Iowa smoking laws 2018

Iowa smoking laws 2018 DEFAULT

List of smoking bans in the United States

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For smoking bans and restrictions outside the United States, see List of smoking bans.

Map of current statewide smoking bans as of October 1, 2018.

The following is a list of smoking bans in the United States.

The United States Congress has not attempted to enact any type of nationwide federal smoking ban in workplaces and public places. Therefore, such policies are entirely a product of first-level jurisdictional, localcriminal, and occupational safety and health laws.

In 1995, California was the first state to enact a statewide smoking ban for restaurants.[1] Throughout the early to mid-2000s, especially between 2004 and 2007, an increasing number of states enacted a statewide smoking ban of some kind. As of July 2018, the most recent statewide smoking ban is Alaska's, which was signed into law on July 18, 2018, and went into effect on October 1, 2018.

As further detailed in this list, smoking laws vary widely throughout the United States. Some places in the United States do not generally regulate smoking at all, some ban smoking in certain areas and not others, and some ban smoking nearly everywhere, even in outdoor areas (no state bans smoking in all public outdoor areas, but some local jurisdictions do). As of July 1, 2017, according to the American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation, 81.5% of the U.S. population lives under a ban on smoking in "workplaces, and/or restaurants, and/or bars, by either a state, commonwealth, or local law",[2] and 58.6% live under a ban covering all workplaces and restaurants and bars.[3] A smoking ban (either state or local) has been enacted covering all bars and restaurants in each of the 60 most populated cities in the United Statesexcept these ten: Jacksonville, Memphis, Miami, Las Vegas, Nashville, Oklahoma City, Philadelphia, Tampa, Tulsa, and Virginia Beach. New Hampshire allows smoking in some private member's clubs where alcohol is served.[4][5]

Overview[edit]

Statewide bans on smoking in all enclosed public places[edit]

As of July 2018, 26 states have enacted statewide bans on smoking in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants: Alaska, Arizona, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin. Ten other states have enacted statewide smoking bans but have carved out an exception for certain establishments and workplaces: Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

However, these states exempt a variety of places from their respective smoking bans. All except seven (California, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, Utah, Vermont, and Washington) exempt tobacconists. All except six (Alaska, Michigan, Indiana, North Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin) allow hotels and motels to designate a certain percentage of smoking rooms. Many also exempt or do not cover casinos (10), private clubs (8), cigar bars (14), or certain small workplaces (8). The following is a table of common exemptions from these 28 states' smoking bans:

States that exempt tobacconists States that exempt cigar bars States that exempt private clubs States that exempt casinos States that exempt small workplaces
AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, HI, KS, IL, IA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, NE, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OR, RI, SD, TN, WI AK, CA, CO, CT, MA, MI, NE, NJ, NM, NY, OR, RI, SD, TN, WI AK, AZ, CT, IA, KS, MA, NY, OH, TN CT, IA, KS, ME, TN (OTB parlors, beano and bingo halls), MI, MN, NJ (including OTB parlors), NM, RI (including OTB parlors), WI CO & TN (three or fewer employees), ID (five or fewer employees), ND (one employee), NM (one employee), OH (family owned and operated), UT (one employee), VT (one employee)

In Connecticut, Oregon, Montana, Utah, and Wisconsin, the state law preempts local governments from enacting stricter smoking bans than the state, though some cities and counties in some of those states have enacted local versions of the state's smoking ban. In the other 23 states with a statewide general smoking ban, some cities and counties have enacted stricter local smoking bans to varying degrees. In California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, and Vermont, usage of e-cigarettes is prohibited indoors. The strictest smoking ban in the United States is in Calabasas, California, where smoking anywhere a non-smoker could congregate, including public sidewalks and apartment complexes, is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of at least $250.[6]

Statewide smoking bans exempting adult-only venues[edit]

As of July 2017, five states ban smoking in most enclosed public places, but permit adult venues such as bars (and casinos, if applicable) to allow smoking if they choose: Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Louisiana, and Nevada. In Florida, state law preempts local governments from enacting stricter smoking bans than the state, though in Idaho, Indiana, and Louisiana, some cities and counties have enacted stricter local smoking bans to varying degrees, in some cases banning it in all enclosed workplaces. See individual state listings below for details.

Unique statewide smoking bans[edit]

As of July 2018, 5 states have enacted smoking bans in particular places that do not fit in the other categories:

  • Alaska bans smoking in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants, but allows smoking in private clubs that were in existence prior to January 1, 2017, and allows for certain localities such as villages to opt out of the law; local governments in Alaska can regulate smoking more strictly than the state.
  • Nevada generally bans smoking in all public places and places of employment, but exempts bars, casinos, strip clubs, brothels, and retail tobacco stores, and restaurants that do not allow patrons under 21 years of age. In all other restaurants, smoking is relegated to separately ventilated designated smoking areas. Local governments in Nevada may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.
  • New Hampshire bans smoking in restaurants and some bars (those besides cigar bars and private clubs), schools, and certain common areas open to the public, but not anywhere else, and state law prohibits local governments from enacting local smoking bans.
  • North Carolina bans smoking in all restaurants and bars (excluding cigar bars and private clubs), as well as government buildings and vehicles, but does not regulate smoking anywhere else. Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state, except in cigar bars, private clubs, tobacco shops, private residences/vehicles, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, and theatrical performances involving smoking.

States with no statewide smoking ban[edit]

As of July 2018, twelve states have not enacted any general statewide ban on smoking in workplaces, bars or restaurants: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Instead, laws in most of these states (see individual state listings below for further information) require proprietors of certain places to designate smoking and non-smoking areas and post warning signage.

In Oklahoma and Virginia state laws prohibit local governments from regulating smoking more strictly than the state, making those states among the fewest in the nation without any legislated smoking bans. In the other ten states, cities and counties have enacted stricter smoking laws than the state, in some cases banning smoking in all enclosed workplaces. In Alabama and Mississippi, the state smoking law expressly allows all local governments to do so. In Kentucky, Missouri, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia, a court has ruled that certain local governments have the power to do so. See the individual state listings below for details.

Smoking laws and non-states[edit]

In the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands, smoking is banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and restaurants. Guam prohibits smoking in restaurants, but the ban does not extend to workplaces or any other businesses. The Northern Mariana Islands prohibits smoking in most workplaces and restaurants, but not in bars.

Smoking laws and the U.S. federal government[edit]

Although Congress has not attempted to enact a nationwide federal smoking ban in workplaces, several federal regulations do concern indoor smoking. Effective April 1998, inflight smoking is banned by the United States Department of Transportation on all commercial passenger flights in the United States or by American air carriers.[7] This was long after Delta Air Lines had banned smoking on all of its flights. On August 9, 1997, PresidentBill Clinton issued Executive Order13058, banning smoking in all interior spaces owned, rented, or leased by the Executive Branch of the Federal Government, as well as in any outdoor areas under executive branch control near air intake ducts.[8]

Smoking laws of the United States by state or territory[edit]

Alabama[edit]

