Mario 3d world

Mario 3d world DEFAULT

Super Mario 3D World

Not to be confused with Super Mario World or Super Mario 3D Land.

This article is about the original Wii U version of the Super Mario 3D World game. For the Nintendo Switchport of this game, see Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury.
Super Mario 3D World
North American box art of Super Mario 3D World
North American box art
For alternate box art, see the game's gallery.
DeveloperNintendo EAD Tokyo
1-UP Studio[1]
PublisherNintendo
PlatformsWii U
Release dateOriginal release:
Japan November 21, 2013[2]
USA November 22, 2013
Brazil November 26, 2013[3]
Europe November 29, 2013[4]
Australia November 30, 2013[5]
Nintendo Selects:
USA March 11, 2016
Europe September 30, 2016
GenrePlatformer
Rating(s)
Mode(s)Single player, multiplayer
Media

Wii U:

Compact disc icon for use in templates.Optical disc
Digital download icon for use in templates.Digital download
Input

Wii U:

Super Mario 3D World is a 3D platformer action game for the Wii U, released in November 2013. It is the direct sequel to the 2011 Nintendo 3DS installment Super Mario 3D Land, the fifteenth title in the Super Mario series, the seventh 3D Mario title overall, and the fifth 3D Mario title on a home console after Super Mario Galaxy 2. The game builds upon the previous installment, following a similar 3D level-design convention inspired from the 2D platformer titles where players must navigate through a linear-designed level within a time limit to reach a level's Goal Pole. The game's plot centers around Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, and Toad having to rescue the rulers of the Sprixie Kingdom, the Sprixie Princesses from Bowser.

One key aspect introduced in this title is the simultaneous multiplayer: while not the first game in the series to do so, it is the first 3D title in the Mario series to incorporate up to four players cooperating with each other to reach the goal. Players can select their character from a pool of playable characters prior to starting the game; each of these characters have their own unique playstyle that gives them advantages and disadvantages over other characters. The game makes use of several Wii U exclusive features, such as tapping blocks with the touch screen on the GamePad and blowing into the mic to reveal hidden items and blow away enemies. Various new power-ups are introduced in this title, with the trademark suit being the Cat power-up, which enables characters to perform a melee attack, climb up walls, and leap while midair, as well as the game generally having a cat-based theme.

It included Miiverse integration through collectible stamps that could be used in Miiverse posts, and the Ghost Mii functionality that emulates players replaying levels for other players to view; however, the service was terminated on November 7, 2017, meaning that stamps can be collected, but not used. Additionally, the Miiverse posts that appeared on the course select screen and when selecting courses are no longer present.

The game introduces a smaller set of levels called Captain Toad's Adventures, which were later reused and expanded into its own standalone title and prequel, Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker.

An enhanced port called Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury for the Nintendo Switch was released on February 12, 2021.[6]

Story[edit]

On an evening in the Mushroom Kingdom, Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, and Toad come to view and enjoy the fireworks outside of Peach's Castle, when they discover a slanted Clear Pipe along the path. Mario and Luigi fix the Clear Pipe with hammers and wrenches, causing the pipe to eject a large number of items as well as a Sprixie Princess, a fairy-like creature of the Sprixie species. The Green Sprixie Princess begins to explain that Bowser has kidnapped six of her fellow Sprixie Princesses and that she needs their help; thereafter, however, Bowser emerges from the pipe and traps the princess inside a bottle before disappearing back down the pipe with her. Peach, in trying to stop Bowser, falls down the pipe herself, and the others soon follow in order to assist her. The heroes soon end up in the Sprixie Kingdom, where the journey mainly takes place.[7]

After going through six worlds, the group encounter Bowser in World Castle, where he is keeping the Red Sprixie Princess; the only Sprixie Princess whom has not been saved yet. After the group successfully defeats Bowser, the Sprixie Princess is saved. The celebration is cut short, however, when Bowser ambushes and grabs all seven Sprixie Princesses in a large bottle. With their combined power, he creates World Bowser: a theme park modeled after himself, and escapes to the tower.

The heroes make their way through this world and encounter Bowser again in The Great Tower of Bowser Land. Here, Bowser uses a Super Bell to transform to Meowser and make duplicates of himself, initiating the final battle. The group manages to defeat Meowser after climbing the tower and rescue all of the Sprixie Princesses. Now safe from Bowser, they thank the heroes as they go through a Clear Pipe back to the Mushroom Kingdom.

Gameplay[edit]

Super Mario 3D World is a linear 3D platform game with gameplay similar to the 2D games. The player must navigate through levels, defeating enemies and collecting power-ups on the way. The player clears a level by reaching the Goal Pole at the end before losing a life or running out of time. The player can store collected power-ups in the item storage, allowing them to be collected by pressing Minus Button. The player can also collect Green Stars and Stamps, which allow the player to unlock certain levels or can be used in Miiverse posts, respectively. Points are earned by collecting items and defeating enemies, and are used to determine the player's high score in a level. The player completes the main game when they clear World Bowser and completes the entire game when all bonus worlds are complete and all Green Stars and Stamps are collected.

Multiplayer[edit]

Players' score results at the end of a stage. This is shown when there are at least two active players after a course has been cleared.

For the first time in a 3D Super Mario title, the game supports up to four-player simultaneous multiplayer, allowing players to control Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Toad, and Rosalina; additional players can drop in at any time by pressing A Button/Two Button, and can drop out by pausing and pressing Minus Button on the pause menu, similar to New Super Mario Bros. Wii and New Super Mario Bros. U; in this game, however, players can also switch characters before entering a stage. Each character has different abilities, much like they had in Super Mario Bros. 2. The multiplayer works similarly to New Super Mario Bros. Wii and New Super Mario Bros. U, in that players can enter a bubble at any time, pick each other up and throw each other, bounce on each others' heads, and so on. Players also share lives when playing in multiplayer, rather than each player having a separate life counter. The game uses a cooperative and competitive multiplayer system; each player works together to get to the end of the stage, but is ranked based on points earned out of the total score at the end. The player that scores the most points for one stage receives a crown, which can be stolen by the other players and gives the player wearing it at the end of the stage a score bonus.

In addition to being the default player one controller, the GamePad can be used at any point during gameplay (multiplayer or not) to interact with the environment, allowing players to stun enemies, momentarily reveal hidden objects (both in levels and on the map), hit blocks, stop moving platforms, and various other functions, similar to the Co-Star Luma from Super Mario Galaxy 2 and Boost Mode from New Super Mario Bros. U. The GamePad can also be used to control the camera during gameplay by pressing the button on the bottom corner of the GamePad screen and tilting the controller, in what is known as Free Camera Mode. It works in a similar fashion to the camera from Super Mario 64 and Super Mario Sunshine. The GamePad can also be used for Off-TV Play at any point.

