knife brand.  Pete Kershaw started out as a sales representative for Gerber in the 60’s, and started his own brand with his namesake in   Many of the blades were outsourced to KAI in Japan, who later acquired the brand and formed KAI USA in the ’s.

Best-Kershaw-Knives

Best Kershaw Knives: Summary

The brand has expanded continuously from there, to be one of the best known names in knives all over the world.  Make no mistake, there’s a massive spread of products in the Kershaw portfolio today, not even considering the piles of fantastic discontinued products.  Here the team at Knife Informer is proud to share our view on the best Kershaw knives for your money in the market today.

LEEK

Kershaw Leek

The Leekmay well be the most iconic knife Kershaw has ever produced, the knife most closely associated with the brand name.  It is to Kershaw what the is to Buck, the Spartan is to Victorinox, or what the is to Benchmade.  Why all the love?  The Leek has been around for a long time – in fact, it’s still in production seven years past its designer’s departure from Kershaw.  The Leek was designed by Ken Onion as part of a series of organically shaped knives named after onion derivatives (including the shallot, chive, and scallion) that excels as a lightweight EDC blade.  The thin profile (only ” thick!) makes the Leek a fantastically carryable knife, virtually disappearing in your pocket.  It also employs Kershaw’s Speed Safe technology, which uses a torsion spring hidden in between the handle and the liners to spring the blade open one you push it out the first 10% or so.  You can pick between a flipper tab or a thumb stud to pop the blade open, and the super light blade means the Leek has an incredibly snappy action.

The blade shape is what brings people back to the Leek: the 3” modified wharncliffe shape creates a needle-thin point that is a fantastic penetrator, and with ultra-thin ” blade stock and a slick hollow grind the Leek can slice with the best of them.  There’s a range of materials and prices from the standard aluminum handled liner lock with Sandvik 14C28N steel, up through the new carbon fiber handled model with CPM steel for a bit more.  There have been countless special variants of the Leek over the years including hard the to miss Rainbow models, and the composite steel blade model that combines a hard D2 cutting edge with a 14C28N spine bonded together with copper.  The Leek is a “knife guy” must have; if you haven’t owned one yet you will at some point. All Leeks are built in the USA and have build quality well above their reasonable price points, something that’s becoming less common with Kershaw these days.

SKYLINE

Kershaw Skyline

Another of Kershaw’s “greatest hits” that has been around for a long time but would cause a riot in the streets if it were ever discontinued, the Skylineis lightweight minimalist EDC perfection.  It’s similar in size to the Leek but trades a lot of the Onion designed knives’ features for a single piece G10 scale and backspacer, and a slick manual flipper action.  At only ounces the Skyline is a great summertime carry option, since the wide clip grips the pocket securely and the weight won’t drag your shorts down.

The minimalistic design may not raise any eyebrows but it’s the kind of clean and simple ergonomics that just work; the deep finger choil creates a strong grip when open, and the gentle curves of the handle fit most hands perfectly.  The ” blade is made of stonewashed Sandvik 14C28N steel like the Leek, with a slick hollow grind for good slicing abilities, and the drop point shape is the textbook definition of practical.

The Skyline is the type of knife that doesn’t blow your hair off with wild details or exotic materials, it just consistently works great for years and years.  There is also a blackwashed blade version and a Damascus variant, as well as a number of discontinued special editions (some retailer special editions like a Cabela’s Orange handle and Blade HQ blue and red handle, and a rare flat ground S30V blade with blue handle model) if you’re into variety, but the standard Skyline at under $50 is one of the best reasonably priced everyday carry knives.