  • No statewide smoking ban. Instead, Alabama's 2003 statewide smoking law, the Alabama Clean Indoor Air Act, generally prohibits smoking in public places and public meetings[9] unless a smoking area is designated that in certain places must be "enclosed and well ventilated".[10] Warning signs must be posted appropriately.[11] Bars, lounges, retail tobacco stores, limousines under private hire, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, and psychiatric facilities are entirely exempt from the Act's regulation.[9] Local governments may regulate smoking more stringently than the Act,[12] and the Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals reiterated this in August 2009.[13]
    • Proposals to enact a statewide smoking ban in Alabama, all but one of which were sponsored only by State Senator Vivian Davis Figures, have failed in the Alabama Legislature every year since 2008. In May 2008, a bill by Sen. Figures to ban smoking in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants, failed when it did not receive a vote before the end of the legislative session.[14] In April 2009, Sen. Figures withdrew a similar bill after the Alabama Senate amended it to allow smoking in bars, the bar sections of restaurants, dog tracks, and gambling halls.[15] In April 2010, a bill by Sen. Figures to ban smoking statewide only in restaurants passed the Senate by a vote of 19–3 but did not receive a vote in the Alabama House of Representatives.[16] In April 2011, a bill by Sen. Figures to ban smoking in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants, failed when it did not receive a vote in a Senate committee, and a similar House bill by Rep. Mary Sue McClurkin failed the same way.[17] In 2012, two Senate bills (one by Sen. Figures) and another House bill by Rep. McClurkin to enact a statewide smoking ban in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants, also failed this way.
  • Localities in Alabama with smoking bans that include all bars and restaurants (36 total):
    • Albertville, November 12, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Anniston, July 1, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Atmore, November 13, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Auburn, November 15, 2006, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Bayou La Batre, August 31, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Birmingham, April 27, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants; also includes private clubs and hotels/motels[5]
    • Chickasaw, December 26, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Citronelle, March 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Clay, January 6, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Cottonwood, December 11, 2005, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Creola, April 25, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Decatur, October 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • East Brewton, November 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Fairfield, February 1, 2006, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Flomaton, June 23, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Fultondale, September 1, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants;[5] also includes private clubs
    • Gadsden, January 1, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Gulf Shores, August 14, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Headland, May 1, 2005, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Homewood, November 19, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Jasper, November 1, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants;[5] exempts private clubs that are for non-profit.
    • Lanett, October 17, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Luverne, April 11, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Midfield, December 28, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Monroeville, March 19, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Mountain Brook, October 19, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Orange Beach, August 9, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Oxford, January 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Phenix City, February 18, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Saraland, September 22, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Satsuma, August 1, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sheffield, October 31, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Talladega, September 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Tallassee, December 16, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Troy, June 25, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Vestavia Hills, July 25, 2012, banned in workplaces, bars, restaurants, hotels/motels, and within 20 feet (6.1 m) of entrances and exits[5]
  • Localities in Alabama with smoking bans that do not include all bars and restaurants (17 total):
    • Alexander City, January 1, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Bay Minette, January 1, 2008, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Bessemer, November 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Center Point, June 25, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, exempting bars and restaurants[5]
    • Daphne, May 18, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Fairhope, November 20, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Foley, November 23, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Fort Payne, April 1, 2009, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Geneva, July 4, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, exempting bars and restaurants[5]
    • Mobile, October 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Northport, October 12, 2007, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Opelika, May 22, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Opp, November 1, 2006, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Prichard, February 28, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Robertsdale, January 2, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Spanish Fort, September 15, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Tuskegee, June 9, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants, but exempting bars.[5]

Alaska[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On October 1, 2018, after being signed into law on July 18, 2018, smoking was banned statewide in all enclosed public places, including bars, restaurants, private clubs, hotels/motels, outdoor arenas, playgrounds and parks. The law exempts (1) a vehicle that is a place of employment when the vehicle is used exclusively by one person, (2) on a vessel when the vessel is engaged in commercial fishing or sport charter fishing, (3) a private club if the private club has been in continuous operation at the same location since January 1, 2017; is not licensed to serve alcoholic beverages; and is not a place of employment, (4) at a private residence, except a private residence described in (b) of 27 section or while a health care provider is present, (5) in a stand-alone shelter if the stand-alone shelter meets the following requirements: food or drink may not be sold or served in the stand-alone shelter; and the stand-alone shelter meets the minimum distance requirements of 10 feet (3.0 m), and (6) allows smoking so long as it's not within 10 feet (3.0 m) of all places where smoking is prohibited. Localities may regulating smoking more stringently than the state, and the bill also allows for certain municipalities such as villages to exempt certain establishments, including bars and restaurants from the bill if they see fit.[18][19]

American Samoa[edit]

  • Territory-wide smoking ban. On October 20, 2010, GovernorTogiola Tulafono signed into law the American Samoa Smoke Free Environment Act, a Fono (Legislature) bill passed earlier in the year. The bill went into effect on January 20, 2011.[20]

Arizona[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On May 1, 2007, the Smoke Free Arizona Act (Proposition 201) went into effect after passage by 54.7% of voters the prior November, banning smoking in all enclosed workplaces and within 20 feet (6.1 m) of an entrance or exit of such a place, including bars and restaurants, only exempting private residences, retail tobacco stores, private clubs, smoking associated with American Indian religious ceremonies, outdoor patios, and stage/film/television performances. The law does not cover businesses located on Indian Reservations, as the reservations are sovereign nations; but local governments may enact stricter regulations than the state.[21][22][23]
  • Other local smoking regulations in Arizona:
    • Flagstaff, May 1, 2005, banned in all parks, cemeteries, and enclosed workplaces. Retail tobacco stores were not exempted from this city ordinance.[24]
    • Goodyear, July 1, 2009, banned in all parks.[25]
    • Mesa, July 1, 1996, banned in amphitheaters, stadiums, and all waiting lines (such as the ones present outside movie theaters).[25][26]

Arkansas[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban excluding bars and some restaurants. The Arkansas Clean Indoor Air Act of 2006, bans smoking in most enclosed workplaces in Arkansas, exempting private residences, hotel and motel rooms designated as smoking rooms, workplaces with fewer than three employees, retail tobacco stores, designated areas in nursing homes, outdoor areas, workplaces of tobacco manufacturers (and importers and wholesalers), bars and restaurants that do not allow patrons younger than 21, and gaming floors of operations regulated by the Arkansas Racing Commission.[27] Local governments may regulate smoking more stringently than the state law.[28] At the same time, the Arkansas Protection from Secondhand Smoke for Children Act of 2006 went into effect, prohibiting smoking in a motor vehicle carrying a child under age six years old who weighs less than 60 pounds and is in a car seat.[29]
  • Localities in Arkansas with smoking bans that include all bars and restaurants (3 total):
    • Fairfield Bay, January 29, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Helena-West Helena, November 7, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Wooster, May 26, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Localities in Arkansas with smoking bans that do not include all bars and restaurants (3 total):
    • Fayetteville, March 11, 2004, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Highfill, July 12, 2003, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Pine Bluff, July 7, 2005, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]

California[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: Since January 1, 1995, smoking has been banned in all enclosed workplaces in California, including bars and restaurants (bars were excluded until January 1, 1998); these following areas were exempt until June 9, 2016: meeting and banquet rooms except while food or beverage functions are taking place (including set-up, service, and clean-up activities or when the room is being used for exhibit activities), retail or wholesale tobacco shops and private smokers lounges (i.e. cigar bars), truck cabs/tractors if no nonsmoking employees are present, theatrical production sites if smoking is an integral part of the story, medical research or treatment sites if smoking is integral to the research or treatment being conducted, private residences except homes licensed as family day care homes during the hours of operation and in those areas where children are present, and patient smoking areas in long-term health care facilities.[30]

Effective January 1, 2004, California bill AB846 bans smoking within 20 feet (6.1 m) of the entrance or operable window of a public building ("public building" means a building owned and occupied, or leased and occupied, by the state, a county, a city, a city and county, or a California Community College district.) The law also prohibits smoking in state owned vehicles.[31][32]

Additionally, effective January 1, 2008, smoking in a moving vehicle while in the presence of a minor (18 years or younger) is an infraction; the charge is not serious enough to be pulled over, and only can be cited along with a stricter offense, such as a moving violation or traffic accident.[33][34]

Local jurisdictions may regulate smoking more strictly than the state. Many California communities have established smoke-free registries for private residential apartment buildings, which range from complexes where smoking is entirely prohibited (whether inside private dwellings or outside) to those where certain sections of dwellings may be designated as smoking dwellings. Most California cities allow landlords to regulate smoking at will.