Nintendo Network[edit]

Super Mario 3D World features Nintendo Network support in the form of Miiverse integration and Ghost Miis. These features are first enabled on a given save file after progressing a bit into the game. With Miiverse, players could make a post at any point on the World Map or after completing a stage by tapping the "Post" icon; other players' posts could also be viewed on the World Map by walking up to their Miis and pressing A Button/Two Button, or on the top of the stage results screen. Ghost Miis are created after the player clears a course without losing a life, and they perfectly recreate the player's movements throughout the course, automatically distributing them to other players. Players who receive the data can play through an already cleared course with three Ghost Mii characters. While traveling through a course, the Ghost Mii characters occasionally carry gifts behind them that when caught can contain various items. The Nintendo Network settings for this title can be changed at any point by pausing the game and selecting the Nintendo Network icon button.

Returning elements[edit]

Super Mario 3D World plays very similarly to Super Mario 3D Land, being a 3D platformer with gameplay similar to the 2D games. This game retains its predecessor's similarity to Super Mario Bros. 3 (with colorful blocks, the Super Leaf, Spikes, and the Lose a Life theme returning from that game); many elements from Super Mario World return as well, such as Chargin' Chucks, Beach Koopas, and Galoombas (the Goombas of that game renamed). Stages are once again open yet linear, have a time limit, and end by grabbing the classic Goal Pole at the end. Green Stars return from the Super Mario Galaxy games, taking the role of the Star Medals from Super Mario 3D Land. There are also various stamps that the player can find. There is one in each level and they can be used in Miiverse posts. The game also seems to be slightly more puzzle-focused than its predecessors. The path from the start of the level to the goal is no longer a straight shot, and the players would often have to use certain power-ups and items in order to find the way ahead. Additionally, the game also features a score system, the first time one has appeared in a 3D Mario game.

Mario and co., in their Cat suits, confronting Spikes.

Almost every power-up and item from Super Mario 3D Land returns (except the Statue Leaf and P-Wing). The Mega Mushroom from New Super Mario Bros. also makes an appearance. There are also several new power-ups and suits; The most prominent of the new power-ups is the Super Bell, a power-up that grants the player a Cat Suit, allowing them to lunge at and claw enemies and climb up walls.

Luigi Bros.[edit]

Main article: Mario Bros. (game) § Luigi Bros.
The title screen to Luigi Bros., a remastered port of Mario Bros.

As part of the Year of Luigi celebration, also included is another game that can be accessed from the title screen after beating the main game once (or immediately if New Super Luigi U save data is present). The game, titled Luigi Bros., is a modified ROM of Mario Bros., but with Luigi as the only playable character. The game can be accessed by touching the Luigi button found in the bottom-left corner of the screen. As it is a modification of the original NES game, it makes use of the Virtual Console interface and allows the use of save/restore points. Also, similar to New Super Luigi U, multiple 8-bit Luigi sprites can be found throughout the game.

Controls[edit]

Worlds[edit]

The game features a large world map, consisting of eight worlds with four unlockable bonus worlds. Each world is connected by Clear Pipes. Unlike previous games, where players follow a simple path through the maps, the map here can be freely roamed with full control of the characters, except with a limited jump. Each world features a set of levels along with Enemy Battles, Toad Houses, Sprixie Houses, Lucky Houses, and either Mystery Houses or a puzzle-focused series of levels called Captain Toad's Adventures with Captain Toad playable. The maps also contain items such as coins and 1-Up Mushrooms and other secrets.

When the player finishes a course with all Green Stars, the ball ornament on the Goal Pole will be replaced with a Green Star, which can even become gold when the stage is cleared with all five characters, the stamp from that stage is collected (if any), and at least one character touches the top of the flag at the end of the stage. Upon reaching World Crown, the player can also see which stage has been cleared with which characters on the Map Progression screen or when approaching a stage. When all the stages in a world have been cleared with every character, a paw print mark will be shown on the upper-right corner of the Map Progression screen.

Level names with a subscripted number appended to them are locked and require that many Green Stars to unlock.

Characters[edit]

Playable and abilities[edit]

See also: Super Mario 3D World playable characters' statistics
Character Advantages Disadvantages Availability
Solo artwork of Mario from Super Mario 3D World.
Mario
Balanced From the start
Artwork of Luigi from Super Mario 3D World
Luigi
Jumps the highest
Can Scuttle, allowing his jumps to cover more ground
Sprints later
Low traction, making him slippery
Artwork of Princess Peach from Super Mario 3D World
Peach
Can float briefly after jumping
Sprints the soonest
Runs the slowest
Artwork of Toad running, from Super Mario 3D World.
Toad
Runs the fastest Falls the fastest
Sprints the latest
Jumps the lowest
Rosalina
Rosalina
Can use Spin attacks, allowing her to attack without a power-up, perform a double jump, or jump higher
Sprints the soonest, tied with Peach
Runs the slowest, tied with Peach
Loses her Spin attack when using power-ups (excluding the Super Mushroom, Double Cherry, and Super Star)
After completing World StarStaricon.png-2
Artwork of Captain Toad with a Green Star, from Super Mario 3D World.
Captain Toad
Sprints the soonest Cannot jump Only in Captain Toad's Adventures levels

Supporting cast[edit]

Image Description
Group artwork of the Sprixie Princessess from Super Mario 3D World.
Sprixie Princess
Sprixie Princesses rule the Sprixie Kingdom and are captured by Bowser at the beginning of the game. At the end of every world, the player rescues a Sprixie Princess and it builds a Clear Pipe to the next world. After World Castle, Bowser captures all the Sprixie Princesses again, but they are rescued permanently when the player defeats Meowser in World Bowser.
A Sprixie from Super Mario 3D World.
Sprixie
Sprixies are fairy-like creatures that are ruled by Sprixie Princesses. They appear in many levels and hold binoculars, allowing the player to see the end of the level. They are also found in Sprixie Houses.
A Luma in Super Mario 3D World.
Luma
Lumas make a minor appearance as non-playable characters. They can be found floating around the map in the bonus worlds. The player cannot interact with them.
Artwork of Plessie with the four playable characters, from Super Mario 3D World.
Plessie
Plessie is a character that the player can ride across water. The player must tilt Nunchuk Control Stick to move or accelerate. The player can press A Button to jump. It functions similarly to Dorrie from Super Mario 64 and Manta Ray from Super Mario Galaxy.
A Rabbit from Super Mario 3D World.
Rabbit
Rabbits can be found in several levels, where they run from the player. When caught by the player, they release power-ups, Coins, or Green Stars.
Giant Rabbit in Super Bell Hill of Super Mario 3D World
Mega Rabbit
Similar to normal rabbits, they try to run from the player and must be caught. These rabbits release Mega Mushrooms or Green Stars.
A magenta Toad in Super Mario 3D World
Toads
Toads appear in and host Toad Houses, where the player can win power-ups.
Ghost Miis
Ghost Miis
Mii characters that represent the ghost data of another player, recreating the exact movements of said player. They will appear once Nintendo Network features have been enabled. However, as of November 7, 2017, Miiverse is discontinued and Ghost Miis no longer appear in the game.

