50 best rock songs

50 best rock songs DEFAULT

The 28 best classic rock songs of all time

AC/DC

Lighters up: These are the songs that defined the classic-rock era and changed the face of music.

Written by Andy KryzaContributor Bryan Kerwin

Classic rock songs isn't just a throwaway term for guitar music of a certain vintage. It's an era, a lifestyle and a sound all its own. To paraphrase one of its great practitioners, classic rock will never die. Even as the '60s and '70s fade further into history, classic rock's greatest contributions still have the power to ger your fist pumping and your feet stomping. 

Assembling our list of classic rock's greatest hits was an exercise in exclusion. While rock genres like punk, New Wave, psychedelic and pop are indeed classic, here we're defining "classic rock" as arena-ready, guitar-driven, thunderous compositions from the late '60s through the pre-hair early '80s. Yes, you'll find the likes of Talking Heads, The Police, The Clash and Blondie on classic-rock stations, but you won't find them here. They're classic, but they're not classic rock, no matter what your FM dial says. 

Prepare to raise your fists: These are the 28 essential classic rock songs. 

Listen to these songs on Amazon Music

RECOMMENDED:
🎉  The best party songs ever made
🎤  The best karaoke songs
🚗  The best road trip songs
🎶  The best ’80s songs
😊  The best happy songs

An email you’ll actually love

By entering your email address you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and consent to receive emails from Time Out about news, events, offers and partner promotions.

🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!

Best classic rock songs of all time

 "Purple Haze" by Jimi Hendrix

1.  "Purple Haze" by Jimi Hendrix

There are famous riffs, and then there's "Purple Haze." As usual, Hendrix was operating on a level wholly different than that of mere mortals, laying down an effortlessly original blend of freaky psych and screaming old-school blues with enough panache to seem like he really could just excuse himself for a few minutes to kiss the sky (or this guy) if he wanted to.

"Whole Lotta Love" by Led Zeppelin

2. "Whole Lotta Love" by Led Zeppelin

Zeppelin achieved god-tier fame and redefined music throughout the '70s, all but defining the term "epic" in rock thanks to its explosive compositions, blues-rock detours, Toklien-inspired head trips and the thunderous approach to blowing minds. "Whole Lotta Love," from the quartet's second album, solidified Zeppelin as rock's next great thing, serving almost as a mission statement for what the band would unleash upon the next decade. From Jimmy Page's chugging guitar to John Bonham's mortar-blast drums and Robert plant's deirious yelp, the band struts throughout. It's a frenzied, lightheaded trip that only slows down for a second in the middle. Maybe it does so to allow listeners a chance to breathe. 

"Sympathy for the Devil" by The Rolling Stones

3. "Sympathy for the Devil" by The Rolling Stones

We've forced ourselves to pick just one Stones song, and it gave us about 19 nervous breakdowns. But few songs capture the essence of the Stones' at full power quite like "Sympathy." Those unexpected hand drums. Keith's sloppily perfect guitar solo. Mick starting off with feral yowls and only escalating the sexual deviousness as the song climbs to crescendo. "Satisfaction" is more iconic and "Start Me Up" is more ear-wormy (don't even get us started on Exile), but "Sympathy" is the Stones doing everything they do at once, and doing it all just right. 

"Under Pressure” by Queen & David Bowie

4. "Under Pressure” by Queen & David Bowie

Don't be fooled by the undemanding funk of that notorious two-tone bass line, this baroque and passionate plea for love from sorcerers Bowie and Mercury still sounds like they might beat you over the head with the mic stand if you don't listen up.

"Baba O’Riley" by The Who

5. "Baba O’Riley" by The Who

We may never know if Pete Towshend wrote the massive all-downbeat riff specifically so he could windmill-strum it, but it worked out perfectly that way. And when his guitar thunders in after the mechanical, synthesized opening, it's one of rock & roll’s top all-time moments.

"Rockin’ in the Free World" by Neil Young

6. "Rockin’ in the Free World" by Neil Young

The godfather of grunge comes out swinging on one of his most intense tracks, with the first Bush administration, American malaise and drug addiction catching jabs, all while Young's fierce, fervid guitar work capitalizes on his titular promise.

"Comfortably Numb" by Pink Floyd

7. "Comfortably Numb" by Pink Floyd

This epic track from their magnum opus is a distillation of everything Floyd — swirling, psychedelic organs, a doom-laden narrative of druggy madness and multiple heaven-scraping solos from David Gilmour, endlessly searching for some redemption through the haze. It's a moment of calm amid the constant storm of Floyd's landmark double album. 

"Funk #49" by the James Gang

8. "Funk #49" by the James Gang

Joe Walsh gives a clinic in guitar hooks on this gritty, crunchy fist pumper, following that signature intro lick by howling "I sleep all day, out all night" with the conviction of a rock star who had just done both. The song rips from front to back. No wonder Walsh looked so bored plucking away with the Eagles.

"The Boys are Back in Town" by Thin Lizzy

9. "The Boys are Back in Town" by Thin Lizzy

This pinnacle of party songs is a few parts leather (either pants or boots), a smattering of coin-operated jukebox and a splash of bar fight, topped with raucous guitar-monies. Mixes well with people you haven't seen since high school.

"Iron Man" by Black Sabbath

 "Iron Man" by Black Sabbath

Ozzy's lyrics are mostly nonsensical — he's a time-traveling revenge robot? — but he belts them out with purpose over the original sludge metal track, all pounding kick drum and destructive riffage meant to keep heads banging and devil horns pumping.

"Roadhouse Blues" by The Doors

 "Roadhouse Blues" by The Doors

The LA rockers are more at home with the psychedelic denizens of Jefferson Starship and Donovan, but when they let loose on the blues, they made a massive crater in the soundscape. That's no more apparent than on "Roadhouse Blues," a droning, repetitive, swampy wallow through bar debauchery in which Jim Morrison — vocally pushing 50 by the time he was 26 —screamed about roadhouses as Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger filled the empty spaces with so much sonic bravado it felt like getting hit by a truck on a lost highway. 

"No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature" by the Guess Who

 "No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature" by the Guess Who

The Canadian rockers entered the riff-rock hall of fame with "American Woman," but "No Sugar" is their magnum opus, a two-parter combining melodic harmonies and staccato vocal explosions, with precision guitar and keyboard work serving as the stadium-ready glue that holds the whole chaotic thing together. 

"Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple

 "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple

Whole generations of guitarists have been introduced to the fretboard via this song's iconically simple riff: four chords consisting of parallel fourths. The song's lyrics reference the true story of Deep Purple's members watching a casino fire burn, set off by an overzealous fan with a flare gun at that night's Frank Zappa gig.

"Barracuda" by Heart

 "Barracuda" by Heart

Ann and Nancy Wilson seldom get the credit they deserve in the early transition from classic rock's heyday to the emergence of metal, but "Barracuda'' is a song of tremendous power, a crunchy, abrasive, catchy and violently triumphant amalgam of soaring guitars, transcendent vocals and fist-pumping bravado. It's a top-tier song whose influence can be felt in everything from Joan Jett to Miley. 

"Frankenstein" by the Edgar Winter Group

 "Frankenstein" by the Edgar Winter Group

Oh nothing, just a deranged quartet of groove-rockers laying the groundwork for heavy metal way back in with an instrumental track that thrashes harder than basically everything that came after. This is a garage-rock masterpiece of heavy distortion, infectious riffs and early synth mayhem that still hits hard, but absolutely shattered brains when it debuted the same year that "Brandy" and "American Pie" were lulling listeners to sleep. 