KNOCKOUT

Kershaw Knockout

The Knockout is one of the coolest knives Kershaw has made in quite some time.  The name comes from where the aluminum handle is knocked out for the unique Sub-Frame lock, which functions as a frame lock (the lock bar is full width where it contacts the blade tang) but is thin in profile like a liner lock.  Additionally, the scales serve as an integrated lockbar stabilizer to prevent overtravel, giving you the best attributes of both a liner lock and a frame lock.  The aluminum handles are contoured on the show side, flat on the lock side, and the lock bar is black.  On the standard version (black handles with a stonewashed blade) it blends in, but there’s also a flat olive green version with a black blade that provides a nice contrast between the handle and the lock.

The blade is no slouch, either: made from Sandvik 14C28N, which strikes a perfect balance between edge retention and ease of sharpening, the Knockout’s blade measures ” and sports a very high hollow grind for slicing ability.  A mild drop point leaves plenty of belly for rolling cuts and a nice pointy tip, and Kershaw’s Speed Safe assisted opening mechanism pops the blade open from either a pair of thumb studs or a flipper. The Knockout is tapped for four-way clip mounting, and a deep carry clip buries it in your pocket.  It’s a lot of knife for $65 retail.

BLUR

Kershaw Blur

The Blurwas another one of Ken Onion’s designs for Kershaw during his stint as a designer there, and it’s a beloved knife by many Kershaw fans.  Like the Leek its claim to fame is packing a lot of cutting power into a small, slim pocketable package. With a ” blade in a ” long handle, the Blur hardly takes up any pocket real estate: the handle is less than a half-inch thick, and it tips the scales at only ounces.  Like a lot of Kershaw’s products there is a multitude of variants, but the standard Blur features aluminum handles with “Trac-Tek” inserts, and a stonewashed blade made from Sandvik 14C28N steel. A high hollow grind and a pronounced recurve boosts cutting performance but makes sharpening more of a chore. Tanto versions ditch the recurve, and some of them are available with a partially serrated edge.  There are also tiger stripe variants, acid stonewashed blades, and a variety of handle colors.

Of course there’s a slew of limited releases such as the blue/silver twill S30V version, a carbon fiber insert version, and desert tan handles with Elmaxsteel.  There are also some versions which use Carpenter CTS-BD1, a new steel designed to be a domestically sourced stainless steel similar in performance to Sandvik 14C28N.  All Blurs use Speed Safe assisted opening technology with a stepped thumb stud and kick open with serious authority.  A classic among modern tactical folding knives, a Blur variant is a must-have for any knife nut. Prices vary from $45 up to $85 depending on materials and finish.

If you like the Blur but want a flipper, the often-overlooked Camber offers a similar profile and features but with a Speed Safe-assisted flipper. Trac-Tek inserts and a deep carry clip offer a solid grip, and the flat ground 3” drop point blade is made from CPM S30V.  At under 4 ounces and just about a half inch thick it also makes a fantastic daily carry knife.

LINK

Kershaw Link

The Link’s internal model number is &#; they should have just called it the ‘Murica, because that’s the point of the Link: to bring back a high-quality affordable knife that’s made in America.  It’s certainly attainable, with retail prices starting at $33 and topping out at $  Considering it’s made in America that low price has to come from somewhere, and here it’s the steel: HC (high carbon) isn’t great on edge retention compared to more modern mid-range steels, but it does take a great edge easily.  It’s just the right size for EDC tasks at ” and like many of the best practical knives it’s a drop point with a high hollow grind and a swedge for a great balance of piercing and cutting.

You have choices with the Link: lower priced models have injection molded GFN scales over stainless liners, while nicer version feature machined aluminum handles for a couple bucks more and an additional ounces of weight.  There’s also a Damascus version that’s of questionable value, but that’s up to you.  All Links use Speed Safe assisted opening actuated by a flipper tab and have liner locks. There are plain edge, serrated, and tanto versions as well as a variety of colors and finishes – including a new anodized blue finish with an American flag silhouette for this year.  The Link offers a lot of knife for the money, made in America – a refreshing thing to see these days.  If you like the concept but want something a little sleeker, the new Dividend model offers the same options – GFN or Aluminum and HC both around $40, but with a 3” hollow ground Wharncliffe blade.

