Biggest gangs in california

Biggest gangs in california DEFAULT

13 American Gangs That Are Keeping The FBI Up At Night

Gang trinitarios
YouTube
More than 1.4 million Americans are wearing the colors of more than 33,000 gangs across the country, according to a report by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Based on evidence from federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement, the FBI says gangs commit 48% of violent crime, and are only becoming more dangerous. Some even source weapons from the military.

While many of these groups are regional and only loosely organized, many gangs are expanding their ranks and establishing themselves at international levels. 

Florencia 13 members have been caught buying weapons from U.S. military personnel

graffiti wall
Flickr - kootenayvolcano

Another rapidly expanding Sureño gang, Florencia 13, works closely with the Mexican Mafia and is a rival of the 18th Street set. Based out of South Los Angeles, Florencia 13 is part of a terrifying gang war scene that has turned L.A. into one of the most dangerous counties in the country.

It also has members and influence in states like Virginia and Iowa.

The gang has racked up charges ranging from piracy to conspiracy to sell drugs and murder over the last few years. They also have been cited as another gang infiltrating the U.S. military. In 2010, six members were given life sentences out of the 94 that pleaded guilty to their crimes.

Barrio Azteca has ties to several major Mexican drug trafficking organizations

barrio azteca head tattoo
Mafia Today

Originally based out of El Paso, Texas, Los Aztecas have become a powerful paramilitary force on both sides of the Mexico border. Now many of the gang's members are recruited from Texas prisons, and some of its work takes place inside prison walls, such as heroin production.

Los Aztecas work with the Juarez cartel and Los Zetas running drugs, smuggling illegal aliens and murdering consulate officials.The gang has a military structure that has helped keep order.

In March 2011, 35 members of the gang were charged with a variety of crimes, including 10 gangsters involved in the murder of the U.S. Consulate employee and several family members.

Juggalos are somewhere between ridiculous and dangerous

juggalo barbeque
Flickr - K.Rock

Originally just the crazed and face-painted fans of the horrorcore rap group Insane Clown Posse, "Juggalos" have become a non-traditional hybrid gang with a loose structure and unclear motives.

Many Juggalos only engage in low-level crime, like simple drug possession and theft. But the FBI has noticed increasingly gang-like behavior, such as forming organized subsets and committing more serious crimes, "such as felony assaults, thefts, robberies, and drug sales."

Though only recognized as a gang in four states, the already established Juggalo culture has aided the transition to greater violence and gang-like activity. The transient nature of the group makes it hard to locate exact pockets of influence, but Juggalo activity has been noted in states like California, Pennsylvania and Utah.

The Almighty Latin King Nation is said to be the largest Hispanic street gang in the country

latin king
Wikimedia

Originally formed in Chicago in the 1940s, the strictly organized structure of the Latin Kings has helped them become the biggest Hispanic gang in the U.S. The gang's influence stretches to 34 states, and there an estimated 18,000 members in Chicago alone.

Though the gang is splintered into the original Chicago clique and an east coast set, all members subscribe to being Latin Kings. All gang members subscribe to the group's religious aesthetic, which calls for the eventual rebirth of a member as a New King, enlightened and ready to serve the downtrodden peoples of the world.

The Kings have been the subject of multiple federal operations, looking to arrest gang members and limit the group's growing influence. Recently, the latest sting produced a conviction of Augustin "Tino" Zambrano, considered to the be the highest ranking out-of-prison member in the nation.

Somali gangs are seeing increasing influence in places like Minnesota

somali gang tshirt
FBI

While some Somali immigrants adopt Blood or Crip membership, separate Somali gangs are becoming more prevalent across the country. They often experience tension with other African-American gangs, such as groups comprised of Ethiopian refugees.

Somali gangs have been involved in alien smuggling, human trafficking, credit card fraud, prostitution and violent crime.

Strangely, the biggest pockets of Somali gangs can be found in states like Minnesota, Washington, and Missouri.

MS-13 is the gang that has the FBI most worried

tattoo face
Sours: https://www.businessinsider.com/dangerous-american-gangs-fbi-2011-11

Gang Populations
Los Angeles County & City



Gang Arrest by U.S. Homeland Security Investigations

Gang arrest by U.S. Homeland Security Investigations. Courtesy of U.S. Homeland Security Investigations.

