Genesis chapter 8 explained

Genesis chapter 8 explained DEFAULT

Genesis chapter 8

New International Version

1 But God remembered Noah and all the wild animals and the livestock that were with him in the ark, and he sent a wind over the earth, and the waters receded. 2 Now the springs of the deep and the floodgates of the heavens had been closed, and the rain had stopped falling from the sky. 3 The water receded steadily from the earth. At the end of the hundred and fifty days the water had gone down, 4 and on the seventeenth day of the seventh month the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. 5 The waters continued to recede until the tenth month, and on the first day of the tenth month the tops of the mountains became visible.

6 After forty days Noah opened a window he had made in the ark 7 and sent out a raven, and it kept flying back and forth until the water had dried up from the earth. 8 Then he sent out a dove to see if the water had receded from the surface of the ground. 9 But the dove could find nowhere to perch because there was water over all the surface of the earth; so it returned to Noah in the ark. He reached out his hand and took the dove and brought it back to himself in the ark. 10 He waited seven more days and again sent out the dove from the ark. 11 When the dove returned to him in the evening, there in its beak was a freshly plucked olive leaf! Then Noah knew that the water had receded from the earth. 12 He waited seven more days and sent the dove out again, but this time it did not return to him.

13 By the first day of the first month of Noah's six hundred and first year, the water had dried up from the earth. Noah then removed the covering from the ark and saw that the surface of the ground was dry. 14 By the twenty-seventh day of the second month the earth was completely dry.

15 Then God said to Noah, 16 Come out of the ark, you and your wife and your sons and their wives. 17 Bring out every kind of living creature that is with you--the birds, the animals, and all the creatures that move along the ground--so they can multiply on the earth and be fruitful and increase in number on it.'

18 So Noah came out, together with his sons and his wife and his sons' wives. 19 All the animals and all the creatures that move along the ground and all the birds--everything that moves on land--came out of the ark, one kind after another.

20 Then Noah built an altar to the LORD and, taking some of all the clean animals and clean birds, he sacrificed burnt offerings on it. 21 The LORD smelled the pleasing aroma and said in his heart: 'Never again will I curse the ground because of humans, even though every inclination of the human heart is evil from childhood. And never again will I destroy all living creatures, as I have done.

22 As long as the earth endures, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night will never cease.'

English Standard Version

1 But God remembered Noah and all the beasts and all the livestock that were with him in the ark. And God made a wind blow over the earth, and the waters subsided. 2 The fountains of the deep and the windows of the heavens were closed, the rain from the heavens was restrained, 3 and the waters receded from the earth continually. At the end of 150 days the waters had abated, 4 and in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. 5 And the waters continued to abate until the tenth month; in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen.

6 At the end of forty days Noah opened the window of the ark that he had made 7 and sent forth a raven. It went to and fro until the waters were dried up from the earth. 8 Then he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters had subsided from the face of the ground. 9 But the dove found no place to set her foot, and she returned to him to the ark, for the waters were still on the face of the whole earth. So he put out his hand and took her and brought her into the ark with him. 10 He waited another seven days, and again he sent forth the dove out of the ark. 11 And the dove came back to him in the evening, and behold, in her mouth was a freshly plucked olive leaf. So Noah knew that the waters had subsided from the earth. 12 Then he waited another seven days and sent forth the dove, and she did not return to him anymore.

13 In the six hundred and first year, in the first month, the first day of the month, the waters were dried from off the earth. And Noah removed the covering of the ark and looked, and behold, the face of the ground was dry. 14 In the second month, on the twenty-seventh day of the month, the earth had dried out. 15 Then God said to Noah, 16 “Go out from the ark, you and your wife, and your sons and your sons’ wives with you. 17 Bring out with you every living thing that is with you of all flesh—birds and animals and every creeping thing that creeps on the earth—that they may swarm on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.” 18 So Noah went out, and his sons and his wife and his sons’ wives with him. 19 Every beast, every creeping thing, and every bird, everything that moves on the earth, went out by families from the ark.

20 Then Noah built an altar to the LORD and took some of every clean animal and some of every clean bird and offered burnt offerings on the altar. 21 And when the LORD smelled the pleasing aroma, the LORD said in his heart, “I will never again curse the ground because of man, for the intention of man’s heart is evil from his youth. Neither will I ever again strike down every living creature as I have done. 22 While the earth remains, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.”

King James Version

1 And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that was with him in the ark: and God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters asswaged; 2 The fountains also of the deep and the windows of heaven were stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained; 3 And the waters returned from off the earth continually: and after the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters were abated.

4 And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat. 5 And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month: in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, were the tops of the mountains seen.

6 And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made: 7 And he sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro, until the waters were dried up from off the earth. 8 Also he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the ground; 9 But the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark. 10 And he stayed yet other seven days; and again he sent forth the dove out of the ark; 11 And the dove came in to him in the evening; and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf pluckt off: so Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth. 12 And he stayed yet other seven days; and sent forth the dove; which returned not again unto him any more.

13 And it came to pass in the six hundredth and first year, in the first month, the first day of the month, the waters were dried up from off the earth: and Noah removed the covering of the ark, and looked, and, behold, the face of the ground was dry. 14 And in the second month, on the seven and twentieth day of the month, was the earth dried.

15 And God spake unto Noah, saying, 16 Go forth of the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons' wives with thee. 17 Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, of all flesh, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth; that they may breed abundantly in the earth, and be fruitful, and multiply upon the earth. 18 And Noah went forth, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons' wives with him: 19 Every beast, every creeping thing, and every fowl, and whatsoever creepeth upon the earth, after their kinds, went forth out of the ark.

20 And Noah builded an altar unto the LORD; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt offerings on the altar. 21 And the LORD smelled a sweet savour; and the LORD said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake; for the imagination of man's heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done. 22 While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease.

New American Standard Bible

1 But God remembered Noah and all the animals and all the livestock that were with him in the ark; and God caused a wind to pass over the earth, and the water subsided. 2 Also the fountains of the deep and the floodgates of the sky were closed, and the rain from the sky was restrained; 3 and the water receded steadily from the earth, and at the end of 150 days the water decreased. 4 Then in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, the ark rested upon the mountains of Ararat. 5 And the water decreased steadily until the tenth month; in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains became visible.

6 Then it came about at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made; 7 and he sent out a raven, and it flew here and there until the water was dried up from the earth. 8 Then he sent out a dove, to see if the water was low on the surface of the land; 9 but the dove found no resting place for the sole of its foot, so it returned to him in the ark, for the water was on the surface of all the earth. Then he put out his hand and took it, and brought it into the ark to himself. 10 So he waited another seven days longer; and again he sent out the dove from the ark. 11 And the dove came to him in the evening, and behold, in its beak was a fresh olive leaf. So Noah knew that the water was low on the earth. 12 Then he waited another seven days longer, and sent out the dove; but it did not return to him again.

