Dnd 5e devil

Dnd 5e devil DEFAULT

D&D 5th Edition

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Traits

Devil's Sight: Magical Darkness doesn't impede the devil's Darkvision.

Magic Resistance: The devil has advantage on Saving Throws against Spells and other magical Effects.

Actions

Multiattack: The devil makes three melee attacks: two with its fork and one with its tail. It can use Hurl Flame in place of any melee Attack.

Fork: Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (2d8 + 6) piercing damage.

Tail: Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (1d8 + 6) piercing damage. If the target is a creature other than an Undead or a Construct, it must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution saving throw or lose 10 (3d6) Hit Points at the start of each of its turns due to an Infernal wound. Each time the devil hits the wounded target with this Attack, the damage dealt by the wound increases by 10 (3d6). Any creature can take an action to Stanch the wound with a successful DC 12 Wisdom (Medicine) check. The wound also closes if the target receives magical Healing.

Hurl Flame: Ranged Spell Attack: +7 to hit, range 150 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (4d6) fire damage. If the target is a flammable object that isn't being worn or carried, it also catches fire.

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Condition Immunities

Languages

Infernal, Telepathy 120 Ft.

Resistances

Cold; Bludgeoning, Piercing, And Slashing From Nonmagical Attacks That Aren't Silvered

Roll 0

Roll 1

Roll 2

Saving Throws

Str +10, Dex +7, Wis +7, Cha +7

Senses

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Sours: https://roll20.net/compendium/dnd5e/Horned%20Devil

Dungeons & Dragons: 10 Types of Devils (& How To Use Them Properly)

Dungeons & Dragons, the role-playing tabletop game, has become even more popular than ever since its 1974 release. Many credit the release of the 5th edition, currently 5E, even though some players still prefer older versions.

Like Owlbears, Gelatinous Cubes, and others, Devils are monsters in the D&D universe. Unlike Demons, Devils are lawful, if evil, creatures, and while they are dangerous for newbies to mess with, advanced players may find the Devils they encounter useful for various purposes.

RELATED: D&D: Fan-Created Combat Wheelchair Establishes Baseline Inclusivity

With information gleaned from discussion of the D&D source book, here are some ways players can take advantage of the awesome powers of Devils. In most cases, players will encounter a Devil representative rather than the Archdevil themselves. But – beware, because Devil’s contracts always come with dangerous consequences if both sides aren’t fulfilled. After all, their primary purpose is to collect souls for the Archdevils they serve.

10 Formidable Pit Fiends Can Be Used In A Couple Of Ways

Pit Fiends come second in the Devil hierarchy, just after the Archdevils. Players could make a deal with a Pit Fiend with the intention of using as a weapon. Their natural weaponry includes claws, wings, tails, a mace, and a poisonous, contagious bite.

They can burn anyone who gets too close to them, and cast a Fear Aura. Another pro tip: since they are always joined by many lemures in battle, the space around them can count as difficult terrain that causes damage to any hostile intruders.

9 It’s Wise To Be Leery Of Ice Devils

Ice Devils have the ability to manipulate the cold and use it as a weapon, and they are brilliant as tacticians. A deal with an Ice Devil may involve him helping players to vanquish powerful enemies by in exchange for the player’s help in defeating his own enemies.

A disgraced ice Devil is always hoping to one day regain his spot in the hierarchy of hell, and will use players to get there. Ice Devils are also very intelligent, so his contracts tend to include stringent clauses.

8 Gain Power In Battle From Zariel

Zariel was an angel who loved battle too much, and fell from grace. Now, she is a large fiend with magical weapons, innate spellcasting ability, and many more talents and natural gifts. Zariel rules the first layer of the Nine Hells as an Archdevil, and if there's one thing she loves, it's collecting the souls of warriors.

Players can make a deal with Zariel for great strength in combat. She is very clever, however, so any contracts should be scoured for hidden clauses.

7 Use Chaos To Combat Devil Commanders

Facing a single Devil – let alone an army – is a scary proposition. It helps, though, to know how they will operate. A Devil commander can issue an order that makes weaker Devils act in smart and strategic ways, or get a group of legionnaires to gang up on a single target.

However, the Devil commander of the legion must wait until the next turn to issue another order, so changes on the fly are impossible. It’s an issue of timing that advanced players can use to their advantage.

6 The Erinyes Can Warn You Of Upcoming Danger

Erinyes have evolved to become powerful female warriors, like the Furies of ancient Greek mythology they are named after. They are heavily armed and often hunt down those who have broken their oaths with Archdevils or Admodeus himself.

RELATED: D&D: Mythic Odysseys of Theros – How to Build a Triton

They may be fallen angels, and some still have a soft spot for players, so she may stop and warn them of dangers that lie ahead. Erinyes also use a long-lasting poison that can come in handy during encounters with bosses.

5 Mammon Can Give Players Riches

Mortals who crave riches and the power that goes along with them are known to make deals with Mammon. Sometimes called Minauros, he's also lord of Minauros, a realm of perpetual rain, and he may be the wealthiest being in the world.

It’s true that players can get rich with Mammon, but the contract should be taken note of with great care. Anyone who can’t repay their debt to Mammon when it comes due st in for horrendous consequences.

4 Summon A Devil To The Material Plane

A gate spell conjures a portal into a different plane. If a player speaks the name of a specific creature while casting the spell, the portal should open and draw them onto your side of the portal. Players can conjure up Devils in this way. Once the Devil escapes the Nine Hells and enters the material plane, the player will get a brief glimpse of the Devil’s home realm.

If the Devil serves Zariel, for example, the player may be able to see right into the Blood War on the banks of the River Styx.

3 Glasya Will Find Contractual Loopholes

Glasya is the daughter of Asmodeus, and a natural lawyer. She will examine Devil contracts with a fine tooth comb, trying to find ways of allowing humans to avoid paying the price of their mortal soul. She can also help mortals with avoiding the laws of their own Material Plane.

RELATED: 10 Things You Didn’t (Want To) Know About D&D Owlbears

She respects mortals who go up against the odds. But – in return, her own contracts are ironclad, and anyone who benefits from her wisdom by avoiding a Devil contract will find themselves inextricably embroiled in hers.

2 Bone Devils Offer A Straightforward Contract

Tall, gaunt bone Devils aren't dumb, but let's say they aren't intellectual either. They also have a strong respect for the strict rule of the law, and hate chaos. They can likewise be trusted in contracts to stick exactly to the terms, without cleverly worded hidden clauses.

The bone Devil likes to manipulate local rulers into causing instability, all with a view to advancing his own goals. What he can offer is information on key issues like enemy troops and other threats.

1 Levistus Can Be Your Last Hope

Levistus is the Rogue Archdevil, imprisoned inside a glacier even as he rules Stygia, the fifth layer of the Nine Hells. He rules through his cage of ice via avatars and telepathy, and remains defiant. As part of his curse by Asmosdeus, he’s obliged to help anyone to calls out to him.

He’s a good bet for anyone who’s about to succumb to a hopeless situation – or is about to die. He can get players a reprieve from death, or whatever dire situation they find themselves in, but players will have to promise something valuable in return.

NEXT: D&D: How to Incorporate One-Shots Into Extended Campaigns

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About The Author
Anya Wassenberg (124 Articles Published)

I'm a long time freelance writer, blogger, and editor with a specialty in entertainment, arts, culture and travel. I'm also a longstanding science fiction/fantasy/comic book fan. My work has been cited and referenced in numerous books, magazines, and academic publications all over the world. I teach creative writing courses at the college level and in my other identity, I'm also a singer-songwriter known as Anya Mia. You can check out me and my work on my website at AnyaWassenberg.ca, and follow me on Twitter at @AnyaArtsMaven

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I might be just about done with this! I'll probably touch it up as I work on the Guide to Hell.

This guide is a broad overview of devils in Dungeons & Dragons. "Devil" is a term that encompasses a lot of different creatures that are organized into a hierarchy.

First, we'll go over 5th edition devils. After that, we'll look at general devil traits and weird little things from other editions that might add to your game. Once that is done, there is a list of every devil type that I can find.

Purpose: The idea here is to mine as much material as possible so that you can use them as fodder for your campaign.

I used a ton of sources on this. I think that if you are looking for a supplement to give yourself more devil-related things to use in your campaign, I suggest you go with one of these:
Faces of the fiends is very overlooked, I think, because of the name. Whenever I see the title I immediately think it is a book full of NPCs. It's not. It is a treatise on devils, demons and yugoloths. It is really good.

Devils and Demons: It is important to understand that devils and demons are two entirely different types of creatures. They are enemies. It goes like this:
  • Devils are lawful and they live in Hell.
  • Demons are chaotic and they live in the Abyss.
It is Chaos vs. Law. The eternal war between these fiends is known as the Blood War.

Devils in 5th Edition D&D


Can a Devil Die?If a devil dies outside of the Nine Hells, it instantly returns to its home layer, reforming at full strength. Devils only die if they are killed in the Nine Hells.

What Devils Do: Here's how devils think and operate:
  • They conquer, enslave and oppress.
  • They obey orders even when they dislike their superiors.
  • They love to strike bargains with mortals in exchange for their soul.
  • "Only divine intervention can release a soul after a devil has claimed it."
What is a Baatezu?Baatezu is another name for devil. "Baator" is another name for the Nine Hells. In 2nd edition, devils became known as "baatezu" due to pressure from groups that thought that D&D was tied to satanism and the occult. They didn't even call Asmodeus by name until the very end day of 2nd edition.

The 5e Devil Hierarchy

This 2nd edition diagram shows possible promotions
Most devils in 5th edition have these traits:
  • Resistant to cold and nonmagic weapons that are not silvered.
  • Immune to fire and poison.
  • Magic Resistance: Advantage on saves vs. spells.
  • Devil's Sight: Magical darkness doesn't impede their darkvision.
  • Telepathy 120 feet.
  • They speak and read the Infernal language.
Pit Fiend

Because devils are all about order, they have a strict caste system. Devils can be "promoted" or "demoted" from one type to another. They're all gunning to become an archdevil who rules one of the nine layers of Hell.

Here's the 5e version of the hierarchy:

1. Lemure: The lowest form of devil. Can only be truly killed with a blessed weapon or holy water. Can't speak, but babbles.

Lesser Devils
2. Imp: Spies, willing servants of mortals.
3. Spined Devil: Messengers and spies for greater devils and archdevils, flying artillery.
4. Bearded Devil: Violent shock troops.
5. Barbed Devil: Guards who are very alert.
6. Chain Devil: Sadistic jailers and torturers.
7. Bone Devil: Cruel taskmaster of devils beneath them.

Greater Devils
8. Horned Devil: Lazy and belligerent flying infantry.
9. Erinyes: Beautiful, fierce and disciplined winged warriors.
10. Ice Devil: Commanders of the armies of the nine hells.
11. Pit Fiend: Lords of other devils, generals of armies,  direct servants of Archdukes.

Archdevils
12. Duke or Duchess: Unique devils that serve or scheme against archdevils.
13. Archduke and Archdutchess: Rules one of the nine layers of Hell.

The Rulers of Hell
Mephistopheles, Lord of Cainia

While I wrote this guide, I also wrote guides to Hell and the archdevils. Here is a quick overview of both:

There are 9 layers of Hell, each with its own ruler:
  1. Avernus, ruled by Zariel
  2. Dis, ruled by Dispater
  3. Minauros, ruled by Mammon
  4. Phlegethos, ruled by Belial and Fierna
  5. Stygia, ruled by Levistus
  6. Malbolge, ruled by Glasya
  7. Maladomini, ruled by Baalzebul
  8. Cania, ruled by Mephistopheles
  9. Nessus, ruled by Asmodeus
Asmodeus is the ruler of all devils.

Tiamat: In 5th edition, Tiamat the evil dragon god is trapped in Hell (I wrote a Guide to Tiamat here). The adventure Rise of Tiamat is all about the Cult of the Dragon performing a ritual to free Tiamat and bring her to the Forgotten Realms.
  1. In 1st edition, Tiamat actually ruled Avernus, the first layer of Hell.
  2. In 2nd edition, the heroes can actually go to her lair in Hell in the adventure Fires of Dis. 
  3. In 3rd edition, Tiamat has a massive army called the Red Hand of Doom that tries to overtake the Elsir Vale (a generic fantasy realm). 
  4. In 4th edition, she lives in the astral plane (called the "astral sea" in 4e) on a floating island called Tytherion. There is a huge adventure path called Scales of War which involves Tiamat killing Bahamut, the god of good dragons. In the end of the whole thing, the group can actually kill her, which may have sent her back to Hell where we find her in 5th edition.
Things to Know About Devils

A narzugon and a spinagon

There are tons of great ideas from older editions that you might want to mine for your game.