INDUCTION

Kershaw Induction

At the time of writing here the Induction is very close to its official release &#; we reviewed a sample and it&#;s fantastic.  Who doesn’t love Grant & Gavin Hawk?  The father and son design duo are responsible for some of the absolute coolest knives on the market.  The list is long – the fantastic Buck Marksman flipper with its innovative strap lock and crazy smooth pivot, the Kershaw E.T. folder that won most innovative American made design of the year at the Blade Show, the Chris Reeve Ti-Spine, the Kershaw R.A.M., the dirt-resistant M.U.D.D. folder that was produced originally by ZT and is now being made by Millit, and more.  Their bread and butter is finding better ways to build a mouse trap, including the new Deadlock OTF knife that has eliminated blade play in the open position – something no other OTF has been able to do so far.  The Induction is their latest production collaboration with Kershaw, and it brings some of the funky G&G Hawk flavor to a more budget conscious audience, with a $ MSRP and an expected street price around $40 when it becomes available to consumers.

The main feature of the induction is the Hawk Lock, which uses a toggle style slider on a spring to engage the tang when opened, similar to an Axis lock.  This lock was also used on the R.A.M. knife a few years ago to great acclaim.  The increased detent strength of the Hawk Lock versus an axis lock should help the Induction pull off the manual flipper it’s sporting, a rare occurrence for Kershaw these days. The black aluminum handle has GFN inserts for a solid grip, and the blade (8Cr13MoV) has a black and satin two tone finish that gives it a classy appearance.

BARGE

Kershaw Barge

How often do you come across a folding knife with the tip broken off?  It’s a shame, really.  A perfectly good knife cut short in the prime of its life due to gross misuse.  Nothing breaks my heart quite like a PM2 with the tip broken off, because someone doesn’t know how to use a knife correctly.  It’s part of the reason I don’t lend my knife to people I don’t trust – “can I use your knife?” usually has a silent “to pry open this paint can” at the end of it.

Well worry no more with the Kershaw Barge, a clever solution to an old problem: you want to use your knife as a pry bar?  How about we include a pry bar on your knife?  The Barge’s party trick is a stainless steel pry bar that protrudes from the end of the handle, integrated into the backspacer itself.  It looks like a pretty decent pry bar, too: chisel ground so it can slide into crates and lift them open.  The design is quite stout – the backspacer forms the spine of the pry bar and it reaches almost halfway up the spine of the handle.  Three torx screws secure the backspacer along the spine, and two oversized flathead screws anchor the pry bar at the end of the handle.  Perhaps overkill but creating strength for the pry bar while giving the whole frame of the knife rigidity is a good idea when it’s serving dual purposes.

At the other end of the knife, there’s a ” modified Wharncliffe blade made from 8Cr13MoV, with a high hollow grind and a shallow swedge on the top making a practical utility blade shape.  The downward pointing tip is great for packaging and boxes, making the barge a great knife for someone who works in a shop or in shipping.  The Barge has a framelock for the blade, and it’s a manual opener with a thumb stud.  No more broken tips, yours for around $

EMERSON CQC-6K

Kershaw Emerson CQC-6K

Kershaw produces a large number of Emersondesigned knives featuring Ernest’s patented wave opener mechanism – a protrusion from the spine of the blade that when drawn from the pocket pulls the knife open by itself – so picking just one is hard.  For us, the most practical is the CQC-6K.  The blade shape is a long, sleek clip point with a deep swedge and a half-height flat grind (on both sides, unlike Emerson produced knives which are almost all chisel ground) for a strong tip for penetrating cuts.  Blade steel isn’t anything to write home about, but the 8Cr14MoV blade has a dual surface finish – stonewashed on the primary bevel, satin finished on the flats – a rare bit of attention to detail, especially at the CQC-6K’s sub-$40 price point!