"La Grange" by ZZ Top

 "La Grange" by ZZ Top

Legendary bassist Dusty Hill passed on earlier this summer, and with him went one of the powerhouses of simple three-man rock royalty. ZZ Top proved surprisingly enduring, but one need only listen to "La Grange" to understand how the 2/3 bearded dynamos became rock gods. That meandering intro. That flippant, fading "they gotta lotta nice girls." And, most crucially, that herky-jerky drum fills as the musicians slam into one of the best chord-driven rippers of the era. Have mercy indeed. 

"American Girl" by Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers

 "American Girl" by Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers

Petty became an unexpected classic-rock holdover in the '80s and its elder statesman all the way through his tragic death in , so it's hard to imagine how fresh and vibrant his debut truly was. In the intervening years, tracks like "Breakdown" pack a greater punch, but despite its ubiquity, "American Girl" remains bracing thanks to its giddily building vibes. It's not Petty's best song by a long shot. But it's the moment the scrappy longhair graduated to legendary status in a scant three-and-a-half minutes of riff-heavy bliss. 

"You Really Got Me” by The Kinks

 "You Really Got Me” by The Kinks

Dave Davies' scuzzed-up playing on this record may have laid the foundation for whole other genres, though the band's magnum opus was clearly never meant to be more than what it was: an unkempt, three-chord “love song for street kids.”

"Tom Sawyer" by Rush

 "Tom Sawyer" by Rush

Rush occupies the same prog-rock space as such brilliant acts as King Crimson and Yes. But while the latter remained on the fringes, content to appeal to the more mathematically inclined fan, Rush brought the thunder, bridging the gap between music nerds and the mainstream by simply rocking the holy hell out of everything they did. "Tom Sawyer'' is likely their most popular song. It's also one of their best thanks to Neil Peart's all-timer drum fills, Geddy Lee's manipulation of the bass and Alex Lifeson's gnarly licks. 

"Locomotive Breath" by Jethro Tull

 "Locomotive Breath" by Jethro Tull

Ian Anderson might not be the ‘70s most iconic name, but he does hold a number of superlatives regarding his use of the flute — best chorus involving a flute, most animated flute solo, fastest flute solo, perhaps the decade's only flute solo Some would say it's a gimmick, but we say it's innovation.

"(Don’t Fear) the Reaper" by Blue Oyster Cult

 "(Don’t Fear) the Reaper" by Blue Oyster Cult

Let's forget about the cowbell for a second — the song’s mystical, serene take on death achieves a level of profundity you wouldn't expect from the band behind "Godzilla," and the proto-metal solo section is everything a hard rock devotee could hope for.

"Whipping Post" by the Allman Brothers Band

 "Whipping Post" by the Allman Brothers Band

Any notion of the laid-back vibes presented by the noodling of "Jessica" and "Melissa" was shattered with the emergence of "Whipping Post," The Allman's epic in which the late Duane's steadily building guitar sputters and explodes like an ancient locomotive reigniting and driving straight to hell. The band's epic live versions often pushed into the double-digit runtime. The 5-minute studio version, however, packs the raw power of one guitar-rock's greatest sons pushing things to the absolute limit. 

"Evil Ways" by Santana

 "Evil Ways" by Santana

With respect to Rob Thomas, guitar god Carlos Santana was at his peak when he recorded this slam-bang classic, which goes from a laid-back Latin-infused groove to an all-out axe assault so quickly you might just get whiplash. 

"You Shook Me All Night Long" by AC/DC

 "You Shook Me All Night Long" by AC/DC

Brian Johnson tries on a few metaphors over the course of this track, but AC/DC's raison d'etre — hot-blooded, balls-to-the-wall rock & roll — doesn't suffer any of that; they've got the best damn woman that they've ever seen, and we're going to hear all the brash, sweaty details. Loudly.

"Me & Bobby McGee" by Janis Joplin

 "Me & Bobby McGee" by Janis Joplin

In her most fiery, delirious performance, Janis claimed Kris Kristofferson's much-covered song as her own so completely that there's a high chance that before reading this sentence you were unaware she didn't write it herself.

"Just What I Needed" by The Cars

 "Just What I Needed" by The Cars

The song's ardent pulse and undeniable earworm melody, which bely Benjamin Orr's sardonic delivery and barely sincere lyrics, might be power-pop's crowning achievement.

"Slow Ride" by Foghat

 "Slow Ride" by Foghat

Beginning with a foot-stomp, escalating into one of the best riffs in guitar-rock history, capping with a massive all-hands-on-deck frenzy and wedging in the phrase "slow ride, take it easy" into the proceedings with hypnotic abandon, "Slow Ride" is the most fist-pumping hangout song ever written. No contest. 

"School's Out" by Alice Cooper

 "School's Out" by Alice Cooper

When goth rock, classic rock, metal and glam collide, you either get some ham-handed "Another Brick in the Wall" wannabe or you get "School's Out," a song that has never gone out of style, never lost its luster and never felt anything less than revolutionary. Forty years on, this is a song that still feels edgy as hell every time it returns to heavy rotation at the emergence of summer. 

An email you’ll actually love

By entering your email address you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and consent to receive emails from Time Out about news, events, offers and partner promotions.

🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!

Sours: https://www.timeout.com/newyork/music/best-classic-rock-songs-of-all-time

Top Classic Rock Songs

Top Classic Rock Songs
Bored with best-songs lists that are dominated by the same handful of bands? We've put an interesting twist on things.
No. 1: Aerosmith, ‘Sweet Emotion’ – Top Classic Rock Songs
'Sweet Emotion' by Aerosmith earns the top spot on our Top Classic Rock Songs list by embodying such an overwhelming portion of the intangible things that make the rest of the songs on our countdown so timeless. It also rocks to high heaven.
No. 2: Led Zeppelin, ‘Kashmir’ – Top Classic Rock Songs
Led Zeppelin earn the penultimate spot on our Top Classic Rock Songs list with 'Kashmir,' a stately, epic masterpiece that refuses to acknowledge that rock music should have any uncrossable boundaries.
No. 3: Rolling Stones, ‘Gimme Shelter’ – Top Classic Rock Songs
With an ominous mood set from the first notes, we know for certain that "the storm is threatening" on the Rolling Stones' haunting and powerful 'Gimme Shelter.' It's 'Apocalypse Now,' in just over four minutes.
No. 4: AC/DC, ‘Back In Black’ – Top Classic Rock Songs
It's a lesser statistic, but somehow it speaks most loudly: AC/DC's 'Back in Black' received the RIAA's Master Ringtone Sales Award (Gold and Platinum) in and reached 2x Platinum status in
It's a Top Classic Rock Song that is so omnipresent, so beloved, so…
No. 5: The Beatles, ‘A Day in the Life’: Top Classic Rock Songs
Of all the acts on our countdown of the Top Classic Rock Songs, none gave us a bigger challenge than the Beatles. Although the decision to only include one song per act allowed for a greater range of bands, it also meant that the entire catalog of the Beatles, the greatest and most diverse in al…
No. 6: The Jimi Hendrix Experience, ‘All Along the Watchtower’ – Top Classic Rock Song…
Anyone can cover another artist's song, but few are able to take that song and truly make it their own. In the case of 'All Along The Watchtower,' there is no doubt that Jimi Hendrix most certainly turned the Bob Dylan composition into not only a Hendrix song, but into a true classic.
No. 7: Queen, ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’– Top Classic Rock Songs
Released in , Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody' must be one of the oddest songs to ever become not just a hit, but practically a part of our daily lives.
No. 8: Van Halen, ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ – Top Classic Rock Songs
The higher we climb on our Top Classic Rock Songs list, the harder it gets to pick just one song to represent bands such as the mighty Van Halen.
No. 9: Pink Floyd, ‘Comfortably Numb’ – Top Classic Rock Songs
Pink Floyd's David Gilmour and Roger Waters are almost as famous for their feuding as they are for their music -- and although they were bandmates for nearly two decades, their personality conflicts precluded true collaboration for many of those years. One notable exception: the No. 9 song on o…

Load More Articles

Sours: https://ultimateclassicrock.com/tags/topclassic-rock-songs/
  1. Ibm softlayer data center
  2. 365 skinny pills
  3. Dodge v8 for sale

50 greatest Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Songs

Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, George Harrison and John Lennon of the Beatles. (Plain Dealer Historical Images).

