Matthew 7 6 niv

Matthew 7 6 niv DEFAULT

Matthew 7:6

Matthew 7:6

Give not that which is holy to the dogs
Dogs were unclean creatures by the law; the price of one might not be brought into the house of the Lord, for a vow, ( Deuteronomy 23:18 ) yea, these creatures were not admitted into several temples of the Heathens {h}. Things profane and unclean, as flesh torn by beasts, were ordered to be given to them, ( Exodus 22:31 ) but nothing that was holy was to be given them, as holy flesh, or the holy oblations, or anything that was consecrated to holy uses; to which is the allusion here. It is a common maxim F9 with the Jews,

``(Myblkl Nlykahl Myvdqh ta Nydwp Nyav) , "that they do not redeem holy things, to give to the dogs to eat".''
Here the phrase is used in a metaphorical sense; and is generally understood of not delivering or communicating the holy word of God, and the truths of the Gospel, comparable to pearls, or the ordinances of it, to persons notoriously vile and sinful: to men, who being violent and furious persecutors, and impudent blasphemers, are compared to "dogs"; or to such, who are scandalously vile, impure in their lives and conversations, and are therefore compared to swine;

neither cast ye your pearls before swine.
But since the subject Christ is upon is reproof, it seems rather to be the design of these expressions, that men should be cautious, and prudent, in rebuking and admonishing such persons for their sins, in whom there is no appearance or hope of success; yea, where there is danger of sustaining loss;

lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend
you:
that is, despise the admonitions and reproofs given, and hurt the persons who give them, either by words or deeds; see ( Proverbs 9:7Proverbs 9:8 ) . The Jews have some sayings much like these, and will serve to illustrate them F11;

``(Myryzxh ynpl Mynynph wkylvt la) , "do not cast pearls before swine", nor deliver wisdom to him, who knows not the excellency of it; for wisdom is better than pearls, and he that does not seek after it, is worse than a swine.''

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Matthew 7:6

Bible verse from the book of Matthew

"Pearls before swine" redirects here. For other uses, see Pearls before swine (disambiguation).

Matthew 7:6 is the sixth verse of the seventh chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament and is part of the Sermon on the Mount.[1]

Content[edit]

The original Koine Greek, according to Westcott and Hort, reads:

μὴ δῶτε τὸ ἅγιον τοῖς κυσὶν μηδὲ βάλητε τοὺς μαργαρίτας
ὑμῶν ἔμπροσθεν τῶν χοίρων μήποτε καταπατήσουσιν αὐτοὺς
ἐν τοῖς ποσὶν αὐτῶν καὶ στραφέντες ῥήξωσιν ὑμᾶς

In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads:

Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast
ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them
under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

The World English Bible translates the passage as:

Don’t give that which is holy to the dogs, neither throw
your pearls before the pigs, lest perhaps they trample
them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

For a collection of other versions see BibleHub Matthew 7:6

Analysis[edit]

This well known verse, which has no parallel elsewhere in the New Testament, is a difficult one to interpret. There is much debate over what is represented by the holy and by the unclean animals. How it is linked to the previous and proceeding verses is also in question.

Historical context[edit]

At the time both dogs and pigs were poorly regarded. Dogs were part of society, but were half wild and roamed the region in packs that were sometimes dangerous to humans. The word used here refers specifically to dogs without a human master.[2] They were unclean and would eat whatever scraps and carrion they came across. Pigs were the quintessential unclean animal and were closely associated with the Gentile communities in the region which kept them in large numbers. Pearls were a luxury of extreme value.

Another question raised by this metaphor is what link there is between pearls and pigs. One suggestion is that a related metaphor is found in Proverbs 11:22: "Like a gold ring in a pig's snout is a beautiful woman without discretion."[1]: 451  Alternatively the word pearls can be seen as a reference to the food prepared on holy days, which would never have been given to swine. Alternatively the metaphor may be a reference to the immense appetites of pigs, and to how enraged they will be when they discover they cannot eat the pearls, and since they have no understanding of their greater value, will turn on the giver.[3]

Nolland notes the work of Von Lips that advocates for two separate meanings. Pigs and dogs were thought of very differently. Parables from the period portray such dogs as dangerous urban animals. Pigs, while unclean, were docile and nonthreatening. Similarly while what is holy is clearly something of God's, pearls were a sign of secular wealth with no religious connotations.[4]

Interpretations[edit]

The metaphor seems to be teaching against giving what is considered just or holy to those who do not appreciate it. Animals such as dogs and pigs cannot appreciate ethics, and this verse implies that there is even some class of human beings who cannot, either.