Also see Gang-Related Crime in Los Angeles & Los Angeles County

City of Los Angeles Gang Populations
for December by Year

(LAPD has not release these statistics since 2005)

YearHispanicCripBloodAsianStoner*WhiteTotal
2005Gangs24611345321611463
Members21,79010,7924,41683953760038,974
2004Gangs24611345321611463
Members22,51410,1874,2051,11775279139,566
2003Gangs2041074332165407
Members28,82711,6614,6201,59965692648,289
2002Gangs2041074332165407
Members30,51712,0164,7001,70170485950,497
2001Gangs2041074332165407
Members33,76213,1095,3171,74978766155,385
2000Gangs2041074332165407
Members36,07113,1865,3771,72880819057,360
YearHispanicCripBloodAsianStoner*WhiteTotal
1999Gangs2041074332165407
Members38,55415,1376,0322,02886716462,782
1998Gangs2051074332165408
Members35,02513,8485,6611,84779210157,274
1997Gangs2041074332165407
Members39,99115,4155,5322,04875269164,429
1996Gangs2041064332165406
Members38,89514,7715,2921,97372964062,300
1995Gangs2031054331165403
Members36508139064941176770553258,359
1994Gangs2021044229165398
Members32,88612,9054,5801,62868543953,123
1993Gangs2081094535174418
Members35,86516,4505,4942.42873938761,362

*Usually teenagers of various races/ethnicities, who listen to metal or gothic music
Source: Los Angeles Police Department

Sours: http://www.laalmanac.com/crime/cr03v.php
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Skip nagivation.To Contents     To Appendix A     To Appendix C     To Department of Justice Home Page

National Drug Intelligence Center
Attorney General's Report to Congress on the Growth of Violent Street Gangs in Suburban Areas
April 2008


Appendix B. National-Level Street, Prison, and Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Profiles

STREET GANGS

18th Street (National)

Formed in Los Angeles, 18th Street is a group of loosely associated sets or cliques, each led by an influential member. Membership is estimated to be 30,000 to 50,000. In California approximately 80 percent of the gang's members are illegal aliens from Mexico and Central America. The gang is active in 50 cities in 28 states. The gang's main source of income is retail-level distribution of cocaine and marijuana and, to a lesser extent, heroin and methamphetamine. Gang members also commit assault, auto theft, carjacking, drive-by shooting, extortion, homicide, identification fraud, and robbery.

Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation (National)

Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation (ALKQN) was formed in the 1970s by Luis Felipe. The gang shares a common culture and structure with the Chicago-based Latin Kings but does not report to Latin Kings. Membership is estimated to be 2,200 to 7,500, divided among several dozen chapters operating in 25 cities in 21 states. A primary source of income is the distribution of powder cocaine, crack cocaine, and marijuana. The gang is also involved in various criminal activities including assault, auto theft, burglary, and homicide.

Asian Boyz (National)

Asian Boyz is one of the largest Asian street gangs operating in the United States. Formed in southern California in the early 1970s, the gang is estimated to have 1,300 to 2,000 members operating in at least 28 cities in 14 states. Members primarily are Vietnamese or Cambodian males. Members of Asian Boyz are involved in producing, transporting, and distributing methamphetamine, as well as distributing MDMA and marijuana. In addition, gang members are involved in other criminal activities including assault, burglary, drive-by shooting, and homicide.

Black Peace Stone Nation (National)

Black Peace Stone Nation, one of the largest and most violent associations of street gangs in the United States, consists of seven highly structured street gangs with a single leader and a common culture. It has an estimated 6,000 to 8,000 members, most of whom are African American males from the Chicago metropolitan area operating in 31 cities in 22 states. The gang's main source of income is the street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and, to a lesser extent, methamphetamine. Members also are involved in many other types of criminal activity including assault, auto theft, burglary, carjacking, drive-by shooting, extortion, homicide, and robbery.

Bloods (National)

Bloods is an association of structured and unstructured gangs that have adopted a single gang culture. Large, national-level Bloods gangs include Bounty Hunter Bloods and Crenshaw Mafia Gangsters. Bloods membership is estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000; most members are African American males. Bloods gangs are active in 123 cities in 37 states. The main source of income for Bloods gangs is retail-level distribution of cocaine and marijuana. Bloods members also are involved in transporting and distributing methamphetamine, heroin and, to a much lesser extent, PCP (phencyclidine). The gangs also are involved in other criminal activity including assault, auto theft, burglary, carjacking, drive-by shooting, extortion, homicide, identification fraud, and robbery.

Crips (National)

Crips is a collection of structured and unstructured gangs that have adopted a common gang culture. Crips membership is estimated to be 30,000 to 35,000; most members are African American males from the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Large, national-level Crips gangs include Insane Gangster Crips, Rolling 90s Crips, and Shotgun Crips. Crips gangs operate in 221 cities in 41 states. The main source of income for Crips gangs is the street-level distribution of powder cocaine, crack cocaine, marijuana, and PCP. The gangs also are involved in other criminal activity such as assault, auto theft, burglary, and homicide.

