How to pass token in postman

How to pass token in postman DEFAULT

Introduction

When I discover a new REST API, I usually like to explore it before I start to code against it. I do so by poking around to get a feeling of what it has to offer and usually start off by skimming through the documentation & examining the Swagger UI (if available). Then, at some point, I switch over to my tool of choice, which is .

Now for OAuth 2.0 protected APIs it is rather time-consuming and inefficient having to request a token from the Azure AD endpoint manually, store it somewhere, and then setting the authorization header by pasting in the token.

We are going to automate this steps with postman's pre-request script feature.

"But, hey wait...", you say, "...then, why don't we just use the built-in OAuth 2.0 authorization mechanism that Postman provides out of the box?"

Because the current postman version (v8.3.1 as of writing) doesn't provide an automatic token refresh mechanism. And we'd like to ensure, that we are always calling with a fresh and valid token.

So long story short. This post demonstrates how the retrieval of an access token can be automated with Postman before sending an HTTP request.

For the sake of this demonstration, we are going to call the Microsoft Graph API with a system identity (see OAuth 2.0 client credential flow).

Please note, that Microsoft provides a web application called Graph Explorer that provides a more comfortable way to explore its API then demonstrated in this article here.

High-Level Steps

  1. Create an Azure app registration
  2. Prepare Postman
  3. Call API

1. Create Azure App Registration

  1. Create a new app registration, leave the redirect URI empty and name it e.g. . Make a note of the application id, after clicking .

2. Then create a client secret and copy it somewhere.

3. Grant your application some permissions of type I took here for demo purposes. Make sure the permission type is not as we are going to call with a system identity, remeber? 😉

4. Grant admin consent and make sure the status indicates the green check-sign

2. Prepare Postman

  1. Create a collection and give it a descriptive name
  2. Set the section of your collection to and the token field to the variable reference

3. Now this is what you came for. Paste the following JavaScript into the section of your collection.

Postman's JavaScript API exposes most of its functionality via the object. It provides a method that we are going to use to request and store an access token before making our final HTTP call to Microsoft's Graph API.

4. Create the following variables in the corresponding section of your collection. This is where the script expects its input parameters (pm.collectionVariables.get())

Now that everything is in place, let's give it a shot 🤩

3. Call API

  1. Create a new request underneath your collection and make sure the section is set to .
In the example I am requesting user details by specifying an email address. You won't be able to use in this scenario as we are calling with a system identity and not a user identity!

2. After clicking the send button you should get presented with an HTTP 200 and some user details.

Have a close look at the section of the screenshot from above. You should see two requests there, where the first one was issued by our pre-request script coming from the collection.

If you feel curious you might want to further examine the access token in use and paste it into a token debugger like https://jwt.ms.

Conclusion

As we have seen, Postman provides some nice scripting features that makes a developers life easier.

The nice thing about the proposed solution is that it allows us to add (almost) any Microsoft Graph calls to the collection without having to worry about authorization - as long as your app has the necessary app permissions.

Beautiful, isn't it 😎 That is it for today. In case you have any questions or feedback, please leave them in the comment field bellow or drop me a message.

Happy Hacking, Matthias 😀

Further reading

Microsoft Graph documentation

Microsoft Graph provides a unified programmability model that you can use to build apps for organizations and consumers that interact with the data of millions of users. You can use the Microsoft Graph REST APIs to access data in Azure Active Directory, Office 365 services, Enterprise Mobility and S…

Microsoft DocsCelesteDG

Azure REST API reference documentation

Reference documentation for Azure REST APIs including their supported operations, request URI parameters and request bodies, responses, and object definitions.

Microsoft DocsBryanLa

Using variables

Scripting in Postman

Writing pre-request scripts

Graph Explorer - Microsoft Graph

The Microsoft Graph explorer is a tool that lets you make requests and see responses against the Microsoft Graph

Sours: https://www.azureblue.io/automate-token-retrieval-with-postman/

Related Guides

To authenticate to the Box API the Postman collection will use an Access Token to identify you, the User to the API. Access tokens expire after 1 hour and therefore need to be refreshed every hour.

If you set up your own Box App in step 2 of the Postman Quick Start guide then your Box environment in Postman should include a valid and . These client credentials and the can be used to create a new value for the .

To refresh the access token, select the Refresh access token API call within the Authorization folder of the Postman collection.

Next, click the Send button to request a new .

At the end of this API call, your environment should have a new and value, and you should be able to make any of the other API calls.

Refresh tokens are only valid once and need to be used within 60 days. If used within 60 days, a new one is created together with a new access token and the 60 day period starts again.