13 Now it came about in the six hundred and first year, in the first month, on the first of the month, that the water was dried up from the earth. Then Noah removed the covering of the ark, and looked, and behold, the surface of the ground had dried up. 14 And in the second month, on the twenty-seventh day of the month, the earth was dry. 15 Then God spoke to Noah, saying, 16 'Go out of the ark, you and your wife and your sons and your sons’ wives with you. 17 Bring out with you every living thing of all flesh that is with you, birds and animals and every crawling thing that crawls on the earth, that they may breed abundantly on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.' 18 So Noah went out, and his sons and his wife, and his sons’ wives with him. 19 Every animal, every crawling thing, and every bird, everything that moves on the earth, went out by their families from the ark.

20 Then Noah built an altar to the LORD, and took some of every kind of clean animal and some of every clean bird and offered burnt offerings on the altar. 21 The LORD smelled the soothing aroma, and the LORD said to Himself, 'I will never again curse the ground on account of man, for the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth; and I will never again destroy every living thing, as I have done.

22 While the earth remains, Seedtime and harvest, Cold and heat, Summer and winter, And day and night Shall not cease.'

New Living Translation

1 But God remembered Noah and all the wild animals and livestock with him in the boat. He sent a wind to blow across the earth, and the floodwaters began to recede. 2 The underground waters stopped flowing, and the torrential rains from the sky were stopped. 3 So the floodwaters gradually receded from the earth. After 150 days, 4 exactly five months from the time the flood began, the boat came to rest on the mountains of Ararat. 5 Two and a half months later, as the waters continued to go down, other mountain peaks became visible.

6 After another forty days, Noah opened the window he had made in the boat 7 and released a raven. The bird flew back and forth until the floodwaters on the earth had dried up. 8 He also released a dove to see if the water had receded and it could find dry ground. 9 But the dove could find no place to land because the water still covered the ground. So it returned to the boat, and Noah held out his hand and drew the dove back inside. 10 After waiting another seven days, Noah released the dove again. 11 This time the dove returned to him in the evening with a fresh olive leaf in its beak. Then Noah knew that the floodwaters were almost gone. 12 He waited another seven days and then released the dove again. This time it did not come back.

13 Noah was now 601 years old. On the first day of the new year, ten and a half months after the flood began, the floodwaters had almost dried up from the earth. Noah lifted back the covering of the boat and saw that the surface of the ground was drying. 14 Two more months went by, and at last the earth was dry!

15 Then God said to Noah, 16 'Leave the boat, all of you--you and your wife, and your sons and their wives. 17 Release all the animals--the birds, the livestock, and the small animals that scurry along the ground--so they can be fruitful and multiply throughout the earth.'

18 So Noah, his wife, and his sons and their wives left the boat. 19 And all of the large and small animals and birds came out of the boat, pair by pair.

20 Then Noah built an altar to the LORD, and there he sacrificed as burnt offerings the animals and birds that had been approved for that purpose. 21 And the LORD was pleased with the aroma of the sacrifice and said to himself, 'I will never again curse the ground because of the human race, even though everything they think or imagine is bent toward evil from childhood. I will never again destroy all living things. 22 As long as the earth remains, there will be planting and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night.'

Christian Standard Bible

1 God remembered Noah, as well as all the wildlife and all the livestock that were with him in the ark. God caused a wind to pass over the earth, and the water began to subside. 2 The sources of the watery depths and the floodgates of the sky were closed, and the rain from the sky stopped. 3 The water steadily receded from the earth, and by the end of 150 days the water had decreased significantly. 4 The ark came to rest in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, on the mountains of Ararat.

5 The water continued to recede until the tenth month; in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were visible. 6 After forty days Noah opened the window of the ark that he had made, 7 and he sent out a raven. It went back and forth until the water had dried up from the earth. 8 Then he sent out a dove to see whether the water on the earth's surface had gone down, 9 but the dove found no resting place for its foot. It returned to him in the ark because water covered the surface of the whole earth. He reached out and brought it into the ark to himself. 10 So Noah waited seven more days and sent out the dove from the ark again. 11 When the dove came to him at evening, there was a plucked olive leaf in its beak. So Noah knew that the water on the earth's surface had gone down. 12 After he had waited another seven days, he sent out the dove, but it did not return to him again. 13 In the six hundred and first year, in the first month, on the first day of the month, the water that had covered the earth was dried up. Then Noah removed the ark's cover and saw that the surface of the ground was drying. 14 By the twenty-seventh day of the second month, the earth was dry.

15 Then God spoke to Noah, 16 "Come out of the ark, you, your wife, your sons, and your sons' wives with you. 17 Bring out all the living creatures that are with you--birds, livestock, those that crawl on the earth--and they will spread over the earth and be fruitful and multiply on the earth." 18 So Noah, along with his sons, his wife, and his sons' wives, came out. 19 All the animals, all the creatures that crawl, and all the flying creatures--everything that moves on the earth--came out of the ark by their families.

20 Then Noah built an altar to the LORD. He took some of every kind of clean animal and every kind of clean bird and offered burnt offerings on the altar. 21 When the LORD smelled the pleasing aroma, he said to himself, "I will never again curse the ground because of human beings, even though the inclination of the human heart is evil from youth onward. And I will never again strike down every living thing as I have done.

22 As long as the earth endures, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, and day and night will not cease."

Sours: https://www.bibleref.com/Genesis/8/Genesis-chapter-8.html

LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Genesis, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

God, Humanity, and Creation Theme Icon

God, Humanity, and Creation

Mistrust, Disobedience, and Death Theme Icon

Mistrust, Disobedience, and Death

Covenants and Faith in God’s Promises Theme Icon

Covenants and Faith in God’s Promises

The Role of Women Theme Icon

God remembers Noah, his family, and the animals in the ark. He causes a wind to blow over the earth, which makes the floodwaters subside. At the end of the 150 days, the ark rests on the mountains of Ararat. As the waters recede, the mountains gradually reappear.

When the Bible describes God as “remembering” someone, it doesn’t mean that God had forgotten about them. Instead, it means that God is about to act on that person’s behalf—in this case, bringing Noah and his family safely through the waters, as he’d promised to do. The mountains of Ararat are located in modern Turkey.

After 40 days, Noah opens a window and sends a raven out. The raven flies back and forth until the waters dry up. Then Noah sends out a dove, but it returns to the ark because there is not yet dry ground for it to rest on. He sends the dove out again 7 days later, and the dove returns with an olive leaf in its mouth, showing that the waters have subsided. After another 7 days, Noah sends the dove out for a final time, and it does not return.

While the flood was sudden and dramatic, the waters’ recession and the earth’s drying is a slow, gradual process. Noah’s method of sending out the various birds to gauge the earth’s conditions shows that even after Noah and his family had survived the flood, they were still required to wait and trust that God would fully deliver them from the situation.