Florencia 13 (Regional)

Florencia 13 (F 13 or FX 13) originated in Los Angeles in the early 1960s; gang membership is estimated to be more than 3,000. The gang operates primarily in California and increasingly in Arkansas, Missouri, New Mexico, and Utah. Florencia 13 is subordinate to the Mexican Mafia (La Eme) prison gang and claims Sure�os (Sur 13) affiliation. A primary source of income for gang members is the trafficking of cocaine and methamphetamine. Gang members smuggle multikilogram quantities of powder cocaine and methamphetamine obtained from sources of supply in Mexico into the United States for distribution. Also, gang members produce large quantities of methamphetamine in southern California for local distribution. Florencia members are involved in other criminal activities including assault, drive-by shooting, and homicide.

Fresno Bulldogs (Regional)

Fresno Bulldogs (Bulldogs) is a street gang that originated in Fresno, California, in the late 1960s. It is the largest Hispanic gang operating in central California, with membership estimated at 5,000 to 6,000. Bulldogs are one of the few Hispanic gangs in California that claim neither Sure�os (Southern) nor Norte�os (Northern) affiliation. However, gang members associate with Nuestra Familia (NF) members, particularly when trafficking drugs. The street-level distribution of methamphetamine, marijuana, and heroin is a primary source of income for gang members. In addition, members are involved in other types of criminal activity including assault, burglary, homicide, and robbery.

Gangster Disciples (National)

The Gangster Disciples street gang was formed in Chicago, Illinois, in the mid-1960s. It is structured like a corporation and is led by a chairman of the board. Gang membership is estimated to be 25,000 to 50,000; most members are African American males from the Chicago metropolitan area. The gang is active in 110 cities in 33 states. Its main source of income is the retail-level distribution of cocaine, marijuana, and heroin. The gang also is involved in other criminal activity including assault, auto theft, fraud, homicide, and money laundering.

Latin Disciples (Regional)

Latin Disciples, also known as Maniac Latin Disciples and Young Latino Organization, originated in Chicago in the late 1960s. The gang is composed of at least 10 structured and unstructured factions with an estimated 1,500 to 2,000 members and associate members active in at least six states. Most members are Puerto Rican males. Maniac Latin Disciples is the largest Hispanic gang in the Folk Nation Alliance. The gang is most active in the Great Lakes and Southwest Regions of the United States. The street-level distribution of powder cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and PCP is a primary source of income for the gang. Members also are involved in other criminal activity including assault, auto theft, carjacking, drive-by shooting, home invasion, homicide, money laundering, and weapons trafficking.

Latin Kings (National)

The Chicago-based Almighty Latin King Nation, commonly referred to as Latin Kings, is a collection of over 160 structured gangs, referred to as chapters, operating in 158 cities in 34 states. The gang's current membership is estimated to be 20,000 to 35,000. Most members are Mexican American or Puerto Rican males. Latin Kings' main source of income is street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana. Gang members obtain drugs primarily from several Mexican DTOs that operate along the U.S.-Mexico border. Members also engage in other criminal activity such as assault, burglary, homicide, identity theft, and money laundering.

Mara Salvatrucha (National)

Mara Salvatrucha, also known as MS-13, is one of the largest Hispanic street gangs in the United States. Traditionally, the gang consisted of loosely affiliated groups known as cliques; however, law enforcement officials have reported the coordination of criminal activity among Mara Salvatrucha cliques in the Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas. The gang is estimated to have 30,000 to 50,000 members and associate members worldwide, 8,000 to 10,000 of whom are active in at least 38 states. According to recent law enforcement reporting, MS 13 is active in suburban areas outside Naples, Florida. Members smuggle illicit drugs, primarily powder cocaine and marijuana, into the United States and transport and distribute the drugs throughout the country. Some members also are involved in alien smuggling, assault, drive-by shooting, homicide, identification theft, prostitution operations, robbery, and weapons trafficking.

Tiny Rascal Gangsters (National)

Tiny Rascal Gangsters is one of the largest and most violent Asian street gang associations in the United States. It is composed of at least 60 structured and unstructured gangs, commonly referred to as sets, with an estimated 5,000 to 10,000 members and associates active in at least 16 states. Most members are Asian American males. The sets are most active in the Southwest, Pacific, and New England Regions. The retail-level distribution of powder cocaine, marijuana, MDMA, and methamphetamine is a primary source of income for the sets. Members also are involved in other criminal activity including assault, drive-by shooting, extortion, home invasion, homicide, robbery, and theft.