  • Alameda, January 2, 2012, banned in commercial areas, recreation areas (parks, trails beaches, sports fields), service areas (bus stops, ticket lines, ATMs), dining areas, public event spaces, entryways, and many workplaces including 90% of hotel/motel guest rooms, small businesses with fewer than five employees, tobacco shops, hookah bars medical research sites, work vehicles, theatrical production sites, and all outdoor worksites. On January 1, 2013, the ban expanded to include all multi-unit housing.[35][36]
  • Belmont, October 9, 2007, banned in parks and other public places, as well as inside apartments and condominiums.[37]
  • Berkeley, March 26, 2008, banned on all commercially zoned sidewalks, and within 20 feet (6.1 m) of a bus stop[38][39]
  • Beverly Hills, October 1, 2007, banned in all outdoor dining areas.[40]
  • Burbank, April 2007, banned in most public places including Downtown Burbank, outdoor dining & shopping areas, parks, service lines, and within 20 feet (6.1 m) of all building entrances/exits.[41]
  • Calabasas, 2006, banned in all indoor and outdoor public places, except for a handful of scattered, designated outdoor smoking areas in town. Believed to be the strictest ban in the United States.[42]
  • Davis, The Davis City Code prohibits smoking in a wide variety of locations open to the public.[43]
  • El Cajon, August 14, 2007, banned on city streets, in outdoor patios in restaurants, and outside of the local shopping mall. Anyone caught smoking in public areas will faces a fine of up to $500. The city previously outlawed smoking in parks, and also requires businesses that sell tobacco products to obtain a city license.[44]
  • El Cerrito, January 1, 2015, banned in all public places, commercial areas, and multi-unit residences and within 25 feet of any of these.[45]
  • Escondido, in 2005, increased the state prohibition on smoking within 20 feet (6.1 m) of an entrance to a public place to 80 feet (24 m) outside city-owned buildings.[46][47] In 2009, the city, at the urging of local students, banned smoking in parks, city open spaces, and trails, including the parking areas for these city properties.[46][48]
  • Glendale, October 7, 2008, banned smoking[49] in/on and within 20 feet (6.1 m) from: all city property (except streets and sidewalks); city vehicles and public transportation vehicles; city public transit stations; places of employment; enclosed public places; non-enclosed public places; and common areas of multi-unit rental housing. Some of the areas where smoking is prohibited are authorized to have smoking-permitted areas, subject to regulations. Also, landlords in Glendale are required to provide disclosure to a prospective renter, prior to signing a lease, as to the location of possible sources of second-hand smoke, relative to the unit that they are renting.[citation needed]
  • Hermosa Beach, March 1, 2012, banned at all of Hermosa's outdoor dining areas, the popular Pier Plaza, the city pier, the Strand, the greenbelt parkway, and all city parks and parking lots. Smoking already is outlawed on the city-owned beach.[50]
  • Loma Linda, July 25, 2008, banned on all sidewalks, streets, common areas in shopping centers, bus stops, parks, restaurant patios, theaters, City Hall, and 80% of motel rooms and apartment units. Exempts the federally controlled VA hospital grounds, and smoking in cars traveling in the city.[51]
  • Long Beach, California bans smoking in all city parks, at or within 20 feet of busstops, and at farmers' markets.
  • Los Angeles, 2007, banned in all city parks,[52] and, 2011, all outdoor dining areas.[53]
  • Marin County, May 23, 2012, banned in all condos and apartments, as well as all patios within residential units. Anyone caught smoking will face a $100 fine and will be sentenced to five days of community service. A second offense warrants a $300 fine and ten days of community service, and a third offense being $700 fine and fifteen days of community service. Landlords may opt out of smoking restrictions by designating 20 percent of their units reserved for smoking and may permit e-cigarettes to be used inside apartments and condos. All other outdoor areas, including bar and restaurant patios, and private homes that are not of multi-unit residences and smoking in cars are exempt from the ban.[54]
  • Oakland, bans smoking within 25 feet of an entrance, exit, window, or air intake of the building of most enclosed places where smoking is prohibited (e.g., workplaces, service areas, common areas and no-smoking units of multi-unit housing); exemption is made outside of bars provided the smoke does not enter prohibited areas. Smoking is also banned in certain unenclosed areas, including service areas (e.g., bus stops, cab stands, ATMs).[55]
  • Palm Springs, April 2011, banned smoking in all city parks.
  • Pasadena, October 27, 2008, banned smoking in certain outdoor areas, including shopping malls, unenclosed areas of bars and restaurants, service waiting lines (e.g. ATMs, bus stops, etc.) and within 20 feet (6.1 m) from them, and within 20 feet (6.1 m) of doorways, windows, or ventilation areas of enclosed places where smoking is banned. Also banned smoking in multi-unit housing, owned or leased, and all public events, including the Rose Parade.[56]
  • San Diego, July 11, 2006, banned smoking at all City of San Diego beaches and parks, including all beaches from La Jolla to Sunset Cliffs.[citation needed]
  • San Francisco, January 2005, banned smoking in all city parks.[57] January 2013, banned smoking at all outdoor "street fairs and festivals", with exceptions for legal medical marijuana and small neighborhood block parties.[58]
  • San Jose, October 2007, banned in all city parks.[59]
  • San Luis Obispo, August 2, 1990, became the first city in the world to ban smoking in all public buildings.[60] On January 15, 2010, the city's municipal code amendment included city parks and outdoor recreational facilities as smoke-free areas.[61] In April 2010, City Council adopted an ordinance that bans smoking in all areas frequented by the public, with limited exceptions, including unenclosed areas at certain drinking establishments.[62]
  • Santa Barbara & Goleta, Local laws in Santa Barbara County and in the City of Goleta prohibit smoking within 30 feet of any building or area where smoking is prohibited. Ashtrays are also banned within a 30-foot smoke-free area.[63]
  • Santa Monica, 2006, banned smoking within 20 feet (6.1 m) of entrances, exits, or operable windows of a public building (such as City Hall and the courthouse); in local parks (including parking lots); on the Third Street Promenade; on local beaches; and on the Santa Monica Pier (except within designated zones).[64]

In 2012, the California Legislature passed the following into law, California Civil Code Section 1947.5. (a) A landlord of a residential dwelling unit, as defined in Section 1940, or his or her agent, may prohibit the smoking of a cigarette, as defined in Section 104556 of the Health and Safety Code, or other tobacco product on the property or in any building or portion of the building, including any dwelling unit, other interior or exterior area, or the premises on which it is located, in accordance with this article. (b) (1) Every lease or rental agreement entered into on or after January 1, 2012, for a residential dwelling unit on property on any portion of which the landlord has prohibited the smoking of cigarettes or other tobacco products pursuant to this article shall include a provision that specifies the areas on the property where smoking is prohibited, if the lessee has not previously occupied the dwelling unit. (2) For a lease or rental agreement entered into before January 1, 2012, a prohibition against the smoking of cigarettes or other tobacco products in any portion of the property in which smoking was previously permitted shall constitute a change of the terms of tenancy, requiring adequate notice in writing, to be provided in the manner prescribed in Section 827. (c) A landlord who exercises the authority provided in subdivision (a) to prohibit smoking shall be subject to federal, state, and local requirements governing changes to the terms of a lease or rental agreement for tenants with leases or rental agreements that are in existence at the time that the policy limiting or prohibiting smoking is adopted. (d) This section shall not be construed to preempt any local ordinance in effect on or before January 1, 2012, or any provision of a local ordinance in effect on or after January 1, 2012, that restricts the smoking of cigarettes or other tobacco products. (e) A limitation or prohibition of the use of any tobacco product shall not affect any other term or condition of the tenancy, nor shall this section be construed to require statutory authority to establish or enforce any other lawful term or condition of the tenancy. (Added by Stats. 2011, Ch. 264, Sec. 2. Effective January 1, 2012.) [65]

Colorado[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On July 1, 2006, the Colorado Clean Indoor Air Act went into effect, banning smoking in all enclosed workplaces statewide, including bars and restaurants. Casinos, initially exempt, were added to the ban January 1, 2008.[66] The Act only exempts private residences and automobiles unless used for the public transportation of children or as part of healthcare or daycare, limousines under private hire, hotel/motel rooms designated as smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, cigar bars, designated areas in airports, outdoor areas, workplaces not open to the public where the employer employs three or fewer employees, private nonresidential buildings on a farm or ranch that has annual gross income of less than $500,000, and designated areas in nursing homes.[67] Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.[68] A judge has ruled that a bar sharing common indoor space with a tobacco shop is also exempt from the ban.[69]