Noah removes the covering from the ark and sees that the ground is drying. When it is fully dry, God tells Noah, his wife, and his sons’ families to leave the ark with the animals. After they emerge from the ark, Noah builds an altar to the LORD and offers burnt sacrifices on it. When the LORD smells the offerings’ aroma, he promises himself never again to destroy his creation.

When Noah emerges from the ark, the first thing he does is offer a sacrifice of thanksgiving and atonement (a practice that’s explained in greater detail in the Book of Leviticus). The offering also suggests that even if human beings disobey God again, God will not destroy them like he did with the flood, and that sacrificial practices will be part of upholding that harmony between humanity and God.

Active Themes

God, Humanity, and Creation Theme Icon
Mistrust, Disobedience, and Death Theme Icon
Covenants and Faith in God’s Promises Theme Icon
Sours: https://www.litcharts.com/lit/genesis/chapter-8
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After the flood, God forced more consequences on humanity. Genesis, Chapter 8 details the actions of Noah and those animals and people who gathered with him on the ark. God set into motion a great wind to dry the water which was left over after the great flood. He stopped the rain, a process which took one hundred and fifty days.

After the flood, Noah’s ark is said to have settled on the mountains of Ararat. And after a ten month period, the peaks of mountains could finally be seen.

The book of Genesis chapter 8 reveals that when Noah to left the ark, God sent a dove as a sign that he would stop the judgments. The dove brought with it an olive leaf to demonstrate that the waters had indeed abated and vegetation would begin growing again. After some time, Noah emerged and looked carefully at what had come of the ark.

God told Noah that he and his family could now leave the ark. He asked them to be fruitful and multiply, to recreate humanity which would then start anew. The same applied to all of the animals that God asked Noah to safeguard in the ark. Noah built an altar, burnt offerings on it, and praised his savior. He was pleased with Noah so he made a covenant with him. In Chapter 8, God ultimately promised never to again attack his own people–his flock–nor would he judge and attack the Earth’s people and animals as he did in the great flood.

1 And God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the cattle that was with him in the ark: and God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters assuaged;

2 The fountains also of the deep and the windows of heaven were stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained;

3 And the waters returned from off the earth continually: and after the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters were abated.

4 And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.

5 And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month: in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, were the tops of the mountains seen.

6 And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made:

7 And he sent forth a raven, which went forth to and fro, until the waters were dried up from off the earth.

8 Also he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the ground;

9 But the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark.

10 And he stayed yet other seven days; and again he sent forth the dove out of the ark;

11 And the dove came in to him in the evening; and, lo, in her mouth was an olive leaf pluckt off: so Noah knew that the waters were abated from off the earth.

12 And he stayed yet other seven days; and sent forth the dove; which returned not again unto him any more.

13 And it came to pass in the six hundredth and first year, in the first month, the first day of the month, the waters were dried up from off the earth: and Noah removed the covering of the ark, and looked, and, behold, the face of the ground was dry.

14 And in the second month, on the seven and twentieth day of the month, was the earth dried.

15 And God spake unto Noah, saying,

16 Go forth of the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons’ wives with thee.

17 Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, of all flesh, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth; that they may breed abundantly in the earth, and be fruitful, and multiply upon the earth.

18 And Noah went forth, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons’ wives with him:

19 Every beast, every creeping thing, and every fowl, and whatsoever creepeth upon the earth, after their kinds, went forth out of the ark.

20 And Noah builded an altar unto the LORD; and took of every clean beast, and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt offerings on the altar.

21 And the LORD smelled a sweet savour; and the LORD said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake; for the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done.

22 While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease.

Sours: https://totallyhistory.com/genesis-chapter-8/

Genesis 8 – Noah and His Family Leave the Ark

A. God remembers Noah.

1. (1) God focuses His attention on Noah again.

Then God remembered Noah, and every living thing, and all the animals that were with him in the ark. And God made a wind to pass over the earth, and the waters subsided.

a. God remembered Noah: This is an anthropomorphism (a non-literal picture of God in human terms we can understand). Certainly, God never forgot Noah, sustaining him every day on the ark. But at this point, God again turned His active attention towards Noah. It was truly as if He remembered Noah again.

i. “Noah had been shut up in the ark for many a day, and at the right time God thought of him, practically thought of him, and came to visit him. Dear heart, you have been shut out from the world now for many days, but God has not forgotten you. God remembered Noah, and he remembers you.” (Spurgeon)

b. God made a wind to pass over the earth: God knew how to make the waters subside. Even a big problem like this was not a big problem to God. The God who created the heavens and the earth (Genesis 1:1) could also do this.

2. (2-5) As the floodwaters recede, the ark rests on Mount Ararat.

The fountains of the deep and the windows of heaven were also stopped, and the rain from heaven was restrained. And the waters receded continually from the earth. At the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters decreased. Then the ark rested in the seventh month, the seventeenth day of the month, on the mountains of Ararat. And the waters decreased continually until the tenth month. In the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen.

a. The fountains of the deep and the windows of heaven were also stopped: The rain that began in Genesis 7:11-12 was now stopped. God was in control of when the rain and other waters began, and when they stopped.

b. On the mountains of Ararat: In one way of thinking, Mount Ararat was not a good place to leave the ark. Leaving the ark at a high altitude and mountainous terrain meant a difficult departure for everyone and everything in the ark. However, if God’s purpose was to put the ark in a place where it might be preserved for thousands of years, He chose an excellent place for it.

c. The tops of the mountains were seen: This is another indication in the Biblical record that this was a worldwide flood. It was so significant that for a time the tops of the mountains were covered, and now they were seenagain as the waters decreased continually.

3. (6-12) Birds are used to test the condition of the earth.