The Pact Primeval: Described in the Fiendish Codex 2, this is an agreement signed by lawful deities that established the system of punishing the damned. Asmodeus exploits the loopholes and uses them to his advantage. There are 3 copies of this contract. There is one in Hell, one in Mechanus and one in Mount Celestia. These contracts are heavily protected and radiate immense power.

Language of the Devils: Devils speak and write a language called Infernal. It is a rigorous language with rigid grammar. In Infernal, there is only one way to construct any given statement.

The alphabet uses 33 geometric glyphs. It's a good language for book keeping but it is bad for poetry. There are four forms of Infernal. Speaking a higher tongue of Infernal than permitted will result in the offending devil being punished for insolence. Each form is more complex than the last:
  • Least Infernal: This is very basic and is used for simple commands and insults.
  • Lesser Infernal: This is the form most humanoids learn. Those who peak this can understand the higher forms, but aren't fluent in them.
  • Greater Infernal: This showy version has patterns that emerge over the course of a conversation.
  • Mabrahoring (High Infernal): This is an archaic form of the language spoken mostly by archdevils. Only unique devils can learn and speak this language. Comprehend languages can decipher it.
Promotion: Archdevils can transform a devil into a higher form. This is often done as a reward for service. The promoted devil keeps their memories from their previous form. Only 1 in 1,000 lemures get promoted.

Being Promoted: When a devil is selected to be promoted, they go through a painful ceremony that lasts up to a day. Their old form breaks apart and the new form emerges like a parasite via the ovatorium (described in "Biology" below). They retain full memories of their devil history.

Promotion Expunges Chaos: Devils purge themselves of chaotic behavior and thoughts as they get promoted up the ranks. The highest-ranking devils, ice devils and pit fiends, are thoroughly lawful and rigid.

Pain and Promotion: Being promoted is not fun. It is said that the faster you got promoted, the more painful your transformation. Every time a devil achieves a new rank, they experience a different kind of pain.

Here are some examples:
  • Thrown into the pit of flame where your impurities are burned away.
  • Your skin/hide is shorn off, revealing your new form underneath.
  • Masters of torture cut and reshape your body into the new form.
  • Spined devils go through an undefined process called the Ritual of Spined Descent.
The Ministry of Promotion: This ministry is overseen by Zaebo of the Dark Eight. They record and scrutinize each promotion. There are stringent requirements to be met, and superiors making bad promotions are punished by being placed on the front lines in the blood war.

Things to know:
  • None may rise until another falls - a spot must open up in order to be promoted.
  • Generally, incompetents don't rise in power. Backstabbers do. 
  • Speedy promotions are discouraged.
  • Devils don't reward the good - they punish the bad. Exemplary service means no mistakes.
  • There is a lot of intrigue. Lots of doctoring reports to keep a certain devil down.
Demotion: The punishment for failure or disobedience is demotion. If demoted to a lemure, the devil loses memories of their former status.

Barbed Devil (Hamatula)
Where Did Devils Come From?Each edition of D&D changes the story a little. To me, the most interesting one is from 2nd edition. That one claims that there were creatures in Hell before the devils. These creatures "disappeared."

It goes like this. Soul larvae of Hell are evil souls not touched by devils in life. If left alone, they become nupperibos, not lemures. If the nupperibos are left alone, they will become.. something else. Apparently they'd become creatures called Ancient Baatorians, eventually. Nupperibos and amnizu are the only two types of devils who actually get promoted 'downward.' That's because they're not being promoted - they're being transformed from Baatorian to Devil.

There are some clues that the Ancient Baatorians are deep underground and that they may have created the devil race. In Faces of the Fiends it is shown that devil skeletons are clearly made rather than grown naturally.

Devils are Ambitious: All devils are ambitious. They hate defeat and humiliation. They pursue vengeance with tremendous vigor.

Devils Don't Have to Eat: Devils derive sustenance from the energy of tortured souls. They can eat if they want. They enjoy the flesh of angels, demons, and whole soul larvae.

Eating Lesser Devils: If you eat a nupperibo or lemure, they are gone forever. If their essence is ingested by another, it is erased from existence. This is why demons devour them on the battlefield.

Devils Need Oxygen: Devils do need oxygen (according to the fiendish codex II). Not much, but some.

Reproduction: Every edition says something different. 2nd edition says that males are fertile, but females are not. 3rd Edition directly contradicts this, saying that only an erinyes can become pregnant. The more humanlike a devil is, the stronger the desire for sexual gratification.

Tieflings: Tieflings do nothave a devil parent. Tieflings are descendants of devils, never more than 1/4th devil.

Pit Fiend and Ice Devil
Intoxication and Alcohol: Alcohol doesn't intoxicate them. In Hell, devils drink:
  • Gughalaki: A sweet, ropy, hallucinogenic liquid made from fiendish centipede glands. 
  • Infernal Wine: Distilled from the fire grapes of Phlegethos.
  • Screecher: A dulling acrid tipple.
Biology: Inside the bodies of devils are organs like the ones humans have, plus more. Their bodies contain the ovatorium - mushy tissue littered with dozens of tiny sacs. In each sac is finger-sized fetal versions of different devil types. When promoted, one of those little devil fetuses grows, explodes out of the body and becomes the new form of the devil.

Here are other anatomical differences:
  • The adrenal gland is three times the size of a human adrenal gland, making devils aggressive and quick.
  • Their warped muscles give them fantastic endurance.
  • Their blood is black, but it changes colors in different atmospheres.
  • Their interior organs are covered with scales - natural armor
  • Their bones are slightly metallic and seem like they've been carved/constructed.
Erinyes with an infernal contract
Gender: 1/3rd of the devil population is male, 1/3rd is female, and 1/3rd are genderless. Fun facts about devil gender:
  • Lemures and nupperibos are genderless. 
  • Erinyes are always female but can assume a male form.
  • Pit fiends get to pick their gender, if any. They can even change their mind and switch, but they will be punished for disturbing the order. They must spend three days in the pit of flame if they change their gender.
Getting Old: Devils don't physically age. That said, in 1st edition some devils are specifically described a being middle-aged and have receding hairlines.

Sleep: Some books say that devils don't sleep, some say they do. Those that say that devils sleep explain that they sleep one hour out of every nine. Devils have violent, evil dreams that reinforce lawful behavior. They may join in a devilish collective unconscious when slumbering.

Devils Dying: There is a specific name for when you die and re utterly obliterated, unable to come back in any way: True Death. Devils fear this more than anything. Different editions handle this differently. In every edition, a devil experiences True Death when it is slain in Hell.

When slain somewhere else, the devil appears back in hell. In some editions, the slain devil appears in Hell instantaneously. In others, they reform over the course of 99 years.

1st edition has specific rules on this:
  • If a greater devil has its material form destroyed, it becomes a lemure, is tortured for 9 years and then it is returned to its former station. 
  • If a duke is destroyed, it is bound to hell for 10 years. 
In 2nd edition: 
  • If a devil chooses of their own free will to leave Hell and dies, it experiences True Death. 
  • When slain outside of Hell, lesser devils are reborn as nupperibos. They do not retain their memories, but regain them when promoted above lemure status.
  • Almost every devil has a recovery plan in case they end up as a nupperibo due to being slain. A lower-ranking lieutenant has instructions to find them and promote them.

Your Choice: Deciding what happens when a devil is slain makes a huge difference, so you should definitely think carefully about it. This is an easy way to get around the problem of using a recurring villain who always escapes in some contrived manner.

Devils With Special Powers: Some devils were part of a failed experiment that gave them one of two abilities. When they use a power, they "drain their life essence." These devils look utterly emaciated:
  • Illusionist Devils: Some devils can cast illusion spells at the cost of draining their life essence.
  • Blind Devils: They can fire magic missiles from their eyes every round, but they take the damage, too. A lesser fiend has to guide them about, using telepathy to direct their attacks. If a blind devil is promoted, it is no longer blind and can no longer fire magic missiles.
Devil True Names: Every devil above a lemure has a true name. If you learn it, you can summon that devil and bind them into service. Usually this requires a ritual/sacrifice and possibly a devil talisman.

Devil Talisman: An ancient relic that has the truename of a devil on it. Usually, it was bathed in the blood of someone the creator loved when it was crafted. 1st edition has specific rules about how a talisman affects different ranks of devil:
  • You can use a devil talisman to force a devil to serve you for nine days.
  • Greater devils serve for nine hours
  • Archdevils will do one single service for you.
A 3e erinyes being summoned
Economy: Money doesn't do much for devils. They trade for gems, soul larvae, knowledge, magic and favors.

Devils Want Souls: Devils want souls. They don't want to obliterate them, they want to torture them. The torment of souls nourishes devils. The more tortured souls an archdevil has, the more powerful the archdevil is. Devils lure souls to Hell by corrupting mortals either through guile or through a devil pact, described below.

Some Souls Are More Valuable: In the 4e Book of Vile Darkness, it says: "The brighter a soul shines, the more energy the Hells can squeeze from it." So, the more powerful or good the soul is, the more energy devils can draw from it.

Devil Law: Legally, a superior devil can always attack a lesser-ranked devil. Devils can do anything violent to other devils that are nine stations lower or more. Any other assault is illegal, as injuring a devil is considered to be an act of "damaging the property" of an archduke.

Devils can file for a license of lawful combat, where they can fight in the duelist's chasm in Stygia.

The Ministry of Mortal Relations: They govern all contact with mortals. Devils who are summoned by a mortal spellcaster must report to them when it is over. The Ministry will want all information that the devil gleaned while in captivity.

Devil Pacts: In the Fiendish Codex, there are two types of devil pacts:
  • The Pact Certain: This is an explicit contract where a mortal affirms their allegiance to a lord of hell in exchange for whatever benefits are offered. This can be voided if the signature is given under duress. It must be given freely. Those who sign one a contract to free a soul from Hell do not count as being under duress.
  • The Pact Insidious: This delivers its promises in stages. The signer will need to do a series of tasks, each nudging them closer to damnation.
The other way to get out of a pact is to prove that the devil did not provide the benefits promised.

I would very highly recommended checking out the way that pathfinder does infernal contracts (scroll down a bit on this page here). I think they are really good.

Where Devils Come From: When you die and go to Hell you appear on the Shelves of Despond, clammy rocks on a half-mile path of the River Styx. If a devil corrupted you, you bear the brand of an archdevil on your soul.

In general, almost everyone appearing in hell has a brand that indicates that they are the property of one of the nine archdevil rulers. Bearded devils scour the river for these soul shells, haul them into cages and transport them to a torture station.

The torture stations are run by amnizu. The amnizu record the new arrivals in meticulous logbooks and files. The soul shells are then stripped of their individuality through torture and their magical energy flows to the archduke of the layer.

The shells are thrown in a maggot pit and transform into lemures, the lowest form of devil.

No Memories of Mortal Life: Devils never retain the memories from their mortal lives.

Some Devils Become Good: Many devils are fallen angels of good. The reverse also occurs. Devils who turn good are known as The Risen. Hell's Ministry of Morale sends agents after them.

Types of Devils

You can go through this list of devils and pick out the ones that you would like to use in your campaign. You will see that many of the devils have two names, the second of which is in parenthesis. I put the more descriptive name first, as it is easier to remember.
Abishai

Abishai: These are draconic devils that appear in five different colors, each stronger than the last. They served Tiamat at one time. In the Fiendish Codex II, it says that some devils are promoted from lemure (the lowest form of devil) to abishai. Abishai progress from one color to the next. They start as white abishai, then black, green, blue and finally, red. Reds who are promoted become chain devils.

Advespa: These devils are in the 3rd edition Monster Manual 2. They are female, wasplike devils. Most of them are entirely black. They often serve amnizus.

Assassin Devil (Dogai)

Assassin Devil (Dogai): Assassin devils are gray-skinned fiends who can turn into shadows and summon fog to obscure their location. Outcasts among their own kind, assassin devils spy on and assassinate devils in the courts of pit fiends and archdevils. Many of them report directly to Asmodeus, feeding him the secrets of their patrons.

Ayeperabo Swarm

Ayperabos Swarm: This swarm of tiny flying devils can burrow into the flesh of a creature and take control of the creature's body. Devils and other fiends consider ayperabos to be a delicacy. Because of this, these swarms despise other devils and will attack them.

Barbed Devil (Hamatula)

Barbed Devil (Hamatula): These devils are guardians of places and individuals. They rarely leave Hell. In fact, they can not pass from one layer of Hell to another on their own. They have a gland behind their ears that produces a powerful hallucinogen. It is used to torment and interrogate prisoners.
Bearded Devil (Barbazu)

Bearded Devils (barbazu): These devils are shock troops of Hell. They often lead armies of lemures into battle. They love fighting, utilizing glaives and their disease-carrying beards (which sometimes are made of snake) as weapons. Most of them never survive long enough to get promoted to the status of bone devil.