Historically, a common view was that this verse refers to the Eucharist, as exemplified in the Didache, which teaches that only baptized individuals ought to receive the Eucharist.[5]

One modern argument is that dogs and pigs represent Gentiles and heathens, and that this verse is demonstrating that Jesus' original message was intended only for the Jews. Harrington notes that such warnings are found in rabbinic works of the period.[6] In Jewish literature heathens were often compared to dogs, and the unclean pig was a Jewish symbol for the Roman Empire. In 2 Peter 2:22, dogs and swine quite clearly refers to heretics. According to Schweizer this verse was used by Jewish Christians to attack the Gentile churches, to argue that Gentile Christians would turn on the Jews by rejecting their laws and destroying Israel.[7]

The dominant reading is that the two expressions are both referring to the same thing and the same group of people. To Nolland this verse is not an attack on any particular group, but rather a continuation of the theme of God and Mammon begun at Matthew 6:24 and that verse is an attack on wasteful spending. We should put all of our resources to God, as everything is like dogs and pigs compared to him.[4] Nolland also proposes that the verse might be to balance the other verses, that non-judgmentalism can only go so far and that there are some who should be excluded.[4]

As Morris points out, this verse can also be read as a reasonable limit on evangelism. If a population or individual is not open to Christianity, leave and find a more receptive audience. As Morris points out Jesus was silent before Herod and Paul abandoned the unsympathetic city of Corinth. Fowler links this to the earlier discussion of judgment. One should not judge severely, but there is a point at which any reasonable person will realize that those they are dealing with are dogs and swine.[8]

The alternative interpretation is that dogs and pigs are not metaphors for some group of people, but for the unholy in general. This verse is not about excluding some group from God's teaching, but rather ensuring that those things that are God's are kept holy. Thus the Temple is kept clean, religious meals treated with respect, and holy days honoured and kept separate from the turbulence and impiety of daily life.

In Divine Conspiracy, Dallas Willard offers another interpretation. In it, Jesus is not speaking of a wonderful treasure (the pearl), or whether the audience is fit to have it (the swine). Instead, he is observing that the pearl is not helpful. "Pigs cannot digest pearls, cannot nourish themselves upon them." He concludes that this reflects "our efforts to correct and control others by pouring out our good things" that our audience is not ready for, and that our seemingly good intentions will ultimately yield anger, resentment and attack by the audience. This turns the analogy into one that exposes one's self-superiority in thinking the other needs the unbidden advice.[9]

All those points aside, one might usefully[citation needed] read through Matthew 13[10] when interpreting the phrase. The "pearls" may be like the seed sown by the farmer. If the farmer continues to sow on the rocky places, path or among thorns he may be foolish. The farmer may be wiser to sow in the good soil; or suffer weaker harvests (albeit the crops that do grow among weeds and/or thorns or in other, harder, places may prove more hardy: having survived and then been considered "good enough to keep" by the farmer despite the effects of the weeds and/or thorns). Like the seeds, pearls (of wisdom) placed before swine might simply be swallowed without being digested: repeated without understanding (perhaps as Jesus saw others of his time repeating scripture without understanding it). Matthew 13:44-46 opens this interpretation up a little further. As a more contemporary note, it is worth[citation needed] considering the sowing parables in light of subsequent monastic thought on selective breeding (see Augustinian Friar, Gregor Mendel and peas): the seeds from the crops that survived the weeds, thorns, path or rock may provide stronger, more durable, seed for sowing in all types of situation - albeit there may be differences in taste and quality to consider too.

One other interpretation reads this verse in light of the ones immediately preceding it (7:1–5) where instruction is given to not judge a brother and to remove the log from one’s own eye before removing the speck from the eye of another. In this interpretation, the “holy things” and the “pearls” are the “brother” who might be cast amongst the “dogs” and the “swine” of the world by such actions. [11][12]

In popular culture[edit]

The phrase "pearls before swine" has become a common expression in English. A film was made in 1999, Pearls Before Swine (film) starring Boyd Rice and Douglas P., directed by Richard Wolstencroft. There is a Pearls Before Swine comic strip, a Pearls Before Swine American psychedelic folk band, and Pearls Before Swine is an alternate title for Kurt Vonnegut's novel God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater.