So it came to pass, at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made. Then he sent out a raven, which kept going to and fro until the waters had dried up from the earth. He also sent out from himself a dove, to see if the waters had receded from the face of the ground. But the dove found no resting place for the sole of her foot, and she returned into the ark to him, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth. So he put out his hand and took her, and drew her into the ark to himself. And he waited yet another seven days, and again he sent the dove out from the ark. Then the dove came to him in the evening, and behold, a freshly plucked olive leaf was in her mouth; and Noah knew that the waters had receded from the earth. So he waited yet another seven days and sent out the dove, which did not return again to him anymore.

a. At the end of forty days: This was counted from the time when the rain and other water sources began (Genesis 7:11-12).

i. “God told Noah when to go into the ark, but he did not tell him when he should come out again. The Lord told Noah when to go in, for it was necessary for him to know that; but he did not tell him when he should come out, for it was unnecessary that he should know that. God always lets his people know what is practically for their good.” (Spurgeon)

b. Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made: Genesis 6:16 describes the window that was to be made in the upper portion of the ark. The windowwas also made with some kind of covering that could be closed and opened.

i. “Because he believed in God, therefore he removed the covering of the ark, and looked abroad, expecting by-and-by to see not only the tops of the mountains, but also a dry and green earth once more. True faith often goes to the window. If your faith turns her face to the wall, and expects nothing, I do not think it is genuine faith.” (Spurgeon)

c. He sent out a raven, which kept going to and fro: Apparently the ravendid not return to the ark. Perhaps this was because the ravenis a scavenger, and might rest and feed upon dead, floating carcasses.

d. The dove found no resting place… she returned into the ark: Being a clean, non-scavenging bird, the dovewould not land upon the earth until there was a dry, suitable place to land. When the dove returned into the ark, Noah knew that the waters had not yet drained enough to leave the ark.

i. Charles Spurgeon made a spiritual point from the idea that the dove found no resting place. He explained that like the dove, the believer finds no true resting place in this world. “The world is said to be progressing, advancing, improving; but we cannot discover it. The same sin, the same filthiness, the same universally abounding unbelief, that our fathers complained of, we are obliged to complain of still; and we are weary with the world, weary with the nineteenth century, and all its boasted civilization. There is nothing upon which the sole of our foot can rest.”

e. The dove came to him… a freshly plucked olive leaf was in her mouth: The raven never returned, but the dovecame back with evidence that the terrible season of judgment through the flood was over and God had begun to renew plant life on the earth. Since this, a dovewith an olive leaf has been a symbol of peace and goodness.

i. “Perhaps you have seen a picture of the dove carrying an olive branch in its mouth, which, in the first place, a dove could not pluck out of the tree, and in the second place, a dove could not carry an olive branch even if she could pluck it off. It was an olive leaf, that is all. Why cannot people keep to the words of Scripture? If the Bible mentions a leaf, they make it a bough; and if the Bible says it is a bough, they make it a leaf.” (Spurgeon)

f. The dove, which did not return again to him anymore: The departure of the dove proved that the earth was habitable again.

4. (13-19) Noah, his family, and all the animals leave the ark.

And it came to pass in the six hundred and first year, in the first month, the first day of the month, that the waters were dried up from the earth; and Noah removed the covering of the ark and looked, and indeed the surface of the ground was dry. And in the second month, on the twenty-seventh day of the month, the earth was dried. Then God spoke to Noah, saying, “Go out of the ark, you and your wife, and your sons and your sons’ wives with you. Bring out with you every living thing of all flesh that is with you: birds and cattle and every creeping thing that creeps on the earth, so that they may abound on the earth, and be fruitful and multiply on the earth.” So Noah went out, and his sons and his wife and his sons’ wives with him. Every animal, every creeping thing, every bird, and whatever creeps on the earth, according to their families, went out of the ark.

a. In the six hundred and first year: Genesis 7:11-13 says that Noah entered the ark on the seventeenth day of the second month of the six hundredth year of his life. This is almost a full year later, and in the second month of his six hundred and first year Noah left the ark. It seems he was in the ark a full calendar year.

b. Bring out with you every living thing: Just as the ark was loaded with animals before the flood, it was then unloaded. We don’t read of any animals that died in the year on the ark.

c. That they may abound on the earth and be fruitful and multiply: Living things from the ark would once again repopulate the earth.

i. “Noah came out of the ark — no longer cooped up and penned within its narrow limits, he walked abroad, and the whole world was before him where to choose. Was not that a picture of the freedom of the believer who has been ‘buried with Christ,’ and enjoys the possession of God’s free Spirit?” (Spurgeon)

B. God’s covenant with Noah.

1. (20) Noah builds an altar and offers a sacrifice.

Then Noah built an altar to the LORD, and took of every clean animal and of every clean bird, and offered burnt offerings on the altar.

a. Then Noah built an altar: Noah’s first act after leaving the ark was to worship God through sacrifice. His gratitude and admiration of God’s greatness led him to worship God.

b. Took of every clean animal and every clean bird: As is the nature of true sacrifice, this was a costly offering unto God. With only seven of each animal on the ark, Noah risked extinction by sacrificing some of these animals. But costly sacrifice is pleasing to God.

i. “Common sense would have said, ‘Spare them, for you will want every one of them.’ But grace said, ‘Slay them, for they belong to God. Give Jehovah his due.’” (Spurgeon)

ii. The sacrifices we are called to offer to God should also cost us something. We should present our bodies as a living sacrifice to God (Romans 12:1), the giving of our resources is a sacrifice (Philippians 4:18), and we should give the sacrifice of praise to God (Hebrews 13:15).

iii. Costly sacrifice pleases God, not because God is greedy and wants to get as much from us as He can but because God Himself sacrificed at great cost (Ephesians 5:2 and Hebrews 9:26, 10:12). God wants costly sacrifice from us because it shows we are being conformed into the image of Jesus, who was the greatest display of costly sacrifice. As Paul wrote in Ephesians 5:2, we should be like Jesus in this regard: And walk in love, as Christ also has loved us and given Himself for us, an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling aroma.

iv. May we think like David, who said he would never offer to God that which costs me nothing (2 Samuel 24:24).

2. (21-22) God’s promise to Noah and to all mankind.

And the LORD smelled a soothing aroma. Then the LORD said in His heart, “I will never again curse the ground for man’s sake, although the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth; nor will I again destroy every living thing as I have done.

“While the earth remains,
Seedtime and harvest,
Cold and heat,
Winter and summer,
And day and night
Shall not cease.”

a. The LORD smelled a soothing aroma: Noah’s costly sacrifice pleased God. It was as if God smelled the great aroma of the roasting meat (indicating that God loves the smell of grilling or burning meat), and He then made this wonderful promise to Noah and to man.

i. Of course, the Bible speaks anthropomorphically here – using a human analogy of a divine action or attribute. More pleasing to God than the smell of the sacrifice was the heart of Noah in his sacrifice.

b. I will never again curse the ground for man’s sake: God promised to never again visit the earth with judgment by a flood on this scale, to destroy every living thing. God did this understanding that the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth. This was a promise full of mercy.

i. We may observe a strange combination of truths; first, that the imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth and second, God’s promise to never again curse the ground for man’s sake. It would seem that man’s evil would invite God’s curse, not put it away. The strange combination is accounted for by Noah’s altar and sacrifice, and God’s pleasure in the sacrifice (the LORD smelled a soothing aroma).

ii. “The sacrifice is the turning-point. Without a sacrifice sin clamours for vengeance, and God sends a destroying flood; but the sacrifice presented by Noah was typical of the coming sacrifice of God’s only begotten Son, and of the effectual atonement therein provided for human sin.” (Spurgeon)

iii. We can say that after the flood, Noah’s story illustrated many things relevant to the life of the believer.