Connecticut[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban in bars, restaurants, and some workplaces: On October 1, 2003, the Clean Indoor Air Act went into effect, banning smoking statewide in bars and restaurants (bars, cafes, and bowling alleys were exempt until April 1, 2004).[70] The Act exempts correctional and psychiatric facilities, public housing projects, private clubs whose liquor permit was issued on or before May 1, 2003, separately-ventilated break rooms in non-work areas of non-hospitality businesses with 5 or more employees, non-hospitality businesses with fewer than 5 employees, areas of businesses where tobacco products are developed and tested, and cigar bars (a business that has a liquor permit and generated at least 10% of its 2002 gross income from on-site sales of tobacco products or humidor rentals and has not changed its size or location after December 31, 2002).[70] Local governments are preempted from regulating smoking at all.[70] Smoking is also permitted in hotel rooms but must be designated.

Two large casinos on Mohegan and Mashantucket Pequot tribal land, Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods, allow smoking in many areas of their properties.

Delaware[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On November 1, 2002, the Clean Indoor Air Act went into effect, banning smoking statewide in all enclosed workplaces in Delaware, including bars, restaurants, and casinos.[71] The Act exempts private homes and automobiles not used for childcare or daycare or the public transportation of children, rented social halls while being rented, limousines under private hire, hotel/motel rooms designated as smoking rooms, fundraising activities sponsored by an ambulance or fire company while on property owned or leased by the company, and fundraising activities sponsored by a fraternal benefit society taking place upon property owned or leased by the society.[71] Local governments can regulate smoking more strictly than the state. Bethany Beach has outlawed smoking on the boardwalk and beach.[5][71] In Rehoboth Beach, smoking is banned in parks, playgrounds, the beach, the boardwalk, and adjacent public areas.[72][73]

District of Columbia[edit]

  • District-wide smoking ban: Effective January 2007, smoking is banned in bars, restaurants, and other public places in the District of Columbia; exempts outdoor areas, designated hotel/motel rooms, retail tobacco stores, cigar bars, hookah bars, and businesses that can show they receive 10% or more of their annual revenue from tobacco sales, excluding cigarette machines.[74]

Florida[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban excluding bars: On July 1, 2003, a constitutional amendment passed by voters came into effect which banned smoking statewide in all enclosed workplaces in Florida, exempting private residences, retail tobacco shops, designated smoking rooms in hotels/motels, stand-alone bars with no more than 10% of revenue from food sales, rooms used for quit-smoking programs and medical research, and designated smoking areas in customs transit areas under the authority of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.[75] Local governments are preempted from regulating smoking.[76][77]

See also: Tobacco Free Florida

Georgia[edit]

  • No statewide smoking ban. Instead, Georgia's 2005 statewide smoking law, the Georgia Smokefree Air Act, prohibits smoking in all enclosed public places in Georgia, except each of the following: designated smoking areas in non-work areas of businesses that are separately ventilated, bars and restaurants where persons under 18 years of age are not employed or permitted to enter, separately enclosed smoking rooms in any bar or restaurant, private residences not used as healthcare or child daycare facilities, hotel/motel rooms designated as smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, nursing homes, outdoor areas, designated areas in international airports, workplaces of a tobacco manufacturer or other tobacco business, privately owned meeting and assembly rooms during private functions where persons under 18 are not allowed, and areas of private places of employment (other than medical facilities) that are open to the general public by appointment only.[78] Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.[79] Buildings in which smoking is banned under the Act may have an outdoor smoking area that is located a reasonable distance from any entrance, exit, window, vent, or air intake system, but any ashtrays located there must be placed a reasonable distance away.[79] A violation of the Act is punishable by a fine of between $100 and $500.[79]
  • Localities in Georgia with smoking bans that include all bars and restaurants (12 total):
    • Athens, July 7, 2005, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Atlanta, January 2, 2020, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars, restaurants, places of employment, hotel and motel rooms and other enclosed public areas.[80]
    • Buena Vista, April 2, 2004, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Chatham County, February 24, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars, private clubs, restaurants, and retail tobacco stores.[5]
    • Effingham County, November 21, 2002, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Gainesville, July 1, 2005, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Morrow, September 22, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Pooler, January 1, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Richmond County, January 1, 2019, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants, except for the cities of Blythe and Hephzibah[5]
    • Savannah, January 1, 2011, banned in bars and restaurants and even service queues[81]
    • Snellville, April 1, 2004, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Tift County, December 5, 2004, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
  • Localities in Georgia with smoking bans that do not include all bars and restaurants (16 total):
    • Berkeley Lake, May 1, 2004, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Clarkston, September 3, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars but exempting restaurants[5]
    • Columbia County, January 1, 2005, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Cordele, June 1, 2004, banned in all enclosed workplaces, except bars and restaurants[5]
    • Decatur, April 1, 2005, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • DeKalb County, February 17, 2003, banned in all enclosed workplaces, except bars and restaurants[5]
    • Douglas, June 26, 2004, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Douglas County, March 1, 2005, banned in all enclosed workplaces, except bars and restaurants[5]
    • Douglasville, May 1, 2004, banned in all enclosed workplaces, except bars and restaurants[5]
    • Dunwoody, December 1, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, except bars and restaurants[5]
    • Loganville, May 10, 2003, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]
    • Madison, November 8, 2004, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Peachtree City, October 18, 2004, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • South Fulton, February 27, 2018, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Tifton, October 18, 2004, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Valdosta, February 16, 2004, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempting bars[5]

Guam[edit]

  • Territory-wide ban on smoking in restaurants only: On February 6, 2007, the Natasha Protection Act went into effect after the Supreme Court of Guam lifted an injunction on it, banning smoking in all restaurants, as well as in bars that double as restaurants between 4:00 am and 10:00 pm; the ban does not cover either stand-alone bars or workplaces in general.[82] In 2009, a new act went into effect, additionally banning smoking within 20 feet of public buildings.[83]

Hawaii[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On November 16, 2006, smoking was banned statewide in all enclosed or partially enclosed workplaces in Hawaii, including the indoor and outdoor portions of all bars and restaurants.[84] The law exempts private residences not used as a healthcare or daycare facility, hotel/motel rooms designated as smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, designated rooms in nursing homes, outdoor places of employment not part of bars or restaurants, any place where smoking is part of a production being filmed, and state correctional facilities.[85] Smoking is prohibited within 20 feet (6.1 m) of the entrance/exit of a place where the law prohibits smoking indoors.[86] Fines range from $50 for a person caught smoking in violation of the law, to between $100 and $500 for an establishment caught allowing smoking in violation of the law.[87] In 2010, several bills were introduced attempting to exempt bars.[88] Counties may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.[89]
  • Kalawao County, October 4, 2002, banned smoking in all public buildings.[90] The ban did not apply to private homes or Kalawao County's only bar at the time.[90]
  • Hawaii County, March 13, 2008, banned in public recreational areas, such as parks and beaches.[citation needed]

Idaho[edit]

  • Statewide ban excluding bars and some workplaces: On July 1, 2004, the Clean Indoor Air Act went into effect, banning smoking statewide in all enclosed public places, except in bars, retail tobacco stores, private clubs when used by members or their guests/families, designated smoking rooms in hotels/motels, facilities rented/leased for private functions, theatrical productions, areas of owner-operated businesses with no employees besides the owners not generally open to the public, offices (other than childcare facilities) within private homes, veterans homes, bowling alleys (until July 2007), and designated breakrooms in businesses with 5 or fewer employees (as long as they are separate from work areas and minors are not allowed).[91] Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.[92]
  • Boise, January 2, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and private clubs, as well as in any public outdoor space accessible to children and in all spaces owned by the public, including parks.[93]
  • Moscow, August 4, 2009, banned in bars and private clubs, but not other workplaces[5]
  • Ketchum, April 15, 2013, banned in a long list of areas that include all bars, city-owned facilities, parks, and indoor public places and places of employment, including hotel and motel rooms.[94]

Illinois[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On January 1, 2008, the Smoke Free Illinois Act went into effect, banning smoking in all enclosed workplaces, including bars, restaurants, and casinos, and within 15 feet (4.6 m) of such places; exempts certain retail tobacco stores, private and semiprivate rooms in nursing homes occupied exclusively by smokers, enclosed and semi-enclosed temporary structures attached or adjacent to bars and restaurants, no more than 25% of designated smoking rooms in hotels/motels on the same floor, and private residences.[95] Smoking is prohibited in private residences when defined as a place of employment such as when used for child care or foster care.[95] Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.[95]

HB 1310: a proposal in January 2012 to once again permit smoking in bars, casinos, adult entertainment venues, and private clubs failed in the Illinois House 30–82.