Enemies and obstacles[edit]

New[edit]

Image Description First appearance Last appearance
Artwork from Super Mario 3D World.
Ant Trooper
Ant Troopers are purple ant-like enemies that attack by marching in groups. They cannot be defeated with a jump, but they can be ground-pounded, pounced/tail-whipped, or hit with a Boomerang. Ant Trooper HillSprawling Savanna
A Big Ant Trooper from Super Mario 3D World.
Big Ant Trooper
Big Ant Troopers are larger versions of Ant Troopers. They cannot be defeated, but the player can jump on them to reach otherwise inaccessible areas. Ant Trooper HillSprawling Savanna
A Big Galoomba from Super Mario 3D World.
Big Galoomba
Big Galoombas are larger versions of Galoombas. They attack by attempting to ram into the player and can be defeated if jumped on twice. A Ground Pound will defeat them in one hit. Big Galoomba BlockadeGargantuan Grotto
A Blockstepper from Super Mario 3D World.
Blockstepper
Blocksteppers are blocks with hats and feet that attack by marching in groups to the beat of the music in the current stage. They can be defeated by most attack methods, but if one member of a group is defeated, the rest will hurriedly scatter and subsequently chase the player after a while. Double Cherry PassFaster Fort Fire Bros.
A Blurker from Super Mario 3D World.
Blurker
Blurkers are pink block-like enemies that are found in groups blocking areas. They will temporarily disappear like a Boo if interacted with on the GamePad or attacked by normal means. They can be permanently defeated through use of a Mega Mushroom, a Piranha Plant, White Tanooki Mario, Lucky Cat Mario, or Invincible Mario. Shadow Play AlleyBack to Hands-On Hall
A Brolder from Super Mario 3D World.
Brolder
Brolders are boulder enemies found in lava levels. When the player approaches, they pop up from the ground and attempt to roll over the player. When attacked, they can be carried and thrown to press switches or obtain collectibles within the arc of throw. They can also be defeated permanently by throwing them into lava or attacking them with Lucky Cat Mario or White Tanooki Mario. Brolder BlockadeMystery House Marathon
Artwork of a Cat Banzai Bill from Super Mario 3D World.
Cat Banzai Bill
Cat Banzai Bills are Banzai Bills with a cat appearance. They attack by following the player and can be defeated with most attacks. The Bullet Bill ExpressThe Bullet Bill Express
A Cat Bullet Bill from Super Mario 3D World.
Cat Bullet Bill
Cat Bullet Bills are Bullet Bills with a cat appearance. They attack by following the player, similarly to the Bull's-Eye Bill, and can be defeated with most attacks. The Bullet Bill ExpressMystery House Marathon
Artwork of Cat Goomba from Super Mario 3D World.
Cat Goomba
Cat Goombas are Goombas with a cat appearance. They attack by jumping and pouncing like Cat Mario to its original location. They can be defeated with most attacks. Some will leave behind a Super Bell when defeated. Super Bell HillThe Great Tower of Bowser Land
A Charvaargh from Super Mario 3D World.
Charvaargh
Sours: https://www.mariowiki.com/Super_Mario_3D_World

See, Super Mario 3D World features a large world map (much like the map in the original Super Mario World) that’s broken down into smaller worlds that typically feature 5-8 courses (along with several different types of bonus levels such as Lucy, Toad, and Mystery houses) and boss arenas. The various worlds are connected through interdimensional clear pipes that send you to the next area. At the start of the game, you’ll progress through six initially available worlds.

  • World 1 – Grass World (Five Courses)
  • World 2 – Desert World (Five Courses)
  • World 3 – Snow World (Seven Courses)
  • World 4 – Mountain World (Five Courses)
  • World 5 – Beach World (Seven Courses)
  • World 6 – Cloud World (Seven Courses)

Admittedly, those names are ours and not Nintendo’s official descriptions, but you get the idea. When you beat those six worlds, you’ll unlock two final “Boss” worlds:

  • Castle World (Seven Courses)
  • Bowser World (Eight Courses)

While that’s quite a bit of content by Super Mario standards, the fun doesn’t end there. When you’ve completed Bowser World, you’ll unlock the ability to take on these four bonus worlds:

  • World Star (Nine Courses)
  • World Mushroom (Seven Courses)
  • World Flower (Twelve Courses)
  • World Crown (Three Courses)

Considering that the final bonus worlds require you to complete various challenges (and that the bonus courses are incredibly difficult in their own right), it’s going to take you a while to actually beat the base game’s full collection of content.

Of course, Super Mario 3D World‘s Switch port is more than just the base game. It also comes with the recently added Bowser’s Fury DLC that you’ll be to jump into whenever you want. Unlike Super Mario 3D World, though, Bowser’s Fury is more of an open-world game somewhere between a classic Super Mario platformer and other 3D Mario games like Odyssey. It’s basically one big world, but the size of the DLC is fairly substantial. In fact, in terms of size, you should probably think of it as a fairly large Super Mario Odyssey level.

Many fans suspect that Bowser’s Fury could be a preview of what a future 3D Super Mario game will look like. As we’ve talked about before, the DLC is also loaded with references to cats. Whether or not you consider that information necessary to understanding the DLC is really up to you.

Sours: https://www.denofgeek.com/games/super-mario-3d-world-how-many-worlds-nintendo-switch-bowsers-fury/
  1. Dune buggy for sale florida
  2. Synonym for conquer
  3. Vril parasite reddit

Super Mario 3D World

2013 platform video game published by Nintendo

Not to be confused with Super Mario World or Super Mario 3D Land.