Bone Devil (osyluth)
Bone Devil (osyluth): First off, the above drawing by Baxa is my favorite depiction of a bone devil by far. If you look at other artistic depictions, none really feels right except this one. Bone Devils are skeletal demons with scorpion stingers. Some of them wield hooked polearms that they can use to grab creatures with. They are the "police" of the Nine Hells, authorized to send anyone breaking the law into the pit of flame where they are tormented for 101 days.

There are 1,000 bone devils in existence. All of them are promoted to barbed devil every 100 years. A devil who kills a bone devil is demoted to a "marked" lemure. Marked lemures are never allowed to advance and they are hated by other devils.
  • The Ring of Centrum: Once per century, 100 bone devils meet with the Dark Eight to choose which ice devil will be advanced to pit fiend status. 
Wizards of the Coast actually previewed the 5e bone devil as part of the Monster Manual release. You can see everything there is to know right here.
Brazen Devil

Brazen Devil: Encased in hellforged brass armor, brazen devils dwell in Nessus and serve as loyal guards. War devils get promoted to brazen devils, bone devils or barbed devils. They are cut apart and fitted into hellforged armor that can't be removed and will be attached to them for the rest of their existence. They wield hellfire halberds and can teleport.

Burning Devil

Burning Devil: These devils are made of flame and they despise the living. Mortals who live a life of extreme torment such as corrupt priests, necromancers and mass murderers often become burning devils.

There are two special types of burning devils:
  • Blackfire Burning Devils: These devils burn with necrotic flames due to their dark mortal lives.
  • Whitefire Burning Devils: Their fire is actually made of radiant energy, possibly because in their mortal life they were a holy servant.

Chain Devil (kyton)

Chain Devil (Kyton): Chain devils are literally covered in chains that sprout hooks and blades. They use their control of chains in their work as jailers and torturers. They primarily live in the city of Jangling Hiter on Malbolge, a city made entirely of chains.

Gorechain Devil
Gorechain Devil: I'm listing these as a variant of a chain devil because these creatures are basically ogre-sized kytons with chains that have a mind of their own. Gorechain devils are jailers and bounty hunters. They can use their chains to make a person their "puppet," controlling their movements in battle.

Hellchain Weaver

Hellchain Weaver: Kytons live in fear of these massive devil spiders made of hooked, jagged iron. They spin webs of iron chains and they have whirling blades embedded in their bodies. They regenerate their wounds and live in elaborate chain webs. They are speaking, intelligent creatures and they love to stalk and torment their prey.
Corruption Devil (Paeliryon)

Corruption Devil (Paeliryon): This hefty devil dons makeup and wears hellish perfume that fogs the mind of those nearby. They often have a network of informants who blackmail people into handing over their souls. These incredibly powerful devils serve Dispater and enforce his will in the City of Dis.

The Escapist declared this the 8th dumbest D&D monster of all time. I don't know if it's dumb or not, I think it depends on how you you run it and what your group is like. 4th edition added a lot of cool lore to them:

Sire of Corruption: The 4e Monster Manual 3 says that these creatures are more powerful versions of corruption devils. They go to mortal worlds to corrupt entire towns and kingdoms. They resent those who are highly moral and go out of their way to try to corrupt or kill them. Sires of Corruption can deal out a "touch of vice" that infuses a person with lust, excess, greed, fear, sloth, vengeance. This can turn them into a corrupted follower.

Corrupted Glutton
Corrupted Followers: These mortals signed a pact with a sire of corruption. The pact is actually burns red on their flesh. These creatures were often at a low point in life and handed over their soul in exchange for a need created in part by the sire of corruption's touch.

These creatures can be returned to normal, but the contract must be nulled and the corrupted must forsake their vices.

There are many types of corrupted followers:

Corrupted Lecher: These are extremely attractive people who others become infatuated with. People become so obsessed that they lose sleep over them. Corrupted lechers can cause lust with their touch and when they are in danger, can cause a "spread of passion" to try to influence the attacker to spare them.

Corrupted Glutton: These people become gluttons, devouring anything they like. They are minions of Sires of Corruption.
Corrupted Monger

Corrupted Monger: These people are consumed with the desire for wealth. They spread greed with their touch and have the ability to drain magic items of their power.

Corrupted Idler: Idlers are those dependent on others to provide for their needs. They want to live a life where everything is done for them. They cause sloth with their touch and have an aura that makes people near them weary.

Corrupted Lunatic: These mortals can't let go of their anger. They hold grudges and eventually become violent.Their touch causes rage and they have a number of powers that force people to attack others.

Corrupted Craven
Corrupted Craven: Soldiers who were overcome with fear and abandoned their posts, leaving the people they were supposed to protect to a grim fate. They have the power to infuse people with fear and give them the frightened condition.

Erinyes

Erinyes: Erinyes change with each edition. I think this is partly because they were too similar to the succubus once the succubi became devils. In 2nd edition, they were tempters of mortals who reported directly to the Dark Eight (the pit fiend council that governs much of Hell).

It is said that there are only 500 erinyes in the Nine Hells at one time, but if you read enough products it seems like there is a heck of a lot more than 500 in existence. They have the ability to pass into the prime material for a short time. They can only bring one person back and no inorganic matter.

When a mortal is lured to hell by an erinyes and dies, it becomes a lemure. Many erinyes refuse promotions - they don't want to go up in rank. Some erinyes are directly promoted to pit fiend. Most become ice devils. Some become pleasure devils.
3rd edition bearded devil, war devil and erinyes

In 3rd edition, the erinyes are rumored to be angels who fell. They are depicted as having blue skin and red hair. They are scouts, servants and concubines. It is said that they are fallen angels who fought alongside Asmodeus when he rebelled long ago, and they fell into Hell with him.

Erinyes often see themselves as superior to other devils. Other devils feel animosity toward them, but also envy, lust after and idolize them.

In 4th edition, Erinyes became wingless monstrous females who were elite warriors. "Furies of Vengeance and rage, erinyes exist for battle." They have attacks that give allies temporary hit points.


In 5th edition, they are still elite warriors but they are beautiful females and males often mistaken for celestials.

Harvester Devil (Falxugon)

Harvester Devil (Falxugon): These creatures go to mortal realms to corrupt as many souls as they can. Harvester devils have an aura that makes it hard for mortals to attack them. They need to make a saving throw or else they can't bring themselves to do it.

Hellcat (Bezekira): In 3rd edition, Hellcats were listed as stronger than chain devils and weaker than an erinyes. They were featured as one of the main devil types. They are telepathic cats and lions made of blinding light and fiery sparks.
Hell Hound

Hell Hound: Hell hounds are often found serving devils and fire giants. They can breathe fire and are thoroughly evil. They care most about eating flesh, as it stokes the fires within them.
Hell Knight (Narzugon)

Hell Knight (Narzugon): Hell knights ride a nightmare, which are evil flying horses. In 3rd edition it says that these creatures are fashioned from soul shells that exhibited blind, impassive obedience in life. They are brave and loyal. Most of them have sworn oaths of loyalty to Asmodeus himself. They often go on missions to the material plane to destroy temples of good gods and to recover evil relics.

They have flaming lances that do a lot of damage during a charge. They almost always are on or near their nightmare mounts, and the nightmare gains skills and abilities transferred from the hell knight rider.
Hell Knight (Narzugon)

4th edition greatly expands on these creatures and change their. Hell knights were servants of the deity known as He Who Was. Asmodeus tricked them into betraying their god.

Their betrayal damned them to serve Asmodeus for an eternity. Each archdevil and duke has hell knights at their disposal. These knights yearn for forgiveness but are bound to follow the orders of Asmodeus.  
Hellfire Engine

Hellfire Engine: These are massive constructs that spew hellfire (which harms creatures immune to fire)s. They are made of cold iron that was bathed in the blood of a dozen celestials. They are often used a siege engines in the Blood War.

Hellforged Devils: These devils were created by a magical catastrophe that wiped out demon and devil armies in the Blood War. The essence of the slain devils fused with the ground and became hellforged devils. They now protect Hell itself and have prevented civil war on a number of occasions. Aurandeus, the Magistrate of Hell, commands them.

There are 6 types of hellforged devils:

Coal Devil

Coal Devil: These massive devils are made of coal with their body eternally aflame and their faces contorted into a scream. They guard and enforce the will of Hell. Coal devils can breathe fire and emit obscuring clods of smoke.

Glass Devil

Glass Devil: Made from transparent glass plates, these devils are nearly invisible spies and scouts. Their eyes are mirror-like orbs and they have extremely sharp claws.

Lead Devil

Lead Devil: Slow and ponderous, lead devils are powerful bounty hunters. They specialize in tracking down a wanted foe, grabbing them, and using their innate dimension door power to whisk the enemy away to captivity.

Obsidian Devil

Obsidian Devil: Made of obsidian and covered in in razor-sharp ridges, these devils are the police of Hell. They are unfeeling, violent creatures who obey orders to the letter. Obsidian devils like to grab victims and grind them to death on their sharp obsidian bodies.

Sand Devil

Sand Devil: These devils use their ability to turn into sand to act as informants and information gatherers.

Spiked Devil

Spiked Devil: Not to be confused with spined devils (spinagons), spiked devils are made of iron and are covered in spikes. They are guards and protectors with the ability to fire off their spikes as projectiles.

Hellwasp Devil

Hellwasp Devil: These devils live in a colony in the Garden of Delights in Malbolge. Hellwasps were once demons, but Glasya killed their master and took them back to the Nine Hells. They once served a wasplike demon lord that was slain by Glasya. The hellwasps now revere her as their queen and they consider serving her to be a reward.

Horned Beast

Horned Beast: At one time, the archdevil Geryon had a magic horn that summoned minotaurs. Once he was exiled from Hell, his power waned and so did the magic in his horn. It now summons extinct demons known as horned beasts. Horned beasts are very simple creatures similar to minotaurs. They wield greataxes, charge with their horns and when they are slain they explode in a deathly inferno.

Horned Devil (cornugon)
Horned Devil (cornugon): They are 9 feet tall, have wings and are covered in scales. They have an aura of magical fear and can fire off lightning bolt spells a few times per day. They fight with barbed whips and tail stingers.

Often, pit fiends lead armies of horned devils into battle. They are used as personal guardians of ice devils and are very loyal, a rare trait among devilkind.   
Ice Devil (gelugon)

Ice Devil (Gelugon): Weirdly enough, one of the most powerful types of devils are Ice Devils. There are actually two levels of hell that are extremely cold. This is where ice devils dwell, coveting the power of the pit fiends that are one rank above them.

They can trap you in magical domes of ice and some of them have ice spears that can slow you down.

To become a pit fiend, an ice devil must serve the aims of Hell flawlessly for 777 years. Then, it is thrown into the pit of flame for 1,001 days. During that time, it transforms into a pit fiend. It is said that only an ice devil or an erinyes can survive this experience. Exactly 1000 ice devils are promoted each century.
Imp

Imp: Just one step above lemures and nupperibos, Imps are little red winged devils with a scorpion tail. They can turn invisible and they have a poison stinger. Despite being a bit lazy and inefficient, they make great spies because they can turn invisible at will. They often act as a familiar for mortal wizards, doing their best to corrupt the souls of living beings. Most imps serve a duke named Beleth, the Witch's Viscount.
 
Assassin Imp
Assassin Imp: These vicious creatures enjoy killing helpless innocents. They have black scales and wield sharp razors. Their tail stinger inject a sleep toxin into the enemy, making for easy throat-slitting. There are more powerful versions of these devils known as Murder Lords.

Indwelling Devil: These creatures are dark spirits, unseen puppet masters that hunt down souls that escape from Hell. They frequently do work for archdevils. Many believe they all secretly serve an underling of Asmodeus called Phongor the Inquisitor

Infernal Armor Animus

Infernal Armor Animus: Devils can use a ritual to attach a mortal soul to a suit of armor. Powered by the soul, the armor becomes animate and is used as military support. When the armor is destroyed, the remains of the soul will enter into a nearby devil and heal it.

Infernal Ironguard: These devil constructs accompanied Dispater when he tried to steal the soul of Bahamut. They block attacks and knock attackers back.

Kalabon: A kalabon is a weak devil that is a heap of flesh with three legs. Here's a quote: "Blood and pus leak from its many sphincters..."

They can combine with other kalabons to form a massive, expanded mound of flesh that eats everything in its path. These creatures are remains of the Hag Countess, former ruler of Malbolge.

Legion Devil (Merregon)

Legion Devil (Merregon): These are humanoid devils, low-ranking soldiers in devil armies. They can pool their hit points together, meaning that an attacker has to do a lot of damage before they all drop at once. They are utterly loyal and fearless. In 4th edition, they were 1 hit point minions.

Lemure

Lemure: These pathetic wretches are the lowest form of devil. They wander the first two layers in large hordes, attacking intruders. In 5th edition, lemures can't die. When slain, they reform in d10 days.

It is believed that there are an infinite number of lemures in Hell that wander endlessly. Only the most evil of mortals become lemures when they die. Just one in a thousand lemures ever rise in rank. Lemures cannot speak, but they do babble and they comprehend the Infernal language.