Chicago has had its own Clean Indoor Air Ordinance since 1988.[96] The Chicago Clean Indoor Air Act was updated to mention e-cigarettes in 2014, making it the first major U.S. city to legislate e-cigarette use.[97] The Chicago Park District's Board of Commissioners has discussed banning all forms of smoking in Chicago parks, beaches, play lots and other facilities, but there is not yet a municipal ordinance.

Indiana[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban excluding bars and some restaurants Effective July 1, 2012, after having been signed into law by GovernorMitch Daniels on March 19, 2012, Indiana's 1993 statewide Clean Indoor Air Law was repealed and replaced by a new chapter of the Indiana Code titled "Prohibition on Smoking." The new chapter bans smoking in all enclosed public places and workplaces in Indiana and within 8 feet (2.4 m) of an entrance thereto, except as exempted.[98] The law exempts: (1) horse racing facilities including off-track betting parlors; (2) riverboats; (3) all indoor portions of casinos and other licensed gaming facilities; (4) cigar bars and hookah lounges; (5) private clubs; (6) retail tobacco stores; (7) bars and taverns (defined as any business with a liquor license that does not allow in persons under 21 years of age); and (8) cigar manufacturers.[98] The law expressly allows local governments to enact more stringent smoking restrictions.[98]
  • Attempts in the Indiana General Assembly to enact a ban on smoking in all workplaces in Indiana, including all bars and restaurants, have failed every year since 2007. In April 2007, the Indiana Senate removed a smoking ban from a health care funding bill passed by the Indiana House of Representatives, and in January 2008, a proposed statewide smoking ban introduced by Rep. Charlie Brown died in a House committee without a vote or debate.[99] In April 2009, another proposed statewide ban introduced by Rep. Brown was passed in the House by a vote of 70–26 after being amended to exempt restaurants, bars, and casinos, and then did not receive a committee hearing in the Senate.[100] In February 2010, another proposed ban by Rep. Brown was denied a committee hearing or vote in the Senate after having been passed by the House, 73–26.[101] In April 2011, a Senate committee voted 8–1 to reject a statewide ban exempting bars, casinos, private clubs, retail tobacco shops, and nursing homes, which also had been introduced by Rep. Brown and previously had passed the House, 68–31.[102] The ban that ultimately was enacted in 2012 passed the House as a complete ban on smoking in all workplaces in Indiana, including all bars and restaurants (and authored again by Rep. Brown), but was amended by the Senate to include the above exemptions, upon which the House agreed to the Senate's exemptions.[103]
  • Austin, December 10, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Bloomington, January 1, 2005, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[5] Smoking is allowed only outside at a "reasonable distance" from doors, vents, and windows – measured by whether smoke can drift inside.
  • Columbus, June 1, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars, restaurants, and private clubs[5]
  • Cumberland, January 1, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[5]
  • Delaware County, August 11, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, bars, private clubs and restaurants[5]
  • Elkhart, May 1, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants but exempted existing bars until May 1, 2009, with a grandfather clause[5]
  • Franklin, June 8, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Fort Wayne, June 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[5][104]
  • Greencastle, September 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[5]
  • Hancock County, March 15, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[5]
  • Howard County, July 1, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Indianapolis, June 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants;[5] exempts cigar and hookah bars, retail tobacco stores, off-track betting facilities and private clubs and veterans halls.[citation needed]
  • Lawrence, October 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Monroe County, February 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants. Ban also applies to drivers carrying children aged 13 or younger.[5][105]
  • North Manchester, August 31, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Plainfield, February 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5] but exempting private clubs; nursing homes were exempt until July 1, 2012, when the new statewide smoking ban took effect[5]
  • South Bend, January 2, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[106]
  • Terre Haute, July 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Vanderburgh County, July 1, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars & restaurants; under new provisions, smoking is prohibited within 10 feet (3.0 m) of entrances where smoking is banned to ensure that no smoke can drift inside; excludes retail tobacco stores, fraternal clubs and private clubs that prohibit persons younger than 18[5]
  • Vigo County, June 26, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars, restaurants and private clubs[5]
  • West Lafayette, July 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5] but exempting tobacco bars, private residences, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, private clubs, and outdoor areas in the city.[5]
  • Zionsville, July 5, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars, restaurants,[5] and private clubs.[citation needed]
  • Localities in Indiana with a smoking ban that was rejected in some manner (1 total):
    • Evansville, April 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants, private clubs and fraternal organizations, but excluded casino gaming floors.[107] But struck down by Indiana Supreme Court on February 11, 2014, as unconstitutional due to the casino exemption, which was held to violate the Indiana Constitution and could not be severed from the ordinance.[108]

Iowa[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On July 1, 2008, the Iowa Smokefree Air Act went into effect, banning smoking statewide in all workplaces in Iowa, including bars and restaurants, as well as the outdoor areas of schools, stadia, restaurants, and public transit areas (including bus shelters).[109] The Act does not legislate smoking in public parks.[110] The Act exempts private residences while not being used as a childcare or healthcare facility, outdoor areas where smoking is not specifically prohibited, hotel/motel rooms designated as smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, private and semiprivate rooms in nursing homes occupied by smokers, private clubs, limousines under private hire, private work vehicles where only one employee is located, places where a quit-smoking program is taking place, farm vehicles, casino gaming floors, the state-run veterans' home in Marshalltown, and designated areas of correctional facilities.[111] Fines for individuals found in violation of the Smokefree Air Act are $50 per violation.[112] Fines for businesses range anywhere from $100 to $500 for each violation with the eventual possibility of revocation of liquor or business license for habitually offending businesses.[112]

Kansas[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On July 1, 2010, after being signed into law by GovernorMark Parkinson on March 12, 2010, an amendment to Kansas' 1987 statewide smoking law took effect, banning smoking statewide in all enclosed, indoor workplaces in Kansas.[113] The law will exempt only (1) casino and racetrack gaming floors, (2) the entire area of a private club that was in existence on January 1, 2009, (3) designated areas in any private club where persons under 18 are prohibited, (4) tobacconists, (5) designated hotel and motel smoking rooms, (6) designated smoking areas in nursing homes and healthcare facilities, (7) and all outdoor areas, unless within a 10' radius of an entryway to a public building.[113] The amendment will not change the original law's provision allowing local governments to regulate smoking more stringently than the state,[113][114] which the Kansas Supreme Court reiterated in 2007 upon a bar owner's challenge to Lawrence's local smoking ban.[115] On June 30, 2010, the District Court of Shawnee County, Kansas, issued a preliminary injunction prohibiting the statewide smoking ban from taking effect in 31 private clubs established after January 1, 2009, until it settles a lawsuit against the state by those clubs.[116]

Kentucky[edit]

