02 ford explorer

02 ford explorer DEFAULT

Ford Explorer

Acceleration Acceleration Acceleration tests are conducted on a smooth, flat pavement straightaway at the track. Time, speed, and distance measurements are taken with a precise GPS-based device that’s hooked to a data-logging computer.

0 to 60 mph 0 to 60 mph (sec.) The time in seconds that a vehicle takes to reach 60 mph from a standstill with the engine idling.

Transmission Transmission Transmission performance is determined by shifting smoothness, response, shifter action, and clutch actuation for manual transmissions.

Braking Braking The braking rating is a composite of wet and dry stopping distances and pedal feel. Braking distance is from 60 mph, with no wheels locked.

Emergency Handling Emergency Handling Several factors go into the rating, including the avoidance maneuver speed and confidence, as well as how the vehicle behaves when pushed to its limit.

Sours: https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/ford/explorer/2002/overview/

Be Smart, Check in Advance. CARFAX — Your Vehicle History.

CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-2002-Ford-Explorer_z7528
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If the architects of quantum theory physics -- Planck, Einstein, Bohr, de Broglie, Schrodinger, Pauli, and Heisenberg -- were alive today, this septet of centenarians could all carpool down to the home for pensioner physicists in comfort in one 2002 Ford Explorer. The quiet cabin and smooth ride would provide a pleasant environment in which to share a few laughs about the old corpuscular theory of light and Al's hairdo. And these guys could probably tell you, via complex equations, about the quantum leap forward that the '02 Explorer represents. We'll try to do it in words.

The quantum mechanics involved in this transformation have their roots in a spanking-new chassis, which remains separate from the body but no longer bears any resemblance to that of a Ranger pickup truck. The new frame is nearly flat from end to end, with no dramatic kinks or kickups to clear big live axles, thanks to Ford's upgrade to unequal-length control arms at each corner. This flatter frame rides about two inches lower at either end to line up with car bumpers for improved crash friendliness. Furthermore, the rails of this new frame are fully boxed from front to rear -- a much stiffer design than that of the old "C-channel" rails. Computer modeling was employed to design the frame and its many boxed and hydroformed crossmembers with the ultimate goal of minimizing the relative motion of key points where the body and suspension pieces bolt up.

Similar computing power was used to develop the body to make it as rigid as the frame to prevent vibration modes that can arise from dramatic differences in body and frame rigidity. The result? Compared with the current models, the new Explorer and its Mercury Mountaineer sibling are 3.5 times as stiff in torsion despite an increase in both width and wheelbase of about two inches. By modern model-upgrade standards, that's a leap of several quanta.

To this superstructure is bolted a superb unequal-length-control-arm rear suspension with a toe-control link and a coil-over shock on each side. The cast-aluminum upper and boxed-stamped-steel lower control arms are long enough to provide a respectable eight inches of wheel travel. This design also helps lower the cargo floor by an incredible seven inches, making a third row of seats possible. The total system weighs a bit more than did the old live axle on leaf springs, but unsprung weight drops from 400 to 95 pounds. This reduces axle hop for improved acceleration and braking traction. Lateral compliance is also greatly reduced, enhancing cornering accuracy and improving dynamic stability -- especially when towing a trailer.

Up front, a switch from torsion bar springs to coil-over shocks allows for greater flexibility in ride tuning. Torsion bars prevented the lower control arms from absorbing any longitudinal impact harshness, and they were harder to tune for ride-height management under heavy loads. New aluminum knuckles and a wider track with longer control arms permit a tighter turning circle (36.7-foot diameter, down 16 inches) and an 85 percent reduction in scrub radius (this improves steering effort and feel).

The transformation in ride refinement and handling wrought by these upgrades is nothing short of astonishing. We drove old and new Explorers back-to-back over many of the toughest surfaces Ford uses to develop new cars at its Arizona proving grounds near Lake Havasu City. One rocky road traversed at 40 mph required a great deal of steering correction to maintain a straight heading in the old Explorer, but the new one motored straight through with minimal bucking and snorting. On a gymkhana course, the new one more willingly went where it was pointed with greater steering linearity. And during an 18-mile ride through a desert dry wash, the '02 model felt sure-footed and composed, although rough stretches got the seats moving around audibly and excited the doors in their frames a bit, signaling that this is still a body-on-frame vehicle.

In case you're wondering why the separate frame was retained, Ford answers that this arrangement is more robust for towing (maximum capacity is up from 5800 to 7300 pounds), and it's better at bearing the suspension loads generated by the company's rigorous off-road truck duty cycle.

And although the Explorer is not optimized as all Jeeps are for rock hopping across the Rubicon Trail, the approach and departure angles are improved from 28 and 19 degrees to 31 and 24.5 degrees -- that's with or without the trailer hitch, which now nestles up inside the rear bumper. Ground clearance is also up, from 8.5 to 9.2 inches. The Control Trac transfer case is functionally unchanged (switchable among automatic, high, and low modes), but the computer that decides when to engage drive to the front axle in auto mode now reacts much more quickly. This provides better control on slippery surfaces or in deep sand and snow. (Mountaineers continue with a hands-free, viscous-coupled all-wheel-drive system that splits torque 35/65 front to rear.)