· Noah showed the believer’s freedom.

· Noah showed the believer’s faith (in sacrifice).

· Noah showed the believer’s heart (by sacrifice).

· Noah showed the believer’s covenant of mercy (in light of sacrifice).

c. Cold and heat, winter and summer: God promised that after the flood, the earth would have established seasons. This speaks of the profound climatic and ecological changes in the earth since the covering of water vapors covering the earth was emptied. Now, there would be seasonal and temperature variations.

i. “As there should be no more a general deluge, so should there be no more a serious disarrangement of the course of the seasons and the temperature appropriate thereto. Seed-time and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night, are to succeed each other in their perpetually unchanging change, so long as the present reign of forbearance shall last.” (Spurgeon)

ii. The result of this change is found in the rapidly decreasing lifespans. There will never be 900-year-old men after the flood. The mass extinction of animals revealed in the fossil record (such as dinosaurs and other such creatures) probably took place shortly after the flood, when the earth was changed so dramatically and plunged into an ice age.

iii. “How faithfully God fulfils his covenant with the earth! How truly will he keep his covenant with every believing sinner! Oh, trust ye in him, for his promise will stand fast for ever!” (Spurgeon)

©2018 David Guzik – No distribution beyond personal use without permission

Sours: https://enduringword.com/bible-commentary/genesis-8/

8 explained chapter genesis

Old Testament Studies

GENESIS

Lesson 8 - Chapters 8 and 9

Just as chapter 7 began with the comforting words that God invited the righteous family of Noach into the safety of the Ark, chapter 8 tells us that God “remembered” Noah. But, the verse doesn’t stop there; it says He also remembered all the living things that came into the Ark with Noach. I cannot stress enough how important God’s living creatures…..what we typically call animals……are to God. Man is certainly a bit above the animals, placed into dominion over the animals, yet we’re made of the same stuff as the animals; the dust of the ground. And, God put that same neshemah, spirit of life, into both animals and mankind. I’m not trying to be an advertisement for PETA. I’m saying that we lose sight of the fact that animals were not throw-aways. No doubt, early in Genesis when God had the animals parade by Adam as he named them, we must not forget that Adam was also given the opportunity to select one of them as a companion. Not in the sense of a wife, but as a friend. And, no doubt, this was to show us the place man has…..slightly above the animals…..but also the loving importance God places on His living creatures.

I only point this out, because if I can be permitted to attach a human emotion to God, it was a terrible thing the day God had to kill an animal or two to make animal skin clothing to cover Adam and Eve; it would have grieved Him greatly. And, it grieved Him when, for His own good reasons, it became necessary for animals to be slain on a regular basis for blood sacrifice, in order to atone for men’s sins. And, it must have grieved Him yet again, when for reasons I cannot fathom, the Father of all things instructed Noach and his descendants that they could now kill countless thousands, and then millions, of His beloved living creatures for food. This was a HUGE matter. When we’re told that God knows when a sparrow falls from the sky, it’s because that sparrow is one of His living creatures who no longer lives. Not “knowing” the sparrow in the sense that a single dollar is important to an accountant reconciling his books; rather, because God put His Life Spirit into that creature, and now it was extinguished. We too often look at that verse only from the viewpoint of how important man is……because it also says he numbers the hair on our heads. But, that’s not the entire point it is that even a bird is important to Him. So, WAY before Jesus came to the world, God was watching His living creatures die on account of mankind’s sin.

The 2nd half of verse 1 uses a word that is familiar to us. It says that God brought a “rushing wind” across the earth, to push back the waters. The Hebrew word used here is ruach. In Hebrew, Holy Spirit is Ruach HaKodesh. Ruach is commonly used in the OT as a word to describe God’s spirit, or sometimes “spirit” in general. So, this rushing wind was more than just a weather event; the wind was real and literal, but it also involves the idea that this wind had a spiritual component as it was “of God”. Another example of the Reality of Duality.

After 150 days of the water rising, the water receded for the next 150 days.

The wooden Ark had bobbed around in the floodwaters, until it came to rest upon the mountains of Ararat…..NOT Mt. Ararat, a specific peak…rather, somewhere on top of one of the mountains of the extensive Ararat mountain range that is in modern day Turkey. And, we’re told the precise day: the 7th month, the 17th day of the month. But, it would be awhile before they could disembark. Forty more days passed, and Noah sent out a Raven, a scavenger bird, an Unclean animal. It didn’t come back, which indicated it had found food, likely dead things, and a place to nest, likely in the now uncovered mountaintops. Next a dove, a CLEAN animal, was sent out, but it returned indicating that it had no food source or place to nest. A week later Noach sent out another dove, and this time it returned with a green, freshly picked Olive tree leaf in its beak. Another week passes, and the dove doesn’t return, indicating that the water had receded to the tree line, or below. Quite remarkably, it is well known by Olive growers that they never have to fear flooding that would drown normal trees……..for an Olive branch will actually bear leaves while under the water.

It is so interesting to note that for some reason, God wants us to know the exact month to the day, that certain stages of the flooding, and its receding, occurred. For instance, we see that on the FIRST month, the FIRST day……that is, the first day of a new year, as the Jews call it, Rosh Hoshanna, it was safe to remove the covering over the Ark, and all that remained was for the ground to dry up enough for the Ark’s inhabitants to set foot on it again. It was on the 2nd month, the 27th day, that God instructed Noah that he could now resume life on the soil of the earth.

How interesting it is that the selfsame flood that destroyed the old also purified and made way for the new. Death of that which was corrupted was needed in order to prepare for new life. And, again, we have a type and a shadow of what was to come. For Christ, called Living Water in the NT, is what this all pointed to. Our old natures die, and we are purified through this Living Water. And, it sets up all the symbolic meaning of water baptism. Through death, we are brought to new life.

Noach well understood, by now, the impact of what had just transpired. And, in verse 20, in an absolutely appropriate response, he built an Altar and sacrificed of EVERY kind of CLEAN animal to the Lord. The first act of the new order of mankind was to honor God. Yet, as we’ll soon see, this newly purified world, beginning in righteousness, thoroughly understanding sin and its awful and destructive consequences, would not stay clean for long.

But, this sacrifice of Noah also shows us at least one rather important reason that God ordered that 14…… that is, 7 pairs….of clean animals were brought on board the Ark. If Noach was going to sacrifice from every single species of clean animal (which he did), had there been only a single pair of each clean species brought on board, this first sacrifice would have signaled the extinction of that species. Right? Further, by performing this series of sacrifices, Noach affirmed that he would take up the mantle of the line of Seth: the godly line of people. BTW: what were the unclean animals used for? Why were they even retained, instead of just being allowed to die out in the flood? Well, without getting too graphic, later on we will find that several of the unclean variety of animals lives on a scavenger diet. The corpses of dead people and animals must have been strewn everywhere as the waters receded. These animals would have thrived on this huge “food” supply, and they certainly served a useful purpose, cleaning up the landscape, just as vultures and other scavengers do today.