2013 video game

Super Mario 3D World
Artwork featuring the playable characters in a colorful 3D landscape, both in their ordinary outfits and wearing their "cat suit" power-ups

Packaging artwork, featuring (left to right) Luigi, Mario, Princess Peach, and Toad

Developer(s)Nintendo EAD Tokyo[a]
Publisher(s)Nintendo
Director(s)
Producer(s)Yoshiaki Koizumi
Designer(s)
  • Yuichi Iwasa
  • Eisaku Sato
  • Futoshi Shirai
Programmer(s)
  • Hideyuki Sugawara
  • Norihiro Aoyagi
Artist(s)
  • Daisuke Watanabe
  • Rikuto Yoshida
Composer(s)
SeriesSuper Mario
Platform(s)
Release

November 21, 2013

    • Wii U
      • JP: November 21, 2013
      • NA: November 22, 2013
      • EU: November 29, 2013
      • AU: November 30, 2013
    • Nintendo Switch
Genre(s)Platformer
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Super Mario 3D World[b] is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo for the Wii U in 2013. It is the sixth original 3D platform game in the Super Mario series and the sequel to Super Mario 3D Land (2011) for the Nintendo 3DS. The game follows Mario and friends attempting to rescue fairy-like creatures called Sprixies from Bowser, who invades the realm known as the Sprixie Kingdom. The gameplay is similar to previous installments of the series, with players passing through individual levels to reach Bowser. The game features a character selector as well as introducing a power-up called the Super Bell, which turns the player into a cat, enabling them to climb walls and use a scratch attack. An enhanced port with additional content, Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury, was released for the Nintendo Switch on February 12, 2021.

Super Mario 3D World was acclaimed for its level design, presentation, replay value, and soundtrack, though some reviewers decried its unreliable camera in the multiplayer mode. The game was a financial success, with the Wii U version selling 5.87 million units worldwide as of September 2020 and becoming the second best-selling game for the console. As of June 2021, the Switch version had sold 6.68 million units worldwide. Between both versions, a total of 12.55 million units have been sold worldwide.

Gameplay[edit]

Luigi, Toad, Peach, and Mario sprint through a game level.

The game levels play similarly to those of Super Mario 3D Land, which combine the free-roaming gameplay of the Super Mario franchise's 3D games with the mechanics of its 2D side-scrollers, including a timer and a level-ending flagpole.[5] Up to four concurrent players may control player characters, including Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Toad, and the unlockable Rosalina. Similar to their appearances in Super Mario Bros. 2,[6] each of the characters possesses unique abilities and controls differently: Mario has balanced running speed and jump height; Luigi jumps higher and falls slower, but has slightly lower traction; Peach can jump and briefly float through the air, but runs slowly; Toad runs the fastest, but cannot jump as high and falls faster; Rosalina can use the spin attack move as seen in the Super Mario Galaxy games, but has the slowest running speed.[7] The player can select any of the five characters to use before beginning a level, and up to four players may explore the same level simultaneously, sharing from a pool of lives. Players are also able to pick up, carry, and throw each other.[8]

Levels are accessed through a world map, in which players can find hidden areas to earn more items or coins. Each level contains three collectable Green Stars, which are required to access certain levels, and each main level contains a hidden Stamp which was used in handwritten posts to the now defunct Miiverse online community. Players can also view messages left by other players, both on the world map and after clearing a level, and can download 'Mii Ghosts', which are live records of other players completing levels. Ghosts can be raced against, and may hold gift prizes such as coins or extra lives.[9] Additional Green Stars can be earned in Captain Toad, Mystery House, and Challenge levels.[10][11]

Along with items returning from previous games, such as the Fire Flower, Super Leaf, Mega Mushroom, Propeller Box, and Boomerang Flower, several items are introduced. The Super Bell gives players a Cat Suit, allowing them to run faster, perform unique attacks and climb up walls to reach new areas. A variation of the Super Bell, the Lucky Bell, allows the player to temporarily transform their character into a lucky cat statue that awards coins under certain conditions.[12] Double Cherries make a clone of the player, allowing for more effective attacks and a higher chance of survival; the more Double Cherries a player uses, the more clones appear. Players can wear Cannon Boxes which fire shots at enemies, Light Blocks which can defeat ghosts, and Goomba masks which let them blend in with enemy Goombas. Players are able to pick up various objects, such as bombs, baseballs, and Piranha Plants (which can be used to defeat enemies or solve puzzles), and can ride in a Skating Shoe or on an aquatic dinosaur named Plessie.[13]

The Wii U GamePad allows players to rub the touchscreen, blow into the microphone to reveal hidden blocks or items, hinder enemies, activate mechanisms, and use Off-TV Play.[14] The game is compatible with the Wii Remote, Nunchuk, Classic Controller, and Wii U Pro Controller.[15] An unlockable Luigi-themed version of Mario Bros., Luigi Bros., is accessed by clearing the game or by having save data from New Super Luigi U.[16]

Plot[edit]

Mario, Luigi, Peach, and Toad are watching a fireworks show until they find a tilted glass pipe. After Mario and Luigi fix it, a green fairy-like Sprixie princess appears and tells them that Bowser has kidnapped and trapped the rest of the Sprixie princesses in jars. He arrives and captures her before escaping through the pipe, while the heroes enter it and pursue him. They find themselves in a realm known as "The Sprixie Kingdom" and set off to find the Sprixies. After the heroes save the final one, Bowser recaptures all seven and heads to his amusement park fortress. Thereafter, Bowser uses the Super Bell to transform into a cat form called Meowser. The group proceeds to climb the tallest tower and defeat Meowser. The heroes say goodbye to the Sprixies and travel home through the pipe back to the Mushroom Kingdom.

Development[edit]

Development on Super Mario 3D World began shortly after the release of Super Mario 3D Land with Nintendo EAD Tokyo heading the project; 1-Up Studio provided developmental assistance.[17][better source needed] A staff of 100 personnel, including producer Yoshiaki Koizumi, wrote ideas for game mechanics on sticky notes, which were collected upon the studio walls. Ideas approved by the team would be implemented it in-game for testing. Co-director Kenta Motokura stated, "We discussed and discarded a huge number of ideas during development – sometimes you just can't tell if an idea is good or bad by looking at it on the drawing board; when this happens, we try it out in-game. If we don't find the idea fun, it won't make it into the final product. There was a lot of back and forth on the course designs due to this."[18] Co-director Koichi Hayashida stated that Super Mario 3D World was intended to be a Wii U game for the fanbase of New Super Mario Bros., as well as a de facto continuation of Super Mario 3D Land.[18] Implementing the game's multiplayer feature was proven to be complicated, as the team's goal was to perfect the camera for all four players simultaneously without them "feel[ing..] left out". Motokura expressed that the game was designed to be both "highly intuitive and readily accessible".[18] "We designed this game so that the players could really sink into it and clear all the courses without having to read lots of text or deal with difficult controls, whether playing by themselves or with others," Motokura added. Koizumi said that the team "went all out inserting elements [that allow] players to further enjoy the sprawling environments."[18]