Some devils are demoted to lemures and "marked." Those lemures bearing a mark are never promoted and are hated by other devils.

Sometimes a lemure is randomly promoted to a spinagon. Other times, a higher-ranking devil will make them fight each other to see which one they will promote.

Lillitu
Lillitu: In 4th edition, it is said that Lilith, Mother of the Succubi, promoted some devil succubi to a higher form known as a lillitu. These are more monstrous succubi, with poison instead of blood. The 3e lillitus (which I believe are all demons) have 4 tails. The 4e lillitus each have unique monstrous parts like owl heads, snakes, etc.

Misfortune Devil

Misfortune Devil: Misfortune devils are shapeshifting creatures that often disguise themselves as a relative or loved one of a victim. They encourage mortals to take unreasonable risks. They have the power to redirect attacks meant to hit them to other targets.
Nupperibo
Nupperibo: Nupperibos are extremely weak devils who are blind, deaf and unable to speak. Devils lead them using telepathy. These blobby humanoids regenerate wounds and missing limbs. The only way to destroy them permanently is to use holy water or a holy sword on them.

They are slightly higher in rank than lemures but when they are "promoted," they are technically demoted to lemure status.
  • The Secret of the Nupperibos: In Tales from the Infinite Staircase it was revealed that nupperibos are not devils. They are Baatorians, the type of fiend that lived in Hell before devils ever existed! If devils didn't demote/transform nupperibos into lemures, they'd eventually grow into "Ancient Baatorians."
Yugoloths (a race of fiendish mercenary "daemons," not linked to normal demons) use nupperibos as food and accept them as currency. Yugoloths may know the secret of the Nupperibos. A few archdevils know as well.

In third edition it is claimed that nupperibos are actually devils who have been tortured and punished. Their brains were actually pulled out through their nostrils.

Orthon: An orthon is a bit like a devil ogre. They have an aura that blocks planar travel and their armor has been hammered directly onto their bodies. Their bodies are full of maggots and when they are slain, the maggots swarm and attack all enemies nearby.
Pain Devil

Pain Devil (excruciarch): These relatively weak devils are sadistic torturers. They have a fierce rivalry with chain devils, who are also torturers. In 4th edition they are found in Dis and Minauros.
Passion Devil

Passion Devil: Passion devils are shapechanging infiltrators created by Fierna, ruler of Phlegethos. Each of them is physically beautiful save for a single physical flaw. They have difficulty controlling their own passion which sometimes causes them difficulties. They have an aura that causes creatures to desire them and their fiery touch allows them to charm people. These devils are very similar to pleasure devils, listed below.
Pillager Devil

Pillager Devil: These devils scour other planes to steal souls of mortals who have passed on. They have a quota and need to bring a certain amount to their masters. Most other devils don't like pillagers because they are uncouth and malformed. They have an ability called soul grasp, meaning that they can handle intangible souls meant for other destinations.

Pit Fiend

Pit Fiend: Pit Fiends are huge winged devils who lord over all other devils. Only archdevils are higher ranked. These creatures are generals and often attend to archdukes and rulers personally. I wrote a Guide to Pit Fiends here.

Pleasure Devil (Brachina)

Pleasure Devil (Brachina): Sometimes an erinyes is promoted to become a pleasure devil, seducers who look like mortals of various races. Their specialty is corrupting agents of good gods. They can beguile a victim magically and completely control their bodies for a few moments. Archdevils use pleasure devils as playthings and then discard them.
Rage Devil

Rage Devil: The result of a dangerous experiment involving injecting demon ichor into hell knights, these 10 foot tall devils have stony skin covered in hieroglyphics of hate. When the glyphs flare, they erode an enemy's resistance. These creatures fly into joyful rages and lead legion devils into battle in the Blood War.

Shocktroop Devil

Shocktroop Devil: These devils are frontline devils for Hell's armies. They can singlehandedly slaughter a great number of the enemy. Their attacks are very straightforward - hammering away with a sword and shield. I really like the way these creatures look. The artist who designed them wrote about shocktroop devils here.
Slime Devil

Slime Devil: Servants of the archdevil Mammon, slime devils are blobs of sludge and hate. They are born in the swamps of Minauros when the souls of corrupt inquisitors mingle. They can engulf victims and burn them with acid. The slime devil will ask the victim questions. Each untruthful answer causes psychic damage.

Spined Devil (spinagon)

Spined Devil (Spinagon): These winged devils are quite weak, stand about three feet tall, and are covered in prickly spines. They are very common in Hell, flying about delivering messages while always on the lookout for intruders.

Spined devils herd lemures, forming armies for more powerful devils. Doing this well frequently gets them promoted. Some spined devils are promoted up multiple ranks all at once because they have pleased a powerful devil.

Storm Devil

Storm Devil: Found in the armies of Maladomini and Nessus, storm devils have the power to create cyclones, launch lightning bolts and let out infernal thunderclaps. They are bodyguards to pit fiends. They will disobey orders on occasion because they can't resist the temptation to score a quick kill or the opportunity to torment lower-ranked devils.
Styx Devil (Amnizu)

Styx Devil (amnizu): Styx Devils first appeared in the 1e Fiend Folio. They are ranked very high in the devil hierarchy and they have many responsibilities:
  • They occupy checkpoints on the River Styx where they search and interrogate travelers.
  • They search for souls to take to the archdevil Geryon. 
  • They are generals of armies consisting of thousands of abishai and erinyes. 
  • They are guardians of the River Styx, often referred to as the Keepers of the Styx.
  • They are expected to bring new souls to the Nine Hells by using their imprisonment power and to capture mortals exploring Hell. 
  • They are also record keepers, staffing the Labyrinth of Truths in Minaurous. This labyrinth holds files and records pertaining to everyone who has ever been in Minaurous and many other layers of Hell. 
Styx Devils generally believe that the rules of Hell don't apply to them due to their high ranking and special privileges. They will mess with pit fiends any chance they get out of fear and envy.

They can can magically imprison someone once per day and their touch causes people to lose one day's worth of memory. In 3e, it is said that they are often served by the wasplike advespas.

It is possible that these creatures are actually Baatorians.

Succubus: In each edition, a succubus is different. In some, a succubus is a demon. In 5th, they are both demons and devils. I covered all of this in my Guide to the Succubus. Devil succubi are ruled by Lilith, the consort of Baalzebul. Devil succubi like primarily in Dis, Stygia and Malbolge.

Steel Devil (bueroza): These devils look quite like mortal soldiers wearing armor covered in dust and cobwebs. They are blindly loyal.
Swarm Devil

Swarm Devil: Agents of Baalzebul, this devil swarm forms into an ogre-sized humanoid that gleefully does the bidding of Baalzebul. When an angel lies to its master and is torn asunder, it becomes a swarm devil that slowly starves but never dies from hunger. Swarm Devils can spew flies like a breath weapon, doing acid damage.
Vizier Devil

Vizier Devil: Vizier devils spend most of their time in mortal realms infiltrating governments. They look exactly like tieflings. They try to corrupt rulers and nations by getting them involved in an activity that starts out as a noble pursuit but becomes something grim. They have the ability to fire hellfire bolts as a ranged attack and they can imbue items with hellfire. They can speak a word of command to force creatures to do what they want.
War Devil (Malebranche)

War Devil (Malebranche): These 22 foot tall devils have wings and a black hide. They are brutes and bullies that are fanatically loyal to powerful devils. In the 4e monster manual, it says that they obey only pit fiends and archdevils.
Warder Devil

Warder Devil: Once escorts for the emissaries of Asmodeus, most warder devils now work for Dispater as bodyguards . The first warder devils were angels of protection that became too bloodthirsty and aided Asmodeus in his rebellion. They wield flaming greatswords and can teleport with a power called hell's step.
Wrath Devil

Wrath Devil: Roamers of mortal worlds, wrath devils exploit anger by goading people to give in to their hatred. The very presence of a wrath devil causes tempers to flare. Wrath devils often have bearded devils as bodyguards and are known to consort with succubi, duergar and bearded devils to hatch vile schemes with.
Withering Devil

Withering Devils: These devils cause famines and plagues by tricking mortals into depression or apathy. They each have a staff of weariness that can drain emotional energy and their gaze can cause apathy. Withering devils are careful to disguise themselves with hooded cloaks, as their appearance is hideous to mortals. 

Xerfilstyx: These insane devils have a winged, muscled upper body and the lower body of a giant slug. They are immune to the memory-draining effects of the River Styx and the experience the memories that the river has stolen from people as they swim through it. They have a breath weapon - they spew a cone of boiling blood that eats flesh and erodes memories.

Links

This article on the wizards site gives you a fantastic look at the devils and the archdevils.

Sours: http://thecampaign20xx.blogspot.com/2016/12/dungeons-dragons-guide-to-devils.html

Devil (Dungeons & Dragons)

A devil (also known as baatezu) is a fictional character in the Dungeons & Dragonsroleplaying game, a powerful group of monsters used as a high-level challenge for players of the game. Devils are Lawful Evil in alignment and originate from the Nine Hells of Baator. True to their Lawful Evil alignment, devils are locked in a strict and brutal hierarchy (changing form as they work their way up the ladder of power). At the top of the hierarchy are the supreme Archdevils or Lords of the Nine, who are the rulers of the different regions of Baator. Devils often see the various worlds in the D&D metacosmos as tools to use for their own ends, including prosecuting the Blood War, a millennia-long war between the devils and their arch-enemies, demons.

Publication history[edit]

Devils first appeared in the original first edition Advanced Dungeons & DragonsMonster Manual.[1]

Many of the early devils were inspired directly by real-world religion and mythology, with Mephistopheles best known from the Faust cycle, Asmodeus, a devil from the Deuterocanonical Book of Tobit and Baalzebul appearing as high devils in the D&D cosmology.[citation needed] Other inspirations came from the Erinyes, Greek demigoddesses of vengeance, and the Lemures, Roman spirits of the dead.[citation needed]

The release of the 2nd Edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons rule set brought a name change for the devils and their counterparts demons. The 1st Edition's Deities and Demigods sourcebook was described as "exactly like witchcraft" by a televangelist.[2] Concerned about protests from religious groups and others who viewed the game as an entryway into Satanic worship, TSR, Inc. dropped the words "devil" and "demon" from all descriptors of the monsters,[3] substituting instead baatezu and tanar'ri .[2] This persisted until the rollout of 3rd Edition, when the original terms were reinstated. Since the change, the term "baatezu" has been retained as a specific subset of powerful devils.

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition (1977–1988)[edit]

Devils first appear in the first edition Monster Manual (1977), which includes the barbed devil (lesser devil), the bone devil (lesser devil), the erinyes (lesser devil), the horned devil (malebranche) (greater devil), the ice devil (greater devil), the lemure, the pit fiend (greater devil), and the arch-devilsAsmodeus, Baalzebul, Dispater, and Geryon. The imp, a frequent servant of devils, also first appeared in the original Monster Manual.[4] The Monster Manual was reviewed by Don Turnbull in the British magazine White Dwarf #8 (August/September 1978). As part of his review, Turnbull comments on several new monsters introduced in the book, considering the devils the most prominent among them. Turnbull notes that "they are all pretty strong and compare not unfavourably in this respect with the Demons we already know".[5]

Astaroth, Belial, and Satan appeared in the article "The Politics of Hell," in Dragon # 28 (August 1979);[6] note that this article does not appear to be connected to the established canon of the Nine Hells.[citation needed] Selm, Prince of the Possessors, and the asperim appeared in Dragon #42 (October 1980).

The Styx devil (greater devil) first appears in the Fiend Folio (1981)[7]

A series of articles appearing in Dragon in 1983 greatly expanded upon the devils and their home, the Nine Hells, and presented numerous new devils and arch-devils. The article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom" by Gary Gygax in Dragon #75 (July 1983) introduced the black abishai, blue abishai, green abishai, red abishai, and white abishai (lesser devil), the bearded devil (lesser devil), the spined devil (least devil), the princess of Hell Glasya, the dukes of Hell Amon, Bael, Bitru, Hutijin, and Titivilus, and the arch devils Belial, Mammon, Mephistopheles, and Moloch.[8] Dozens of unique devils appeared in a two-part article by Ed Greenwood, including the greater devils Bist, Caim, and Nergal, the dukes of Hell Agares, Alocer, Amduscias, Arioch, Balan, Bathym, Biffant, Caarcrinolaas, Chamo, Focalor, Gaziel, Gorson, Herodias, Machalas, Malphas, Melchon, and Merodach, and the princesses of Hell Cozbi, Lilis, and Naome in "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75,[9] and the dukes of Hell Abigor, Adonides, Barbas, Barbatos, Bele, Bifrons, Bileth, Buer, Bune, Morax, Neabaz, Rimmon, Tartach, Zagum, and Zepar, the princesses of Hell Baalphegor, Baftis, and Lilith, the chancellor of Hell Adramalech, the queen of Hell Bensozia, and the inquisitor of Hell Phongor in "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (August 1983).[10]

The black abishai, blue abishai, green abishai, red abishai, and white abishai (lesser devil), the bearded devil (lesser devil), the nupperibo (least devil), the spined devil (least devil), appeared in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983), along with the princess of Hell Glasya, the dukes of Hell Amon, Bael, Hutijin, and Titivilus, and the arch devils Belial, Mammon, Mephistopheles, and Moloch.[11] Ed Greenwood's follow-up article, "The Nine Hells Revisited" in Dragon #91 (November 1984) introduced the greater devils Armaros, Azazel, Cahor, Dagon, Duskur, Kochbiel, Malarea, Nisroch, Rumjal, and the arch-devil Gargoth.[12]

Baalphegor appeared as the ultimate villain of "Caermor" in Dungeon #2 (November 1986)[13] (which was later reprinted in the Dungeons of Despair anthology (1999).[14]).