In the play "A Streetcar Named Desire" by Tennessee Williams, there is a reference: "But I have been foolish – casting my pearls before swine!" referring to this verse.

In the 1954 musical film "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" the verse is quoted by Milly after comparing her new husband and his brothers to hogs for failing to say grace and for the way they rudely and voraciously began eating the first dinner she had prepared in her new home.

In Aerosmith’s 1994 song “Eat the Rich” they say “But there’s one good thing that happens when you toss your pearls to swine.”

In an 2019 episode during the fall final season of Fox network's "Empire", actor Terrence Howard's character, Lucious Lyon, says "Let's not cast pearl before swine" when meeting his rival character Damon Cross, played by Wood Harris.

A common version of the saying in Spanish is echar margaritas a los cerdos, lit. 'to cast daisies before swine'. This comes from translating Greek μαργαρίτας (margarítas) as its Spanish false friendmargaritas ("daisies").[13]

[edit]

Augustine: Because the simplicity to which He had been directing in the foregoing precepts might lead some wrongly to conclude that it was equally wrong to hide the truth as to utter what was false, He well adds, Give not that which is holy to the dogs, and cast not your pearls before swine.

Pseudo-Chrysostom: Otherwise; The Lord had commanded us to love our enemies, and to do good to those that sin against us. That from this Priests might not think themselves obliged to communicate also the things of God to such, He checked any such thought saying, Give not that which is holy to the dogs; as much as to say, I have bid you love your enemies, and do them good out of your temporal goods, but not out of My spiritual goods, without distinction. For they are your brethren by nature but not by faith, and God gives the good things of this life equally to the worthy and the unworthy, but not so spiritual graces.

Augustine: Let us see now what is the holy thing, what are the dogs, what the pearls, what the swine? The holy thing is all that it were impiety to corrupt; a sin which may be committed by the will, though the thing itself be undone. The pearls are all spiritual things that are to be highly esteemed. Thus though one and the same thing may be called both the holy thing and a pearl, yet it is called holy because it is not to be corrupted; and called a pearl because it is not to be contemned.

Pseudo-Chrysostom: Otherwise; That which is holy denotes baptism, the grace of Christ’s body, and the like; but the mysteries of the truth are intended by the pearls. For as pearls are inclosed in shells, and such in the deeps of the sea, so the divine mysteries inclosed in words are lodged in the deep meaning of Holy Scripture.

Chrysostom: And to those that are right-minded and have understanding, when revealed they appear good; but to those without understanding, they seem to be more deserving reverence because they are not understood.

Augustine: The dogs are those that assault the truth; the swine we may not unsuitably take for those that despise the truth. Therefore because dogs leap forth to rend in pieces, and what they rend, suffer not to continue whole, He said, Give not that which is holy to the dogs; because they strive to the utmost of their power to destroy the truth. The swine though they do not assault by biting as dogs, yet do they defile by trampling upon, and therefore He said, Cast not your pearls before swine.

Rabanus Maurus: Or; The dogs are returned to their vomit; the swine not yet returned, but wallowing in the mire of vices.

Pseudo-Chrysostom: Otherwise; The dog and the swine are unclean animals; the dog indeed in every respect, as he neither chews the cud, nor divides the hoof; but swine in one respect only, seeing they divide the hoof, though they do not chew the cud. Hence I think that we are to understand by the dog, the Gentiles who are altogether unclean, both in their life, and in their faith; but by the swine are to be understood heretics, because they seem to call upon the name of the Lord. Give not therefore that which is holy to the dogs, for that baptism and the other sacraments are not to be given but to them that have the faith. In like manner the mysteries of the truth, that is, the pearls, are not to be given but to such as desire the truth and live with human reason. If then you cast them to the swine, that is, to such as are grovelling in impurity of life, they do not understand their preciousness, but value them like to other worldly fables, and tread them under foot with their carnal life.

Augustine: That which is despised is said to be trodden under foot: hence it is said, Lest perchance they tread them under foot.

Glossa Ordinaria: He says, Lest perchance, because it may be that they will wisely turn from their uncleannessa.

Augustine: That which follows, Turn again and rend you, He means not the pearls themselves, for these they tread under foot, and when they turn again that they may hear something further, then they rend him by whom the pearls on which they had trode had been cast. For you will not easily find what will please him who has despised things got by great toil. Whoever then undertake to teach such, I see not how they shall not be trode upon and rent by those they teach.