United Blood Nation (Regional)

United Blood Nation (UBN) is a loose confederation of street gangs, or sets, that once were predominantly African American but now include Asians, Caucasians, and Hispanics. UBN began in the Rikers Island Jail in New York City in 1993 and spread throughout the East Coast. Membership is estimated to be more than 7,000; members are active in seven states. UBN derives its income from street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana; robbery; auto theft; and smuggling of drugs to inmates in prison. UBN members also engage in arson, carjacking, credit card fraud, extortion, homicide, identity theft, intimidation, prostitution operations, and weapons distribution.

Vice Lord Nation (National)

Vice Lord Nation, based in Chicago, is a collection of structured gangs located in 74 cities in 28 states, primarily in the Great Lakes Region. Led by a national board, the various gangs comprise an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 members, most of whom are African American males. The gang's main source of income is street-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, and marijuana. Members also engage in other criminal activity such as assault, burglary, homicide, identity theft, and money laundering.

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PRISON GANGS

Aryan Brotherhood (National)

Aryan Brotherhood, also known as AB, was originally ruled by consensus but is now highly structured with two factions--one in the California Department of Corrections (CDC) and the other in the Federal Bureau of Prisons system. The majority of members are Caucasian males, and the gang is primarily active in the Southwest and Pacific Regions. Its main source of income is the distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamine within the prison systems as well as on the streets. Some AB members have business relationships with Mexican DTOs that smuggle illegal drugs into California for AB distribution. AB is notoriously violent and is often involved in murder-for-hire. Although historically linked to the California-based Hispanic prison gang Mexican Mafia (La Eme), tension between AB and La Eme is becoming increasingly evident as seen in recent fights between Caucasians and Hispanics within the CDC.

Barrio Azteca (National)

Barrio Azteca is one of the most violent prison gangs in the United States. The gang is highly structured and has an estimated membership of 2,000. Most members are Mexican national or Mexican American males. Barrio Azteca is most active in the Southwest Region, primarily in federal, state, and local corrections facilities in Texas and outside prison in southwestern Texas and southeastern New Mexico. The gang's main source of income is derived from smuggling heroin, powder cocaine, and marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution both inside and outside prisons. Gang members often transport illicit drugs across the U.S.-Mexico border for DTOs. Barrio Azteca members also are involved in alien smuggling, arson, assault, auto theft, burglary, extortion, intimidation, kidnapping, robbery, and weapons violations.

Black Guerrilla Family (Regional)

Black Guerrilla Family (BGF), originally called Black Family or Black Vanguard, is a prison gang that was founded in the San Quentin State Prison, California, in 1966. The gang is highly organized, along paramilitary lines, with a supreme leader and central committee. BGF has an established national charter, code of ethics, and oath of allegiance. BGF members operate primarily in California, Georgia, Maryland, and Missouri. The gang has 100 to 300 members, most of whom are African American males. A primary source of income for gang members is the distribution of cocaine and marijuana. BGF members obtain these drugs primarily from Nuestra Familia/Norte�os members or from local Mexican traffickers. BGF members are involved in other criminal activities including auto theft, burglary, drive-by shooting, and homicide.

Four Horsemen, Tangos, and Tango Blast (Local)

Texas prison officials first noted the presence of a gang known as Four Horsemen in 1998. Some Hispanic gang members entering the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) from the cities of Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston were not interested in joining an established prison gang and established Four Horsemen to protect one another and to engage in illegal activities, particularly drug trafficking, to make money. Four Horsemen became known as Tangos, because its members wore tattoos that reflected the town (or tango) in which they resided prior to incarceration. As interest in Tangos grew among Hispanic gang members entering TDCJ from other areas of Texas, Tangos from West Texas, the Rio Grande Valley, San Antonio, and El Paso were accepted. Of the eight groups now recognized as Tangos, only six are part of Tango Blast, also known as Puro Tango Blast. Tango Blast includes Tangos from the four original cities as well as the West Texas and Rio Grande Valley areas. Tango Blast differs from Tangos in that separate Tango Blast gangs sometimes band together to help one another. The gang's rapid growth poses a significant new security threat, and elements of Tango Blast within TDCJ appear to be challenging Texas Syndicate for control of illegal prison activities. Tango members appear to return to their local street gangs when released from prison, rather than continue their prison-based affiliation.

Hermanos de Pistoleros Latinos (Local)

Hermanos de Pistoleros Latinos (HPL) is a Hispanic prison gang formed in the TDCJ in the late 1980s. It operates in most prisons in Texas and on the streets in many communities in Texas, particularly Laredo. HPL is also active in several cities in Mexico, and its largest contingent in that country is located in Nuevo Laredo. The gang is structured and is estimated to have 1,000 members. Gang members maintain close ties to several Mexican DTOs and are involved in the trafficking of large quantities of cocaine and marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution.