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd edition (1989–1999)[edit]

The black abishai, green abishai, and red abishai lesser baatezu, the amnizu greater baatezu, the barbazu lesser baatezu, the cornugon greater baatezu, the erinyes lesser baatezu, the gelugon greater baatezu, the hamatula lesser baatezu, the lemure, the nupperibo least baatezu, the osyluth lesser baatezu, the pit fiend greater baatezu, and the spinagon least baatezu appear in the Monstrous Compendium Volume Outer Planes Appendix (1991).[15] The black abishai, green abishai, and red abishai lesser baatezu, and the pit fiend greater baatezu next appear in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[16]

The Planescapecampaign setting utilized devils, known exclusively as baatezu under 2nd edition rules, extensively. The black abishai, green abishai, and red abishai lesser baatezu, the amnizu greater baatezu, the barbazu lesser baatezu, the cornugon greater baatezu, the erinyes lesser baatezu, the gelugon greater baatezu, the hamatula lesser baatezu, the lemure, the nupperibo least baatezu, the osyluth lesser baatezu, the pit fiend greater baatezu, and the spinagon least baatezu are detailed in the first Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix (1994).[17] The kocrachon lesser baatezu and the kyton appear in the Planes of Law boxed set (1995).[18]Monstrous Compendium Annual Three (1996) featured the kyton again.

Guide to Hell (1999) described the transition of the devils and archdevils throughout the millennia, and reconciled the differences between the first edition and second edition archdevils by explaining the Reckoning of Hell. The book also described the mezzikim.[19] Moloch appeared in and played a key role in the adventure The Apocalypse Stone (2000).[20]

Dungeons & Dragons 3.0 edition (2000–2002)[edit]

Devils appear in the Monster Manual for this edition (2000),[21] including the barbazu (baatezu), the cornugon (baatezu), the erinyes (baatezu), the gelugon (baatezu), the hamatula (baatezu), the hellcat, the imp, the kyton, the lemure (baatezu), the osyluth (baatezu), and the pit fiend (baatezu).

The black abishai, blue abishai, green abishai, red abishai, and white abishai for the Forgotten Realms setting appear in Monsters of Faerûn (2000).[22]

The spinagon (baatezu) and the narzugon (baatezu) appear in this edition's Manual of the Planes (2001).[23] The kocrachon (baatezu) and the ghargatula (baatezu), as well as the archdevils Bel, Lord of the First; Dispater, Lord of the Second; Mammon, Lord of the Third; Belial/Fierna, Lord of the Fourth; Levistus, Lord of the Fifth; The Hag Countess, Lord of the Sixth (not technically a devil, but a powerful night hag); Baalzebul, Lord of the Seventh; Mephistopheles, Lord of the Eighth; and Asmodeus, Lord of the Ninth appear in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[24] The advespa (baatezu), the amnizu (baatezu), and the malebranche (baatezu) appear in this edition's Monster Manual II (2002).[25] The paeliryon (baatezu) and xerfilstyx (baatezu), as well as the bloodbag imp, the euphoric imp, and the filth imp appear in this edition's Fiend Folio (2003).[26]

Savage Species (2003) presented the hamatula (devil), the imp (devil), and the kyton (devil) both as races and as playable classes.[27]

The hellforged devils, including the coal devil, the glass devil, the lead devil, the obsidian devil, the sand devil, and the spiked devil appear in Dragon #306 (April 2003).[28]

The stony devil appears in Underdark (2003).[29]

Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 edition (2003–2007)[edit]

Devils appear in the revised Monster Manual for this edition (2003), including the barbed devil (hamatula), the bearded devil (barbazu), the bone devil (osyluth), the chain devil (kyton), the erinyes, the hellcat (bezekira), the horned devil (cornugon), the ice devil (gelugon), the imp, the lemure, and the pit fiend.

The chain devil is presented as a player character race in the Planar Handbook (2004).[30]

The desert devil (araton) appears in Sandstorm: Mastering the Perils of Fire and Sand (2005).[31]

The unique devil Malkizid, the Branded King appears in Champions of Ruin (2005) for the Forgotten Realms setting.[32]

The logokron devil appeared in the Tome of Magic: Pact, Shadow, and Truename Magic (2006).[33]

Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006) includes new content for devils and inhabitants of Baator, including the black abishai, blue abishai, green abishai, red abishai, and white abishai, the amnizu, the assassin devil (dogai), the ayperobos swarm, the harvester devil (falxugon), the hellfire engine, the kalabon, the legion devil (merregon), the malebranche, the narzugon, the nupperibo, the orthon, the paeliryon, the pain devil (excruciarch), the pleasure devil (brachina), the spined devil (spinagon), the steel devil (bueroza), and the xerfilstyx. The book also contains statistics the aspects of the Lords of the Nine, including Bel, Lord of the First; Dispater, Lord of the Second; Mammon, Lord of the Third; Belial and Fierna, Lords of the Fourth; Levistus, Lord of the Fifth; Glasya, Lord of the Sixth; Baalzebul, Lord of the Seventh; Mephistopheles, Lord of the Eighth; and Asmodeus, Lord of the Ninth .[34]

The death devil (jerul) appears in Dragon #353 (March 2007). The gulthir devil, the remmanon devil, and the stitched devil appeared in Monster Manual V (2007).

The unique devils Moloch the Outcast, Titivilus, Bael, Balan, and Bathym all reappeared in the online version of Dragon, in issue #360 (October 2007) in the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[35] The unique devils Agares, Tartach, Lilith, Hutijin, and Adramalech reappeared in Dragon #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[36]

Dungeons & Dragons 4th edition (2008–2014)[edit]

Devils appear in the Monster Manual for this edition (2008),[37] including the bearded devil (barbazu), the bone devil (osyluth), the chain devil (kyton), the ice devil (gelugon), the imp, legion devils (legion devil grunt, legion devil hellguard, legion devil veteran, and legion devil legionnaire), the pit fiend, the spined devil (spinagon), the succubus, and the war devil (malebranche). All devils now have the "Evil" alignment and speak Supernal. There were no changes to the line-up of the Lords of the Nine from Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells.

Asmodeus appears as one of the gods of evil in the 4th edition Dungeon Masters Guide (2008).[38]

The assassin devil (dogai), erinyes, gorechain devil, infernal armor animus, misfortune devil, shocktroop devil, and withering devil appeared in the fourth edition Monster Manual 2 (2009). More devils are detailed in the Manual of the Planes (2008): barbed devil (hamatula), brazen devil, pain devil (excruciarch), storm devil and Dispater, the Lord of Dis; The Plane Above: Secrets of the Astral Sea (2010): burning devil, indwelling devil, pillager devil and warder devil; and Monster Manual 3 (2010): corruption devil (paeliryon), hell knight (narzugon), hellwasp, passion devil, rage devil, slime devil, swarm devil and vizier devil; while Monster Vault (2010) revisited several devils originally printed in the Monster Manual – all of them except for the bearded devil, spined devil and war devil – and Monster Vault: Threats to the Nentir Vale (2011) only contained the tar devil. Various high-ranking devils, including Alloces and Geryon, have had published statistics in the Codex of Betrayal feature in Dungeon magazine; the only Lords of the Nine with published statistics as of July 2012 are Dispater and Glasya.

History[edit]

The Reckoning of Hell (often referred to as the Reckoning) was a civil war that shaped the political landscape of the Nine Hells into its current form. The Reckoning received its fullest treatment in the D&D sourcebook A Guide to Hell.

Types[edit]

Archdevils[edit]

Zariel is the current ruler of Avernus, the first layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. She was previously deposed by her chief warlord, a pit fiend called Bel, thousands of years in the past. However, she reclaimed her position after Bel proved inadequate in managing the Blood War.[39]

My legions are the only thing standing between your precious Seven Heavens and the bottomless hunger of the Abyss. I did not fall into the clutches of evil. I rose to shoulder a cosmic burden. Zariel, Archduchess of Avernus, former angel of Celestia[40][39]

Originally, she was an angel of Celestia who was charged with watching the Blood War. Instead of just observing, she marshaled forces and charged into Hell. Zariel succumbed to the corrupting nature of the plane and fell from grace. Asmodeus then put her in charge of Avernus.[39][41][42] She was first mentioned in the second edition book Guide to Hell (1999).[19] Zariel was also mentioned in third edition in the Manual of the Planes (2001),[43]: 117  and Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[44] In 5th Edition, Zariel was given a stat block in Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes (2018).[39] She is also featured heavily in the adventure module Baldur's Gate: Descent into Avernus (2019).[42][45]

Asmodeus[edit]

Asmodeus (az-mo-DAY-əs or az-MOH-dee-əs)[46] is a fictional character from the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. His exact nature varies from publication to publication; he is alternately presented as an evil god or a powerful devil. In all publication appearances, he is the Lord of Hell (Baator) and the Overlord of the lesser Dukes of Hell.

Asmodeus is named after Asmodeus, a Judeo-Christian demon of the same name, from the Book of Tobit, and for a fallen angel of the same name who appears in John Milton's "Paradise Lost."[47][48]

His physical appearance is based on popular modern and medieval conceptions of Satan.[citation needed] Asmodeus first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[48][4]

Baator and Asmodeus' place in it were further detailed in Ed Greenwood's "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[49]

Owing to a moral panic regarding Dungeons & Dragons, Asmodeus did not initially appear in the 2nd edition.

In the Planescape line of game products, the lord of the lowest circle of hell was initially unnamed. Eventually, the Lord of the Ninth was revealed to be Asmodeus, in Guide to Hell (1999).[19]

Asmodeus appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[50] He was further described in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[51]

Conflicting stories of Asmodeus' power and origins are given throughout both books, ostensibly as an in-universe foil to those wishing to learn more about him.

Asmodeus appears as an evil god in the Dungeon Masters Guide (2008).[52] His backstory for this edition is expanded in the supplements Manual of the Planes, The Plane Above: Secrets of the Astral Sea, and Demonomicon. His origins are explicitly defined as the leader of a rebellion against a forgotten god of good.

Setting-specific versions of Asmodeus are described in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide and the Eberron Campaign Guide. The Realms Asmodeus differs from the core character: he has only become a full god in the wake of the Spellplague, while the core version has been a god for millennia. Much of this information was presented as a retcon to justify changes from previous editions' settings.[53]

It is unclear whether the Eberron Asmodeus is meant to be a literal god, since that setting's deities are much more aloof than those of other settings. His character is consistent with the generic presentation, however: he is the undisputed master of the Nine Hells.[54]

In the Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide, the Realms Asmodeus retains the same recent history as the 4th edition version. He consumed the divine spark of Azuth, and through it achieved godhood during the Spellplague. This means that, while before the Spellplague he was Lord of the Nine Hells, and a powerful immortal being, he only became a god after the Spellplague.

Similar characters have appeared in products by publishers other than TSR or Wizards of the coast (copyright holders for Dungeons & Dragons material). The character is Wizards' intellectual property. However, because Asmodeus (the original mythical being) is in the public domain, the name and associated demonic characteristics may be used without infringing Wizards' copyright.

Asmodeus became an official part of the Judge's GuildCity State of the Invincible Overlord setting with the publication of The Azurerain Pirates.[55]

Green Ronin's The Book of Fiends series mentions Asmodeus. This series is published under the OGL.[56][57]

Another OGL product was Asmodeus's Den of Deception, part of the Devilish Dens series.[58]

Asmodeus features prominently in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game setting.

His appearance in Dungeons & Dragons was cited as evidence for Satanism in the game by Pat Pulling and Kathy Cawthon in their 1989 book The Devil's Web.[59]

The inclusion of Asmodeus and other Judeo-Christian devils in Dungeons & Dragons is discussed in Pegasus magazine as well.[60]

Fabian Perlini-Pfister considered demons like Asmodeus among the "standard repertoire of "Monsters"" of the game.[61]

Asmodeus is the most powerful of infernal beings. Like the other Archdevils, he is impervious to mundane attacks and requires powerful magics to slay. A powerful aura of submission surrounds him, making most who approach him slaves to his will.