Ideas for the game's feline costumery came early in development, to implement an attack mechanic, introduce the ability to climb walls, and help novice players to clear obstacles. "When we started out, we were thinking about different kinds of actions that Mario could do," said Motokura in an interview with IGN. "Thinking about those different actions[...] it turned out that a cat was a perfect animal that everybody knows."[19]

Regarding power-ups, Motokura said the process of including power-ups being included involve balancing a novice player's experience between difficulty and "what was fun about the game". He added that the team wanted to introduce "new" ways to use classic power-ups, such as using the Fire Flower on clear pipes.[19]

Inspiration for the Double Cherry, which clones a player character, came late in development when a level designer erroneously inserted an extra copy of Mario's character model into a level. The team was relieved to see that the game did not crash with two identical characters present, and were amused that both could be controlled simultaneously. Developers "scrambled" to include this feature in the final game.[18] Motokura stated that it is also designed for single players to "[...help] replicate some situations" with multiplayer elements.[19]

The decision to include a free-roaming world map was "a very important element", and gave the team more "freedom" to locate higher-difficulty levels. "In just one world, the world map, you can have all kinds of different experiences. [...we] want to emphasize some of the other elements that are free-form within the world maps," Motokura said.[19]

According to Hayashida, Peach wasn't originally intended to be a playable character until producer Yoshiaki Koizumi suggested for her inclusion. Speaking with Polygon, Koizumi reasoned that it's to emphasize female representation. "I feel like Mario games, as you know, have done lots of representation of male characters over the years.," he said. "Perhaps much more so than female — so it's actually really nice to be able to have a female playable character in the game."[20] Miyamoto also commented on his own reasoning by saying "I'll add that cat women have a sexy side to them and I wanted to see what a feline Peach would look like ( laughs )".[21] Koizumi added, "I think she adds a lot to the sense of competition when you get in multiplayer. You can have different people choosing different characters based on their personality or whoever they like."[20] Similarly, Rosalina was later added as a playable character. Motokura said, "I was thinking about what would be pleasing after the ending and wanted to bring in another female character in addition to Princess Peach. Rosalina has a following among the Super Mario Galaxy fanbase, and she appeared in Mario Kart recently, so I think she's well known."[22]Yoshi was also planned at one point, but was dropped due to much of his moves being to similar to other functions of characters and items, such as Peach's floating, the Piranha Plant's chomping, and Plessie's riding abilities (who can allow three additional characters).[19]

According to Koizumi, the game was also planned to have a stereoscopic 3D feature similar to Super Mario 3D Land, but was dropped due to multiplayer concerns over the use of 3D glasses.[19] Concerning the "3D" in the game's title, general producer and series creator Shigeru Miyamoto stated that "the team had a strong desire from the very start to call it 3D World."[23]

Music[edit]

The game's soundtrack was composed by Mahito Yokota (also the sound director), Toru Minegishi, Koji Kondo, and Yasuaki Iwata, and performed by the Mario 3D World Big Band, which they formed after being inspired by jazz music.[3] "There are naturally a lot of tracks performed live," stated Yokota. "We're arranging the music with a big-band feel, taking advantage of a full horn section with trumpets and saxophones."[24] In addition to the game's new compositions, it features new arrangements from games such as Super Mario Bros. 2 as well.[3]

In developing the music, Yokota mentioned that he worked on "fun, energetic" tracks to match the game's cat theme, with a few even using electric guitar and trombone tunes imitating a cat's "meowing" sounds.[3] After working on the Super Mario Galaxy games, one of Yokota's goals for the soundtrack is to shift musical direction from the games since the majority of 3D World takes place on the ground. "The game chiefly takes place on terra firma, so there isn't the majestic or floaty feel of the Mario Galaxy series; instead, the music has a more rhythmic atmosphere, something you'll want to dance to," he said. When asking about live orchestrated soundtracks for the game, previously done in the Super Mario Galaxy games, a Destructoid reporter was asked to "[w]ait for more information about that soon."[4]

A soundtrack was released for Club Nintendo members in Japan, Australia, and Europe, featuring 77 tracks across two CDs.[25][26]

Release[edit]

Director Koichi Hayashida promoting the game at E3 2013

In a January 2013 Nintendo Direct, Nintendo teased that a new 3D Mario game was being produced by the development team behind Super Mario Galaxy.[27][28] The title was announced during the E3 2013 Nintendo Direct on June 11, 2013, along with a tentative release date of November 2013.[29] It was released in Japan on November 21, 2013,[30] North America on November 22, 2013,[29] Europe on November 29, 2013,[31] and in Australia on November 30, 2013.[32]

Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury[edit]

Main article: Bowser's Fury

An enhanced port for the Nintendo Switch, Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury,[c] was announced on September 3, 2020 as part of the Super Mario Bros. 35th AnniversaryNintendo Direct and released worldwide on February 12, 2021 alongside Cat Mario and Cat Peach Amiibo figures.[33] The port adds an online multiplayer option, Amiibo functionality to spawn power-ups, a Snapshot feature for taking in-game screenshots, and four-player co-op to the Captain Toad levels. Other differences include the base speed of characters being increased and the stamps unlocked throughout the game, originally intended for the now-discontinued Miiverse service, can now be used to decorate the environment in Snapshot mode.[34][35][36][37]

The new Bowser's Fury campaign follows Mario as he winds up in a place known as Lake Lapcat and teams up with Bowser Jr. in order to stop Bowser, who has been transformed by an inky substance into Fury Bowser. Unlike the main campaign, Bowser's Fury takes place in a large free-roaming area similar to the open world Super Mario games. Mario must explore the islands in order to retrieve Cat Shines. Bowser Jr., who can be controlled by a second player, can assist Mario by using his paintbrush to attack enemies and reveal secrets. Occasionally, Fury Bowser awakens and begins to attack, transforming the island in certain places. By collecting the Cat Shines, Mario gains access to the Giga Bell, a large version of the Super Bell, which transforms Mario into Giga Cat Mario so that he can take on Fury Bowser.[38][39][40][41]

Reception[edit]

Reception

Super Mario 3D World received "universal acclaim" from critics, according to review aggregator Metacritic.[42] It won awards from many media outlets, including Game of the Year from Eurogamer, Digital Spy, and MSN UK.