Mexican Mafia (National)

The Mexican Mafia prison gang, also known as La Eme (Spanish for the letter M), was formed in the late 1950s within the California Department of Corrections (CDC). It is loosely structured and has strict rules that must be followed by the estimated 350 to 400 members. Most members are Mexican American males who previously belonged to a southern California street gang. Mexican Mafia is active in 13 states, but its power base is in California. The gang's main source of income is extorting drug distributors outside prison and distributing methamphetamine, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana within the prison systems and on the streets. Some members have direct links to Mexican DTOs and broker deals for themselves and their associates. Mexican Mafia also is involved in other criminal activities including controlling gambling and homosexual prostitution in prison.

Mexikanemi (National)

The Mexikanemi prison gang (also known as Texas Mexican Mafia or Emi) was formed in the early 1980s within the TDCJ. The gang is highly structured and is estimated to have 2,000 members, most of whom are Mexican national or Mexican American males who were living in Texas at the time of incarceration. Mexikanemi poses a significant drug trafficking threat to communities in the Southwest Region, particularly in Texas. Gang members reportedly traffic multikilogram quantities of powder cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine; and multiton quantities of marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution inside and outside prison. Gang members obtain drugs from associates or members of the Osiel C�rdenas-Gu�llen, and/or Vicente Carrillo-Fuentes Mexican DTOs. In addition, Mexikanemi members possibly maintain a relationship with Los Zetas, which is associated with a Gulf Cartel.

Nazi Low Riders (Regional)

Nazi Low Riders (NLR) is a violent California-based prison gang that subscribes to a white supremacist philosophy. The gang has 800 to 1,000 members, most of whom are Caucasian males with a history of street gang activity and drug abuse. NLR operates in correctional facilities and communities, primarily in the Pacific and Southwest Regions. The gang's primary sources of income are derived from the distribution of multiounce to multipound quantities of methamphetamine, retail-level distribution of heroin and marijuana, and extortion of independent Caucasian drug dealers and other white supremacist gangs. Members also engage in violent criminal activity such as armed robbery, assault, assault with deadly weapons, murder, and attempted murder; in addition they commit identity fraud, money laundering, witness intimidation, and witness retaliation.

�eta (National)

�eta is a prison gang that began in Puerto Rico and spread to the United States. �eta is one of the largest and most violent prison gangs, with about 7,000 members in Puerto Rico and 5,000 in the United States. �eta chapters in Puerto Rico exist exclusively inside prisons; once members are released from prison they no longer are considered to be part of the gang. In the United States �eta chapters exist both inside and outside prisons within 36 cities in nine states, primarily in the Northeast Region. The gang's main source of income is the retail-level distribution of powder and crack cocaine, heroin, marijuana and, to a lesser extent, LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), MDMA, methamphetamine, and PCP. �eta members also commit such crimes as assault, auto theft, burglary, drive-by shooting, extortion, home invasion, money laundering, robbery, weapons and explosives trafficking, and witness intimidation.

Public Enemy Number One (Local)

Public Enemy Number One (PEN1) is the fastest-growing Caucasian prison gang, with an estimated 400 to 500 members operating in prisons and communities in California and, to a much lesser extent, in locations throughout the Northeast, Pacific, Southwest, Southeast, and West Central Regions of the country. PEN1 members espouse a white supremacist philosophy and pose a criminal threat inside and outside prison because of their alliance with AB and NLR. Gang members derive their income from distributing midlevel and retail-level quantities of methamphetamine. In addition, members engage in violent criminal activity such as assault, attempted murder, and homicide as well as auto theft, burglary, identity theft, and property crimes.

Sure�os and Norte�os (National/National)

As individual Hispanic street gang members enter the prison systems, they put aside former rivalries with other Hispanic street gangs and unite under the name Sure�os or Norte�os. The original Mexican Mafia members, most of whom were from southern California, considered Mexicans from the rural, agricultural areas of northern California as weak and viewed them with contempt. To distinguish themselves from the agricultural workers or farmers from northern California, members of Mexican Mafia began to refer to the Hispanic gang members that worked for them as Sure�os (Southerners). Inmates from northern California became known as Norte�os (Northerners) and are affiliated with NF. Because of its size and strength, Fresno Bulldogs is the only Hispanic gang in CDC that does not fall under Sure�os or Norte�os but remains independent. Sure�os gang members' main sources of income are the retail-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamine both within prison systems and in the community, as well as the extortion of drug distributors on the streets. Some members have direct links to Mexican DTOs and broker deals for Mexican Mafia as well as their own gang. Sure�os gangs also are involved in other criminal activities such as assault, carjacking, home invasion, homicide, and robbery. Norte�os gang members' main sources of income are the retail-level distribution of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, methamphetamine, and PCP within prison systems and in the community, as well as the extortion of drug distributors on the streets. Norte�os gangs also are involved in other criminal activities such as assault, carjacking, home invasion, homicide, and robbery.