Troy L. Smith, cleveland.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio – We've been counting down the list of the greatest songs by Rock & Roll Hall of Famers. And now we look at the top

The list ONLY features of artists inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. So you can count your favorite snub (Janet Jackson, The Smiths, etc.) or one-hit-wonder out.

We ranked the songs based on quality, success, impact and critical acclaim, as well as the Rock Hall's own criteria of influence and significance. And we limited the number of songs one act could have on the list to five.

Without further ado, here are the 50 best songs from Rock & Roll Hall of Famers. This is just one opinion. So feel free to disagree in the comments section.

Don't Edit

Motown

Marvin Gaye - "Heard it Through the Grapevine"

Motown’s smartest and best-produced single of the s got passed around to a few artists at the label. Ultimately, 'I Heart It Through the Grapevine" soared when Marvin Gaye’s got his hands on it, creating the signature version that would become a pop culture sensations.

Don't Edit

RCA Records

Elvis Presley - "Heartbreak Hotel"

One of the great performance records in rock history, “Heartbreak Hotel” is two minutes of proof as to why Elvis Presley is the greatest rock star of all time. It set the stage for the most important live performances in music history that would spread Elvis' legend around the globe.

Tamla Motown

Stevie Wonder - "Superstition"

To be honest, no one saw “Superstition” coming. Sure, Stevie Wonder was an adult now, but he had yet to really reach his peak creatively. But the song, played on the Clavinet, would kick start one of the greatest creative periods for any artist in the history of music. "Superstition" was the centerpiece of "Talking Book," as Wonder would go on to release four classic albums in as many years.

Don't Edit

Asylum Records

The Eagles - "Hotel California"

The arrival of Joe Walsh to the Eagles is often cited as the move that gave the band its bluesy edge. But it was Don Felder who found the melody for the band’s greatest hit. Walsh isn’t even the main player on the stunning extended solo, partnering with Felder for what amounts to one of the greatest moments in rock history. The song has many interpretations, but that has never diminished its status as iconic.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Sugar Hill Records

Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five - "The Message"

Three years prior to “The Message,” The Sugarhill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight” became hip-hop’s first mainstream hit. But Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five’s masterpiece pushed things to the next level, establishing rap music as an art form that could inform social change while captivating mainstream audiences.

Don't Edit

Capitol Records

Beach Boys - "God Only Knows"

The greatest song from the album that forever changed pop music. That alone puts “God Only Knows” in the top half of this list. But it’s also such a unique love song that begins with an odd decoration of love (“I may not always love you”). No matter, Carl Wilson’s vocal is enough to make anyone fall in love with this one.

Don't Edit

Brunswick Records

The Who - "My Generation"

One of the first rock tracks to capture teenage angst, The Who’s “My Generation” was a key anthem both for the genre and in establishing The Who at the forefront of s popular music. It's rebellious lyrics caught on with young audiences, causing the band's label to push the fast-forward button on its momentum. There was not looking back.

Don't Edit

Pye Records

The Kinks - "You Really Got Me"

The Kinks’ big hit features one of the most influential guitar riffs of all time. It’s said that the edgy chords featured in “You Really Got Me” served as the first signs of heavy metal and punk. These days that's easy to see.

Don't Edit

Elektra Records

The Doors - "Light My Fire"

A monumental achievement of psychedelic rock, “Light My Fire” is the signature tune by The Doors. The band seemed to exist in another world during the s. But that didn’t make them any less appealing to mainstream audiences. “Light My Fire” was one of the sexiest things to come out of the entire decade.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Troy L. Smith, Cleveland.com

Jerry Lee Lewis - "Great Balls of Fire"

One of the biggest tracks of the s, Jerry Lee Lewis’ “Great Balls of Fire” sold a million copies in less than two weeks after its release, making it the biggest rock and roll song in history at the time and an essential part of the genre’s development.

Don't Edit

Motown

Public Enemy - "Fight the Power"

Everything about Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power” was of a revolution. Spike Lee needed an anthem for his landmark film “Do the Right Thing.” Chuck D and company were happy to oblige with an anthem that felt life changing. It's no discredit to the song that, unfortunately, it's message resonates as much today as it did in

Don't Edit

Zoo/Atco/Polydoor

Cream - "Sunshine of Your Love"

Eric Clapton might have been a blues man at heart. But he created his most influential song when he went full psychedelic rock on Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love.” The song’s epic guitar chords would serve as the bridge from blues to heavy metal.

Don't Edit

Motown Records

The Temptations - "My Girl"

The Temptations had scored a few pretty solid hits leading into But when Smokey Robinson brought the group a song tailor made for singer David Ruffin’s powerful voice, all bets were off. "My Girl" helped cement The Temptations as Motown's signature group who could rival any act on any label at the time.

Don't Edit

Decca Records

Buddy Holly - "That'll Be the Day"

One of the early great love songs of the rock and roll era, Buddy Holly struck gold with “That’ll Be the Day,” which became influential for future acts of multiple generations including the Beatles. It was pop rock at an early stage, while still being perfect.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Island Records

U2 - "One"

U2 was in a weird place heading into “Achtung Baby.” The band was on the verge of breaking up over what direction they should go in next. The song that brought them back together was “One,” a powerful statement about the bandmembers relationship and an anthem of love overcoming all.

Don't Edit

Motown

The Jackson 5 - "I Want You Back"

“I Want You Back” is a performance record built on the greatest bassline in pop music history. And that’s not even the most jaw-dropping aspect. That honor goes to a pre-teen Michael Jackson delivering a vocal most adult performers couldn’t come close to.

Don't Edit

Parlophone

The Beatles - "Tomorrow Never Knows"

It’s one of the most influential songs the Beatles ever released, which is saying something. “Tomorrow Never Knows'” stunning sounds and composition is considered to be one of the starting points for psychedelic rock and electronic music.

Don't Edit

Sex Pistols/EMI

Sex Pistols - "Anarchy in the U.K."

Punk rock was already a thing by the time the Sex Pistols came along. But “Anarchy in the U.K.” was a gut punch to the system and a call to arms for punk kids everywhere. It's a scathing masterpiece of rebellion that took Europe by storm.

Don't Edit

Columbia Records

Pink Floyd - "Wish You Were Here"

When you dig into it, Pink Floyd’s “Wish You Were Here” album is quite heartbreaking. Much of the subject matter deal with former member Syd Barrett’s breakdown. That all comes home on the mesmerizing title track. It's the most straight-forward great song Pink Floyd ever wrote, as a longing for something (or someone) that is no longer there. Pink Floyd has had more complex songs, but nothing quite so devastating.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Capitol Records

David Bowie - "Life on Mars?"