  • No statewide smoking ban. Instead, in Kentucky, the only state laws dealing with smoking prohibit smoking in government offices, universities, and the state capitol, except in designated smoking areas.[117][118] In 2004, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled that the state's food and tobacco sales laws do not preempt cities and counties from enacting smoking regulations of any kind.[119] In 2011 and 2012, bills to enact a statewide smoking ban in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars, restaurants, and gaming facilities, as well as a bill in 2011 to ban smoking in cars in which minors are riding, all failed before the Kentucky General Assembly when they did not receive a committee hearing in the Kentucky House of Representatives.[120][121][122]
  • Localities in Kentucky with smoking bans that include all bars and restaurants (37 total):
    • Ashland, October 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants,[5] as well as outdoor venues and outdoor patio areas of bars and restaurants[citation needed]
    • Bardstown, June 17, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Berea, September 2, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Bowling Green, April 28, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Campbellsville, June 1, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Clarkson, May 18, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Corbin, November 23, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Danville, June 27, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants,[5] as well as within ten feet of the entrance of any such place[citation needed]
    • Elizabethtown, December 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Frankfort, August 7, 2006, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not in all other workplaces[5]
    • Franklin County, May 4, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Georgetown, October 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Glasgow, June 20, 2010, banned in bars and restaurants, but not all other workplaces[5]
    • Hardin County, April 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants, in unincorporated areas of the county[5]
    • Leitchfield, January 1, 2017, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Lexington, November 6, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • London, August 3, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Louisville, July 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[123]
    • Manchester, January 29, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Martin, June 26, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Midway, August 18, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Middlesborough, August 17, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants; this municipality is dry[5]
    • Morehead, August 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Murray, September 12, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Oldham County, April 17, 2018, banned in enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Owensboro, October 15, 2014, banned in bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Paducah, May 10, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Prestonburg, November 1, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Radcliff, April 1, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Richmond, September 9, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Salyersville, April 1, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Somerset, November 14, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants; exempts private clubs when not open to the public[5][124]
    • Stanford, April 19, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Versailles, October 6, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Williamsburg, February 11, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Williamstown, September 18, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Woodford County, December 4, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
  • Localities in Kentucky with smoking bans that do not include all bars and restaurants (5 total):
    • Henderson, October 1, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, excluding bars and restaurants[5]
    • Kenton County, April 15, 2011, banned in all workplaces, except for establishments with a liquor license
    • Letcher County, July 1, 2006, banned in restaurants, but not bars or other workplaces[5]
    • Paintsville, January 31, 2007, banned in restaurants, but not bars or other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Pikeville, November 1, 2007, banned in all restaurants, but not bars or all other workplaces[5]
  • Localities in Kentucky with smoking ban in vehicles:
  • Localities in Kentucky in which a smoking ban was rejected in some manner (1 total):
    • Boone County, July 2010, bowed out of multi-county discussions due to a lack of votes to support a ban[126]
    • Campbell County, December 2010, banned in enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants, but then repealed in February 2011 by 3–1 vote of County Fiscal Court[127]

Louisiana[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban excluding bars: On January 1, 2007, SB 742 went into effect, banning smoking in all schools, workplaces, and public places, including restaurants.[128] The law exempts bars (food establishments where the majority of sales are derived from alcohol), private residences and automobiles except those when used as a healthcare or childcare facility, limousines under private hire, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, retail tobacco shops, outdoor areas, private and semiprivate rooms of nursing homes occupied exclusively by smokers, casino gaming floors, workplaces of tobacco-related businesses such as manufacturers and distributors, convention and banquet facilities rented out to private parties, and correctional facilities (until August 1, 2009).[128] Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state. Prior to this ordinance, six localities had smoking provisions that exempted restaurants, but were later superseded by the Act once it had gone into effect, and localities were prohibited from regulating or prohibiting smoking in bars and restaurants as well.[5][128]
  • Since 2009, attempts to further ban smoking statewide in Louisiana have failed every year before the Louisiana State Legislature. In June 2009, the Louisiana House of Representatives rejected ending the exemption for bars and casinos by a vote of 79–21.[129] In May 2010, a House committee rejected a bill to ban smoking in casinos,[130] and then rejected a bill to ban smoking in bars, casinos, and the remainder of restaurants that the Louisiana Senate had passed by a vote of 23–12.[131] In June 2011, the Senate rejected a bill to ban smoking in bars by a vote of 22–15.[132] In May 2012, the Senate rejected a bill to prohibit smoking within 25 feet (7.6 m) of all places where smoking is banned by a vote of 18–12, and instead chose to amend the bill to prohibit smoking within 25 feet (7.6 m) of entrances to state-owned government buildings.[133]
  • Abbeville, January 1, 2015, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Alexandria, January 2, 2012, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Baton Rouge, June 1, 2018, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[134]
  • Bogalusa, December 21, 2016, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Boyce, June 14, 2019, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Cheneyville, June 7, 2014, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Colfax, June 8, 2017, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Cullen, May 1, 2019, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Fenton, May 9, 2019, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Glenmora, March 15, 2017, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Hammond, July 20, 2015, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Lafayette Parish, April 27, 2017, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Lecompte, December 10, 2017, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • McNary, July 4, 2018, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Monroe, January 2, 2014, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • New Orleans, April 22, 2015, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Ouachita Parish, January 2, 2014, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Pineville, February 12, 2019, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Ponchatoula, May 12, 2019, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Roseland, August 19, 2018, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Ruston, April 1, 2019, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Shreveport, August 1, 2021, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[135]
  • West Monroe, January 2, 2014, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]
  • Woodworth, April 15, 2012, banned in all enclosed public places, including bars and gaming establishments[5]

Maine[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: Effective January 1, 2004, laws from 1985 and 1999 were expanded such that smoking is banned statewide in all workplaces and public places in Maine, including bars and restaurants.[136] The law exempts places open to the public during hours when it is closed, stage performances involving smoking, smoking for religious rituals, factories where labor unions have contracted to have smoking areas, designated areas in hospitals, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, private residences except when used as a childcare or healthcare facility, beano and bingo halls, tobacco specialty stores, and off-track betting parlors that were in existence on June 30, 2003.[136] The state law exempts private clubs (Elks, American Legion, VFW etc.) under certain conditions. The state law is silent as to whether local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state, though as of April 2009 no local government in Maine has done so.[5] Effective September 1, 2008, smoking is banned in any car when a person under the age of 16 is present, though no driver may be pulled over or searched solely for violation of this law.[137]

Maryland[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On February 1, 2008, the Maryland Clean Indoor Air Act of 2007 went into effect, banning smoking in all public transportation vehicles, enclosed public places, and enclosed workplaces, including bars, restaurants, casinos, and private clubs.[138] The Act exempts private residences and vehicles while not being used as a childcare or healthcare facility, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, cigar lounges and hookah bars, other tobacco-related workplaces such as importers and distributors, facilities where smoking research is conducted, psychiatric facilities, long-term care facilities, hospitals where a doctor has authorized a patient to smoke, and any business that has applied for and received a waiver allowing smoking (though all waivers expired on January 1, 2011).[138] Local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state, though not less strictly.[138]

Massachusetts[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: Effective July 1, 2004, smoking is banned in all enclosed public places and workplaces, including bars and restaurants.[139] The law exempts private clubs when not open to the public, private residences except when used as a business for healthcare or childcare, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, retail tobacco stores, licensed cigar or hookah bars, stage performances involving smoking, places where smoking-related scientific research is occurring, religious ceremonies involving smoking, outdoor areas, designated areas in nursing homes as approved by the state, and other tobacco-related workplaces such as farms and distributors.[139] Local governments and boards of health may regulate smoking more strictly than the state.[139]
  • Boston, February 9, 2009, banned by the Boston Public Health Commission on outside patios of bars and restaurants; also banned on February 9, 2019 (10 years later than the other new restrictions) in cigar and hookah bars, unless the establishment obtains an additional 10-year exemption. Additionally, smoking is banned in all hotel rooms in the city of Boston. Tobacco products can not be sold at educational institutions or health care institutions including pharmacies and stores having pharmacies within.[140][141][142][143]