Texas Syndicate (Regional)

Texas Syndicate (TS) is one of the largest and most violent prison gangs; it is active on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border and poses a significant drug trafficking threat to communities in the Southwest Region. The gang is highly structured and is estimated to have 1,300 members, most of whom are Mexican American males between 20 and 40 years of age. Gang members smuggle multikilogram quantities of powder cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine and multiton quantities of marijuana from Mexico into the United States for distribution inside and outside prison. Gang members have a direct working relationship with associates and/or members of the Osiel C�rdenas-Guill�n DTO. In addition, TS members possibly maintain a relationship with Los Zetas.

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OUTLAW MOTORCYCLE GANGS

Bandidos (National)

Bandidos, an OMG with 2,000 to 2,500 members in the United States and 13 other countries, is a growing criminal threat to the nation. Law enforcement authorities estimate that Bandidos is one of the two largest OMGs in the United States, with approximately 900 members belonging to over 93 chapters. Bandidos is involved in transporting and distributing cocaine and marijuana and producing, transporting, and distributing methamphetamine. Bandidos is most active in the Pacific, Southeast, Southwest, and West Central Regions and is expanding in these regions by forming new chapters and allowing members of support clubs--"uppet" or "duck" club members who have sworn allegiance to another club and whose purpose is to do the "dirty work" of the mother club--to form or join Bandidos chapters.

Black Pistons Motorcycle Club (National)

Black Pistons Motorcycle Club is the official support club of Outlaws Motorcycle Club. Established in 2002 with the backing of Outlaws, Black Pistons has expanded rapidly throughout the United States and into Canada and Europe. The OMG has an estimated 70 domestic chapters in 20 states and an unknown number of foreign chapters in Belgium, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Norway, and Poland. The exact number of members is unknown but is estimated to be more than 200 in the United States. The Outlaws OMG uses Black Pistons chapters as sources of prospective Outlaws members. The Outlaws OMG also uses Black Pistons chapters to conduct criminal activity, especially transporting and distributing drugs. Black Piston members engage in assault, extortion, fraud, intimidation, and theft.

Hells Angels Motorcycle Club (National)

Hells Angels Motorcycle Club (HAMC) is an OMG with 2,000 to 2,500 members belonging to over 230 chapters in the United States and 26 foreign countries. HAMC poses a criminal threat on six continents. U.S. law enforcement authorities estimate that HAMC has more than 92 chapters in 27 states with over 800 members. HAMC members produce, transport, and distribute marijuana and methamphetamine and transport and distribute cocaine, hashish, heroin, LSD, MDMA, PCP, and diverted pharmaceuticals. HAMC members engage in other criminal activity including assault, extortion, homicide, money laundering, and motorcycle theft.

Mongols Motorcycle Club (Regional)

Mongols Motorcycle Club is an extremely violent OMG that poses a serious criminal threat to the Pacific and Southwest Regions of the United States. Mongols members transport and distribute cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine and frequently commit violent crimes including assault, intimidation, and murder to defend Mongols territory and uphold its reputation. Most of the club's 300 members are Hispanic males who live in the Los Angeles area, and many are former street gang members with a long history of using violence to settle grievances. In the 1980s, the Mongols OMG seized control of southern California from the HAMC, and today it is allied with Bandidos, Outlaws, Sons of Silence, and Pagan's OMGs against the HAMC. The Mongols OMG also maintains ties to Hispanic street gangs in Los Angeles.

Outlaws Motorcycle Club (National)

Outlaws has more than 1,700 members belonging to 176 chapters in the United States and 12 foreign countries. U.S. law enforcement authorities estimate that Outlaws has more than 86 chapters in 21 states with over 700 members. Outlaws also identifies itself as the A.O.A. (American Outlaws Association) and Outlaws Nation. Outlaws is the dominant OMG in the Great Lakes Region. Gang members produce, transport, and distribute methamphetamine and transport and distribute cocaine, marijuana and, to a lesser extent, MDMA. Outlaws members engage in various criminal activities including arson, assault, explosives operations, extortion, fraud, homicide, intimidation, kidnapping, money laundering, prostitution operations, robbery, theft, and weapons violations. It competes with the HAMC for membership and territory.