A refresh token expires if not used within 60 days, after which a new refresh token and access token need to be requested by going through the Quick Start guide again.

The Postman collection can automatically detect an expired value and request a new one by using the . By default this feature is enabled but it can be turned off by setting the Postman environment variable to .

To set this value, click the edit button in the top right of your Box Postman environment variables.

Find the row in the table for the variable and set the Current Value to . Next, click Update to save your changes.

From now on, any time you make any API call the Postman collection will check if your has expired and try to refresh it automatically before making your desired API call.

In some cases you might need to re-authenticate your Postman collection by going through the Quick Start guide again. A common reason for this is because you haven't used the Postman collection in over 60 days and your has expired.

To re-authenticate, first remove your old Box Postman environment. To do so, click the little gear icon in the top right and select your environment from the list.

Select Delete to delete the environment. Then, restart the Postman Quick Start guide again from the start.

When re-importing the Box Postman Collection for a second time the Postman app might ask you to import the new collection as a copy or replace the old one. We recommend importing it as a copy in order to preserve any custom configuration you might have made to any of the APIs.

Sours: https://developer.box.com/guides/tooling/postman/refresh/
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These instructions will guide you through using the Postman application with Aprimo.

Before connecting to Aprimo with Postman, or other application, you will need to set up an integration user and client registration in Aprimo. Please follow steps 1 and 2 of the REST API article on Authorization for services and daemons.

Postman is a third party tool that helps you easily create HTTP Requests to execute them and see the HTTP Responses. If you are having trouble with the REST API, it is a good idea to use a tool like Postman to ensure your request is working properly, as other development tools make it difficult to see the actual HTTP Request and Response, making troubleshooting more difficult. Postman is not provided by Aprimo and Aprimo does not provide any support for Postman, it is simply a common developer tool used to work with REST APIs. 

Postman is a Google Chrome application, however you do not need to sign in to Google or anywhere to download or use Postman. Anywhere you are prompted to sign in you can ignore it and close the login prompt.

Step 1: Install Postman

  1. Download and install Postman from https://www.getpostman.com/
  2. Start the Postman app

Step 2: Request an Aprimo Access Token

Before making requests to Aprimo you need to request an access token. To do so, please follow steps 3 and 4 of the REST API article on Authorization for services and daemons.

Step 3: Save the Request Configuration in Postman

Tip: It’s best to save API configurations that you will use more than once. In Postman you may save the API call to a collection. so that you can use it again later.

  1. In Postman on the top bar rename the configuration to something meaningful (e.g. “Aprimo – Get Access Token)
  2. On the top right drop down the Save button and select Save As
  3. Create a collection if you don’t have one yet
  4. Name the collection something meaningful (e.g. “Aprimo REST API”)
  5. Save the request configuration to that collection
  6. It’s recommended you do this for any REST API operations that you might need to do more than once

Step 4: Request a Record

  1. In Postman select GET and enter a URL like this: https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/{ object name }/{ record ID }
    1. Example: To get user ID 18404 you would enter https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/users/18404
  2. Header: X-Access-Token: [the accessToken value from step 2]
  3. Header: Content-Type: application/json
  4. Click Send and in the body of the response you should receive back the record in JSON format.
  5. Save the request per the instructions in step 3 using “Save As”. This will allow you to reuse the same request configuration later by simply updating the access token.

Step 5: Create a New Record

  1. In Postman select POST and enter a URL like this: https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/{ object name }
    1. Example: To create a new user you would enter https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/users
  2. Header: X-Access-Token: [the accessToken value from step 2]
  3. Header: Content-Type: application/json
  4. Enter the request body with the record information in JSON format.
    1. Tip: If you are only testing, it might be easiest to copy the information from the response body returned in step 4 into the request body, remove the record ID, and then update fields as desired.
  5. Click Send and in the body of the response you should receive back the new record in JSON format.
  6. Save the request per the instructions in step 3 using “Save As”. This will allow you to reuse the same request configuration later by simply updating the access token.

Step 6: Update a Record

Tip: Generally speaking PUT will overwrite all fields in the record. In this case it’s a good idea to query the record first and update fields as needed.

  1. In Postman select PUT and enter a URL like this: https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/{ object name }/{ record ID }
    1. Example: To update user ID 18404 you would enter https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/users/18404
  2. Header: X-Access-Token: [the accessToken value from step 2]
  3. Header: Content-Type: application/json
  4. Enter the request body with the record information in JSON format.
    1. Tip: If you are only testing, it might be easiest to copy the information from the response body returned in step 4 into the request body and then update fields as desired.
  5. Click Send and in the body of the response you should receive back the updated record in JSON format.
  6. Save the request per the instructions in step 3 using “Save As”. This will allow you to reuse the same request configuration later by simply updating the access token.