Everything you love about David Bowie is here, from the vocal he delivers over the song’s piano-driven front end to stunning strings that drop in. Bowie’s brand of rock music was like no other and “Life on Mars?” is Bowie masterfully creating and thriving on a planet of his own.

Don't Edit

Warner Bros.

Prince - "Purple Rain"

About 10 or even 15 years ago, you’d find most people pointing towards “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy” or “Sign of o’ the Times” as proof of Prince’s genius. But much of that praise has shifted to the title track from the film and album that defined the Purple One’s career. “Purple Rain” is a rock ballad rooted in R&B, gospel and blues that Prince owns from the very beginning. It’s a powerhouse of a record before it even gets to the stunning guitar solo that borders on life changing.

Don't Edit

Columbia Records

Bob Dylan - "Blowin' in the Wind"

It’s the song that pushed Bob Dylan into the mainstream spotlight and serves as one of the greatest songwriting showcases of the s. It’s also a moving protest song that would soundtrack so many epic and tragic moments from the decade that changed everything. Its ambiguous nature was one of its most enduring aspects.

Don't Edit

Decca

The Who - "Baba O'Riley"

You might know it as “Teenage Wasteland.” The Who’s “Baba O’Riley” is one of the most mistakenly titled songs in history. Regardless, it’s Pete Townshend’s masterpiece. The track’s appeal has faded a bit over the year, which comes with letting it be the theme song for a popular CBS series. But there’s no denying what Townshend accomplishes here -- a hard rock anthem that has come to mean so much to so many.

Don't Edit

Columbia

Johnny Cash - "I Walk The Line"

It’s the song that’s become synonymous with Johnny Cash and is arguably the most influential country track of all time. With “I Walk the Line” Cash proved the simplicity of country music in no way lessons its impact. Lyrically and vocally he was as assertive as any performer of that era.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Apple Records

John Lennon - "Imagine"

Though it was released nine years before his murder, it can be hard to separate John Lennon’s signature song from his passing. That’s because it instantly became the embodiment of his legacy, a song about breaking down barriers across all facets of life. “Imagine” is not a complex song, but it doesn’t have to be. It’s message is what’s endured.

Don't Edit

Columbia Records

Simon & Garfunkel - "Bridge Over Troubled Water""

Few pop songs contain so many elements of music history. Paul Simon built the title track to the album that essentially broke up Simon & Garfunkel around gospel music, Wall of Sound style production and backing musicians from the famous Wrecking Crew. The result is a true masterpiece that actually features Art Garfunkel as the solo singer.

Don't Edit

Chess Records

Chuck Berry - "Maybellene"

Chuck Berry had yet to perfect the formula for modern rock and roll. But “Maybellene” is the sound of him getting here. It’s, arguably, the first song to embody everything future aspiring rock stars would latch onto.

Don't Edit

Swan Song

Led Zeppelin - "Kashmir"

Forget "Stairway to Heaven." "Kashmir" is the song the members of Led Zeppelin hope most people remember them byAnd as well you should. Sure, the band has bigger songs. But nothing hits as hard as “Kashmir,” the ultimate showcase – from drums and vocals to those pulsating guitar riffs – of whey Zeppelin was the perfect rock band.

Don't Edit

Atco Records

Otis Redding - "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay"

“The Dock of the Bay” brings about mixed feelings for Otis Redding fans. It’s, by all measures, the greatest showcase of his singing and songwriting abilities. But it’s also the last song recorded before he died. It would become a universal hit and the first song released after an artist’s death to reach No

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Decca

Rolling Stones - "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"

The most recognizable guitar chords in music history serve as the backbone for the song that changed everything for the Rolling Stones. But “Satisfaction” is ultimately the Mick Jagger showcase, as he cements his signature charismatic pout of desperation.

Don't Edit

Elektra Records

Queen - "Bohemian Rhapsody"

It’s funny how time can change things. Go back a ways and you’ll find Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” regarded by some as a novelty song or (gasp) a poor man’s “Stairway to Heaven.” Not so much now. Queen’s epic is one of pop’s unquestionable masterpieces, a track beloved by countless music fans and a song that redefined progressive rock.

Don't Edit

RSD/Parlaphone

The Beatles - "Strawberry Fields Forever"

“Strawberry Fields Forever” was a pop music game changer. The track was intended for “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” but released prior as a single to appease the record label. Yet, it served as the starting point for the Beatles' experimental impact. It’s said that Brian Wilson halted work on the Beach Boys’ “Smile” album after hearing “Strawberry Fields Forever.” The song’s groundbreaking production sent him (and everyone else) back to the drawing board.

Don't Edit

Columbia Records

Bruce Springsteen - "Born to Run"

Yes, it’s a rock song. But “Born to Run” is the most romantic thing Bruce Springsteen ever released. It’s his love affair with the American dream, as well as the history of pop music. Springsteen takes the sounds of s Phil Spector-produced pop and adds his own raw power to it.

Don't Edit

Epic Records

Michael Jackson - "Billie Jean"

It’s likely a song like “Billie Jean” will never come around again. That’s saying something, considering few things about it were original. Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones have both admitted to borrowing various aspects, including the epic bassline. But Jackson is the one who brings those parts together for a pop song that would change the music industry. If “Thriller” is the biggest album of all time, “Billie Jean” is its driving force. After that, Jackson was the one everyone was borrowing from.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Polydor Records

The Jimi Hendrix Experience - "Purple Haze"

What was the guitar before Jimmy Hendrix got his hands on it? Does it matter? “Purple Haze” is the starting point for Hendrix’s monumental brand of psychedelic rock and, thus, the starting point for the most important instrument in rock and roll history being flipped into an art form.

Don't Edit

Swan Records

The Beatles - "She Loves You"

It's the song that set the UK on fire, birthed the Beatles crazed and sold more copies than any piece of music British fans had ever seen. But it was even more than that. "She Loves You" was a perfect pop song, so infectious, it changed the way everyone approached writing.

Don't Edit

RCA Records

Sam Cooke - "A Change is Gonna Come"

Listening to “A Change is Gonna Come,” it’s actually hard to imagine someone was actually able to write this. But Sam Cooke was no ordinary songwriter or performer. The song’s lyrics are quite staggering (“It’s too hard living, but I’m afraid to die”), which is probably why the instrumentation behind it is so minimal. And Cooke’s vocal, which builds and builds, is out of this world.

Don't Edit

DGC Records

Nirvana - "Smells Like Teen Spirit"

For a while there, it seemed like we’d never get a rock and roll revolution again. Then came Nirvana. Sure, “Smells Like Teen Spirit” put an inevitable end to s hair-metal and elevated grunge to a new mainstream status. But Nirvana's revolution went beyond that; This was the biggest thing since the Beatles with Kurt Cobain as a the most relatable poet since Bob Dylan. Was it all overhyped? Maybe. Either way, it came crashing down, leaving a lasting impact in more ways than one.

Don't Edit

Philles Records

The Ronettes - "Be My Baby"

For as innovative as artists like Beach Boys, the Beatles and even Bruce Springsteen were, they all borrowed from The Ronettes’ “Be My Baby.” It’s the ultimate expression of Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound production and the song from that era of music that has stood the test of time the most.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Atlantic Records

Ray Charles - "What'd I Say"

Soul music starts here. Ray Charles was everything to the genre, taking elements of gospel and R&B and shaping them into a danceable new genre that made listeners feel like they were part of the song. The impact of “What’d I Say” cannot be understated. It’s the culmination of everything Charles spent the mids building towards, establishing the blueprint major labels like Motown and Stax would follow.