Pagan's Motorcycle Club (Regional)

Pagan's Motorcycle Club is a violent OMG whose members distribute cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, and PCP. It is one of the more prominent OMGs in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Pagan's OMG has an estimated 200 to 250 members among 41 chapters in 11 states. The club has been linked to traditional organized crime (TOC) groups in New York, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh and engages in criminal activities such as arson, assault, bombing, extortion, and murder.

Vagos Motorcycle Club (National)

Vagos OMG has hundreds of members in the United States and Mexico and poses a serious criminal threat to those areas in which its chapters are located. Law enforcement agencies report that Vagos has approximately 300 members among 24 chapters in California, Hawaii, Nevada, and Oregon, and three chapters in Mexico. Vagos members produce, transport, and distribute methamphetamine and distribute marijuana. Vagos Members also have been implicated in other criminal activities including assault, extortion, insurance fraud, money laundering, murder, vehicle theft, weapons violations, and witness intimidation.


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Sours: https://www.justice.gov/archive/ndic/pubs27/27612/appendb.htm

38th Street gang

Hispanic-American street gang

V38.jpg

38th Street gang graffiti, 2011

FoundedUnknown exact date, most accepted early 1920s
Founding locationGreater Los Angeles, California, United States
Years activeEarly 1920s–present
TerritoryPrimarily Los Angeles and Magna, Utah[1]
EthnicityMexican American
ActivitiesDrug trafficking,[2]assault, robbery, extortion,[2]arms trafficking, theft, murder,[2]racketeering,[2]illegal immigration, illegal gambling, kidnapping,[2]witness intimidation[2] and fraud
AlliesMexican Mafia[2]
Sureños
RivalsBloods[3]
Florencia 13[4]
Playboys[5]

The 38th Street gang is an American criminal street gang in Los Angeles, California, composed mainly of Hispanic-Americans. The 38th Street gang is one of the oldest street gangs in Los Angeles and has been occupying its territory since the 1920s.[6] They engage in many criminal activities. The Mexican Mafia controls and routinely uses 38th Street gang members to carry out their orders.[7][8]

History[edit]

Two members of the 38th Street Gang, circa 1993.

Founded in the 1920s, the 38th Street gang dates back to the pachucos and zoot suits and was formed at the border between South Central and the city of Vernon. The 38th Street gang became well known in the 1940s in the Sleepy Lagoon murder trial. Sleepy Lagoon was a popular swimming hole in what is now East Los Angeles. A Mexican American juvenile named Jose Diaz was killed there in 1942, and members of the 38th Street Mexican American gang were arrested and charged with murder by the Los Angeles Police Department.[9][10][11]

All five of the gang members were convicted and sentenced to prison. These convictions ultimately united the Mexican community and changed Mexican gangs.[8] The jail sentences also acted as a glue to unite the Mexican and Mexican American community in a common cause, a fight against class distinction based on prejudice and racism, a fight against the establishment.[9] In prison, 38th Street gang members were held in high esteem.[9] On October 4, 1943, the convictions of the gang members were overturned and the gang members were allegedly welcomed back to their communities as heroes.[8][11][12]

During "Sleepy Lagoon", the media exaggerated the headlines about the gang that wore zoot suits and created wartime hysteria and prejudice against the Mexican-American community. In what was known as the Zoot Suit Riots in May to June 1943, many Mexican-American zoot suiters from the segregated parts of town were attacked by European American servicemen and residents of Los Angeles. The white servicemen and residents felt Zoot Suiters were not contributing to the war effort and were wasting valuable resources by dressing so flamboyantly. Los Angeles police officers did nothing to halt the angry mobs from rioting, arresting the zoot suiters instead of the attackers. After the riots and because of international criticism, the United States Department of War banned all military personnel from going to Los Angeles on leave. The Los Angeles City Council adopted a resolution that banned the wearing of zoot suits on Los Angeles streets, although no ordinance was approved by the City Council nor signed into law by the Mayor.[11] 38th Street is often credited[by whom?] for starting a new style of dress: during the time the Sleepy Lagoon defendants were incarcerated, their prison-issue clothes were deliberately oversized, with the intention of drawing ridicule from Anglo inmates and prison staff. However, the Sleepy Lagoon defendants maintained their clothing well, cleaning and ironing it.

Location[edit]

The 48th Street gang occupies a huge area on the east side of South Los Angeles and some areas in East Los Angeles. These neighborhoods had been historically known to be some of the most dangerous in the nation. Their rivalries expand to most neighborhoods all over Los Angeles County.[5][3] They also have confirmed cliques in, Salt Lake City, West valley, Utah,[13] and Wisconsin.