Action is by the Wave opener or the removable thumb disc, and a stout stainless frame lock supports the blade when open.  Like a “real” Emerson the CQC-6K is built with common hardware – the pivot is a large flathead screw, and the body screws are smaller Phillips screws.  In fact, the CQC series offers a lot of the Emerson experience at a fraction of the Emerson cost – with better fit and finish and a more practical V ground blade to boot.  Also worth considering is the newly introduced, extra-beefy CQC-4KXL with a ” spear point blade for under $40 – hard to go wrong.

Honorable Mentions: Launch series and Agile

There are so many great Kershaw products that it’s hard to narrow this list down, but two others deserve a mention in this article.

Kershaw Launch

The Launch series (numbered 1 through 7) is a set of American-made automatic knives that Kershaw has rolled out over the past few years to great critical acclaim.  While the market for automatics is limited due to legal reasons, the tide is gradually changing on this (considering it doesn’t make sense anyway) and the Launch knives are some of the best values in the auto market.  Almost all of them use aluminum handles and CPM steel, and all use a plunge lock that also serves as the blade release.  Launch 1  has a ” clip point blade, Launch 2 has a slender ” drop point, and Launch 3 has a broader ” drop point.  Launch 4 is designed as a California-legal(!) auto, with a blade length a touch under 2” that has been met with rave reviews.  Launch 5 is an Emerson design, with a ” clip point blade and solid ergonomics – a deep finger choil and a steep thumb ramp.  Launch 6 is a larger knife, a ” drop point blade with a stiletto style handle, and Launch 7 is a sleek ” clip point with an angular handle designed by Tim Galyean. They’re all extremely well built and offer top notch performance for $$, a fraction of what some other “high end” autos cost.

Kershaw Agile

The Agile is Kershaw’s production version of Hinderer’s new MP-1.  It has a ” stonewashed Sheepsfoot shaped blade made from 8Cr13MoV,  with Speed Safe assisted opening via a flipper or a thumb stud.  It’s a stainless steel framelock with some decorative machining on both sides.  That’s not what’s interesting, the backspacer is.  The MP-1 it’s based on stands for “modular platform” and the Agile shares this design: it comes with three different backspacers which can be changed out with one hex screw.  There’s one with a bottle opener (of course!), one with a lanyard hole, and one with a screwdriver.  The Hinderer MP-1 has a ” blade made from S35VN and titanium scales, but considering it’s $ more expensive the Agile seems like a pretty good deal.

Do you like our list?  Did we forget your favorite Kershaw knife? Send us an email!

Last updated on Sep 5th, by Matt Davidson

Sours: https://knifeinformer.com/the-very-best-kershaw-knives/
The 7 Best Kershaw Knives - Knife Banter Ep. 86

There’s more than one way to skin a cat, so the saying goes. However strange the idea of doing that may be, it should also be noted that there is also more than one type of knife with which to undertake that task. Even those just vaguely familiar with pocket knives will have noticed that blades come in every shape and size. That’s not just happenstance, and it surely isn’t the whimsy of imaginative bladesmiths. Knife blades are shaped differently for a reason. Below, you’ll find information on how to identify 12 of the most commonly-found shapes, and what they’re used for.

Drop-Point Blade

One of the most common blade shapes, the drop-point is characterized by a convex spine that curves down from the handle to the point. This creates an easily controlled point and a bigger belly for slicing. Drop points are great for general-purpose use and ideal for hunters.

Kershaw Leek

Kershaw Leek

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Designed by Ken Onion, the Leek is a simple EDC-friendly drop-point that includes an assisted opening for fast action.

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CRKT HVAS

CRKT HVAS

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The HVAS has a wide drop-point blade that's ideal for outdoor applications. It also uses CRKT's Field Strip tech, which lets you flip a lever and spin a wheel to take the entire knife apart for cleaning and maintenance.

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Benchmade Bugout

Benchmade Bugout

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Benchmade made the Bugout with camping and hiking in mind — it only weighs ounces — and gave it a drop-point blade to provide versatility in a range of situations.