Don't Edit

Specialty Records

Little Richard - "Tutti Frutti"

Other artists were innovating the sounds of rock and roll a little bit more than Little Richard. But no one was shaping what it meant to be rock and roll performer quite like him. “Tutti Frutti” is the ultimate performance record, loud, playful and endlessly charismatic. It’s the well everyone from Elvis to James Brown to Michael Jackson drank from.

Don't Edit

Atlantic Records

9. Aretha Franklin - "Respect"

Otis Redding wrote and released “Respect” in Two years later, Aretha Franklin would transform the song into the ultimate anthem of female empowerment. While the Civil Rights Movement had a variety of songs attached to it, Franklin’s massive hit breathed musical life into the feminist movement and became a landmark showcase of soul music.

Don't Edit

Motown Records

8. Marvin Gaye - "What's Going On"

Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” didn’t so much transform Motown as it did the greatest R&B artist of all time. Up until that point, Gaye had been all about the fun loving aspects of the Motown sound. But “What’s Going On” was a shift into Gaye being social conscience and crafting more layered songs. The title track to his powerful album incorporates elements of psychedelic soul and changed a lot of people’s minds about what R&B could (and should) sound like.

Don't Edit

RCA Records

7. Elvis Presley - "Hound Dog"

Had Elvis Presley never recorded “Hound Dog,” Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller would still have a monumental document of blues-rock on their hands. Big Mama Thornton’s original version accomplishes that on its own. But it’s Presley’s version that paved the way for a rock and roll revolution.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

King Records

6. James Brown - "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag"

James Brown’s landmark recording is the moment where funk took hold of the universe. “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag” established the genre that would bring us Sly and the Family Stone, Funkadelic and various others. But the lineage funk would create is quite mind-blowing, influencing everyone from Talking Heads and Michael Jackson to the Red Hot Chili Peppers and all things hip-hop.

Don't Edit

Columbia Records

5. Bob Dylan - "Like a Rolling Stone"

Dylan had already gone electric by the time he released “Like a Rolling Stone.” But the move was also influencing his folk music. “Like a Rolling Stone” stands as one of the most diverse Dylan songs of that error. His voice sounds different, while the music moves in various directions. But at its core is a revolutionary feel that cemented Dylan as one of the greatest rock stars of his time, maybe ever.

Don't Edit

Decca Records

4. Rolling Stones - "Gimme Shelter"

Everything time you think “Gimme Shelter” has reached its peak moment, the Rolling Stones take things to new heights. Keith Richards’ opening guitar chords are mesmerizing. Mick Jagger delivers one of the most aggressive vocals of his career. Then there are Merry Clayton’s background screams that Jagger admitted wowed him in the documentary “20 Feet from Stardom.” “Gimme Shelter” marks the moment where the Stones brought everything they were great at onto one tune.

Don't Edit

Parlophone

3. The Beatles - "A Day in the Life"

The reason you often see “A Day in the Life” cited as the greatest Beatles tune is because it is the ultimate blending of John Lennon and Paul McCartney’s personalities over a song that features two very distinct, yet equally memorable parts. “A Day in the Life” is also the fulfillment of the Beatles revolutionizing pop music as an art form, which began with “Strawberry Fields Forever” and culminated with “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’s” stunning closer.

Don't Edit

Capitol Records

2. The Beach Boys - "Good Vibrations"

In some ways, everything Brian Wilson accomplished on “Pet Sounds” was the warm-up for “Good Vibrations.” The track’s layered parts and pieced together formula was quite advanced. Its recording cost more than any other track before it. “Good Vibrations” was supposed to serve as the centerpiece of Wilson’s “Smile” album, which was never fully completed. But “Good Vibrations” made its mark, expanding the art of production and experimentation more than any other song in music history.

Don't Edit

Don't Edit

Chess Records

1. Chuck Berry - "Johnny B. Goode"

In , inspired by Louis Jordan’s “Ain’t That Just Like a Woman,” Chuck Berry crafted “Johnny B. Goode,” the song that became the blueprint for modern rock and roll. Other popular rock and roll recordings came before it. But nothing gave birth to the mainstream sounds that would surface from countless artists during the s quite like Berry's signature tune. Musically, "Johnny B. Goode" is the culmination of rhythm and blues and rockabilly coming together to form this new, uncanny sound. Lyrically, Berry tells the story of a poor black boy who went on to become a rock star and made boat loads of money. "Johnny B. Goode" is everything rock and roll was, is and forever will be, suggesting the genre's roots while pushing things forward.

Don't Edit

Sours: https://www.cleveland.com/entertainment//03/_greatest_songs_by_rock_rol.html

Greatest Songs of All Time ()

Click here for the new, updated Greatest Songs list from

By Jay-Z

A great song doesn&#;t attempt to be anything — it just is.

When you hear a great song, you can think of where you were when you first heard it, the sounds, the smells. It takes the emotions of a moment and holds it for years to come. It transcends time. A great song has all the key elements — melody; emotion; a strong statement that becomes part of the lexicon; and great production. Think of &#;Bohemian Rhapsody,&#; by Queen. That song had everything — different melodies, opera, R&B, rock — and it explored all of those different genres in an authentic way, where it felt natural.

When I&#;m writing a song that I know is going to work, it&#;s a feeling of euphoria. It&#;s how a basketball player must feel when he starts hitting every shot, when you&#;re in that zone. As soon as you start, you get that magic feeling, an extra feeling. Songs like that come out in five minutes; if I work on them more than, say, 20 minutes, they&#;re probably not going to work.

Read Jay-Z&#;s full essay here.

Sours: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-lists/greatest-songs-of-all-time/

Songs rock 50 best

The Fifty Best Rock & Roll Songs

Rock & roll music has recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. To commemorate this event, we put together a list of songs that have had the greatest influence on rock music. Or maybe they're just great tunes, sounding as fresh and vibrant today as when they were heard for the very first time.

With all the musical genres of rock & roll, it's impossible to select only fifty.
So we'll make an exception and give you the 2 x 50 best.