And, we should not forget the principle of our Universe that EVERYTHING HAS AN OPPOSITE. If there was clean THERE HAD TO BE unclean. But, I also want to make something quite clear about that which God ordains as UNCLEAN; by no means are all unclean animals scavengers. In fact, there appears to be no behavior pattern, nor physical characteristic, no particular kind of food they eat, or any other thing that we can put our finger on to understand WHY God designated certain animals to be unclean. There have been many theories put forth, but absolutely none hold water. We simply need to grasp that God is sovereign; that He makes decisions and choices that He usually doesn’t reveal the reasoning behind. So, if you leave here tonight with one understanding about clean and unclean let it be this: Unclean animals are not some broad category of BAD animals; clean animals are not inherently BETTER than unclean animals; unclean animals are not DEFECTIVE animals, nor are they animals of LESS IMPORTANCE to God. They are nothing neither more nor less than a choice made by the Creator for His own good reason. And, He has never shared the reasoning behind that choice with mankind.

The last 2 verses of chapter 8 reveal a couple of important pieces of information: 1) that God accepted Noach’s sacrifices; He found them pleasing. 2) That God was never again going to destroy all land inhabiting creatures the way he had just finished doing: with a deluge of water. And, 3) please notice the phrase in verse 21 that says: “…..since what the human heart forms is evil from its youth….”

The human heart forms evil from its youth. What could be a more direct admission by The Almighty than this, that man has a problem; he has evil in him.  As we discussed last week, where’s any reference to Satan? Where does God pin the problem of evil in mankind on the Devil? He doesn’t. Don’t get me wrong: Satan is real, and he entices men to do evil. But, Satan did NOT CREATE evil; Satan was a created being just like anything else and HE made a moral choice and became evil embodied to the fullest.  Rather, he simply takes advantage of the evil inclination that is in us, by means of deception. Where it says heart forms evil “from its youth”, “ from its youth” is written as mine’araw in Hebrew. This literally means “from his awakening." So, perhaps a better rendering of that phrase would be: “…..since what the human heart forms is evil from his awakening." Rabbi Judan (one of the great ancient Jewish sages) explains that this means from the time a human has awareness. The sages argued whether awareness took place in the womb or immediately upon birth, or very shortly thereafter. But, either way, the point is that ALL persons are born with hearts that “form” evil. That is what is being said here in Verse 21. And, it is NOT saying that a human heart is ONLY evil…..not at all. It is not saying that babies are automatically born with a 100% evil inclination. We are NOT born 100% evil. If you don’t know God from a peanut, you are not 100% evil.  No, this important statement by God is simply acknowledging that everyone is born with an evil inclination; but, due to the principle of opposites, everyone is also born with a good inclination as well.

A question was asked of me last week, when did God abandon the Garden of Eden? Well, up to the flood, apparently man looked towards the Garden when communicating with God. From here on in the Bible, post-flood, we will see that God now looks DOWNWARD to man, and man UPWARD to God. So, we know that just as whatever remained of the Garden was destroyed by the Flood, God now communicated with Man from his Heavenly realm, and it would be a long time before He would re-establish a place where He would dwell with mankind…….and it happened in Moses’ day with the building of the Wilderness Tabernacle.

Immediately following the Flood, the Earth was a very different place from what it had been just a few short months earlier. The Oceans were more extensive, and therefore, there was less land surface than before the Flood. The land was nearly barren of vegetation and devoid of animal life. The mist that enveloped the air and watered the vegetation was gone. The formerly even and temperate world climate had more radical swings. Seasons became more pronounced, and as a result, more important because the growth of plants for food depended on temperature, and certain amounts of sunlight to be present. And, most dramatically, only 8 people and a handful of animals were left to inhabit, and then to repopulate, the entire surface of the earth.

But, more than that, we see this: Noah was the new Adam. From him would all mankind spring. You and I are all related to Noah, even more closely than we are to Adam. But, Noah and Adam operated from very different paradigms…...their situations were quite at opposite poles. Adam was created as perfection, and created into a world of absolute perfection. He was created in the image of God. Noah, though, was born into a world of Imperfection. For, although Noah was declared righteous in God’s eyes, Noach, just like us, was born with a fallen nature into a fallen world. Because Noach trusted and obeyed God, God simply declared Noach righteous. This most fundamental principle of Salvation……trusting God and being credited (as opposed to earning) righteousness…… is the same exact principle that we all count on today; and it is present right here in the OT, in Genesis. As Adam was created in the image of God, so Noach was “created”, so to speak, in the image of Adam. An era ended and a new one had begun. This universally sinful state of the world, of which Noach was the patriarch, represented the NEW basis of how God would deal with the post-flood world and all its aspects…..quite apart from how it was for Adam……. quite apart from how it would be with the eventual advent of Christ……and still quite apart from how it will be someday in the not too distant future.

We are going to see the tremendous differences between the Old World before the Flood, and the New post-flood world, immediately as we start to read Genesis 9.

The great changes in the governing dynamics of man’s existence, in his relationship to his environment, and in his responsibilities before God are evident right away in V2: whereas animals were once fearless, trusting, and in willing subjection to man before the Flood, now God ordains that man’s dominion over animals will be by force. The very same animals that so docilely appeared before Adam to be named, will now be terrified of man. V3 tells us that meat is no longer a prohibited food for man; animal flesh is now an approved food source. I’ve heard people ask how it was the Noach got all those “wild animals” to enter the Ark; simple: before the Flood man had a different relationship with animals than after.

Verse 2 also gives us an opportunity to put a little common sense back into reading the Bible. Do not ever think that the words written do not mean what they say. Yet, they mean what they mean in the common sense of the Hebrew culture of that day. It says here that ALL animals will fear and dread man. Now, the fact is, we know full well that not 100% of all animals fear men…..never have.  Many animals are quite comfortable with men, because they have been domesticated and raised for that purpose. Sheep learned their Shepherd’s own voice. Without getting into too much detail, just think of common pets like dogs and cats that certainly don’t fear men. The point is this: when the Bible says everything, or every, or all, it means it in a general sense. All or everything does not mean 100.00%; rather it means “it is the general rule but there are likely a handful of exceptions”. We might say it means “the vast majority”. Think of how we commonly talk; we say things like “everybody is against me”; or everything I do turns out bad; or I always take the same route home. It’s a figure of speech. So, we have to be very careful not to read in some theological absolute into these sorts of statements when none was intended.

Now, though every living creature was OK for food, there was a very strict prohibition placed on the eating of meat, and it was that man could not eat the blood from an animal. The reason? The blood is where the life is. Blood was only to be used for sacrifice, and never for human consumption. For blood, the seat of life, was simply too holy for man to be allowed to partake of it.