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Sheepsfoot Blade

A blade shape characterized by a straight edge and a spine that curves down to meet it at the point. Sheepsfoot blades are designed for slicing while minimizing the potential for accidental piercing with the point. It was originally used to trim the hooves of sheep but comes in handy as a rescue tool today.

Gerber Sharkbelly

Gerber Sharkbelly

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The Sharkbelly is lightweight, affordable and practical with its broad, sheepsfoot-style point.

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Spyderco Roadie

Spyderco Roadie

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The Roadie's long, curvy sheepsfoot blade features a circular depression that acts as an alternative to a nail knick and makes it easy to open.

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CRKT Pilar II

CRKT Pilar II

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Named after the boat Ernest Hemingway used to track German U-boats in the Caribbean during World War II, this knife's wide sheepsfoot blade calls to mind a mini cleaver.

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Wharncliffe Blade

Like a sheepsfoot blade, this shape has a straight edge and a curved spine, but the curve extends gradually from the handle to the tip. The shape is similarly ideal for slicing while minimizing the possibility for an accidental puncture with the tip. These blades come in handy in similar situations.

Gerber Fastball

Gerber Fastball

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The Fastball's Wharncliffe blade is more angular than others, but the effect remains the same.

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Spyderco SwayBack

Spyderco SwayBack

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The curve of this Wharncliffe's spine continues all the way to the butt of this knife's handle, creating a subtle wavy appearance.

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Clip-Point Blade

The clip point is a common blade shape, characterized by a spine with a front section that appears to be clipped off. This cut-out area can either be straight or concave and results in a fine point that’s ideal for precision tasks.

Buck Knives Ranger

Buck Knives Ranger

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First released in the early s, Buck's Ranger has become a classic example of an American pocket knife. Its iconic form includes an obvious clip-point blade.

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Case Knives Mini Copperlock

Case Knives Mini Copperlock

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Case's Mini Copperlock has a pronounced clip that comes to a fine point. It's available with a variety of handles including bone and turquoise.

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Chris Reeve Knives Sebenza 31

Chris Reeve Knives Sebenza 31

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Made by Chris Reeve Knives in Idaho, the Sebenza is widely considered one of the best folding pocket knife designs of all time. It has a subtle clip-point blade.

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Normal Blade/Straight Back Blade

A blade with a straight spine and an edge that curves up to meet it at the tip. The long spine makes the blade heavy and sturdy for chopping and slicing, and users can get even more force by using a hand to apply pressure to the long unsharpened area.

CRKT CEO

CRKT CEO

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A group of industry professionals voted the CEO one of the best knives of Its straight back blade is long and slender and deploys on a ball-bearing pivot.

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The James Brand The County

The James Brand The County

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The James Brand reimagined the classic pocket knife with new materials, like the white G that makes this one's handle. The straight-back blade remains unchanged.

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Tanto Blade

Inspired by the short swords that were worn by samurai in feudal Japan, this blade shape replaces a curved belly for an angular edge transition that makes for a much stronger and prominent point. That durable tip and generally robust point make it good for piercing tough objects, but it isn’t as adept at slicing.

CRKT Minimalist Tanto

CRKT Minimalist Tanto

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CRKT makes this small fixed-blade knife with a variety of blade shapes, including an angular tanto. 

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Civivi Keen Nadder

Civivi Keen Nadder

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The tanto edge on this knife is closer to the handle than most, which makes for a sharp, low-angle point.

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Benchmade Tengu Flipper

Benchmade Tengu Flipper

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Designer Jared Oeser brought the tanto blade shape to an EDC-oriented flipper in the Tengu. 

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Gut Hook

Technically, a gut hook is more of a feature included on a blade than a blade shape itself. One usually appears as a small, sharpened hook-like curve that interrupts the spine as it slopes toward the point. These have one main use: field dressing wild game. The design of the hook allows hunters to cut through an animal’s skin without damaging what lies under it.