Step 7: Search for a Record

  1. Select POST and enter a URL like this: https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/{ object name }/search
    1. Tip: For searching multiple records add optional paging parameters to the end
      1. Example: To query the second set of 250 users sorted ascending order by user ID you would enter https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/users/search?limit=250&sortField=userId&sortAscending=true&offset=250
  2. Header: X-Access-Token: [the accessToken value from step 2]
  3. Header: Content-Type: application/json
  4. Enter the request body with the search information in JSON format. Please refer to the REST API article on Searching for examples of what to include in the POST body
  5. Click Send and in the body of the response you should receive back the record in JSON format.
  6. Save the request per the instructions in step 3 using “Save As”. This will allow you to reuse the same request configuration later by simply updating the access token.

Step 8: Get Object Metadata

Tip: Object REST API metadata can be very helpful during development when you need to get object and field information, including field picklist options, whether the field is required or read only, field type, field max length, extended attribute metadata, etc

  1. Select GET and enter a URL like this: https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/metadata/{ object name in singular form }
    1. e.g. to get user object metadata you would enter https://[your Aprimo domain]/api/metadata/user
  2. Header: X-Access-Token: [the accessToken value from step 2]
  3. Header: Content-Type: application/json
  4. Click Send and in the body of the response you should receive back the record in JSON format.
  5. Save the request per the instructions in step 3 using “Save As”. This will allow you to reuse the same request configuration later by simply updating the access token.
Sours: https://developers.aprimo.com/marketing-operations/rest-api/using-postman/

Generate an Access Token Using Postman

  • 2 minutes to read

Summary

The full process your application will need to implement for 3-legged tokens is described in Authorization Code Flow. The steps outlined below describe the process for using Postman to generate OAuth tokens for testing.

Step 1 - Application

Go to the LinkedIn Developer Portal, select the app you'll be using, click the "Auth" tab, and locate your Client ID and Client Secret. Please note these values for use later during this process.

LinkedIn Auth Tab

Step 2 - Auth Settings

From the same "Auth" tab, scroll to the bottom of the page. Under "OAuth 2.0 Settings", add the Postman callback URL as your Redirect URL.

Note

Postman uses the term "Callback URL"
LinkedIn uses the term "Redirect URL" Postman Callback URL

Step 3 - Create a Call

Open a new tab in Postman, click the "Authorization" tab and select "OAuth 2.0":

Authorization Type

Step 4 - Get a New Token

Scroll down the authorization page and click "Get New Access Token".

Get New Access Token

Enter the Authorization parameters, then click "Get new access token":

  • Grant Type: Authorization Code
  • Callback (Redirect) URL:
    • Select "Authorize using browser" to have Postman generate a callback from the users browser
  • Auth URL:
  • Access Token URL:
  • Client ID: {Copy this from the "Auth" tab in the developer portal}
  • Client Secret: {Copy this from the "Auth" tab in the developer portal}
  • Scope:
  • Client Authentication: Send client credentials in body

Set Authorization Parameters

Step 6 - Identity Authentication

Postman will take you to the LinkedIn authorization page, where you may be prompted to log into LinkedIn. Click "Allow" to authorize the request.

Authorize Scopes

Step 7 - Use Token

Postman will then display your access token. Use this for testing. For convenience, it's advisable to configure the token in a Postman environment variable to use in all your requests to the LinkedIn API. You can read about configuring this in Postman's documentation on variables

Access Token

Step 8 - Testing

Finally, create a new tab in Postman to test your token. Fill out the following fields:

  • Set the request URL as
  • Under the request "Headers" tab, add the header key with value . If you set your token in a Postman environment variable, the value should be where would be replaced by the name you set for your variable. In the example below, the variable is named
    • Optional: Many LinkedIn API calls will require a request header with

Make First API Call

Assuming your token was authorized for the product scopes listed in Step 6, your call should be successful and return some basic profile fields from your LinkedIn profile.

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/linkedin/shared/authentication/generate-an-access-token

To pass postman how token in

Use Postman for API Requests

Install Postman

Get Postman from postman.com. There is an online version you can use, but we recommend installing the desktop app.

Get client credentials

To work with the Brightcove APIs, you will need client credentials for the account and API(s) you wish to use. Get you client credentials in Studio by following the directions in Managing API Authentication Credentials. In the steps below, we will be making CMS API requests using Postman, so your credentials should have at least the following permissions:

You can add as many additional permissions as you like to get credentials that will be usable for a wider range of API requests. Also note that you get credentials that will work for multiple accounts if you like.