Pseudo-Chrysostom: Or; The swine not only trample upon the pearls by their carnal life, but after a little they turn, and by disobedience rend those who offend them. Yea often when offended they bring false accusation against them as sowers of new dogmas. The dogs also having trode upon holy things by their impure actions, by their disputings rend the preacher of truth.

Chrysostom: Well is that said, Lest they turn; for they feign meekness that they may learn; and when they have learned, they attack.

Pseudo-Chrysostom: With good reason He forbade pearls to be given to swine. For if they are not to be set before swine that are the less unclean, how much more are they to be withheld from dogs that are so much more unclean. But respecting the giving that which is holy, we cannot hold the same opinion; seeing we often give the benediction to Christians who live as the brutes; and that not because they deserve to receive it, but lest perchance being more grievously offended they should perish utterly.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abBaasland, Ernst (2015). "7.4". Parables and Rhetoric in the Sermon on the Mount: New Approaches to a Classic Text. Tubingen, DE: Mohr Siebeck.
  2. ^Harrington, Daniel J. The Gospel of Matthew. Liturgical Press, 1991 pg. 322
  3. ^Hill, David. The Gospel of Matthew. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1981.
  4. ^ abcNolland, John. The Gospel of Matthew: a commentary on the Greek text. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2005 pg. 198
  5. ^The Didache. Translated by Riddle. Ch. 9. Archived from the original on June 17, 2016.
  6. ^Harrington, Daniel J. The Gospel of Matthew. Liturgical Press, 1991 pg. 103.
  7. ^Schweizer, Eduard. The Good News According to Matthew. Atlanta: John Knox Press, 1975.
  8. ^Morris, Leon. The Gospel According to Matthew. Grand Rapids: W.B. Eerdmans, pg. 168 1992.
  9. ^Dallas Willard, Divine Conspiracy, HarperCollins, 1998, ISBN 0061972770, p. 228.
  10. ^"Bible Gateway passage: Matthew 13 - New International Version". Bible Gateway. Retrieved 2017-11-05.
  11. ^"Relevant Bible Teaching - Pearls Before Swine". www.relevantbibleteaching.com. Retrieved 2019-02-23.
  12. ^Lutheran Study Bible. St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House. 2009. p. 1592.
  13. ^Pérez Atanet, Carlos (2016-09-09). "Del dicho al hecho histórico: ¿de dónde viene la expresión «darles margaritas a los cerdos»?". www.ui1.es (in Spanish). Universidad Isabel I. Retrieved 5 September 2021. It references García Estradé, María del Carmen (2013). "Los modismos religiosos en la paremiología española: un patrimonio inmaterial de la cultura cristiana". Patrimonio inmaterial de la cultura cristiana (in Spanish). Ediciones Escurialenses. p. 119-146.
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“Don’t give a smoker money to a good meal because he will just more cigarettes,” says Waymon, 9.
The dangers of smoking are well documented, but I don’t think Jesus had smokes in mind here. If you’re puffing two packs a day, your throat and lungs may feel like fried bacon, but that’s another matter.
One of the most troubling interpretations comes from Jacob, 6: “I would never give my sister my toy.” Hold on there, Jacob! If you’re using this verse to justify “hogging” your toys, it won’t work.
Remember the three rules for interpreting the Bible or any text: context, context and context. Let’s look at this verse in a slightly larger context: “Do not give what is holy to the dogs; nor cast your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you in pieces” (Matthew 7:6).
Here we have dogs, pearls, swine and someone being ripped to shreds. What’s going on here?
The big clue is the first part of the verse, “Do not give what is holy to the dogs.” Something holy is forbidden for dogs. I know this will be hard for dog lovers to believe, but at the time Jesus spoke these words, dogs were not man’s best friend. They usually traveled in packs and were very dangerous.
To call someone a “dog” in the first century was the lowest insult. As they say in Texas, “Them is fightin’ words.”
The only thing worse than being called a “dog” was to be called a “pig.” It’s still very effective today. Under the dietary laws given by God for Israel, the pig was a forbidden, unclean animal. It was common for first-century Jews to refer to Gentiles as swine because they considered them unclean.
One thing is sure. Jesus didn’t try to appease scoffers.
He purposely offended them.
Let’s look to Jennifer, 10, for more light on what Jesus meant: “Jesus said don’t give your pearls to a pig because a pig is too dumb to understand what a pearl is worth.”
Spiritual dumbness has nothing to do with one’s IQ. You can be a certified genius yet be dumb as a rock in spiritual matters.
But the warning here involves more than spiritual dumbness as in pigs trampling underfoot valuable pearls. There’s a parallel thought at the end of the verse that refers back to the dogs.
What is this holy thing that causes dogs to turn on you and tear you to pieces? For the answer, we turn to Sarah, 12: “Don’t try to give the gospel to people who have already rejected it.”
This could be called the General Patton strategy for spreading the good news. Instead of going through fortifications, Patton’s tank commanders went around them.
Jesus spoke of religious leaders who were offended by what he said: “Let them alone. They are blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind leads the blind, both will fall into a ditch” (Matthew 15:14).
Don’t waste your time preaching to those who are obviously hardened and scornful.
Think about this: The pearl of great value in the Gospel of Matthew is the Messianic king and kingdom foretold by the ancient prophets.
Memorize this truth: Matthew 7:6 previously quoted.
Ask this question: Then and now, some see Jesus Christ as the promised Messiah and trust him as their savior, while others mock and scornfully reject him. Which will you do?