Camillus Parasite Gut Hook and Trimmer Set

Camillus Parasite Gut Hook and Trimmer Set

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This hunting knife set includes a large blade with a gut hook and a smaller one for trimming.

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Gerber Gator Fixed

Gerber Gator Fixed

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Knowing that this gut hook knife will primarily be used outside, Gerber gave it a durable and grippy rubberized handle.

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Buck Knives Buck Zipper

Buck Knives Buck Zipper

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This high-end hunting knife from Buck has a  inch HC stainless steel gut hook blade and a handle made of walnut for a classic look.

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Hawkbill Blade/Talon

Hawkbill knives, sometimes referred to as talons, are characterized by a spine and edge that curve down in the same direction to create a downward-facing point. This shape allows the blade to cut efficiently when pulled back in the direction of the handle, so most of their use comes through utilitarian tasks like cutting carpet and linoleum and pruning vegetation.

Opinel No. 10 Pruning Folding Knife

Opinel No. 10 Pruning Folding Knife

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Opinel accentuated the curve on this knife's blade to make it the perfect tool for harvesting, pruning, weeding and other garden or orchard tasks.

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Spyderco Tasman Salt 2

Spyderco Tasman Salt 2

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Spyderco combined the utility of a curved hawkbill blade with percent corrosion resistance to create a lightweight knife ideal for those who work in or around the water.

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CRKT Provoke

CRKT Provoke

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Needle-Point Blade

The needle point is a symmetrical blade with two edges that taper sharply from handle to point. This design increases the knife’s ability to pierce and penetrate, and as such, most needle points are used for fighting and stabbing. The needle point is also notably more fragile than similar blades, most notably spear points, due to its narrow shape. Many needle-point knives are daggers and classified as weapons, which makes them illegal in many places.

Kizer Söze

Kizer Söze

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This dagger's blade deploys with a flipper tab and is wholly encased by the handle when not in use. Its fine-pointed blade is made of premium CPM-S35VN stainless steel.

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Microtech Ultratech D/A OTF

Microtech Ultratech D/A OTF

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The Ultratech is an OTF knife, which stands for "out the front" and means that the blade shoots out of the front of the handle when a sliding switch is engaged. This model also includes a glass breaker.

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Benchmade Autocrat

Benchmade Autocrat

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Benchmade's Autocrat is among the best examples of a modern needle-point/dagger knife. Like the Ultratech, it's an OTF knife, meaning the blade comes straight out of the handle at the sliding of a switch.

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Spear-Point Blade

Spear-point blades are symmetrical with a point that’s in line with the center of the knife. This shape is stronger than the similar needle-point and is similarly adept at thrusting. A spear point can have either one or two sharp edges. The design is commonly used in daggers and throwing knives, which are classified as illegal weapons in many places, though it's definitely not true of all knives that use the shape.

Kershaw Launch 4

Kershaw Launch 4

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This short-bladed spear-point knife looks like a dagger, but only has one sharpened edge.

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WE Knife Co. Banter

WE Knife Co. Banter

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The Banter is another spear-point knife that demonstrates how this blade shape doesn't always have to result in a dagger or weapon — the Banter is perfect as an EDC tool.

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Drop + Laconico Keen

Drop + Laconico Keen

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Again, not all spear-point knives wind up as daggers. This one is all EDC with its inch premium S35VN blade and titanium frame-lock handle.

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Spey-Point Blade

A spey point blade has a mostly flat edge until close to the tip when it curves up to the point. The spine is also mostly flat, but like the edge, angles down close to the tip of the knife to create the point. The result is a knife that has a short belly and broad tip, which prevents accidental piercing.

These blades were originally used on farms to neuter animals but now are common on classic trapper blades, usually in multi-blade patterns, and are often favored by hunters.

Schrade Old Timer

Schrade Old Timer

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The Old Timer is a classic old-school hunting pocket knife with two blades, one spey point and another clip point. 