Famitsu gave the game a score of 38/40.[50]IGN's Jose Otero gave 3D World a 9.6/10, praising the visual design's "youthful energy," the "interesting risks" taken with the level designs, the "maddening challenge" offered by later worlds, and the "genuinely funny and memorable co-op". He said, "I reveled in the sheer brilliance of how much energy and gameplay mileage Nintendo has packed into every world." Otero's only complaint was that "the camera becomes a slight obstacle in four-player multiplayer".[62]GameTrailers gave the game a score of 9.5, praising its gameplay and presentation, while criticizing camera issues and some odd control choices.[75] Henry Gilbert of GamesRadar gave the game a score of 4.5/5, praising improved multiplayer and some moments so brilliant that they can make some other levels seem dull by comparison.[54] Luke Plunkett of Kotaku called it "a terrific video game...just not a very good Wii U game", praising the game itself, but lamenting that it doesn't do much to show off the Wii U's capabilities.[76] Patrick Klepek at Giant Bomb, said "World continues to make the case that it's possible to reinvent a classic over and over again".[77]

Anime News Network's Heidi Kemps gave the game an A grade, calling it "fun, imaginative, and filled with little surprises and delights".[78]Edge rated the game 9/10, calling it "Wii U's best game to date," and "the most next-gen game that 2013 has yet produced," and stating that Mario is the most fun character to play as because "his cohorts' abilities aren't anything special".[46]Destructoid's Chris Carter awarded the game a 10/10, praising the power-ups, such as the catsuit, which "opens up doors platforming-wise that weren't there before", and the Double Cherry, with which "Nintendo really outdid themselves in terms of the technical mechanics" to make possible, the "incredibly sharp" graphics, and "one of the best OSTs I've ever heard". Carter wrote that "the only downfall of the design is the selection of boss fights", as Nintendo "had achieved a level of platforming design that's close to perfection".[45]Joystiq's Richard Mitchell gave the game 5/5 stars, praising the "astounding" visual craftsmanship, "excellent soundtrack", and "artful, purposeful design" which "communicates goals with complete clarity".[64] GameZone's Mike Splechta stated "With multiple characters to play as (harking back to Super Mario Bros. 2) and an unlockable fifth, a fantastic and unobtrusive multiplayer component and enough new power-ups to make even Mario's head spin, you're bound to have a highly enjoyable time with one of the best 3D platformers released thus far."[79]

Eurogamer's Christian Donlan gave the game a 10/10, describing it as "an endless freewheeling treat of a game" with an "ad-libbed drive to...explore how many different situations Mario can be squashed into". He noted that this inventiveness carries over to the "lavish and quick-changing" soundtrack, saying it "is pastiche at its most skillful, its most panoramic."[49] Cheat Code Central's Jenni Lada gave the game a 5/5, calling it "the closest we will ever come to a perfect Mario game, one that is a culmination of every right decision ever made in the series."[80] Nintendo World Report stated that it is a Mario game that one would want to continue playing once the game is beaten and may be the killer app of the Wii U, saying "Thankfully 3D World isn't just a refinement of the Mario formula, it's a powerful re-imagining. It's an explosive cavalcade of color and excitement as well as a well thought out evolution of Mario."[66] Bob Chipman of The Escapist gave the game four out of five stars, but was slightly critical of it, saying "Buy it if you love that little plumber, and enjoy the new toys, but don't expect your mind to be blown."[81]

Sales[edit]

In Japan, the first week's sales in three days at retail, which doesn't include eShop download sales, totaled 99,588 copies sold[82] and 57% of its initial shipment.[83] The sales were considered low at first, but it maintained strong sales during the following weeks. By January 5, 2014, sales totaled about 400,000 units in Japan and was still on the weekly top 10 charts.[84] In the UK, the game debuted at number 14, behind Knack, which debuted at number 13.[85] In the United States, it sold 215,000 units in its first eight days according to the NPD Group, debuting out of the Top 10.[86] As of March 31, 2021[update], the Wii U version had sold 5.87 million units worldwide, making it the second best-selling game for the console.[87]

Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury launched at nearly three times the physical sales of the original in the UK, and became the fastest-selling release of 2021 in the region.[88] In Japan, it was the best-selling retail game during its first week of release, with 250,018 copies sold.[89] In the US, it was the best-selling game of February 2021.[90] As of June 30, 2021[update], the Switch version had sold 6.68 million units worldwide.[91] Between both versions, a total of 12.55 million units have been sold worldwide.

Legacy[edit]

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker, a spin-off game based on and expanding upon the game's Captain Toad puzzle-based levels, was released for the Wii U on November 13, 2014 in Japan, December 5, 2014 in North America[92] and in January 2015 in PAL regions.[93] It was re-released worldwide for the Nintendo Switch and Nintendo 3DS on July 13, 2018.[94] It has been generally well received.

In late 2014, downloadable content was released for Mario Kart 8, adding Cat Peach to the playable roster.[95] Elements from the game appear in Super Mario Maker 2, as assets players can use while designing their course.[96]

In April 2021, three spirits from the Bowser's Fury campaign appeared in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.[97]