Large disc brakes at each corner round out the chassis picture, improving pedal feel and fade resistance dramatically. The ABS logic now changes in four-wheel-drive low mode to allow more wheel slip, which shortens stopping distances at low speeds on loose surfaces by causing dirt to pile up in front of the tires. Our on-road stopping distance of 201 feet from 70 mph was about the same as in our last five-door Explorer.

This can probably best be explained by the 200-pound weight penalty borne by the new truck despite the aluminum suspension bits, fenders, and hood; the magnesium cross-car beam and transfer-case housing; and myriad other weight-loss measures. The new Explorer is simply bigger. Although it's no longer, it offers four more cubic feet of space in front, nearly two more in the middle seat, and a 40-cubic-foot roomy optional third-row seat (standard at Mercury) that is easier to climb into and more comfortable than the one in a larger Chevy Tahoe. (It also folds flat into the floor.) There's even a bit more cargo room.

That extra weight stymied our loaded Eddie Bauer four-wheel-drive model in the stoplight grand prix. The base V-6 engine boasts refinement and efficiency improvements along with 10 more pound-feet of torque (to 250), but it makes do with the same 210 horsepower. Sixty mph saunters by in a leisurely 10.7 seconds en route to a 17.9-second quarter-mile run at 77 mph. That's well off the 9.3- and 17.1-second pace set by a comparable '97 V-6 model.

To fix this, we highly recommend leaping $695 up the options chart to the SOHC 4.6-liter V-8. Its 240 hp and 280 pound-feet of torque are much better matched to the tasks presented by a loaded Explorer. Acceleration improves to 8.9 seconds from 0 to 60, and to 16.8 seconds at 81 mph in the quarter. That's about a half-second quicker than our last pushrod V-8 Explorer. (Oh, and -- wink, wink -- the Cobra's DOHC 4.6 fits in the new engine bay -- hello, SVT?!)

Pulling our heads out from under the dirty parts for a moment, we find the new Explorer to be a much more user-friendly vehicle. The doors are taller, the step-in height is lower, and the seats are properly contoured and made of higher-density, more supportive foam. Interior sealing has been improved to prevent dust intrusion. The pedals adjust, and the steering wheel tilts and telescopes, meaning that everyone from Barney to a Smurf should be able to get comfy.

Curtain side airbags will be optional, offering protection to the front-seat and middle-row-outboard occupants in side impacts and eventually, when a new slower-venting bag phases in, in rollover accidents. A stability-control system will also arrive later in the model year as Ford attempts a quantum leap past the whole Firestone debacle.

Final pricing of the entire range is not yet available, but prices are not expected to inflate anywhere near as much as the added refinement and content would suggest, which should make the entry-level Explorer XLS and XLT extremely competitive. Top-of-the-line Eddie Bauer and Limited models like our $36,915 test car stray into Acura MDX territory where the competition is tougher. The seven-passenger seating option is expected to lure more folks away from minivans, but we caution anyone who expects to fill all those seats for vacation trips to either opt for two-wheel drive or the V-8 to ensure sufficient power for vacation hill-climbs and passing.

As for us? We're drawn to the sleeker, more-sophisticated-looking Mountaineer -- one of the first designs to be penned under Ford styling boss J Mays's direction. The two trucks are much better differentiated now, and the Mercury is tuned a bit more toward on-road comfort and handling than the Ford.

But regardless of the badging, it doesn't take a physics degree to appreciate the vast improvement that Ford has wrought here.

JOHN PHILLIPS
It rides better. It steers and tracks better. It even carries a Low-Emission Vehicle sticker, which I applaud. But in traffic, the Explorer is still saddled with a kind of slow-witted ponderousness endemic to trucks -- and that's because, well, it's still a truck. I was hoping Ford might have followed a branch in the SUV evolutionary path that Acura recently took. That is, building the thing atop a minivan platform. If it drives like a good minivan, then it's closer to driving like a sedan, which ought really to be the goal. Sure, with its third row the Explorer seats five adults and two infants. Ever notice that a Windstar does, too?

CSABA CSERE
Discussions of suspensions usually involve handling and ride. The volume consumed by the various parts rarely comes up, but in this new Explorer, space efficiency is the paramount benefit provided by the new independent rear suspension. By mounting the differential on the chassis rather than on the live rear axle, the IRS eliminates the clearance needed by the live axle's bouncing pumpkin. As a result, the Explorer's designers were able to lower the rear load floor by seven inches -- freeing up enough space to accommodate a spacious third-row seat without adding any length to the body. The improved ride and handling are just icing on the cake.