As the master of Hell, he has complete power over lesser devils, including other lords of Baator. Several times he has permanently changed their physical forms at a whim. He transformed Mammon into a humanoid/serpent hybrid, and cursed Baalzebul with the form of a gigantic slug with tiny, useless arms.

Asmodeus carries a powerful unique artifact, the Ruby Rod, that allows him to use several powerful offensive and defensive spells. The Rod allows Asmodeus to attack with elemental forces, force his enemies to cower in fear, or cover himself with a field which heals and protects him. It is also a powerful melee weapon that can cause grievous wounds with the merest touch. In the default 4th edition setting, the Ruby Rod is a fragment of the shard of pure evil that created the Abyss, but this origin is not suggested in earlier editions.

In addition to the Ruby Rod, Asmodeus possesses material wealth greater than entire mortal worlds. His clothing is so valuable that a single garment worn by Asmodeus is worth more than an average nation will spend on food in a year.

Finally, Asmodeus is an ancient schemer and deadly manipulator, orchestrator of the most Machiavellian of schemes. He lays plans millennia in advance, patiently biding his time until his machinations come to fruition.

Through all five editions of Dungeons & Dragons, Asmodeus is depicted as the strongest, most cunning, and most handsome of all devils. He is typically described as appearing as a giant human, over 13 feet tall, with dark skin and hair, red eyes, handsome features, and small horns on his forehead. Beneath his clothing, Asmodeus' body is covered in bloody wounds which he sustained when he fell from the Upper Planes. His wounds ooze blood daily, and any drop of blood which touches the ground grows into a powerful devil.

He is described in the Book of Vile Darkness as a "calm, chillingly reasonable" being with a modest appearance that hides his true power.

In Dragon # 28, the article "The Politics of Hell" presents a different version of Asmodeus where he is the latest in a series of hellish rulers. Asmodeus overthrows Beelzebul, who in turn overthrew Satan. This early biography differs from later presentations.

In the Book of Vile Darkness, it is stated that while Asmodeus is the oldest devil in the Nine Hells, he may not be the original ruler.

Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells offers its own internally inconsistent accounts of Asmodeus' origins. It is suggested that, within the fictional settings of Dungeons & Dragons, these accounts may be differing interpretations of an underlying monomyth.

According to the Codex, Asmodeus began as a servant of the lawful gods. Asmodeus is described in some versions of the myth as an "angel" (though this is self-contradictory given the time period during which this would have occurred). He was "the bravest, toughest, fiercest and most beautiful of angels." He and the other angels were created to fight the demons of the Abyss, so that the gods could concern themselves with creating worlds and sentient beings.

After eons of fighting the creatures from the abyss, Asmodeus and some of his fellows began to change. They grew similar in appearance and methods to the demons which they fought. Afraid of his power and of the changes he had undergone, the gods put Asmodeus on trial and demanded that he be cast out of the Upper Planes. However, he argued effectively (and correctly) that he and his fellows had not violated the law. Asmodeus and his followers successfully sued for access to the Upper Planes and the honors to which they were entitled.

Once the gods created worlds and sentient beings, the demons attacked these, too. The gods created mountains, oceans, and wastelands to seal up the gates to the Abyss, but their creations defied their orders and explored their worlds, accidentally unsealing the gates. The gods could not understand why their creations did not follow their instructions, until Asmodeus explained to them that their system did not work because it relied solely upon voluntary compliance. Asmodeus explained that the only way to ensure obedience was to threaten mortals with a disincentive; hence, Asmodeus invented the concept of punishment.

Asmodeus convinced the gods to sign a contract called the Pact Primeval. This contract allowed Asmodeus and his fellow devils to take up residence in the abandoned realm of Baator, to punish the souls of wicked mortals, and to extract magical energy from the souls under their care in order to fuel their powers. Otherwise, Asmodeus reasoned, they would have to be granted the powers of godhood in order to do their job, which the current gods would surely find unacceptable.

In the myth that Asmodeus created Baator (from the Codex) it states that Asmodeus tortured souls in a far off section of the upper planes and that when their screams filled heaven the gods once again tried to remove Asmodeus from the upper planes, but by the Pact Primeval Asmodeus was allowed to torture the souls in heaven. Asmodeus offered the gods an alternative; give him the power to create his own plane of existence from which to torture the souls that broke heavenly law. The gods agreed and Asmodeus and his devils left and created the Nine Layers of Hell.

In both myths, the gods found the arrangement agreeable, at first. However, they eventually realized that fewer and fewer mortal souls were ascending to the Upper Planes, and Asmodeus was deliberately tempting mortals to damnation. When they arrived in Baator, the gods found that Asmodeus had turned it into a nightmarish world of endless suffering, filled with countless new devils. When called to account for his actions, Asmodeus uttered the famous words, "Read the fine print."

This story is presented as mythology, and the Codex itself admits that it does not tell the whole truth. For example, it is known that Asmodeus did not depart from the Upper Planes under amicable circumstances: He was cast out, and literally fell into the Lower Planes, sustaining serious wounds which have never healed. Part of Asmodeus' long-term plans includes using the magical energy harvested from souls in order to heal his wounds, and ultimately, the complete destruction of the Upper Planes, as well as to one day achieve godhood.

The names of the "gods" involved seem to change depending on what world and on which source the myth is told, and some aspects and versions of the origin myth contradict others. For example, the version told in the Fiendish Codex II states that St. Cuthbert became a distinct deity when he agreed with Asmodeus that "Retribution is the basis of all law," while the Deities & Demigods sourcebook states that he is a mortal who ascended to godhood.

The Manual of the Planes suggests a similar but different story. According to the section about the Nine Hells, Asmodeus' true form is that of a giant serpent. He was cast out of the Upper Planes before the creation of the current gods, and his fall created the 8th and 9th planes of Hell. He is currently still recovering from his wounds in the pits of the 9th level, and his devil form is just an avatar of the real Asmodeus. No one who tells the story of the true form of Asmodeus survives more than 24 hours after the telling. These stories are always connected with the name Ahriman of couatl history.

This story first appeared in the AD&D supplement Guide to Hell: Asmodeus is described as Ahriman, the twin brother of Jazirian the god of the couatls. In this story Jazirian and Ahriman were responsible for the establishment of the current arrangement of the planes but fought eventually because of their perspectives of the law (LG versus LE). Asmodeus is said to be a greater power without any need of worship in the guide. As the Forgotten Realms supplement Serpent Kingdoms, as well as the 2e supplement Monster Mythology, tells Jazirian is/was the lawful good aspect of the now-dead overpower the World Serpent, Asmodeus should be the lawful evil one. This interpretation puts Asmodeus as a more supreme evil than other equally official D&D canon, as he was in this material set up as the co-equal first cause of creation and the evil principle therein, rather than a reactionary segment and of evils potentially interpreted as lesser evil due to being meant to combat the demons of the abyss only having gone overboard, as in subsequent explanations of his origin.[19]

In Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells, Asmodeus is described as one of the primal forces of evil in the D&D universe, and had a hand in creating Baator in order to punish sinners for their crimes. After being granted the power to do so, Asmodeus and his followers began consuming souls for power. Despite the horror of the good gods who'd established the Hells as a punishment, they didn't also expect its existence to help fuel evil in the world. As the devils consumed the essences of souls, they began to mutate into the devils that now populate the D&D universe.[51]

Elder Evils names the original ruler of Hell as Zargon, a creature originally described in Dungeon Module B4: The Lost City, by Tom Moldvay.[62]

The core setting of Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition offers yet another origin for Asmodeus, identifying him as a former angel in service to a god only known as He Who Was. Asmodeus, as one of the greatest of the angels, was entrusted with leading angelic hosts in battle against the enemies of the gods. Though he served He Who Was loyally, Asmodeus believed that his deific master was far too forgiving and unwilling to use force. After the conflict, which came to be known as the Dawn War, Asmodeus was assigned to guard the entrance to the prison of the god Tharizdun which was located in the Abyss. The demon lord Pazuzu appeared to Asmodeus, as detailed in Demonomicon, and encouraged the angel to act on his thoughts of rebellion against He Who Was. When Asmodeus was ready to rise up, Pazuzu aided him in obtaining a small piece of the shard of evil at the heart of the Abyss, which Asmodeus used to create his infamous Ruby Rod. Asmodeus returned to Baathion, the realm of He Who Was, gathered those angels who would join his side, and instigated a rebellion that ended with his former master's death. With his last moments of life, He Who Was cursed Asmodeus and all the angels who had followed him. The angels were transformed into the first devils, and the beautiful astral dominion of Baathion was transformed into a prison realm known as the Nine Hells of Baator. Asmodeus assumed the divine might of the fallen deity and became a god himself, albeit one trapped inside his own dominion.

During the Dawn War he worked with Bane; although they hated each other personally they were disciplined enough to work well together. After the war, Bane anticipated the eventual angelic rebellion Asmodeus would launch, and alone of the Gods he was not surprised when it finally happened. Bane wanted to help, but both he and Asmodeus wanted to avoid bringing the other Gods into the fight, and feared that any open collaboration between the two of them would cause exactly that; to avoid notice, instead of soldiers Bane sent aid in the form of advisors and strategy experts. Whether or not this made any difference is unknown, but the devils will deal (slightly) more honestly with followers of Bane than worshippers of other Gods, and Bane's followers are more likely than others to summon and employ devils.

Asmodeus has few allies amongst the other Gods, and is on especially bad terms with Moradin and Avandra. He has a cordial relationship with Erathis, who regards tyranny as just another form that civilization can take. Asmodeus and Bane still maintain a facade of friendship, at least until one is powerful and confident enough to actually overthrow the other.

It is said that Asmodeus owes Pazuzu a favor for his help in the war, and has not yet repaid him.

Asmodeus is devoted to oppression and might through subversive action. He imposes strict rules and harsh punishments on his followers. The cult of Asmodeus urges its adherents to seek power over others, to repay evil with further evil (an eye for an eye), to exploit kindness for personal gain, and to show no compassion for the weak and downtrodden. All done in the most legal possible manner of course, and never overtly.

Typical rhetoric from worshippers of Asmodeus will discuss "promoting personal excellence and independence," "taking care of one's own affairs" and "ridding oneself of weakness". Sometimes one will hear of "ascending to godhood", or "no gods, no masters". When harming innocents, their actions are discussed as "providing motivation to succeed". Most often, ritual practices are deeply secretive and not publicly discussed. Most followers will not publicly admit their worship of Asmodeus, as that would compromise their potential bargaining position for greater power over non-followers.

Though Asmodeus's faith is by far the largest of the diabolic cults, few of Asmodeus' followers are known by name. A notable exception is Christophe Jean Markosian, "The Devil Behind Thrones," a hierarch of the Horned Society. Most of Asmodeus's worshippers are based in the towns and cities of humans and demihumans, though Asmodeus has some monstrous followers as well. His cultists use his faith as a stepping stone to wealth and power. They form secret alliances, using their wealth and connections to bring status and power to other members of the society.

According to the Guide to Hell, though he has worshipers and does on occasion grant them clerical powers, his true identity as Ahriman makes him loath to expand his cult. This is because his true motivation is to spread atheism through the multiverse and make all believe that "gods" are not divine at all, but beings who have achieved great power. In his plan, when belief fails, the outer planes will cease to exist. As Ahriman the evil lawmaker of the whole of the cosmos and unfettered by belief himself, he can then remold the multiverse perfectly according to his desires, and this time not having to share in its creation with Jazirian: the good creator of the multiverse's orderly structure. There will be no remnant of chaos as a result, or any missing rules in this future outer ring of planes, which will be the exclusive domain of Asmodeus.[19]

In most lands, temples to Asmodeus are hidden subterranean complexes, though in places dominated by lawful evil, they may dominate the landscape. If a cult of Baalzebul overthrows the local government, cultists of Asmodeus typically assume control of their headquarters to bring the local diabolism into its "establishment phase."

Vassals

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Asmodeus on Nessus. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Adramalech – Chancellor of Hell, Keeper of Records (DR76).
  • Alastor the Grim, pit fiend – Executioner.
  • Baalberith (BAYL-bər-ith[46]), pit fiend – Major domo.
  • Bensozia – Consort of Asmodeus, Queen of Hell (Deceased) (DR76).
  • Buer – 15 companies of pit fiends (DR76).
  • Bune – 30 companies of cornugons (DR76).
  • Glasya – Daughter of Asmodeus and Bensozia, former Mistress of the Erinyes, now Lord of the Sixth (DR76).
  • Martinet, pit fiend – Constable.
  • Morax – 9 companies of pit fiends (DR76).
  • Phongor – Inquisitor of Hell (DR76).
  • Rimmon – 5 companies of gelugons (DR76).
  • The Spark Hunters – Lord Asmodeus's personal guard of 13 hamatula rangers/mortal hunters who capture and/or slay mortals who draw their master's ire.
  • Zagum – 30 companies of hamatula (DR76).
Enemies

Though he schemes against all the arch-devils, Asmodeus has a special hatred for Levistus.