Accolades[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"E3 2013: Why Nintendo Didn't Make Mario Galaxy 3". IGN. Archived from the original on June 13, 2013. Retrieved June 13, 2013.
  2. ^"Iwata Asks: Super Mario 3D World". Nintendo. Archived from the original on May 17, 2019. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  3. ^ abcd"Super Mario 3D World composers talk cats, dogs, and more". Destructoid. Archived from the original on November 12, 2013. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  4. ^ abNapolitano, Jayson. "Super Mario 3D World reunites Mario Galaxy composers". Destructoid. Archived from the original on April 9, 2016. Retrieved October 1, 2016.
  5. ^Raze, Ashton (November 21, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World review". London: The Telegraph. Archived from the original on November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  6. ^"Super Mario 3D World, Mario Kart 8, new Donkey Kong Country coming to Wii U". CNET. June 7, 2013. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 13, 2013.
  7. ^Team, USgamer (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World: Beginner's Guide, Power-Up List, Infinite Lives". USgamer. Archived from the original on October 24, 2017. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  8. ^"Super Mario 3D World's multiplayer mayhem is delightful, long overdue". Polygon. June 7, 2013. Archived from the original on June 15, 2013. Retrieved June 13, 2013.
  9. ^"Super Mario 3D World Continues To Look Amazing". Kotaku.com. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved October 24, 2013.
  10. ^"Wii U News: Super Mario 3D World features a mode in which you can't jump!". Official Nintendo Magazine. Archived from the original on October 28, 2013. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  11. ^"Two Ideas You May Not Have Seen in Super Mario 3D World". IGN. Archived from the original on October 31, 2013. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  12. ^"Function First". Iwata Asks: Super Mario 3D World. Nintendo of America. Archived from the original on May 17, 2019. Retrieved December 29, 2013.
  13. ^"Super Mario 3D World is a Smorgasboard of Fun New Power-Ups". Kotaku.com. Archived from the original on October 1, 2013. Retrieved October 1, 2013.
  14. ^"E3 2013: Super Mario 3D World Revealed for Wii U". IGN. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved June 13, 2013.
  15. ^"SUPER MARIO 3D WORLD". October 20, 2013. Archived from the original on October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 24, 2013.
  16. ^"Watch All Of Today's Nintendo Direct Right Here". Kotaku. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved November 15, 2013.
  17. ^"開発情報 | 1-Up Studio INC". 1-up-studio.jp (in Japanese). Archived from the original on November 2, 2015. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  18. ^ abcde"Why double Mario forced Nintendo to change Super Mario 3D World". gamesradar. Archived from the original on October 24, 2017. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  19. ^ abcdefOtero, Jose (November 7, 2013). "6 Things We Learned About the Making of Super Mario 3D World". IGN. IGN. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  20. ^ abRiendeau, Danielle (June 12, 2013). "Nintendo thinking on a different frequency with playable Princess Peach". Polygon. Archived from the original on November 26, 2013. Retrieved November 27, 2013.
  21. ^"Super Mario 3D World, l'interview en trio". www.gamekult.com (in French). November 1, 2013. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  22. ^Costabile, Christopher. "Latest Iwata Asks Reveals More on Camera Angles, Rosalina and the Amount of Content in Super Mario 3D World - Wii U News @ Nintendo Life". Nintendolife.com. Archived from the original on December 2, 2013. Retrieved November 27, 2013.
  23. ^"Iwata Asks : Super Mario 3D World : It Had To Be Super Mario 3D World". Nintendo. Nintendo. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  24. ^Napolitano, Jayson (October 30, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World features a lot of live music". Destructoid. Destructoid. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  25. ^Brian (April 10, 2014). "Club Nintendo Europe adds Super Mario 3D World soundtrack CD". Archived from the original on July 16, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  26. ^Whitehead, Thomas (November 14, 2013). "A Super Mario 3D World Soundtrack is Coming to Club Nintendo in Japan". Nintendo Life. Archived from the original on October 19, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  27. ^Purchese, Robert. "New 3D Mario and Mario Kart Wii U games at E3". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved October 1, 2016.
  28. ^Tito, Greg (January 23, 2013). "New Mario Kart Wii U Playable at E3". The Escapist. Archived from the original on October 2, 2016. Retrieved October 1, 2016.
  29. ^ abGoldfarb, Andrew (August 28, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World, Donkey Kong Wii U Release Dates". IGN. Archived from the original on November 15, 2019. Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  30. ^"Nintendo Direct 2013.10.1". Nintendo (in Japanese). Nintendo Co., Ltd. Archived from the original on October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  31. ^"Wii U/3DS - Q4 2013"(PDF). Retrieved September 4, 2013.
  32. ^"NINTENDO ANNOUNCES LAUNCH DATES FOR ANTICIPATED Wii U & NINTENDO 3DS TITLES FOR 2013". Nintendo Australia. October 2, 2013. Archived from the original on October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  33. ^Farokhmanesh, Megan (September 3, 2020). "Super Mario 3D World and other classic Mario games are coming to the Switch". The Verge. Archived from the original on September 6, 2020. Retrieved September 3, 2020.
  34. ^"Bowser's Fury looks like an ambitious addition to Super Mario 3D World". VentureBeat. January 12, 2021. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  35. ^Doolan, Liam (September 4, 2020). "Super Mario 3D World On Switch Appears To Be A Lot Faster Than The Wii U Original". Nintendo Life. Archived from the original on September 5, 2020. Retrieved September 5, 2020.
  36. ^Skrebels, Joe. "Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury Announced for Nintendo Switch". IGN. Archived from the original on September 4, 2020. Retrieved September 3, 2020.
  37. ^Sheridan, Connor (September 3, 2020). "Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury is bringing the co-op party to Switch in 2021". GamesRadar+. Archived from the original on December 13, 2020. Retrieved September 5, 2020.
  38. ^https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nW9o6M5zFo
  39. ^Rairdin, John (September 3, 2020). "Super Mario 3D World is Coming to Nintendo Switch With New Content and amiibo". Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on September 18, 2020. Retrieved September 5, 2020.
  40. ^Oxford, Nadia (September 3, 2020). "Super Mario 3D World's Switch Port Has Us Wondering About This New "Bowser's Fury" Content". USGamer. Archived from the original on September 5, 2020. Retrieved September 5, 2020.
  41. ^Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury - Official Trailer 2 - IGN, retrieved January 12, 2021
  42. ^ ab"Super Mario 3D World for Wii U Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on November 25, 2013. Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  43. ^"Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury for Switch Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved February 13, 2021.
  44. ^"Test: Super Mario 3D World (Plattformer)". 4Players.de. Archived from the original on January 28, 2018. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  45. ^ abCarter, Chris (November 19, 2013). "Review: Super Mario 3D World". Destructoid. Archived from the original on November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  46. ^ abEdge Staff (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World review". Edge. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  47. ^"Super Mario 3D World review It's-a-me, Meowrio!". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  48. ^"Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury review". Electronic Gaming Monthly. February 10, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  49. ^ abDonlan, Christian (November 14, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World review". Eurogamer.net. Archived from the original on July 12, 2017. Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  50. ^ abRomano, Sal (November 12, 2013). "Famitsu Review Scores: Issue 1302". Gematsu. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  51. ^Vore, Brian (November 19, 2013). "Multiplayer Mania Enters The Third Dimension". Game Informer. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  52. ^"Super Mario 3D World review". Game Revolution. Archived from the original on April 3, 2014. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  53. ^Walton, Mark (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on November 20, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  54. ^ abGilbert, Henry (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". GamesRadar. Archived from the original on December 13, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  55. ^Loveridge, Sam (February 2021). "Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury review: "A must-play for Mario fans"". GamesRadar. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  56. ^"Review: Super Mario 3D World". GamesTM. Archived from the original on November 24, 2013. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  57. ^"Super Mario 3D World - Review". GameTrailers. Archived from the original on August 28, 2015. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  58. ^"Super Mario 3D World review". Giant Bomb. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 20, 2013.
  59. ^"Review: Super Mario 3D World". Hardcore Gamer. Archived from the original on May 3, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  60. ^"Review: Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury". Hardcore Gamer. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  61. ^"Super Mario 3D World". Hyper. No. 245. Future Publishing. March 2014. p. 67.
  62. ^ abOtero, Jose (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". IGN. Archived from the original on December 26, 2016. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  63. ^Shea, Cam (February 10, 2021), Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury Review, retrieved April 15, 2021
  64. ^ abMitchell, Richard (November 14, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World review: Just Peachy". Joystiq. Archived from the original on January 28, 2015. Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  65. ^"Super Mario 3D World for Wii U review". Nintendo Life. Archived from the original on November 20, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  66. ^ abBaker, Justin (November 14, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on November 22, 2013. Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  67. ^"Super Mario 3D World review". Official Nintendo Magazine. Archived from the original on November 23, 2013. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  68. ^Mundy, Jon. "Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury review - "One of Nintendo's safest and weirdest Switch games"". www.pocketgamer.com. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  69. ^"SUPER MARIO 3D WORLD REVIEW: SILLY SYMPHONY". Polygon. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  70. ^"Super Mario 3D World review: the cat's pajamas". Shacknews. Archived from the original on February 15, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  71. ^"Super Mario 3D World review: packed with playfulness". The Guardian. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  72. ^"Super Mario 3D World Wii U Review: Makes the Old Feel New". USgamer. Archived from the original on August 25, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  73. ^"Super Mario 3D World Review". VideoGamer. Archived from the original on September 19, 2019. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  74. ^Scullion, Chris (February 10, 2021). "Super Mario 3D World + Bowser's Fury Review (Switch)". Nintendo Life. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  75. ^"Super Mario 3D World Review". GameTrailers. November 19, 2013. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  76. ^Plunkett, Luke (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World: The Kotaku Review". Kotaku. Archived from the original on November 20, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  77. ^Klepek, Patrick (November 20, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". Giant Bomb. Archived from the original on March 26, 2014. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  78. ^Kemps, Heidi (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World - Game Review". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on November 21, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  79. ^Splechta, Mike (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review: Once more with Feline". GZ. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  80. ^Lada, Jenni (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". Cheat Code Central. Archived from the original on November 23, 2013. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  81. ^Chipman, Bob (November 19, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Review". The Escapist. Archived from the original on June 2, 2015. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  82. ^Kaplan, Zack (November 27, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Suffers Low Sales in Japan". Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on November 30, 2013. Retrieved November 30, 2013.
  83. ^Ishaan (November 30, 2013). "Super Mario 3D World Had A Fairly Low Launch Shipment In Japan". Siliconera. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved December 9, 2013.
  84. ^"Media Create Sales: 12/30/13 – 1/5/14". gematsu. November 8, 2013. Archived from the original on January 10, 2014. Retrieved November 8, 2013.
  85. ^"Super Mario 3D World, Launch in UK". GFK Chart-Track. November 30, 2013. Archived from the original on December 17, 2013. Retrieved December 23, 2013.
  86. ^"Super Mario 3D World, NPD US". Joystiq. December 12, 2013. Archived
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Mario_3D_World