By Carey Kinsolving

Sours: https://easttexasreview.com/why-did-jesus-say-dont-cast-your-pearls-before-swine/

Matthew 7:6

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6 “Donotgivedogswhatissacred; donotthrowyourpearlstopigs. If you do, theymaytramplethemundertheirfeet, andturnandtearyoutopieces.

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Matthew 7:6 — English Standard Version (ESV)

6 “Donotgivedogswhatisholy, anddonotthrowyourpearlsbeforepigs, lesttheytramplethemunderfootandturntoattackyou.

Matthew 7:6 — King James Version (KJV 1900)

6 Givenotthatwhichisholyuntothedogs, neithercastyeyourpearlsbeforeswine, lesttheytramplethemundertheirfeet, andturnagainandrendyou.

Matthew 7:6 — New Living Translation (NLT)

6 “Don’twastewhatisholyonpeoplewhoareunholy.Don’tthrowyourpearlstopigs! Theywilltramplethepearls,thenturnandattackyou.

Matthew 7:6 — The New King James Version (NKJV)

6 “Donotgivewhatisholytothedogs; norcastyourpearlsbeforeswine, lesttheytramplethemundertheirfeet, andturnandtearyouinpieces.

Matthew 7:6 — New Century Version (NCV)

6 “Don’t give holy things to dogs, and don’t throw your pearls before pigs. Pigs will only trample on them, and dogs will turn to attack you.

Matthew 7:6 — American Standard Version (ASV 1901)

6 Givenotthatwhichisholyuntothedogs, neithercastyourpearlsbeforetheswine, lesthaplytheytramplethemundertheirfeet, andturnandrendyou.

Matthew 7:6 — 1890 Darby Bible (DARBY)

6 Give not that which is holy to the dogs, nor cast your pearls before the swine, lest they trample them with their feet, and turning round rend you.

Matthew 7:6 — GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)

6 “Don’t give what is holy to dogs or throw your pearls to pigs. Otherwise, they will trample them and then tear you to pieces.

Matthew 7:6 — The Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB)

6 Don’tgivewhatisholytodogsortossyourpearlsbeforepigs, ortheywilltramplethemwiththeirfeet, turn, andtearyoutopieces.

Matthew 7:6 — The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

6 “Donotgivewhatisholytodogs; anddonotthrowyourpearlsbeforeswine, ortheywilltramplethemunderfootandturnandmaulyou.

Matthew 7:6 — The Lexham English Bible (LEB)

6 “Do not give what is holy to dogs, or throw your pearls in front of pigs, lest they trample them with their feet, and turn around and tear you to pieces.

Matthew 7:6 — New International Reader’s Version (NIrV)

6 “Do not give holy things to dogs. Do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they might walk all over them. Then they might turn around and tear you to pieces.

Matthew 7:6 — New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update (NASB95)

6 “Donotgivewhatisholytodogs, anddonotthrowyourpearlsbeforeswine, ortheywilltramplethemundertheirfeet, andturnandtearyoutopieces.


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 Context  Crossref  Comment  Greek 

Verse  (Click for Chapter)

New International Version
“Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

New Living Translation
“Don’t waste what is holy on people who are unholy. Don’t throw your pearls to pigs! They will trample the pearls, then turn and attack you.