AC/DC - Highway to Hell
Aerosmith - Dream On
The Allman Brothers Band - Whipping Post
The Animals - The House of the Rising Sun
The Band - The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down
The Beach Boys - California Girls
The Beach Boys - Good Vibrations
The Beatles - I Want to Hold Your Hand
The Beatles - A Day in the Life
The Beatles - Yesterday
The Bee Gees - Stayin’ Alive
Chuck Berry - Johnny B. Goode
Blondie - Heart of Glass
Booker T. & The MG’s - Green Onions
David Bowie - Space Oddity
The Box Tops - The Letter
Jackson Browne – The Pretender
The Byrds - Mr. Tambourine Man
Chicago - Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
Chubby Checker - The Twist
Eric Clapton - After Midnight
Dave Clark Five - Glad All Over
The Clash - London Calling
Coldplay - Clocks
Sam Cooke - You Send Me
Cream - Sunshine of Your Love
Creedence Clearwater Revival - Proud Mary
Crosby, Stills & Nash - Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
The Crystals - Da Doo Ron Ron (When He Walked Me Home)
Deep Purple - Smoke on the Water
Derek and the Dominos - Layla
Fats Domino - Blueberry Hill
The Doors - Light My Fire
Bob Dylan - Blowin’ in the Wind
Bob Dylan - Like a Rolling Stone
The Eagles - Hotel California
The Everly Brothers - Bye Bye Love
Fleetwood Mac - Go Your Own Way
The Four Seasons - Walk Like a Man
The Grateful Dead – Truckin’
Bill Haley & His Comets - We’re Gonna) Rock around the Clock
Jimi Hendrix - Purple Haze
Buddy Holly and the Crickets - That’ll Be the Day
Iron Butterfly - In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida
Michael Jackson - Billie Jean
Tommy James and the Shondells – Mony Mony
Jefferson Airplane - White Rabbit
Jethro Tull - Aqualung
Billy Joel - Just the Way You Are
Elton John - Your Song
Janis Joplin - Piece of My Heart
Carole King - You’ve Got a Friend
The Kingsmen - Louie Louie
The Kinks - Lola
Kiss - Rock and Roll All Nite
Led Zeppelin - Stairway to Heaven
John Lennon - Imagine
The Lovin’ Spoonful - Do You Believe in Magic
Lynyrd Skynyrd - Free Bird
Madonna - Like a Virgin
The Mamas and the Papas - California Dreamin’
Paul McCartney - Maybe I’m Amazed
Don McLean - American Pie
Joni Mitchell - Both Sides, Now
The Monkees - I’m a Believer
The Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin
Van Morrison - Moondance
Nirvana - Smells Like Teen Spirit
Pearl Jam - Jeremy
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers - American Girl
Pink Floyd - Money
The Police - Every Breath You Take
Elvis Presley - Love Me Tender
The Pretenders - Brass in Pocket
Prince - When Doves Cry
Procol Harum - A Whiter Shade of Pale
Queen - Bohemian Rhapsody
R.E.M. - Losing My Religion
Ramones - I Wanna Be Sedated
Otis Redding - (Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay
Red Hot Chili Peppers - Give It Away
Lou Reed - Walk on the Wild Side
Little Richard - Good Golly, Miss Molly
The Rolling Stones - (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
The Rolling Stones - Jumpin’ Jack Flash
Sam the Sham and the Pharoahs - Wooly Bully
Santana - Black Magic Woman
Bob Segar and the Silver Bullet Band - Night Moves
Simon and Garfunkel – Sounds of Silence
Paul Simon - Graceland
Sly & the Family Stone - Dance to the Music
Bruce Springsteen - Born to Run
Steely Dan - Reelin’ in the Years
Steppenwolf - Born to Be Wild
Rod Stewart - Maggie May
The Surfaris - Wipe Out
T. Rex - Bang a Gong (Get It On)
Talking Heads - Life During Wartime
James Taylor - Fire and Rain
Traffic - Dear Mr. Fantasy
U2 - I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For
Van Halen - Jump
The Ventures - Walk Don’t Run
War - Spill the Wine
The Who - My Generation
The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again
Yes - Roundabout
Neil Young - Heart of Gold
The Young Rascals - Good Lovin’
ZZ Top - Legs

 

Sours: https://www.thefiftybest.com
Best Slow Rock 80s, 90s Playlist - The Best Slow Rock Songs Of All Time

85 Greatest Classic Rock and Roll Songs

A rock guitarist since the s, Kelley has been a fan of rock, blues and jazz since the s.

Rock and roll can be dangerous and fun at the same time, so thanks a lot.

&#x; Billie Joe Armstrong

This list tries to include some of the greatest rock tunes ever, all of which are classics; that is, songs released before the year Also keep in mind it only includes mainstream rock and roll (and we all know what that is, right?) whether soft or hard rock, but certainly not pop, R&B, soul, funk, blues, hip-hop, disco, jazz, country, bluegrass or classical&#x;just good ol&#x; rock and roll, period, okay?

Moreover, most of these songs were released as singles, so their exposure has been much greater than songs only available on albums.

So let&#x;s start the countdown!

Rock and Roll is the most brutal, desperate, vicious form of expression it has been my misfortune to hear.

&#x; Frank Sinatra

White Bird ()

Included on a long list of bands from the San Francisco Bay Area, It&#x;s a Beautiful Day released White Bird on its self-titled debut album. Featuring the singing of Pattie Santos and the five-string violin of David LaFlamme, the song includes a violin solo that&#x;s as stirring and melodic as any in rock history; and a line in the chorus sticks with you: White bird must fly or she will die. The song became the band&#x;s signature number and was often played on the FM-stereo album rock of that era.

Fooled Around and Fell in Love ()

A blues legend singing and playing lead guitar with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, as well as a star in his own right, Elvin Bishop formed a rock group that released the hit single, Fooled Around and Fell in Love, which soared to #3 on the Billboard Hot Included on Bishop&#x;s studio album, Struttin&#x; My Stuff, Bishop, generally the lead singer of his group, decided this song should be sung by backup singer, Mickey Thomas, who did a smashing job crooning this classic rock ballad.

Born to be Wild ()

Included on the soundtrack for Easy Rider (), perhaps the greatest biker movie of all time, Born to be Wild evokes the dawn of heavy metal, but not the music; it expresses the desire of driving a motorcycle. The song goes, I like smoke and lightning, heavy metal thunder, racing with the wind and the feeling that I&#x;m under. The song hit #2 on the Billboard Hot and has achieved anthemic status as it relates to the heedlessness, daring and dash of biker anti-heroes&#x;or any bold, carefree folks who like to hop on motorcycles and tear down the highway.

Dreams ()

Originally a blues band fronted by guitarists such as Peter Green, Fleetwood Mac developed a new pop rock sound when Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks joined the group in Then the band released the album Rumours (), which skyrocketed to popularity and critical acclaim, eventually becoming one of the most successful rock albums of all time. The album spawned four hit singles, one of which was Dreams, which ascended to #1 on the Billboard Hot At this time, band members were undergoing romantic turmoil, which seems conducive to creating stellar rock&#x;for some crazy reason!

I'd Do Anything for Love But I Won't Do That ()

Meatloaf has had a brilliant career as a singer and perhaps his greatest song ever is I'd Do Anything for Love, But I Won't Do That, which topped the Billboard Hot , the only time he&#x;s achieved that feat; it was also #1 in 28 countries and won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo. In the video for this operatic tune, Meatloaf portrays the Beast, who says he&#x;ll do anything for the love of the Beauty. But the Beauty insists, Sooner or later you&#x;ll be screwing around. No, he declares, I won&#x;t do that!

Every Time You Go Away ()

Paul Young, an integral personage of the Second British Invasion of the early to middle s, sang a version of this ballad that draws the tears right out of you. Written and composed by Daryl Hall of Hall & Oates&#x;who recorded it but didn&#x;t release it as a single&#x;hit #1 on the Billboard Hot , and the video won an award for Best British video. Notably, Young, along with his backing band, The Royal Family, which included three black harmony singers, performed the song in Wembley Stadium during Live Aid in

Kid Charlemagne ()

Steely Dan, founded by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen, were called the perfect music antiheroes of the Seventies and "the Manson and Starkweather of rock 'n' roll," play a style of rock that&#x;s funky, yet sophisticated and includes quirky, esoteric lyrics, jazz inspired rhythms and mind-bending guitar solos. Found on The Royal Scam, the band&#x;s fifth studio album, Kid Charlemagne is somewhat based on the exploits of Augustus Owsley Stanley, the notorious LSD impresario of the s. And, highlighted at the song's coda, is a guitar solo by Larry Carlton that&#x;s considered one of the most memorable of all time.