As the Lord of Hell, Asmodeus oversees the Blood War against the chaotic demons and their demon prince leaders.[63][64][65]

Baatezu[edit]

Baatezu (bay-AT-eh-zoo) are the ruling race of Baator's nine hells. They are lawful and evil.
Abishai
[66][67] There are five kinds, easily distinguishable by color (black, blue, green, red, and white).
Advespa
[68] Female, wasp-like devils that patrol infernal skies.
Amnizu
[66][68] Short, stocky winged guardians of the gates of the Nine Hells.
Ayperobos
[66] Small, hateful devils that work together as a swarm to bring down larger foes.
Barbazu ("Bearded Devil")
[69] Ferocious warrior that frenzies with a saw-toothed glaive.
Barbazu, Half-Troll
[70]
Brachina ("Pleasure Devil")
[66] Devilish counterpart of the demonic succubus, and an advanced Erinyes.
Bueroza ("Steel Devil")
[66]
Cornugon ("Horned Devil")
[69]Gargoyle-like fiend armed with a spiked chain.
Dogai ("Assassin Devil")
[66]
Erinyes
[69] A fallen angel that delivers death from her fiery bow. The devilish counterpart to the demonic succubus. Based on the Erinyes from Greek myth.[71][72]
Excruciarch ("Pain Devil")
[66]
Falxugon ("Harvester Devil")
[66]
Gelugon ("Ice Devil")
[69] Insectile horror promising a cold death.
Ghargatula
[73] Dinosaurlike guardians with massive maw and a wicked stinger.
Hamatula ("Barbed Devil")
[69] Elite infernal warrior with impaling spikes.
Kocrachon
[73] Insectoid diabolical torturer.
Lemure
[69] Mindless, tormented creature that attacks in mobs. Cannon fodder in Blood War.
Logokron
[74] Delight in learning the personal truenames of their foes, then tormenting them or turning them into slaves.
Malebranche
[66][68] Hulking, horned warriors, enforcers, punishers, and mounts.
Merregon ("Legion Devil")
[66]
Narzugon
[66][75] Nightmare-riding elite cavalry.
Nupperibo
[66] A grossly fat devil, one of the least powerful of its kind.
Orthon
[66] Foot soldiers of Hell's armies specializing in killing demons.
Osyluth ("Bone Devil")
[69] Osyluths serve as the informers and police of the Nine Hells.
Paeliryon
[66][70] Disgusting spymasters with deforming fingernails. Slightly more powerful than Pit Fiends. Rarely encountered as they work behind the scenes where they manipulate others.
Pit Fiend
[69] Lord of devils, with great strength and deadly power.
Spinagon ("Spined Devil")
[66][75] Spike-covered eyes and ears of Baator.
Xerfilstyx
[66][70] Memory-stealing guardians of the River Styx in Avernus.

Non-Baatezu[edit]

  • Chain Devil (Kyton)[69][75] – Murderous torturer with an infernal command of chains.
  • Desert Devil (Araton)[76] – Scimitar-wielding desert-dwelling devils.
  • Hellcat (Bezekira)[69] – Infernal, invisible catlike devil the size of a tiger.
  • Hellfire Engine[66] – Constructs of cold iron made to combat celestials and demons. Enhanced with hellfire.
  • Imp[69] – Clever devil that aids evil mortals with dark counsel and trickery.
  • Imp, Filth[70] – Foul-smelling imp with a talent for forgery and translation.
  • Imp, Bloodbag[70] – Imp that serves as infernal nurse corps.
  • Imp, Euphoric[70] – Imp that serves as dealer of hallucinogenic slime.
  • Kalabon[66] – Devils spawned from the rotting flesh of the Hag Countess's carcass that can combine their individual bodies into large amalgamations which fights as a single creature.

Hellforged devils[edit]

A subgroup of devils, known as hellforged devils, were constructs that over time were transformed by the Nine Hells of Baator into living beings. They rigidly follow and enforce the laws of the Hells.[77]

  • Coal Devil: Enforcers and shock troops.
  • Glass Devil: Spies and watchers.
  • Lead Devil: Dispatched to capture prisoners alive.
  • Obsidian Devil: Police force of the Nine Hells.
  • Sand Devil: Spies and informers.
  • Spiked Devil: Covered with sharp iron spikes.

References[edit]

  1. ^Turnbull, Don (August–September 1978). "The Open Box, The Monster Manual". White Dwarf. 2 (8): 16–17.
  2. ^ abBebergal, Peter (2014). "Chapter 3: The Devil Rides Out". Season of the Witch: How the Occult Saved Rock and Roll. Penguin. ISBN .
  3. ^James M. Ward; "The Games Wizards: Angry Mothers From Heck (And what we do about them)" in Dragon #154
  4. ^ abGygax, Gary. Monster Manual (TSR, 1977)
  5. ^Turnbull, Don (August–September 1978). "Open Box". White Dwarf (8): 16–17.
  6. ^Von Thorn, Alexander. "The Politics of Hell." Dragon # 28 (TSR, 1979)
  7. ^Turnbull, Don, ed. Fiend Folio (TSR, 1981)
  8. ^Gygax, Gary. "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom." Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983)
  9. ^Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part I." Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983)
  10. ^Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part II." Dragon #76 (TSR, 1983)
  11. ^Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II (TSR, 1983)
  12. ^Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Revisited." Dragon #91 (TSR, 1984)
  13. ^Findley, Nigel D. "Caermor." Dungeon #2 (TSR, 1986)
  14. ^Perkins, Christopher, ed. Dungeons of Despair (TSR, 1999)
  15. ^LaFountain, J. Paul. Monstrous Compendium Volume Outer Planes Appendix. (TSR, 1991)
  16. ^Stewart, Doug, ed. Monstrous Manual (TSR, 1993)
  17. ^Varney, Allen, ed. Planescape Monstrous Compendium Appendix (TSR, 1994)
  18. ^McComb, Colin and Wolfgang Baur. Planes of Law (TSR, 1995)
  19. ^ abcdePramas, Chris. Guide to Hell (TSR, 1999)
  20. ^Carl, Jason, and Chris Pramas. The Apocalypse Stone (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  21. ^Cook, Monte, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  22. ^Wyatt, James and Rob Heinsoo. Monstrous Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn (Wizards of the Coast, 2001)
  23. ^Grubb, Jeff, David Noonan, and Bruce Cordell. Manual of the Planes (Wizards of the Coast, 2001)
  24. ^Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  25. ^Bonny, Ed, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Skip Williams, and Steve Winter. Monster Manual II (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  26. ^Cagle, Eric, Jesse Decker, James Jacobs, Erik Mona, Matt Sernett, Chris Thomasson, and James Wyatt. Fiend Folio (Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  27. ^Eckelberry, David, Rich Redman, and Jennifer Clarke Wilkes. Savage Species (Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  28. ^Mearls, Mike. "By Evil Bound." Dragon #306 (Paizo Publishing, April 2003)
  29. ^Cordell, Bruce R, Gwendolyn FM Kestrel, and Jeff Quick. Underdark (Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  30. ^Cordell, Bruce, and Gwendolyn F.M. Kestrel. Planar Handbook (Wizards of the Coast, 2004)
  31. ^Cordell, Bruce, Jennifer Clarke-Wilkes, and J.D. Wiker. Sandstorm (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)
  32. ^Boyd, Eric L, Jeff Crook, and Wil Upchurch. Champions of Ruin (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)
  33. ^Sernett, Matthew, Dave Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb. (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
  34. ^Laws, Robin D., and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
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  38. ^James Wyatt. Dungeon Masters Guide (Wizards of the Coast, 2008).
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  41. ^Kenreck, Todd; Mearls, Mike (7 February 2018). "Learn about the Blood War in 'Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes'". D&D Beyond. Retrieved 26 June 2019 – via YouTube.
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  43. ^Grubb, Jeff, David Noonan, and Bruce Cordell. Manual of the Planes (Wizards of the Coast, 2001)
  44. ^Laws, Robin D., and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells. Wizards of the Coast, 2006
  45. ^Francisco, Eric. "D&D Unveils a New Campaign That Creators Call "Mad Max in Hell"". Inverse. Retrieved 27 June 2019.
  46. ^ abMentzer, Frank. "Ay pronunseeAY shun gyd" Dragon #93 (TSR, 1985)
  47. ^DeVarque, Aardy. "Literary Sources of D&D". Archived from the original on 9 December 2007. Retrieved 23 February 2007.
  48. ^ abLarme, John. Dangerous Games? Censorship and "Child Protection" (2000).
  49. ^Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part II." Dragon #76 (TSR, 1983)
  50. ^Cook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  51. ^ abLaws, Robin D, and Robert J Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
  52. ^James Wyatt. Dungeon Masters Guide (Wizards of the Coast, 2008).
  53. ^Cordell, Bruce R., Ed Greenwood, and Chris Sims. Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  54. ^Wyatt, James, and Keith Baker. Eberron Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast, 2009)
  55. ^Baier, R. J. The Azurerain Pirates: City State Campaign InstallmentPegasus #6 (Judges Guild, 1981)
  56. ^Pramas, Chris. Legions of Hell, (Green Ronin Publishing, 2001)
  57. ^Loeb, Aaron., Mona, Erik., Pramas, Chris and Schwalb, Robert. Book of Fiends, (Green Ronin Publishing, 2003)
  58. ^Brown, Anne., Melka, Kevin and Ward, James M. Devilish Dens, (Fast Forward Entertainment, 2002)
  59. ^Pulling, Pat; Cawthon, Kathy (1989). The Devil's Web: Who Is Stalking Your Children for Satan?. Huntington House. p. 90. ISBN .
  60. ^Ravitts, Joseph R. (1981). "Monotheism in Fantasy". Pegasus. Judges Guild (4).
  61. ^Bornet, Philippe (2011). Religions in play: games, rituals, and virtual worlds. Theologischer Verlag Zürich. p. 282. ISBN . Retrieved 19 December 2019.
  62. ^Schwalb, Robert J. Elder Evils. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2007
  63. ^Brunner, Frank. "Strike on the Rabid Dawn." Dungeon #111 (Paizo Publishing, 2004).
  64. ^Larme, John. Dangerous Games? Censorship and "Child Protection"[3] (2000).
  65. ^Von Thorn, Alexander. "The Politics of Hell." Dragon # 28. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1979.
  66. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqrLaws, Robin D. and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006).
  67. ^Wyatt, James and Rob Heinsoo. Monstrous Compendium: Monsters of Faerûn (Wizards of the Coast, 2001).
  68. ^ abcBonny, Ed, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Skip Williams, and Steve Winter. Monster Manual II (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  69. ^ abcdefghijkWilliams, Skip, Jonathan Tweet, and Monte Cook. Monster Manual (Wizards of the Coast, 2000).
  70. ^ abcdefCagle, Eric, Jesse Decker, James Jacobs, Erik Mona, Matt Sernett, Chris Thomasson, and James Wyatt. Fiend Folio (Wizards of the Coast, 2003).
  71. ^DeVarque, Aardy. "Literary Sources of D&D". Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  72. ^Bornet, Philippe (2011). Religions in play: games, rituals, and virtual worlds. Zürich: Theologischer Verlag Zürich. p. 282. ISBN . Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  73. ^ abCook, Monte. Book of Vile Darkness (Wizards of the Coast, 2002).
  74. ^Sernett, Matthew, Dave Noonan, Ari Marmell, and Robert J. Schwalb. Tome of Magic: Pact, Shadow, and Truename Magic (Wizards of the Coast, 2006). Pg. 265.
  75. ^ abcGrubb, Jeff, David Noonan, and Bruce Cordell. Manual of the Planes (Wizards of the Coast, 2001).
  76. ^Cordell, Bruce, Jennifer Clarke-Wilkes, and JD Wiker. Sandstorm (Wizards of the Coast, 2005). Pg. 147.
  77. ^Mearls, Mike. "By Evil Bound." Dragon #306 (Paizo Publishing, April 2003). pg. 26–44.