English Standard Version
“Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you.

Berean Study Bible
Do not give dogs what is holy; do not throw your pearls before swine. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and then turn and tear you to pieces.

Berean Literal Bible
Do not give that which is holy to the dogs, nor cast your pearls before the pigs, lest they shall trample upon them with their feet, and having turned, tear you to pieces.

King James Bible
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

New King James Version
“Do not give what is holy to the dogs; nor cast your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you in pieces.

New American Standard Bible
“Do not give what is holy to dogs, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, or they will trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

NASB 1995
“Do not give what is holy to dogs, and do not throw your pearls before swine, or they will trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

NASB 1977
“Do not give what is holy to dogs, and do not throw your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

Amplified Bible
“Do not give that which is holy to dogs, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, for they will trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

Christian Standard Bible
Don’t give what is holy to dogs or toss your pearls before pigs, or they will trample them under their feet, turn, and tear you to pieces.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Don’t give what is holy to dogs or toss your pearls before pigs, or they will trample them with their feet, turn, and tear you to pieces.

American Standard Version
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast your pearls before the swine, lest haply they trample them under their feet, and turn and rend you.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Do not give a sacrifice to dogs; neither throw your pearls before wild boars, lest they trample them with their feet, and return to run you through.

Contemporary English Version
Don't give to dogs what belongs to God. They will only turn and attack you. Don't throw pearls down in front of pigs. They will trample all over them.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Give not that which is holy to dogs; neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest perhaps they trample them under their feet, and turning upon you, they tear you.

English Revised Version
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast your pearls before the swine, lest haply they trample them under their feet, and turn and rend you.

Good News Translation
"Do not give what is holy to dogs--they will only turn and attack you. Do not throw your pearls in front of pigs--they will only trample them underfoot.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"Don't give what is holy to dogs or throw your pearls to pigs. Otherwise, they will trample them and then tear you to pieces.

International Standard Version
"Never give what is holy to dogs or throw your pearls before pigs. Otherwise, they will trample them with their feet and then turn around and attack you."

Literal Standard Version
You may not give that which is [holy] to the dogs, nor cast your pearls before the pigs, that they may not trample them among their feet, and having turned—may tear you apart.

NET Bible
Do not give what is holy to dogs or throw your pearls before pigs; otherwise they will trample them under their feet and turn around and tear you to pieces.

New Heart English Bible
"Do not give that which is holy to the dogs, neither throw your pearls before the pigs, or they will trample them under their feet and turn and tear you to pieces.

Weymouth New Testament
"Give not that which is holy to the dogs, nor throw your pearls to the swine; otherwise they will trample them under their feet and then turn and attack you.

World English Bible
"Don't give that which is holy to the dogs, neither throw your pearls before the pigs, lest perhaps they trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

Young's Literal Translation
Ye may not give that which is holy to the dogs, nor cast your pearls before the swine, that they may not trample them among their feet, and having turned -- may rend you.

Additional Translations ...

Context

Do Not Judge
…5You hypocrite! First take the beam out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye. 6Do notgivedogswhat isholy;do notthrowyourpearlsbeforeswine.If you do,they may tramplethemundertheirfeet,andthen turn andtear you to pieces.7Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and the door will be opened to you.…

Berean Study Bible · Download



Cross References

Proverbs 9:8
Do not rebuke a mocker, or he will hate you; rebuke a wise man, and he will love you.

Proverbs 23:9
Do not speak to a fool, for he will despise the wisdom of your words.

Proverbs 26:4
Do not answer a fool according to his folly, or you yourself will be like him.

Matthew 7:5
You hypocrite! First take the beam out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye.

Matthew 15:26
But Jesus replied, "It is not right to take the children's bread and toss it to the dogs."

Revelation 22:15
But outside are the dogs, the sorcerers, the sexually immoral, the murderers, the idolaters, and everyone who loves and practices falsehood.



Treasury of Scripture

Give not that which is holy to the dogs, neither cast you your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

that.

Matthew 10:14,15
And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear your words, when ye depart out of that house or city, shake off the dust of your feet…

Matthew 15:26
But he answered and said, It is not meet to take the children's bread, and to cast it to dogs.

Proverbs 9:7,8
He that reproveth a scorner getteth to himself shame: and he that rebuketh a wicked man getteth himself a blot…

cast.