Gloria ()

This three-chord garage band classic was written by Van Morrison and released on Them&#x;s first studio album, The Angry Young Them (). The song is an anthem to male teenage lust; Gloria is a girl who&#x;s so forward she comes to this young man&#x;s house, knocks on his door, enters his room&#x;and then makes him feel&#x;all right! Virtually every rock guitarist in the s learned this song the first week or two they began playing. Compiled in , Gloria placed # on Rolling Stone&#x;s list of the Greatest Songs of All Time.

Woodstock ()

Written by Canadian Joni Mitchell, Woodstock is side B of a single with Big Yellow Taxi, another hit for Mitchell. The words to Woodstock include a third person account of the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival, which Mitchell couldn&#x;t attend because of a scheduling conflict. She compares the festival to the mythical Garden of Eden. The supergroup, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young released a hard rock cover of the song that reached #11 on the Billboard Hot Either version of this iconic tune could appear on this list, so pick your favorite!

Black Hole Sun ()

Soundgarden is a grunge band from Seattle, Washington. Included on Superunknown, the band&#x;s most popular and commercially successful album, Black Hole Sun is an alternative rock tune written by frontman Chris Cornell, who said, It's just sort of a surreal dreamscape, a weird, play-with-the-title kind of song." Often considered a positive song, he said, No, &#x;Black Hole Sun&#x; is sad. Some critics have called it a Beatles&#x; tune with a Lennonesque melody. The song reached #1 on Billboard&#x;s Mainstream Rock Tracks, and it won a Grammy Award in for Best Hard Rock Performance.

Touch of Grey ()

After a six-year hiatus, the Grateful Dead released In the Dark (), an album that charted at #6 on the Billboard , the Grateful Dead&#x;s only album to crack the top ten for albums. The greatest single from the album was Touch of Grey, which climbed to #9 on the Billboard Hot , the Dead&#x;s highest charting single. The video for the tune was very popular too; it features life-size marionettes of the band members&#x;operated by a pair of skeletal hands. The song highlights their signature lyrics: We will get by, we will survive. This video was a major treat for the so-called Deadheads, the band&#x;s traveling audience/entourage.

Even Flow ()

Even Flow, written by singer Eddie Vedder and guitarist Stone Gossard, is about the life of an illiterate, crazy man who chases away butterflies, as the song goes, while living on the streets of Seattle, Washington, a city beset by homeless folks. The song is included on Ten (), one of the greatest rock albums, which stayed on the Billboard for five years! Notably, in their live performances, Pearl Jam has played Even Flow more than any of their songs. A complex composition, they practiced it countless times&#x;until band members hated each other!

Brown Eyed Girl ()

An Irish multi-instrumentalist and lead singer, Van Morrison joined the rock group Them in , and then he turned solo in , soon releasing the hit single Brown Eyed Girl, which soared to #10 on the Billboard Hot Written by Morrison, he didn&#x;t think the song was all that great: It's not one of my best, he said. I mean I've got about songs I think are better. Nevertheless, redolent of counterculture free love and joie de vivre, it became Morrison&#x;s signature hit and, since , is the most played and downloaded song of the s.

Sarah Smile ()

Featured on Daryl Hall & John Oates, the fourth studio album by Hall & Oates, one of the most successful duos in the history of pop music, Sara Smile is about Daryl Hall&#x;s year relationship with girlfriend, Sara Allen, with whom he broke up in This soft ballad with an R&B flavor is an integral aspect of what has been called blue-eyed soul, and has become one of those songs many people never get tired of hearing. Sara Smile ascended to #4 on the Billboard Hot It has been covered by numerous artists, including After 7, Rumer, B-Legit and Jimmy Wayne.

The Fly ()

In the Naughty Nineties, U2 produced Achtung, a comeback album of sorts and Grammy Award winner, which features a plethora of hit singles including, The Fly, sang by Bono, perhaps rock&#x;s greatest frontman, who said the song sounds like four men chopping down the Joshua Tree, a reference to U2&#x;s fifth studio album, because the song departs from the band&#x;s spiritual sound of the s. The guitarist, The Edge, charges-up the verse with an industrial sound not previously heard by the band. This seems appropriate since the song is about a crank caller from hell who tells the listener he likes it there. Bono sings, "Every artist is a cannibal . . . every poet is a thief."

Eyes Without a Face ()

A power ballad of note in the s, a decade marked by new wave pretensions, MTV videos, hair metal and electronic drums, Eyes Without a Face is offered on Rebel Yell, the second studio album by Billy Idol. A schoolteacher of Idol&#x;s labeled him as idle and the name stuck to this spiky-haired Brit with the signature crooked sneer and pumped fist. Eyes Without a Face is driven by the guitar mastery of Steve Stevens, starting with poignant acoustic guitar, followed by rakish power chords on the electric guitar for the tune&#x;s ending choruses. The song reached #4 on the Billboard Hot

Wipe Out ()

At least one instrumental should be on this list, and Wipe Out by the Surfaris could be a good choice. Eventually becoming an international hit, countless bands have covered this catchy, surf-rock tune with its rousing, classic drum solo; but the best version may be that of The Ventures, particularly when they use two drummers while performing it!In , Wipe Out hit #2 on the Billboard Hot Then it was re-released in , when it reached #16 on the Hot ; and in it climbed to # on the Bubbling Under Hot Singles chart. Hey, when you wipe out on the surf board, just dive into the waves and try again!

My Sweet Lord ()

Borne from the demise of the Fab Four, the solo career of George Harrison blossomed quickly; Harrison produced the triple album, All Things Must Pass (), which features the number one hit single My Sweet Lord, a paean to Eastern religion and the Hindu god Krishna, of which Harrison was so fascinated he practiced transcendental meditation with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and took sitar lessons from Ravi Shankar. Harrison said he used the Christian hymn Oh Happy Day for inspiration in writing the tune. Notably, Harrison played the song at his Concert for Bangladesh in , rock&#x;s first benefit concert. The quiet, thoughtful ex-Beatle was certainly on a roll in those days, wasn&#x;t he?

Fame ()

A master of showmanship and spectacle in many of his live performances in the s and &#x;80s, David Bowie seemed able to produce whatever style of music was popular at the time. Written by Bowie, Carlos Alomar and John Lennon, Fame is about the darker side of being famous. About fame, Bowie wrote: I think fame itself is not a rewarding thing. The most you can say is that it gets you a seat in restaurants." Notably, Bowie died two days after the release of his last studio album, Blackstar (), which became one of his most successful, winning five Grammy Awards and topping the Billboard So, was Bowie&#x;s demise a famous one?

Sunshine of Your Love ()

Appropriately recorded during the memorable Summer of Love in , Sunshine of Your Love is your quintessential psychedelic rock tune. Inspired by a Jimi Hendrix concert Cream bassist Jack Bruce had attended, he developed the song&#x;s iconic riff. Covered by numerous rockers at the time, including Jimi Hendrix, of course, Sunshine of Your Love was played&#x;and still is&#x;by countless rock guitarists using the minor pentatonic blues scale. The single hit #5 on the Billboard Hot in August , not long before Cream&#x;perhaps rock&#x;s first supergroup&#x;broke up at the end of the year.

Listen to the Music ()

Included on the Doobie Brother&#x;s second studio album, Toulouse Street, Listen to the Music is the band&#x;s first hit single. Written and sung by Tom Johnston, one of the founding members of the group, the song, which reached #11 on the Billboard Hot , suggests that world peace could be attained if people just partied and listened to the music. About writing the tune, Johnston said, It was very utopian and very unrealistic (laughs). It seemed like a good idea at the time." Listen to the Music is often played at the encore of the band&#x;s performances.