Further reading[edit]

  • Fast Forward Entertainment. Encyclopedia of Demons and Devils. ISBN 0-9713234-3-7
  • Grubb, Jeff. Manual of the Planes (TSR, 1987). ISBN 0-7869-1850-0
  • Larme, John. Dangerous Games? Censorship and "Child Protection"[4] (2000).
  • McComb, Colin. Faces of Evil: The Fiends (TSR, 1997). ISBN 0-7869-0684-7
  • McComb, Colin, Dale Donovan, and Monte Cook. Planes of Conflict (TSR, 1995). ISBN 0-7869-0309-0
  • Stewart, Todd, and Paizo Staff. "1d20 Villains" Dragon #359 (Paizo Publishing, 2007).
  • Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual II, (TSR, Inc., 1983).
  • Wyatt, James and Rob Heinsoo. Monstrous Compendium: Monsters of Faerun (Wizards of the Coast, 2001) 12–13.
  • "Devil in the Details." Wizards of the Coast. 8 December 2006. 30 May 2007 <http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/dd/20061208a>.
  • Laws, Robin D., and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells. 1st ed. Renton WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2006. 108–112.
  • "A look Back at Devils". D&D Alumni. Wizards of the Coast. 12 December 2006. Retrieved 16 April 2007.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil_(Dungeons_%26_Dragons)

5e devil dnd

Devils

Medium fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 15 (natural armor)
Hit Points 110 (13d8 + 52)
Speed 30 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
16(+3)17(+3)18(+4)12(+1)14(+2)14(+2)

Saving Throws Str +6, Con +7, Wis +5, Cha +5
Skills Deception +5, Insight +5, Perception +8
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 18
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 5 (1,800 XP)

Barbed Hide. At the start of each of its turns, the barbed devil deals 5 (1d10) piercing damage to any creature grappling it.

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the devil’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The devil has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Multiattack. The devil makes three melee attacks: one with its tail and two with its claws. Alternatively, it can use Hurl Flame twice.

Claw. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (1d6 + 3) piercing damage.

Tail. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (2d6 + 3) piercing damage.

Hurl Flame. Ranged Spell Attack: +5 to hit, range 150 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (3d6) fire damage. If the target is a flammable object that isn’t being worn or carried, it also catches fire.

Medium fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 13 (natural armor)
Hit Points 52 (8d8 + 16)
Speed 30 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
16(+3)15(+2)15(+2)9(-1)11(+0)11(+0)

Saving Throws Str +5, Con +4, Wis +2
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 10
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 3 (700 XP)

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the devil’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The devil has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Steadfast. The devil can’t be frightened while it can see an allied creature within 30 feet of it.

Actions

Multiattack. The devil makes two attacks: one with its beard and one with its glaive.

Beard. Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one creature. Hit: 6 (1d8 + 2) piercing damage, and the target must succeed on a DC 12 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned for 1 minute. While poisoned in this way, the target can’t regain hit points. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Glaive. Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 8 (1d10 + 3) slashing damage. If the target is a creature other than an undead or a construct, it must succeed on a DC 12 Constitution saving throw or lose 5 (1d10) hit points at the start of each of its turns due to an infernal wound. Each time the devil hits the wounded target with this attack, the damage dealt by the wound increases by 5 (1d10). Any creature can take an action to stanch the wound with a successful DC 12 Wisdom (Medicine) check. The wound also closes if the target receives magical healing.

Large fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 19 (natural armor)
Hit Points 142 (15d10 + 60)
Speed 40 ft., fly 40 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
18(+4)16(+3)18(+4)13(+1)14(+2)16(+3)

Saving Throws Int +5, Wis +6, Cha +7
Skills Deception +7, Insight +6
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 12
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 9 (5,000 XP)

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the devil’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The devil has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Multiattack. The devil makes three attacks: two with its claws and one with its sting.

Claw.Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 8 (1d8 + 4) slashing damage.

Sting. Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 13 (2d8 + 4) piercing damage plus 17 (5d6) poison damage, and the target must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or become poisoned for 1 minute. The target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Medium fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 16 (natural armor)
Hit Points 85 (10d8 + 40)
Speed 30 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
18(+4)15(+2)18(+4)11(+0)12(+1)14(+2)

Saving Throws Con +7, Wis +4, Cha +5
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 11
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 8 (3,900 XP)

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the devil’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The devil has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Multiattack. The devil makes two attacks with its chains.

Chain. Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 11 (2d6 + 4) slashing damage. The target is grappled (escape DC 14) if the devil isn’t already grappling a creature. Until this grapple ends, the target is restrained and takes 7 (2d6) piercing damage at the start of each of its turns.

Animate Chains (Recharges after a Short or Long Rest). Up to four chains the devil can see within 60 feet of it magically sprout razor-edged barbs and animate under the devil’s control, provided that the chains aren’t being worn or carried.

Each animated chain is an object with AC 20, 20 hit points, resistance to piercing damage, and immunity to psychic and thunder damage. When the devil uses Multiattack on its turn, it can use each animated chain to make one additional chain attack. An animated chain can grapple one creature of its own but can’t make attacks while grappling. An animated chain reverts to its inanimate state if reduced to 0 hit points or if the devil is incapacitated or dies.

Reactions

Unnerving Mask. When a creature the devil can see starts its turn within 30 feet of the devil, the devil can create the illusion that it looks like one of the creature’s departed loved ones or bitter enemies. If the creature can see the devil, it must succeed on a DC 14 Wisdom saving throw or be frightened until the end of its turn.

Medium fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 18 (plate)
Hit Points 153 (18d8 + 32)
Speed 30 ft., fly 60 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
18(+4)16(+3)18(+4)14(+2)12(+1)14(+2)

Saving Throws Dex +7, Con +8, Wis +6, Cha +8
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 11
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 12 (8,400 XP)

Hellish Weapons. The erinyes’s weapon attacks are magical and deal an extra 13 (3d8) poison damage on a hit (included in the attacks).

Magic Resistance. The erinyes has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Multiattack. The erinyes makes three attacks.

Longsword. Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 8 (1d8 + 4) slashing damage, or 9 (1d10 + 4) slashing damage if used with two hands, plus 13 (3d8) poison damage.

Longbow. Ranged Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, range 150/600 ft., one target. Hit: 7 (1d8 + 3) piercing damage plus 13 (3d8) poison damage, and the target must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or be poisoned. The poison lasts until it is removed by the lesser restoration spell or similar magic.

Reactions

Parry. The erinyes adds 4 to its AC against one melee attack that would hit it. To do so, the erinyes must see the attacker and be wielding a melee weapon.

Medium fiend (devil), lawful evil 

Armor Class 18 (plate)
Hit Points 178 (17d10 + 85)
Speed 20 ft., fly 60 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
22(+6)17(+3)21(+5)12(+1)16(+3)14(+2)

Saving Throws Str +10, Dex +7, Wis +7, Cha +7
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 11
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 11 (7,200 XP)

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the devil’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The devil has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Multiattack. The devil makes three melee attacks: two with its fork and one with its tail. It can use Hurl Flame in place of any melee attack.

Fork. Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (2d8 + 6) piercing damage.

Tail. Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (1d8 + 6) piercing damage. If the target is a creature other than an undead or a construct, it must succeed on a DC 17 Constitution saving throw or lose 10 (3d6) hit points at the start of each of its turns due to an infernal wound. Each time the devil hits the wounded target with this attack, the damage dealt by the wound increases by 10 (3d6). Any creature can take an action to stanch the wound with a successful DC 12 Wisdom (Medicine) check. The wound also closes if the target receives magical healing.

Hurl Flame.Ranged Spell Attack: +7 to hit, range 150 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (4d6) fire damage. If the target is a flammable object that isn’t being worn or carried, it also catches fire.

Large fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 18 (natural armor)
Hit Points 180 (19d10 + 76)
Speed 40 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
21(+5)14(+2)18(+4)18(+4)15(+2)18(+4)

Saving Throws Dex +7, Con +9, Wis +7, Cha +7
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 11
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 11 (7,200 XP)

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the devil’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The devil has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Multiattack. The devil makes three attacks: one with its bite, one with its claws, and one with its tail.

Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 12 (2d6 + 5) piercing damage plus 10 (3d6) cold damage. Claws. Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 10 (2d4 + 5) slashing damage plus 10 (3d6) cold damage.

Tail.Melee Weapon Attack: +10 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 12 (2d6 + 5) bludgeoning damage plus 10 (3d6) cold damage.

Wall of Ice (Recharge 6). The devil magically forms an opaque wall of ice on a solid surface it can see within 60 feet of it. The wall is 1 foot thick and up to 30 feet long and 10 feet high, or it’s a hemispherical dome up to 20 feet in diameter. When the wall appears, each creature in its space is pushed out of it by the shortest route. The creature chooses which side of the wall to end up on, unless the creature is incapacitated. The creature then makes a DC 17 Dexterity saving throw, taking 35 (10d6) cold damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.

The wall lasts for 1 minute or until the devil is incapacitated or dies. The wall can be damaged and breached; each 10-foot section has AC 5, 30 hit points, vulnerability to fire damage, and immunity to acid, cold, necrotic, poison, and psychic damage. If a section is destroyed, it leaves behind a sheet of frigid air in the space the wall occupied. Whenever a creature finishes moving through the frigid air on a turn, willingly or otherwise, the creature must make a DC 17 Constitution saving throw, taking 17 (5d6) cold damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. The frigid air dissipates when the rest of the wall vanishes.

Tiny fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 13
Hit Points 10 (3d4 + 3)
Speed 20 ft., fly 40 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
6(-2)17(+3)13(+1)11(+0)12(+1)14(+2)

Skills Deception +4, Insight +3, Persuasion +4, Stealth +5
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 11
Languages Infernal, Common
Challenge 1 (200 XP)

Shapechanger. The imp can use its action to polymorph into a beast form that resembles a rat (speed 20 ft.), a raven (20 ft., fly 60 ft.), or a spider (20 ft., climb 20 ft.), or back into its true form. Its statistics are the same in each form, except for the speed changes noted. Any equipment it is wearing or carrying isn’t transformed. It reverts to its true form if it dies.

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the imp’s darkvision.

Magic Resistance. The imp has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Actions

Sting (Bite in Beast Form).Melee Weapon Attack: +5 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 5 (1d4 + 3) piercing damage, and the target must make on a DC 11 Constitution saving throw, taking 10 (3d6) poison damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one.

Invisibility. The imp magically turns invisible until it attacks or until its concentration ends (as if concentrating on a spell). Any equipment the imp wears or carries is invisible with it.

Tiny fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 13
Hit Points 13 (3d8)
Speed 15 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
10(+0)5(-3)11(+0)1(-5)11(+0)3(-4)

Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities charmed, frightened, poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 10
Languages understands Infernal but can't speak
Challenge 0 (10 XP)

Devil’s Sight. Magical darkness doesn’t impede the lemure’s darkvision.

Hellish Rejuvenation. A lemure that dies in the Nine Hells comes back to life with all its hit points in 1d10 days unless it is killed by a good-aligned creature with a bless spell cast on that creature or its remains are sprinkled with holy water.

Actions

Fist. Melee Weapon Attack: +3 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 2 (1d4) bludgeoning damage.

Large fiend (devil), lawful evil

Armor Class 18 (natural armor)
Hit Points 180 (19d10 + 76)
Speed 40 ft.

STRDEXCONINTWISCHA
21(+5)14(+2)18(+4)18(+4)15(+2)18(+4)

Saving Throws Dex +7, Con +9, Wis +7, Cha +7
Damage Resistances cold; bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical attacks that aren't silvered
Damage Immunities fire, poison
Condition Immunities poisoned
Senses darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 11
Languages Infernal, telepathy 120 ft.
Challenge 11 (7,200 XP)

Fear Aura. Any creature hostile to the pit fiend that starts its turn within 20 feet of the pit fiend must make a DC 21 Wisdom saving throw, unless the pit fiend is incapacitated. On a failed save, the creature is frightened until the start of its next turn. If a creature’s saving throw is successful, the creature is immune to the pit fiend’s Fear Aura for the next 24 hours.

Magic Resistance. The pit fiend has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects.

Magic Weapons. The pit fiend’s weapon attacks are magical.

Innate Spellcasting. The pit fiend’s spellcasting ability is Charisma (spell save DC 21). The pit fiend can innately cast the following spells, requiring no material components:
At will: detect magic, fireball
3/day each: hold monster, wall of fire

Actions

Multiattack. The pit fiend makes four attacks: one with its bite, one with its claw, one with its mace, and one with its tail.

Bite.Melee Weapon Attack: +14 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 22 (4d6 + 8) piercing damage. The target must succeed on a DC 21 Constitution saving throw or become poisoned. While poisoned in this way, the target can’t regain hit points, and it takes 21 (6d6) poison damage at the start of each of its turns. The poisoned target can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Claw. Melee Weapon Attack: +14 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 17 (2d8 + 8) slashing damage.

Mace.Melee Weapon Attack: +14 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 15 (2d6 + 8) bludgeoning damage plus 21 (6d6) fire damage.

Tail.Melee Weapon Attack: +14 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 24 (3d10 + 8) bludgeoning damage.

Sours: http://5e.d20srd.org/srd/monsters/devils.htm
D\u0026D MONSTER RANKINGS - DEVILS

They went to the bar. I said calmly, not even to Anya so as to somehow defuse the situation. At the bar.

Similar news:

Without making any attempts to free herself, she said frightenedly. I began to cover her face with hot kisses, her neck. The chest visible in the neckline of the dress.



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