Proverbs 11:22
As a jewel of gold in a swine's snout, so is a fair woman which is without discretion.

turn.

Matthew 22:5,6
But they made light of it, and went their ways, one to his farm, another to his merchandise: …

Matthew 24:10
And then shall many be offended, and shall betray one another, and shall hate one another.

2 Corinthians 11:26
In journeyings often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils by mine own countrymen, in perils by the heathen, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren;





Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) That which is holy.--The words point to the flesh which has been offered for sacrifice, the "holy thing" of Leviticus 22:6-7; Leviticus 22:10; Leviticus 22:16, of which no un clean person or stranger, and a fortiorino unclean beast, was to eat. To give that holy flesh to dogs would have seemed to the devout Israelite the greatest of all profanations. Our Lord teaches us that there is a like risk of desecration in dealing with the yet holier treasure of divine truth. Another aspect of the same warning is brought out in the second clause. The fashion of the time had made pearls the costliest of all jewels, as in the parable of Matthew 13:45(comp. also 1Timothy 2:9), and so they too became symbols of the preciousness of truth. The "dogs" and the "swine," in their turn, represent distinct forms of evil, the former being here, as in Philippians 3:2, Revelation 22:15, the type of impurity, the latter (as in Psalm 80:13) of ferocity. The second comparison may possibly imply, as in a condensed fable, the disappointment and consequent rage of the swine at finding that what they took for grain was only pearls. We are to beware lest we so present the truth, either in direct teaching or by an undiscerning disclosure of the deeper religious emotions of the soul, to men, that we make them worse and not better than before. . . .

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 6.- Matthew only. Give not thatwhich is holy,etc. While you are not to be censorious towards brethren (vers. 1-5), you must recognize the great and fundamental differences that there are between men. You must not treat those who are mere dogs and swine as if they were able to appreciate either the holiness or the beauty and wealth of spiritual truth. GiveObserve that "give," "cast," are naturally used of feeding dogs and swine respectively. That which is holy(τὸ ἅγιον). The metaphor is taken from the law that the things offered in sacrifice were no longer to be treated as common food (Leviticus 22:1-16, especially ver. 14, τὸ ἅγιον). Unto the dogs. The scavengers of Eastern cities, which by nature and habit love and greedily devour the most unholy of things (cf. Exodus 22:31). Neithercast ye your pearls,Pearls.Only here and Matthew 13:45, 46in the Gospels. In form not so very unlike swine's food of beans or nuts, they here represent the beauty and precious wealth of the various parts of the Gospel, in which Christ's disciples are accustomed to delight (ὑμῶν). Ignatius ('Ephesians,' § 11) calls his bonds his "spiritual pearls." Before swine; before the swine(Revised Version). Probably in both cases the article is used with the object of bringing the particular dogs and swine to whom these are given more vividly before us. Swine.Which have no care for such things, but rather wallow in filth (2 Peter 2:22). Dogs... swine.The terms seem to so far indicate different classes of men, or more truly different characters in men, as that the one term points to the greedy participation of the wicked in open profanation, the ether to the sottish indifference of sinners to that which is most attractive. Lestthey;i.e.the swine. Dogs, even though wild in the East, would not "tread down" the food. Trample them under their feet(Matthew 5:13). In ignorance of their real worth and in disappointment that they do not afford them satisfaction (For the future, καταπατήσουσιν, cf. Matthew 5:25, note.) It here expresses the greater certainty of the trampling than of the rending (aorist subjective). And turn again- Revised Version omits "again" - and rend you. In rage at the disappointment experienced. The clause expresses the personal enmity which those who wilfully reject the gospel often feel towards those that have offered it to them. It might be thought difficult to carry out this command, as it is evident that we cannot know beforehand who will accept the gospel or not. But in cases where the character of the person is not known (e.g.as when St. Paul preached at Athens, etc.), the command does not apply. Our Lord supposesthe case where the character is apparent (cf. 1 Timothy 5:24). Theodoret (videResch, 'Agrapha,' pp. 103, 168), in quoting this verse, adds, "My mysteries are tot me and mine," which, clearly an adaptation of Symmachus and Theodotion's rendering of Isaiah 24:16, רזי לי(cf. also Targ. Jon.), seems to have become almost an authorized, and certainly a true, interpretation of our verse.

Parallel Commentaries ...