Michigan[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On May 1, 2010, after being signed into law by GovernorJennifer Granholm on December 18, 2009, the Dr. Ron Davis Law took effect, banning smoking statewide in all enclosed, indoor workplaces in Michigan, as well as the outdoor patios of bars and restaurants.[144][145] The law exempts only cigar bars, retail tobacco stores, private home offices, company vehicles including commercial trucks, and Detroit's three casinos' gambling floors.[144] The law is silent as to whether local governments may regulate smoking more strictly than the state, though it prohibits state or local health departments from enacting any smoking rules different than the law.[144]

Minnesota[edit]

  • Statewide smoking ban: On October 1, 2007, the Freedom to Breathe Act went into effect, expanding the existing Clean Indoor Air Act of 1975 so as to ban smoking statewide in all enclosed workplaces in Minnesota, including public transportation, bars, and restaurants.[146] The Act exempts designated rooms in nursing homes, designated areas in psychiatric facilities, places where scientific studies related to smoking occur, private homes and residences not in use as a place of employment, designated hotel/motel smoking rooms, retail tobacco shops, heavy commercial vehicles, farm vehicles and construction equipment, buildings on family farms, the Minnesota disabled veterans' rest camp, smoking by American Indians as part of a traditional spiritual or cultural ceremony, stage performances involving smoking, and outdoor areas.[147] Local governments may regulate smoking more stringently than the state.[148]
  • Carlton County, June 1, 2007, banned on 50% of outdoor patio seating in bars and restaurants.[citation needed]
  • Duluth, March 7, 2010, banned within 15 feet (4.6 m) of a bus shelter or transit center.[149]
  • Golden Valley, March 31, 2009, banned within 25 feet (7.6 m) of entrances, exits, and ventilation openings of all areas of bars and restaurants; also in public parks and recreational facilities.[citation needed]
  • Rochester, June 2010 Downtown smoke-free zone includes the block of Second Avenue Southwest between Gonda and the Kahler, and the two-block pedestrian mall known as the Peace Plaza. The zone was extended in June 2010 to include two blocks of West Center Street between the Kahler Grand Hotel, Methodist Hospital and the Gonda Building.[150]

Mississippi[edit]

  • No statewide smoking ban. Instead, Mississippi's 2006 statewide smoking law, the Clean Indoor Air Act, prohibits smoking only inside any state or local government building (except designated areas in the state's veterans' homes) or inside any university or college classroom building.[151] Local governments may regulate smoking more stringently than the Act.[152] In 2011 and 2012, three separate bills before the Mississippi Legislature seeking to enact some form of a statewide smoking ban all failed when they did not receive a committee hearing.[153][154][155][156]
  • Localities in Mississippi with smoking bans that include all bars and restaurants (151 total):
    • Aberdeen, March 22, 2007, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not in all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Alligator, July 5, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Amory, November 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Anguilla, April 27, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Arcola, May 10, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Artesia, May 5, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Baldwyn, July 5, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Bassfield, March 4, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Batesville, March 4, 2010, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Belmont, December 1, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Belzoni, July 1, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Beulah, September 3, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Blue Mountain, December 7, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Booneville, June 30, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants; this municipality is dry[5]
    • Brandon, May 4, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Brookhaven, May 22, 2019, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Brooksville, July 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Bruce, January 2, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Byram, December 10, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Calhoun City, September 1, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Canton, January 19, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Cary, December 8, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Centreville, December 17, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Charleston, March 7, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Clarksdale, September 10, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Clinton, August 14, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Coahoma County, November 16, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Coldwater, March 3, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Collins, June 5, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Corinth, November 6, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including restaurants, by vote of the Board of Aldermen;[157] this municipality is dry[5]
    • Courtland, April 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Crawford, May 28, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Crenshaw, October 17, 2018, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Cruger, April 6, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Crystal Springs, November 1, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Drew, April 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Duck Hill, April 9, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Duncan, April 5, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Durant, May 3, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Ecru, March 12, 2008, banned in bars and restaurants, but not in all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Eden, August 13, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Edwards, December 15, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Ellisville, November 5, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Ethel, November 1, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Falcon, April 13, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Farmington, February 20, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Fayette, June 11, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Floria, December 13, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Florence, September 20, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Forest, September 6, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Friars Point, January 8, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Fulton, March 18, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Georgetown, April 11, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Glendora, September 7, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Greenwood, August 17, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Grenada, January 8, 2009, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not in all other workplaces[5]
    • Gunnison, May 3, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Hatley, September 6, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Hattiesburg, January 1, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Heidelberg, May 4, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Hernando, March 8, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Hollandale, December 3, 2009, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Holly Springs, October 1, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Houston, September 3, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Indianola, November 7, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Isola, September 4, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Issaquena County, June 6, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Itta Bena, January 16, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Iuka, January 1, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Jackson, July 2, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Jonestown, October 13, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Kosciusko, November 2, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Lambert, March 7, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Laurel, December 4, 2008, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Lexington, October 11, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Louise, October 1, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Louisville, April 3, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Lucedale, February 1, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Lula, December 4, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Lumberton, July 3, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Lyon, October 2, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Macon, September 17, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Madison, June 3, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Madison County, July 19, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Magee, November 19, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Mantachie, September 9, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Marks, June 14, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Mayersville, September 17, 2005, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Meadville, March 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Mendenhall, March 4, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Meridian, February 19, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Metcalfe, September 3, 2002, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Monticello, January 18, 2012, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Moorhead, January 11, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Morton, October 31, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Moss Point, June 14, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Nettleton, February 5, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • New Albany, December 1, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • New Augusta, May 31, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Noxapater, May 1, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Oakland, March 9, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Okolona, April 15, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Oxford, October 16, 2006, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not in all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Pascagoula, July 18, 2013, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not other workplaces[5]
    • Petal, December 20, 2007, banned in nearly all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Picayune, July 26, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Pickens, July 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Pittsboro, June 4, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Plantersville, July 6, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Pontotoc, May 1, 2008, banned in all bars and restaurants, but not in all other enclosed workplaces[5]
    • Poplarville, January 3, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Prentiss, April 1, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Quitman, March 23, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Renova, September 2, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Richland, November 2, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Ridgeland, July 19, 2007, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Rolling Fork, December 12, 2011, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Roxie, July 6, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Saltillo, September 18, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Scooba, October 14, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sebastopol, September 1, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Senatobia, November 20, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sharkey County, March 7, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Shaw, October 24, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Shubuta, December 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Shuqualak, May 31, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sidon, February 5, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sledge, June 4, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Southaven, August 4, 2014, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Starkville, May 20, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • State Line, July 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Summit, March 16, 2017, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sumner, July 5, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Sumrall, July 3, 2010, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Tchula, August 13, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Tremont, February 2, 2019, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Tupelo, October 5, 2006, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Tutwiler, April 2, 2015, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including bars and restaurants[5]
    • Utica, September 8, 2016, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Vaiden, January 3, 2018, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Verona, May 3, 2012, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
    • Walnut, December 5, 2013, banned in all enclosed workplaces, including all bars and restaurants[5]
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_smoking_bans_in_the_United_States

Smoking is now banned in Iowa public housing. Can I still smoke in my apartment?

Residents of public housing in Iowa and the rest of the United States can no longer smoke in their homes. 

A new smokefree housing rule from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development took effect Monday. It bans smoking in all federally-owned public housing apartments and buildings, and within 25 feet of the building.

In Iowa, 6,223 people live in public housing. Nearly 34 percent of the adults who live in public housing smoke, according to the American Lung Association. 

All federally-owned public housing is now non-smoking.

Two million people live in public housing nationwide.

"Secondhand smoke is a serious health threat, and can linger in rooms and even travel between homes in multi-unit housing," said Beth Turner, manager of health promotions for the American Lung Association in Iowa, in a news release. 

By state law, smoking is allowed in private rental housing.