Super Mario™ 3D World + Bowser’s Fury

Available now

Enjoy two Mario adventures solo or with friends!

Pounce and climb through dozens of colorful courses! Mario (and his friends) can use a variety of power-ups like the Super Bell, which grants catlike abilities like climbing and scratching. Team up with up to three other players locally* or online** to reach the goal and see who can get a high score.

Explore a seamless feline world in the new Bowser’s Fury adventure

Free-roaming Super Mario gameplay makes a return in this brand-new adventure. Bowser has become gargantuan and lost all control! Explore Lake Lapcat and its islands, complete objectives to collect Cat Shines, and team up with Bowser Jr. to bring his big, bad dad back to normal. Just watch out for Bowser’s island-wide attacks.

New and improved features pounce in

The Super Mario 3D World + Bowser’s Fury game features the same great co-op gameplay, creative levels and power-ups as the original game, but with added improvements. In the Super Mario 3D World part of the game, characters move faster and the dash powers up more quickly. Both adventures support the newly added Snapshot Mode—pause the action to get the perfect shot, apply filters, and decorate with stamps!

  • In Super Mario 3D World, choose from Mario, Luigi, Peach, and Toad and set off to save the Sprixie Kingdom. Each character has a distinct playstyle—Luigi can jump extra high and Peach can float for a short time. Rosalina is also available as a playable character later in the game! Jump, dash, and pounce to reach the goal while collecting Green Stars, coins and power-ups.
  • Collect stamps throughout your adventure in Super Mario 3D World and use them in Snapshot Mode (in both Super Mario 3D World and the Bowser’s Fury adventure) to create masterpieces to share with friends and family.
  • In Bowser’s Fury, Mario arrives on Lake Lapcat and is confronted with a rampaging Bowser! Join forces with Bowser Jr. and venture through an interconnected world made of cat-themed…well, everything. Enemies, flowers, and even birds take on a feline form.
  • Need some extra assistance bringing Bowser out of his frenzied, furious state? Another player can take control of Bowser Jr. and help out by attacking enemies and storing power-ups. Two sets of claws are better than one!

Release date:
February 12, 2021

Players:
up to 4 players

Genre:
Platformer, Action

Publisher:
Nintendo

Game file size:
3.0 GB

Supported Languages:
Japanese, English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Korean, Dutch, Portuguese, Russian, Chinese

Supported Play Modes:
TV mode

TV mode

Tabletop mode

Tabletop mode

Handheld mode

Handheld mode

Software compatibility and play experience may differ on Nintendo Switch Lite. Additional accessories may be required (sold separately). See support for details.

ESRB Rating:

Nintendo Switch Online

Play online, access classic Super NES™ games, and more with a Nintendo Switch Online membership.

*MSRP: Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary. See retailer for details.

Nintendo Switch Online membership (sold separately) and Nintendo Account required for online play. Not available in all countries. Internet access required for online features. Terms apply. nintendo.com/switch-online

*Additional games, systems and/or accessories may be required for multiplayer mode. Games, systems and some accessories sold separately.

**Nintendo Switch Online membership (sold separately) and Nintendo Account required for online features. Not available in all countries. Internet access required for online features. Terms apply. nintendo.com/switch-online

***amiibo sold separately. Visit amiibo.com for details on amiibo functionality.
©2013-2021 Nintendo. Super Mario and Nintendo Switch are trademarks of Nintendo.

Sours: https://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/super-mario-3d-world-plus-bowsers-fury-switch/

3d world mario

A tripod. Oh my god. Why. You see, ma'am, my apparatus is so heavy that it is difficult to hold it in my hands.

¡BOWSER FURIOSO! - PARTE #1 - SUPER MARIO 3D WORLD + BOWSER'S FURY

And I'm crazy about such. I have always been turned on by smart and cute. I told the bodyguard to lead us to me, but You offered to go to your place. I was surprised, but didn't argue.

You will also like:

She understood and moistened her right hand and began to twist her palm. Forward, it turned out that there was a hand after a huge sausage just fell into my ass. the redhead grunted rather, and shows shove it to the full length. The wife in akhuya slowly begins to twist and press, clenching her hand into a fist, but her hand does not. Reach, pulling her fist out of the ass showed the redhead, he explains in English and on his fingers shove with a boat and twist.



7030 7031 7032 7033 7034