Greek

{Do} not
Μὴ(Mē)
Adverb
Strong's 3361: Not, lest. A primary particle of qualified negation; not, lest; also (whereas ou expects an affirmative one) whether.

give
δῶτε(dōte)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Active - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's 1325: To offer, give; I put, place. A prolonged form of a primary verb; to give.

dogs
κυσίν(kysin)
Noun - Dative Masculine Plural
Strong's 2965: A dog, universally despised in the East. A primary word; a dog.

what is
τὸ(to)
Article - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the.

holy;
ἅγιον(hagion)
Adjective - Accusative Neuter Singular
Strong's 40: Set apart by (or for) God, holy, sacred. From hagos; sacred.

{do} not
μηδὲ(mēde)
Conjunction
Strong's 3366: And not, not even, neither?nor. From me and de; but not, not even; in a continued negation, nor.

throw
βάλητε(balēte)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Active - 2nd Person Plural
Strong's 906: (a) I cast, throw, rush, (b) often, in the weaker sense: I place, put, drop. A primary verb; to throw.

your
ὑμῶν(hymōn)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive 2nd Person Plural
Strong's 4771: You. The person pronoun of the second person singular; thou.

pearls
μαργαρίτας(margaritas)
Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural
Strong's 3135: A pearl. From margaros; a pearl.

before
ἔμπροσθεν(emprosthen)
Preposition
Strong's 1715: From en and pros; in front of (literally or figuratively) or time).

swine.
χοίρων(choirōn)
Noun - Genitive Masculine Plural
Strong's 5519: A swine, hog, sow. Of uncertain derivation; a hog.

If you do,
ποτε(pote)
Conjunction
Strong's 4219: When, at what time. From the base of pou and te; interrogative adverb, at what time.

they may trample
καταπατήσουσιν(katapatēsousin)
Verb - Future Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's 2662: From kata and pateo; to trample down; figuratively, to reject with disdain.

them
αὐτοὺς(autous)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Accusative Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Strong's 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

under
ἐν(en)
Preposition
Strong's 1722: In, on, among. A primary preposition denoting position, and instrumentality, i.e. A relation of rest; 'in, ' at, on, by, etc.

their
αὐτῶν(autōn)
Personal / Possessive Pronoun - Genitive Masculine 3rd Person Plural
Strong's 846: He, she, it, they, them, same. From the particle au; the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person, and of the other persons.

feet,
ποσὶν(posin)
Noun - Dative Masculine Plural
Strong's 4228: The foot. A primary word; a 'foot'.

and
καὶ(kai)
Conjunction
Strong's 2532: And, even, also, namely.

then turn [and]
στραφέντες(straphentes)
Verb - Aorist Participle Passive - Nominative Masculine Plural
Strong's 4762: Strengthened from the base of trope; to twist, i.e. Turn quite around or reverse.

tear you to pieces.
ῥήξωσιν(rhēxōsin)
Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Active - 3rd Person Plural
Strong's 4486: To rend, break asunder; I break forth (into speech); I throw or dash down.


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Matthew 7:6 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Matthew 7:6, NIV: "Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces."

Matthew 7:6, ESV: "“Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you."

Matthew 7:6, KJV: "Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you."

Matthew 7:6, NASB: "'Do not give what is holy to dogs, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, or they will trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces."

Matthew 7:6, NLT: "'Don't waste what is holy on people who are unholy. Don't throw your pearls to pigs! They will trample the pearls, then turn and attack you."

Matthew 7:6, CSB: "Don't give what is holy to dogs or toss your pearls before pigs, or they will trample them under their feet, turn, and tear you to pieces."

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Now discussing:

Verse  (Click for Chapter)

New International Version
"Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

American Standard Version
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast your pearls before the swine, lest haply they trample them under their feet, and turn and rend you.

Berean Study Bible
Do not give dogs what is holy; do not throw your pearls before swine. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and then turn and tear you to pieces.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Give not that which is holy to dogs; neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest perhaps they trample them under their feet, and turning upon you, they tear you.

English Revised Version
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast your pearls before the swine, lest haply they trample them under their feet, and turn and rend you.

King James Bible
Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

World English Bible
"Don't give that which is holy to the dogs, neither throw your pearls before the pigs, lest perhaps they trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces.

Young's Literal Translation
Ye may not give that which is holy to the dogs, nor cast your pearls before the swine, that they may not trample them among their feet, and having turned -- may rend you.

Matthew 7:6 Additional Translations ...

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