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Buck Knives Stockman

Buck Knives Stockman

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The spey-point blade on Buck's Stockman is accompanied by a clip-point blade and a sheepsfoot opposite.

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Case Knives Bone Trapper

Case Knives Bone Trapper

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This knife comes with a clip-point blade in addition to the spey, and a handsome bone handle.

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Trailing-Point Blade

In a trailing point blade, the spine curves upward to create an elevated point that’s typically higher than the handle. This shape creates an oversized belly that makes these knives good for slicing, skinning and filleting.

Spyderco Bow River

Spyderco Bow River

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Knifemaker Phil Wilson used a trailing point design on this fixed blade, lending a fine point to an otherwise large survival knife.

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Benchmade Meatcrafter

Benchmade Meatcrafter

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Trailing point blades often provide their wielder with more cutting control, which is one reason why Benchmade used the shape for its unique hunting-kitchen crossover knife.

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GiantMouse Ace Clyde

GiantMouse Ace Clyde

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The Clyde's trailing-point blade isn't as curvy as most and at just three inches long, it works as a tool for everyday tasks. 

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Sours: https://www.gearpatrol.com/outdoors/a/knife-blade-shapes-guide/

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Kershaw Ultra-Tek Blade Sharpener (); 4-Inch Sharpening Stee

  • CIDASIA

    Culture: Industries and Diversity in Asia

  • CUSP

    The Culture-Subjectivity-Psyche programme

  • HEIRA

    Higher Education Innovation and Research Applications

  • LSCP

    Law Society Culture Programme

Info

On August 15, , HEIRA ceases to exist under that name.

As part of its interest in working towards changing the higher education sector in India, the Centre for the Study of Culture and Society (CSCS), established in , set up a Higher Education Cell in in collaboration with the Sir Ratan Tata Trust. The ground for this had been prepared when CSCS faculty members Tejaswini Niranjana and Mrinalini Sebastian had researched the history and present situation of Indian higher education to write up a Strategy Paper for the Trust.

The Paper listed the possible directions in which independent funding could help address the different kinds of crises in the sector – to do with inflexible institutional structures, outdated and non-relevant curricula, poorly trained teachers, and lack of new resources for students.

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CSCS Digital Innovations Fund (CDIF)

CIS: see: CXYDM 2Pcs Roller Brush for V7 V8 V10 V11 Vacuum Cleaner Parts R
CSDS: Open Media Library see: https://openmedialibrary.com/#about
CAMP:  Bombay Wiki  
Orient Blackswan Series: Culture and Democracy at the Millennial Turn.
Breaking the Silo: Integrated Science Education in India (ed. Tejaswini Niranjana, Anup Dhar and K. Sridhar)  ESTAMICO Toddler Boys Girls Cozy Plush Slippers Cute Cartoon Emb
Conversations with Upendra Baxi (Kakarala Sitharamam, Arvind Narrain, Lawrence Liang and Sruti Chaganti) 
Culture-Critique-Clinic (CCC) (Anup Dhar/Ashish Rajadhyaksha) 
The Difficulty of Being Heathen (A.P. Ashwin Kumar, Vivek Dhareshwar)
Digital Pasts/Futures (Nishant Shah, Nafis Hasan, Ashish Rajadhyaksha)
CSCS Special Projects (Faculty): project to research the history of the Film & Television Institution of India and the National Film Archive of India (NFAI).
Institutional Collaborations:  Indiancine.ma see: http://www.indiancine.ma, Saath-Saath see GOTOTOP , and Good Reliability F75Z1ABC Spare Tire Hoi, Inter-Asia Cultural StudiesSummer School: Jadavpur University, Kolkata see  http://culturalstudies.asia/summer-school/summer-school/

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Sours: https://www.agaxturviagens.com.br/content/55b0f7abd-4ec8-aac0c6e43aed5c


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