And, we see that the importance of blood is carried over from animals, to humans. For murder, the taking of human blood is specifically prohibited. Notice that in V5 that God hands the duty of meting out justice for the murder of a human, over to man. Up to now, God dealt with it Himself. And, He dealt with it very differently because now we see that a man who kills another man, is to be himself killed…… by other men. Remember the penalty for murder when Cain, Kayin, killed his brother Abel? It was banishment from the presence of God. God even went so far as to place a sign over Cain so that others would not be tempted to take matters into their own hands, and harm Cain. Mere separation from God was sufficient punishment.

What the ancient Rabbis so brilliantly point out concerning these passages, is that here we find God establishing the principle of earthly government. Civil law was hereby created, with God delegating some of His authority to man. Later, in Leviticus, God would go to great lengths to define something that we constantly try to rewrite, with little success: what justice is. We tend to call God’s definition of justice, the LAW.

These same Rabbis and Scribes also came to the conclusion that if God turned over to man the terrible matter of determining capital punishment, the right to take human life, then certainly lesser matters of life such as authority over wives, children, servants, property, land, etc. was also now in man’s hands. From this came what was eventually called the 7 Noachide Laws. The Noachide Laws were essentially the most fundamental principles of civil justice as told by God to Noah, from which all other civil laws would be based. We don’t actually see these 7 laws specifically enumerated at this point in the Scriptures. Interestingly, though, thousands of years later, after Christ has come and gone, these Noachide Laws will play a role in the determination of the Jerusalem Council of 49 AD as to the minimum behavioral requirements for gentiles who want to fellowship with, and worship alongside of, Jews who have come to believe that Jesus was their Messiah.

These Noachide Laws are the following: 1) Men were prohibited from idol worship. 2) Man was not to commit blasphemy (taking God’s name in vain). 3) Man was not to murder. 4) There was to be no incest. 5) There was to be no robbing and stealing. 6) Man was not to eat blood nor was he to eat the meat of animals that had been strangled (and therefore, they had not been “bled”). 7) Man was to submit to the authority of a civil government.

Next, in verse 8, God makes a covenant. As we meet Abraham in a couple more weeks, we’ll talk a little more about the important nature of covenants. But, for now, just recognize that this covenant is a contract, a promise; in this case it is between God and Noah….BUT…..it is also promise from God to ALL living flesh. This particular covenant, or contract, is unilateral; the contract does NOT depend on man’s response nor man’s behavior……its all on God. Other covenants we will eventually encounter have a mutual requirement…..both God and man have roles to play. And, this is the first covenant between God and Man mentioned in the Torah. There is a theological belief that this covenant with Noah is actually the 2nd covenant with mankind; that the 1st was between God and Adam; and it was that if Adam didn’t eat of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, man could stay in the Garden with God. Well, personally, I think that waters down the impact of the concept of covenant. Certainly God gave Adam an instruction not to eat of that tree, but just because the idea was that if he disobeyed there would be a penalty does NOT make that single instruction to attain the level of a covenant.

And, the covenant is this: God will never again destroy the world and everything in it……. by flood. Of course, God did leave the door open to destroy the world by just about any OTHER means, but that’s another story. Anyway, the sign of this covenant is the Rainbow.  Now, while I don’t want to spend much time with this, the question often comes, was this the first Rainbow? And, my unequivocal answer to this is……MAYBE!

Here’s the thing, God set many physical things in the heavens to be used as signs. He didn’t necessarily come up with a new one each time He felt a sign was necessary. The physics of light, and refraction as it passes through moisture, is well understood. And, we know it is NOT necessary for actual rain to occur in order to have a Rainbow……we just need a sufficient amount of water content in the atmosphere. However…………… almost universally, among the ancient and modern Biblical scholars, the conclusion is that this WAS the first Rainbow……. so, I see no reason to belabor the point, nor to dispute it.

But, I would like to point out this matter of God saying when He looked upon the Rainbow that HE would remember His covenant with all living things to not bring an end to things again with a flood. As we discussed a couple of weeks ago, statements of this sort are figurative. God is not a man, and He does not have human attributes. God is not some kind of Super Human….He is a wholly separate and different being than a man. Nor is man some type of lesser gods. God doesn’t need to have His memory jogged. He doesn’t need an enormous notepad to remember what He has promised. But, I also imagine that for many generations from Noach, as the flood was relatively fresh in people’s minds, that each time it rained, there was a little bit of anxiousness as they waited for the rain to STOP! And, how reassuring it must have been to look up and see that Rainbow in the sky, and remember the promise that God had made. Maybe it would do us all good to remember that the beautiful Rainbow that is so common for us to see, and without much thought, is in fact a sign from God. That hasn’t changed just because a few thousand years have passed from Noach to our day.

Sours: https://www.torahclass.com/old-testament-studies-tc/34-old-testament-studies-genesis/83-lesson-8-genesis-8-9
Genesis Chapter 8 Summary and What God Wants From Us

Genesis 8

Genesis 8:1-14 . ASSUAGING OF THE WATERS.

1. And God remembered Noah--The divine purpose in this awful dispensation had been accomplished, and the world had undergone those changes necessary to fit it for becoming the residence of man under a new economy of Providence.
and every living thing . . . in the ark--a beautiful illustration of Matthew 10:29 .
and God made a wind to pass over the earth--Though the divine will could have dried up the liquid mass in an instant, the agency of a wind was employed ( Psalms 104:4 )--probably a hot wind, which, by rapid evaporation, would again absorb one portion of the waters into the atmosphere; and by which, the other would be gradually drained off by outlets beneath.

4. seventh month--of the year--not of the flood--which lasted only five months.
rested--evidently indicating a calm and gentle motion.
upon the mountains of Ararat--or Armenia, as the word is rendered ( 2 Kings 19:37 , Isaiah 37:38 ). The mountain which tradition points to as the one on which the ark rested is now called Ara Dagh, the "finger mountain." Its summit consists of two peaks, the higher of which is 17,750 feet and the other 13,420 above the level of the sea.

5. And the waters decreased continually--The decrease of the waters was for wise reasons exceedingly slow and gradual--the period of their return being nearly twice as long as that of their rise.

6. at the end of forty days--It is easy to imagine the ardent longing Noah and his family must have felt to enjoy again the sight of land as well as breathe the fresh air; and it was perfectly consistent with faith and patience to make inquiries whether the earth was yet ready.

7. And he sent forth a raven--The smell of carrion would allure it to remain if the earth were in a habitable state. But it kept hovering about the spot, and, being a solitary bird, probably perched on the covering.

8-11. Also he sent forth a dove--a bird flying low and naturally disposed to return to the place of her abode.

10. again he sent forth the dove--Her flight, judging by the time she was abroad, was pursued to a great distance, and the newly plucked olive leaf, she no doubt by supernatural impulse brought in her bill, afforded a welcome proof that the declivities of the hills were clear.