TONY SWAN
The new Explorer is clearly an improvement: more refined, more comfortable, more competent, more safety features -- all of which seem to make it even better suited to its role as America's most popular new-age station wagon. However, the improvements are diluted by the things the design team failed to do. In particular, Ford failed to put the Explorer on a diet; quite the contrary. And the increased mass is instantly discernible on a stretch of back road. This vehicle would be much better if that new independent rear suspension supported a unit body of 300 or 400 fewer pounds. The Explorer team had a chance to do something really noteworthy here, but instead, they played it safe.

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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15138855/2002-ford-explorer-eddie-bauer-4x4-road-test/

2002 Ford Explorer III 4.6 V8 (242 Hp)

General informationBrandFordModel ExplorerGeneration Explorer IIIModification (Engine) 4.6 V8 (242 Hp) Start of production 2002 year End of production 2005 year Powertrain Architecture Internal Combustion engine Body typeOff-road vehicle Seats 5 Doors 5 Performance specsFuel consumption (economy) - urban 16.8 l/100 km 14 US mpg
16.81 UK mpg
5.95 km/lFuel consumption (economy) - extra urban12.4 l/100 km 18.97 US mpg
22.78 UK mpg
8.06 km/lFuel Type Petrol (Gasoline) Maximum speed 185 km/h 114.95 mphWeight-to-power ratio 8.1 kg/Hp, 123.2 Hp/tonne Weight-to-torque ratio 5.2 kg/Nm, 193.4 Nm/tonne Engine specsPower 242 Hp @ 4750 rpm. Power per litre 52.6 Hp/l Torque 380 Nm @ 4000 rpm. 280.27 lb.-ft. @ 4000 rpm.Engine location Front, Longitudinal Engine displacement 4601 cm3280.77 cu. in.Number of cylinders 8 Position of cylinders V-engine Cylinder Bore 90.2 mm 3.55 in.Piston Stroke 90 mm 3.54 in.Compression ratio 9.4 Fuel System Multi-point indirect injection Engine aspiration Naturally aspirated engine Valvetrain DOHC Space, Volume and weightsKerb Weight 1965 kg 4332.08 lbs.Trunk (boot) space - minimum 1320 l 46.62 cu. ft.Trunk (boot) space - maximum 2490 l 87.93 cu. ft.Fuel tank capacity 85 l 22.45 US gal | 18.7 UK galDimensionsLength 4810 mm 189.37 in.Width 1830 mm 72.05 in.Height 1830 mm 72.05 in.Wheelbase 2890 mm 113.78 in.Front track 1545 mm 60.83 in.Rear (Back) track 1555 mm 61.22 in.Drivetrain, brakes and suspension specsDrive wheel All wheel drive (4x4) Number of Gears (manual transmission) 5 Front suspension Double wishbone Rear suspension Helical spring Front brakesVentilated discs Rear brakesDisc Assisting systemsABS (Anti-lock braking system)
Steering type Steering rack and pinion Power steering Hydraulic Steering Tires size235/70 R16
Sours: https://www.auto-data.net/en/ford-explorer-iii-4.6-v8-242hp-7865

Ford explorer 02

2002 Ford Explorer

2002 Ford Explorer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:16

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.2 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Manual 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:17

combined

city/highway

MPG

5.9 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 2WD 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:15

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.7 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 2WD FFV 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:16

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.2 gals/ 100 miles

E85

Combined MPG:12

combined

city/highway

MPG

8.3 gal/100mi

2002 Ford Explorer Sport 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
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Combined MPG:17

combined

city/highway

MPG

5.9 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer Sport 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Manual 5-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

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Combined MPG:17

combined

city/highway

MPG

5.9 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer USPS ElectricElectricity

Not Available

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Combined MPG:39

combined

city/highway

MPGe

87 kWh/100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:15

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.7 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Manual 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:16

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.2 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 4WD 8 cyl, 4.6 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:14

combined

city/highway

MPG

7.1 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer 4WD FFV 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:16

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.2 gals/ 100 miles

E85

Combined MPG:11

combined

city/highway

MPG

9.1 gal/100mi

2002 Ford Explorer Sport 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:15

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.7 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer Sport 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Manual 5-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:15

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.7 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:16

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.2 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac 2WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Manual 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:17

combined

city/highway

MPG

5.9 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Automatic 5-spd Regular GasolineView Estimates
How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:15

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.7 gals/ 100 miles

2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac 4WD 6 cyl, 4.0 L, Manual 5-spd Regular Gasoline

Not Available

How can I share my MPG?Compare

Combined MPG:16

combined

city/highway

MPG

6.2 gals/ 100 miles

Sours: https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/bymodel/2002_ford_explorer.shtml
2002 Ford Explorer 4.0l-p1400 DPFE Circuit Low Voltage, EGR Flow test

2002 Ford Explorer

Retail Price

$24,585 - $34,510MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Engine4.0L V-6
MPG17 City / 21 Hwy
Seating5 Passengers
Transmission5-spd man w/OD
Power210 @ 5100 rpm
Drivetrainrear-wheel
Smart Buy Program is powered by powered by TrueCar®
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