Criminal activities[edit]

Since the 1920s, the 38th Street gang has continued its criminal activities and has evolved to become one of California's most violent street gangs. Members conduct various activities, including drug sales, murder, theft and vandalism.[10] In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the city closed many of its roads in the 38th Street vicinity due to high volume of people coming to purchase narcotics in the area. City administrators hoped that the blocked streets would deter nonresidents from purchasing narcotics. By the late 1990s, a federal task force was set up in order to investigate the gang's involvement in illegal drug trade; this resulted in the arrest of several of its members. The authorities confiscated thousands of dollars in drugs and money, as reported by the Los Angeles Times and local news channels. The group has historically quarreled with various rival gangs for placement and competition, which has resulted in many drive-by shootings and deaths. On August 24, 2004, a law enforcement preliminary injunction terminated the active members of the 38th Street gang, out of the streets, banning them from using firearms, alcohol, graffiti and other dangerous materials in public.[10] 38th Street, being an old and large gang, has accumulated countless rivalries in Los Angeles county and other cities where they have established. During the 1980s, 38th Street became heavily involved in drug sales and trafficking became a specialty crime that some gang members perfected. Today 38th Street relies almost exclusively on narcotics sales and distribution as its only source of revenue.

In February 2011 the FBI arrested 37 suspects connected to the 38th Street.[6] They were arrested on narcotics and firearms charges. The 38th Street gang is the subject of a 130-page grand jury indictment alleging violations of the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations statute. Some 53 defendants are charged with violating the federal law by acting on behalf of the gang and participating in murders, murder plots, attempted murders, narcotics trafficking, robberies, extortion and witness intimidation.[14] As of 2021, no further information is available as to what happened to the arrested men.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Local Gangs". updsl.org. 2012. Archived from the original on 2010-09-25. Retrieved March 12, 2012.
  2. ^ abcdefgU.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. (2011). Racketeering Indictment Targets 38th Street Gang. Retrieved from website: "Archived copy"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2012-01-05. Retrieved 2012-03-13.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ abPhillips, S. A. (1999). Wallbangin': graffiti and gangs in l.a.. (p. 344). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  4. ^Gang rivalry grows into race war Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times (October 18, 2007)
  5. ^ abCueva, L. (No Date). Effects of Gang Life on Main Street. Retrieved from "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-07-01. Retrieved 2014-02-05.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ abABC News. (2011, February 10). 57 arrested in 38th Street Gang sting. ABC News. Retrieved from http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/los_angeles&id=7933451Archived 2011-02-02 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^Leohart, M. U.S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration. (2011). Statement of the honorable Michelle Leohart of the Drug Enforcement Administration before the United States House of Representatives Committee of Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and Other Agencies. Retrieved from website: "Archived copy"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2012-05-09. Retrieved 2012-03-20.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ abcHarris, K. D. California Department of Justice Division of Law Enforcement, Bureau of Investigation and Intelligence. (2010). Organized Crime in California. Retrieved from website: http://ag.ca.gov/publications/org_crime2010.pdfArchived 2012-03-13 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ abcValdez, A. (2007). Gangs: A Guide to Understanding Street Gangs (5th ed. p. 98-99, ). San Clemente, CA: LawTech Publishing Co.
  10. ^ abc"Delgadillo, Bratton, Perry Announce Crackdown on South L.A.'s 38th Street Gang"(PDF). Office of Civil Attorney, L.A. 2006-08-24. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2006-03-23. Retrieved 2006-09-12.
  11. ^ abc"People & Events: Poing! Murder". PBS.
  12. ^"A History of California's Hispanic Gangs". National Alliance of Gang Investigators' Associations. Archived from the original on 2006-09-18. Retrieved 2006-09-12.
  13. ^Unified Wisconsin, and Iowa. (2008). Gang names and alliances. Retrieved from website: http://updsl.org/divisions/metro_gang_unit/downloads/Gang[permanent dead link] Names and Alliances.pdf
  14. ^38th Street gang members arrested in federal indictment alleging murder, drug trafficking. (2011, February 1). Los Angeles Times. Retrieved from http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/02/los-angeles-street-gang-indicted.html
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/38th_Street_gang

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So, not much, but warning me. Without slowing down my unhurried step, I look closely. To the right on the grass, right a meter from the path, opposite each other are sitting in Turkish, drinking beer and smoking, the old. Girls.

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In a moment after that, my penis turned to stone, thoughts. That there might be happening there now haunted me, I stripped naked, went to bed, then got up, looked out the window - silence. There, not far from me, my wife is being fucked. Maybe they don't fuck yet.

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Looking carefully at my feet, I got out of the kitchen. The toilet door was open. Sima was sitting on the toilet, leaning her cheek against the wall, and peacefully snoring, probably forgetting why she was here.



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