The Iowa Smokefree Air Act, which went into effect in 2008, bans smoking in common areas of apartment buildings and duplexes, but does not ban it in individual units. Smoking policies are at the discretion of the property owner or landlord. 

There are 156 smoke-free properties in the Des Moines metro listed on the Iowa Department of Public Health's Smoke Free Homes registry, smokefreehomes.iowa.gov.

More:

Sours: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/health/2018/07/30/smokefree-housing-smoking-banned-iowa-public-housing-still-smoke-apartment-hud-lung-association/866029002/
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Iowa’s Smokefree Air Act Marks 10th Anniversary

The Iowa Smokefree Air Act turns 10 years old July 1, 2018. Iowa is one of 25 states that have enacted comprehensive smoke-free laws addressing secondhand smoke exposure in workplaces, restaurants and bars.

Iowa Governor Chet Culver signed the Smokefree Air Act into law in 2008. On the Act’s five-year anniversary, a poll by the American Cancer Society Action Network found 82 percent of registered Iowa voters indicated their support of the law banning workplace smoking and said it had made Iowa a better place to live. “The Smoke Free Air Act was the catalyst for many smoke-free initiatives,” said Erin Foster, Director of Prevention Services for ASAC.  “Iowans are now protected from second hand smoke not only in the workplace, but in hundreds of parks and outdoor entertainment areas, and smoke-free rentals are listed on the Smoke Free Homes Registry.”

For more information about the Smoke Free Air Act, including frequently asked questions about the law, visit https://smokefreeair.iowa.gov/. To access the Smoke Free Homes Registry, go to https://smokefreehomes.iowa.gov/ and if you are ready to quit tobacco, call Quitline Iowa at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669), or visit www.quitlineiowa.org. Registration specialists and Quit Coaches® are available 24 hours a day.

Summer Substance UseInternational Overdose Awareness Day

Sours: http://www.asac.us/iowas-smokefree-air-act-marks-10th-anniversary/

Smokefree Air Act

In the spring of 2008, Iowa lawmakers passed legislation to protect employees and the general public. The Smokefree air Act (ISAA) prohibits smoking in enclosed areas within places of employment as well as some outdoor areas. If you are an owner/operator of a bar or restaurant in Iowa, you should familiarize yourself with the law to ensure your establishment is in compliance. 

Restaurants

The ISAA identifies a restaurant as an establishment which offers food to the public, guests, or employees.  The ISAA prohibits smoking in the outdoor seating or serving areas of restaurants.  In other words, if the outdoor area contains seating of any kind (i.e., chairs, benches, picnic  tables, stools, etc.), smoking is prohibited.  Further, if staff serves food or beverages to patrons in the outdoor area, smoking is prohibited.

Bars

The ISAA identifies a bar as an establishment where alcoholic beverages may be purchased for consumption on the premises, and in which food service is limited to prepackaged snack foods, popcorn, peanuts, and the reheating of commercially prepared foods that do not require assembly.  The ISAA does not regulate smoking in outdoor areas of bars and smoking can be allowed on patios, decks or any other outdoor areas of bars.  

Entertainment

Finally, if bars or restaurants provide entertainment (i.e., live band, comedian, etc.), the ISAA prohibits smoking in all outdoor areas where people can witness the entertainment.  These areas include seating, standing room only, festival style seating or any area where people congregate to experience the entertainment.

For more information about the Iowa Smokefree Air Act, call the Iowa Department of Public Health at 888.944.2247 or visit SmokefreeAir.Iowa.gov.

Smokefree Air Act: Marked Highlighted version for licensees

Smokefree Air Act Clean version

Administrative Rules

Report a Smokefree Air Act Complaint Website

Sours: https://abd.iowa.gov/tobacco/smokefree-air-act

2018 laws iowa smoking

Tobacco use in Iowa 2018

Iowa cigarette use among adults and high school students

Cigarette use: Iowa*

  • In 2016, 16.7 percent of adults smoked. Nationally, the rate was 17.1 percent.¹
  • In 2017, 9.9 percent of high school students smoked on at least one day in the past 30 days. Nationally, the rate was 8.8 percent.²

Other tobacco product use: Iowa

  • In 2015, 3.1 percent of adults used e-cigarettes, 3.7 percent used smokeless tobacco and 2.6 percent smoked cigars.³
  • In 2017, 9.0 percent of high school students used e-cigarettes, 6.2 percent used smokeless tobacco and 7.3 percent smoked cigars on at least one day in the past 30 days. Nationally, the rates were 13.2 percent, 5.5 percent and 8.0 percent, respectively.²
Iowa other tobacco product use among adults and high school students

Economics of tobacco use and tobacco control

  • Iowa received $280.9 million (estimated) in tobacco settlement payments and taxes in fiscal year 2018.
  • Of this, the state allocated $4.1 million in state funds to tobacco prevention in fiscal year 2018, just 13.5 percent of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s annual spending target.
  • Smoking-related health care costs: $1.28 billion per year
  • Smoking-related losses in productivity: $1.21 billion per year

Iowa tobacco laws

Tobacco taxes

Iowa 2018 tobacco taxes
  • Iowa is ranked 29th in the U.S. for its cigarette tax of $1.36 per pack (enacted March 2007), compared with the national average of $1.73. (Connecticut and New York have the highest tax at $4.35 and Missouri has the lowest at 17 cents.)⁶ ⁷ ⁸
  • Little cigars are taxed at $1.36 per 20 cigars, snuff is taxed at $1.19 per ounce and all other tobacco products are taxed 50 percent of the manufacturer’s list price.⁶ ⁷

Clean indoor air ordinances

  • Smoking is prohibited in all government workplaces, private workplaces, schools, childcare facilities, restaurants, bars, retail stores and recreational/cultural facilities.⁶ ⁷
  • Smoking restrictions are required in casinos/gaming establishments (tribal establishments are exempt).⁶ ⁷

Youth access laws

  • The minimum age of sale for tobacco products is 18 and penalties exist for both minors and merchants who violate this law.⁶ ⁷
  • Minors are prohibited from buying alternative tobacco products, including e- cigarettes.⁶ ⁷

Quitting statistics and benefits

  • The CDC estimates 43.9 percent of daily adult smokers in Iowa quit smoking for one or more days in 2016.
  • In 2014, the Affordable Care Act required Medicaid programs cover all quit medications.**
  • Iowa’s state quit line invests $2.10 per smoker, compared with the national average of $2.10.
  • Iowa does not have a private insurance mandate provision for quitting tobacco.

Notes and references

Updated June 2018

*National and state-level prevalence numbers reflect the most recent data available. This may differ across state fact sheets.

**The seven recommended quitting medications are NRT gum, NRT patch, NRT nasal spray, NRT inhaler, NRT lozenge, Varenicline (Chantix) and Bupropion (Zyban). Fiore MC, et al. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Clinical Practice Guideline. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service: May 2008.

  1. CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2016.
  2. CDC, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, 2017.
  3. CDC, State-Specific Prevalence of Tobacco Product Use Among Adults - United States, 2014-2015, MMWR.
  4. Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Broken Promises to Our Children: a State-by-State Look at the 1998 State Tobacco Settlement 19 Years Later FY2018, 2017.
  5. Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Toll of Tobacco in the United States, 2018.
  6. American Lung Association, SLATI State Reports, 2017.
  7. American Lung Association, State of Tobacco Control, 2018.
  8. Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, State Cigarette Excise Tax Rates & Rankings, 2018.
  9. CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation System, 2016.
Sours: https://truthinitiative.org/research-resources/smoking-region/tobacco-use-iowa-2018
Lawmakers consider raising Iowa legal smoking age

A forced break was arranged for me by a call from a friend. The clock showed 17:32. And immediately the hungry stomach made itself felt. Having thrown hastily on yesterday's meal, I went to the bathroom, to put myself in a proper form for tonight.

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Do not be afraid of him, he is already accustomed to this business. The dog briskly ran up to Sveta and began to sniff at her. For the first time, the girl felt stupid - the dog did not turn her on, it was just a dog.



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