You can use this online app if you prefer. If you do, you need to specify at least permissions.

Get the OpenAPI spec

Although not required, you can greatly simplify the setup of Postman is to import the OpenAPI specification for the API you want to use. You can do this for any of the Brightcove platform APIs, but for this tutorial, we'll use the CMS API.

To get the OpenAPI spec, just go to the CMS API Reference and click the Download button:

Download OpenAPI Spec

The downloaded file will be called openapi.yaml

Import the OpenAPI Spec

The next step is to launch the Postman app, and then import the OpenAPI spec that you downloaded:

Set Up a Collection

Now the API spec is imported, we can generate a collection of requests.

  1. Click APIs.
  2. If you have other APIs, select Brightcove CMS API Reference
  3. Click Generate Collection:
    Generate Collection
  4. In the dialog that appears enter a name for the collection like "Brightcove CMS API".
  5. Select Test the API under "How do you want to use this API?"
  6. Click Generate Collection:
    Collection Settings
  7. Open the Collections and click on your new CMS API collection:
  8. Expand the collection and click on the videos folder and select the Get Videos request.
    CMS API Collection
    Request Details

Notice that Postman has set up most of the details for you from the API reference, including the request itself and the params that can be added to it. In addition, you can click the Documentation icon on the right to show the documenation for the request from the API reference:

Show Documentation
Request Documentation

You will still need to supply some information of your own, however, including the account id and authentication information. You can do this on a request by request basis, but the better way is to create an environment for the request, where you can store commonly used information as variables. We will do that in the next section.

Create an environment

The steps below will walk you through setting up an environment for the CMS API requests

  1. Click Environments, and then Create Environment:
    Create Environment
  2. Give the environment a name like "Brightcove APIs" (you will be able to use this environment for other Brightcove APIs as well, adding new variables to it as necessary).
  3. Click the text "Add a new variable", type in , and then click in the INITIAL VALUE field and enter your Video Cloud account id:
    Enter Variable
  4. Repeat the previous step to add additional variables:
    VariableInitial Value
    (your client id - see Get Client Credentials above)
    (your client secret - see Get Client Credentials above)
  5. Click Save to save the environment:
    Save Environment
  6. Go back to your Brightcove CMS API collection and select the environment you created from the environment selector:
    Environment Selector

Environment variables can be referenced by enclosing them in double curly braces - example: {{client_id}}. Postman helps you with auto-completion when you type "{{...". You can try this by going back to the Get Videos request and start typing "{{a" in the Value field for the Path Variable :

Variable Autocompletion

Enable requests

Now that you have the environment set up, you can use the variables to test requests. We will look at the Get Videos request first.

  1. If you did not already do so, enter {{account_id}} for the value of the Path Variable.
  2. Click the Authorization tab for the request:
    Auth Tab
  3. Under Configuration Options, change the Grant Type to Client-Credentials:
    Auth Grant Type
  4. Enter the following variables from your environment in the appropriate fields:
    • Access Token URL:
    • Client ID:
    • Client Secret:
  5. Click Get New Access Token:
    Authorization Setup
  6. When the authorization is complete, you can click Proceed or wait for the token to appear. Then click Use Token:
    Manage Access Tokens

Note that Brightcove access tokens expire after five minutes. Depending on what you are doing and how quickly, you may be able to use the same access token several times. When it expires, the CMS API will return an unauthorized error:

(The exact form of the message may vary for other APIs, but it will be similar.)

When this happens, simply return to the Authorization tab and request a new token. You should also delete any expired tokens to avoid confusion, as they are of no further value.

Delete Expired Tokens

Make requests

You are now ready to make a Get Videos request.

  1. Go back to the Params tab and uncheck all the Query Params (you can use them, of course, and change the values, but we will just use the default values for this first test).
  2. Click Send.
  3. You should see JSON code appear in the response area below (an array of video metadata objects):
    Response Data
  4. Now we will try a write request (Create Video). Select that request in the collection:
    Create Video Request
  5. You will again need to enter for the Account ID Path Variable. You will NOT need repeat the steps in the previous section to set up authorization, because Postman transfers these settings to other requests in the collection. However, you will still need to generate a new access token.
  6. Next, go to the Body tab, where you will see a sample request body from the API reference:
    Sample Request Body
  7. This JSON is editable. The only required field for a Create Video request is the , so change that value to "Test Video" and remove the rest of the JSON so that your request body is:
  8. Now click send (getting a new access token if you need one), and you should see the metadata object for the new video appear in the response area.

Related topics

Sours: https://apis.support.brightcove.com/general/use-postman-api-requests.html
Part-1 How to generate API bearer Token using Postman

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