12. he . . . sent forth the dove: which returned not . . . any more--In these results, we perceive a wisdom and prudence far superior to the inspiration of instinct--we discern the agency of God guiding all the movements of this bird for the instruction of Noah, and reviving the hopes of his household.
other seven days--a strong presumptive proof that Noah observed the Sabbath during his residence in the ark.

13, 14. Noah removed the covering of the ark--probably only as much of it as would afford him a prospect of the earth around. Yet for about two months he never stirred from his appointed abode till he had received the express permission of God. We should watch the leading of Providence to direct us in every step of the journey of life.

Genesis 8:15-22 . DEPARTURE FROM THE ARK.

15, 16. And God spoke . . . Go forth--They went forth in the most orderly manner--the human occupants first, then each species "after their kinds" [ Genesis 8:19 ], literally, "according to their families," implying that there had been an increase in the ark.

20. Noah builded an altar--literally, "a high place"--probably a mound of earth, on which a sacrifice was offered. There is something exceedingly beautiful and interesting to know that the first care of this devout patriarch was to return thanks for the signal instance of mercy and goodness which he and his family had experienced.
took of every clean beast . . . fowl--For so unparalleled a deliverance, a special acknowledgment was due.

21. And the Lord smelled a sweet savour--The sacrifice offered by a righteous man like Noah in faith was acceptable as the most fragrant incense.
Lord said in his heart--same as "I have sworn that the waters of Noah should no more go over the earth" ( Isaiah 54:9 ).
for--that is, "though the imagination is evil"; instead of inflicting another destructive flood, I shall spare them--to enjoy the blessings of grace, through a Saviour.

22. While the earth remaineth--The consummation, as intimated in 2 Peter 3:7 , does not frustrate a promise which held good only during the continuance of that system. There will be no flood between this and that day, when the earth therein shall be burnt up [CHALMERS].

Sours: https://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/jamieson-fausset-brown/genesis/genesis-8.html

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Genesis 8 Bible Commentary

Complete     Concise

Chapter Contents

God remembers Noah, and dries up the waters. (1-3) The ark rests on Ararat, Noah sends forth a raven and a dove. (4-12) Noah being commanded, goes out of the ark. (13-19) Noah offers sacrifice, God promises to curse the earth no more. (20-22)

Commentary on Genesis 8:1-3

(Read Genesis 8:1-3)

The whole race of mankind, except Noah and his family, were now dead, so that God's remembering Noah, was the return of his mercy to mankind, of whom he would not make a full end. The demands of Divine justice had been answered by the ruin of sinners. God sent his wind to dry the earth, and seal up his waters. The same hand that brings the desolation, must bring the deliverance; to that hand, therefore, we must ever look. When afflictions have done the work for which they are sent, whether killing work or curing work, they will be taken away. As the earth was not drowned in a day, so it was not dried in a day. God usually works deliverance for his people gradually, that the day of small things may not be despised, nor the day of great things despaired of.

Commentary on Genesis 8:4-12

(Read Genesis 8:4-12)

The ark rested upon a mountain, whither it was directed by the wise and gracious providence of God, that might rest the sooner. God has times and places of rest for his people after their tossing; and many times he provides for their seasonable and comfortable settlement, without their own contrivance, and quite beyond their own foresight. God had told Noah when the flood would come, yet he did not give him an account by revelation, at what times and by what steps it should go away. The knowledge of the former was necessary to his preparing the ark; but the knowledge of the latter would serve only to gratify curiosity; and concealing it from him would exercise his faith and patience. Noah sent forth a raven from the ark, which went flying about, and feeding on the carcasses that floated. Noah then sent forth a dove, which returned the first time without good news; but the second time, she brought an olive leaf in her bill, plucked off, plainly showing that trees, fruit trees, began to appear above water. Noah sent forth the dove the second time, seven days after the first, and the third time was after seven days also; probably on the sabbath day. Having kept the sabbath with his little church, he expected especial blessings from Heaven, and inquired concerning them. The dove is an emblem of a gracious soul, that, finding no solid peace of satisfaction in this deluged, defiling world, returns to Christ as to its ark, as to its Noah, its rest. The defiling world, returns to Christ as to its ark, as to its Noah, its rest. The carnal heart, like the raven, takes up with the world, and feeds on the carrion it finds there; but return thou to my rest, O my soul; to thy Noah, so the word is, Psalm 116:7. And as Noah put forth his hand, and took the dove, and pulled her to him, into the ark, so Christ will save, and help, and welcome those that flee to him for rest.

Commentary on Genesis 8:13-19

(Read Genesis 8:13-19)

God consults our benefit, rather than our desires; he knows what is good for us better than we do for ourselves, and how long it is fit our restraints should continue, and desired mercies should be delayed. We would go out of the ark before the ground is dried; and perhaps, if the door, is shut, are ready to thrust off the covering, and to climb up some other way; but God's time of showing mercy is the best time. As Noah had a command to go into the ark, so, how tedious soever his confinement there was, he would wait for a command to go out of it again. We must in all our ways acknowledge God, and set him before us in all our removals. Those only go under God's protection, who follow God's direction, and submit to him.

Commentary on Genesis 8:20-22

(Read Genesis 8:20-22)

Noah was now gone out into a desolate world, where, one might have thought, his first care would have been to build a house for himself, but he begins with an alter for God. He begins well, that begins with God. Though Noah's stock of cattle was small, and that saved at great care and pains, yet he did not grudge to serve God out of it. Serving God with our little is the way to make it more; we must never think that is wasted with which God is honoured. The first thing done in the new world was an act of worship. We are now to express our thankfulness, not by burnt-offerings, but by praise, and pious devotions and conversation. God was well pleased with what was done. But the burning flesh could no more please God, than the blood of bulls and goats, except as typical of the sacrifice of Christ, and expressing Noah's humble faith and devotedness to God. The flood washed away the race of wicked men, but it did not remove sin from man's nature, who being conceived and born in sin, thinks, devises, and loves wickedness, even from his youth, and that as much since the flood as before. But God graciously declared he never would drown the world again. While the earth remains, and man upon it, there shall be summer and winter. It is plain that this earth is not to remain always. It, and all the works in it, must shortly be burned up; and we look for new heavens and a new earth, when all these things shall be dissolved. But as long as it does remain, God's providence will cause the course of times and seasons to go on, and makes each to know its place. And on this word we depend, that thus it shall be. We see God's promises to the creatures made good, and may infer that his promises to all believers shall be so.

  1. Bible > Bible Commentary
  2. Matthew Henry’s Bible Commentary (concise)
  3. Genesis
  4. Genesis 8
Sours: https://www.christianity.com/bible/commentary/matthew-henry-concise/genesis/8


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