Good Lovin&#x; ()

The Young Rascals or simply The Rascals, had many hit singles in the middle to late s, including Good Lovin&#x;, which soared to #1 on the Billboard Hot But, as many people may not know, the song is a remake of a tune by the R&B band, The Olympics. Becoming very popular at that time, many bands covered it, including The Grateful Dead (often playing it in their performances), The Tremeloes and Tommy James and the Shondells. The song ranks # on Rollingstone&#x;s list of the Greatest Songs of All Time.

Do You Feel like We Do ()

Featured on the album, Frampton Comes Alive!, one of the greatest-selling live rock albums of the all time, this is live version of Do You Feel like We Do, originally released on Frampton&#x;s studio album, Frampton&#x;s Camel (), is one of three hit singles on the live album. Notably, this minute version of the song&#x;often shortened in length on radio stations&#x;features one of Frampton&#x;s famous talk box guitar solos. The single reached #10 on the Billboard Hot , and it may be Peter Frampton&#x;s signature hit tune.

Heart-Shaped Box ()

In Utero, the third studio album by Nirvana includes the song Heart-Shaped Box, written by Kurt Cobain, who said the song was inspired by documentaries about children with cancer, the subject matter of which made him very sad. But some think the song is about his relationship with his wife Courtney Love, particularly as it relates to the song&#x;s most memorable line: I wish I could eat your cancer when you turn black. Is this another way of saying, I love you? The song reached #1 on Billboard&#x;s US Alternative Songs list.

Too Much ()

Featured on Crash, the second studio album by the Dave Matthews Band, Too Much is one of the album&#x;s five hit singles. The song is about the conspicuous consumption of at least one person, perhaps Dave Matthews who co-wrote the song. Here are some words from the chorus: I eat too much, I drink too much, I want too much. Too much! Suck it up! Pondering this content, you may wonder: Is he speaking for all Americans? Do we all eat and drink too much? Anyway, the song reached #5 on Billboard&#x;s Modern Rock Tracks chart.

Hit Me with Your Best Shot ()

Possibly Pat Benatar&#x;s signature hit single, Hit Me with Your Best Shot, reached #9 on the Billboard Hot Included on Benatar&#x;s second studio album, Crimes of Passion, the words to the song exemplify Benatar&#x;s hard chick persona with which she sang such tunes. Heard at many ballgames, the song is meant to be figurative in a romantic context&#x;without anybody getting hit, of course, and it&#x;s usage in pop culture has been great: numerous video games, TV commercials, movies and TV shows have used it to hock products, ideas and companies.

Holding On ()

Playing keyboards, guitar and singing at the young age of 14, Steve Winwood began his musical career by joining the Spencer Davis Group in But Winwood, when working as a solo act, may have reached the peak of his stardom in when he produced the album Roll with It, on which Holding On, is offered; the single reached #1 on the Adult Contemporary chart and #11 on the Billboard Hot A very talented artist, Winwood also writes songs and music and at times plays all the instruments on some songs.

She Loves You ()

Another song written by the illustrious song-writing duo of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, She Loves You was The Beatles&#x; biggest hit in the UK and the top-selling single by any artist in the s. She Loves You includes the refrain, yeah, yeah, yeah, which became the band&#x;s greatest musical hook. But when the band read it on paper, it seemed corny; however, when the Beatles sang it&#x;it sounded great. It became a catchphrase that followed the group for months and years afterward. Notably, in America, the song is included on The Beatles&#x; Second Album.

If This Is It ()

This is one of many hit singles on the album, Sports (), which eventually sold more than 10 million copies and propelled Huey Lewis and the News to worldwide acclaim. The song reached #6 on the Billboard Hot As seen in the very popular video filmed at the beach in Santa Cruz, California, Huey Lewis, while walking the boardwalk, tries to reconcile with his ex-girlfriend (Janet Cross), who has a hard time keeping the guys away. Huey doesn&#x;t regain the affection of his ex-girlfriend, though he does end up with her best friend (Sandra Wilder). At the coda, the happy couple is seen strolling along the beach toward the distant pier.

Long Tall Sally ()

Little Richard, the self-proclaimed King of Rock and Roll (Elvis Presley called him the greatest ), released scores of singles from the early s to the late &#x;80s. An instant hit, Long Tall Sally reach #1 on the Billboard R&B chart and stayed there for 19 weeks. Extremely influential to other artists, who covered countless songs of his, Richard taught the Beatles how to play his songs and Paul McCartney, in particular, how to sing them, including that falsetto cry of hoo, which became an integral aspect of the Beatles&#x; sound. Long Tall Sally has an infectious, up-tempo rhythm that Little Richard learned to play as fast as he could, so people could dance to it likewise.

That&#x;ll Be the Day ()

Most people know that bespectacled rocker Buddy Holly died in a plane crash on February 3, , The Day the Music Died, per the iconic song by Don McLean; but they may not know that That&#x;ll Be the Day, which sprang to #1 on the US and UK singles charts, was the first song recorded by the Quarrymen, John Lennon&#x;s band, which evolved into The Beatles. They also may not know that the phrase that&#x;ll be the day, was muttered several times by John Wayne in the movie, The Searchers (), inspiring Holly to use it in his lyrics. Notably, the song was ranked #39 on Rolling Stone&#x;s compilation of the Greatest Songs of All time, published in

Sours: https://spinditty.com

You will also like:

Guitar World's 50 Greatest Rock Songs of All Time

Series: Guitar Recorded Versions Format: Softcover – TAB Artist: Various

The name says it all: the 50 best as decided by the experts at Guitar World magazine transcribed note-for-note. Includes: All Along the Watchtower • All Day and All of the Night • Barracuda • Bohemian Rhapsody • Carry on Wayward Son • Crazy Train • Detroit Rock City • Enter Sandman • Free Bird • Highway to Hell • Hotel California • Iron Man • Layla • Misirlou • Pride and Joy • School's Out • Smells like Teen Spirit • Smoke on the Water • Sweet Child O' Mine • Tush • Welcome to the Jungle • You Really Got Me • and more. pages!

  • Ain't Talkin' 'Bout Love
  • All Along The Watchtower
  • All Day And All Of The Night
  • Aqualung
  • Back In Black
  • Barracuda
  • Beat It
  • Blitzkrieg Bop
  • Bohemian Rhapsody
  • Born To Be Wild
  • The Boys Are Back In Town
  • Carry On Wayward Son
  • Comfortably Numb
  • Crazy Train
  • Cross Road Blues (Crossroads)
  • Day Tripper
  • Detroit Rock City
  • Dr. Feelgood
  • Enter Sandman
  • Free Bird
  • Funk #49
  • Highway To Hell
  • Hotel California
  • Iron Man
  • Jailhouse Rock
  • Layla
  • Limelight
  • Misirlou
  • Peace Of Mind
  • Photograph
  • Plush
  • Pride And Joy
  • Purple Haze
  • Rock Around The Clock
  • Run To The Hills
  • School's Out
  • Smells Like Teen Spirit
  • Smoke On The Water
  • Stairway To Heaven
  • Suite: Judy Blue Eyes
  • Sultans Of Swing
  • Surrender
  • Sweet Child O' Mine
  • Tush
  • Walk This Way
  • Welcome To The Jungle
  • Whipping Post
  • Whole Lotta Love
  • Won't Get Fooled Again
  • You Really Got Me

Looking for one specific arrangement? Individual selections from this title are available for download at Sheet Music Direct.

Sample Pages

$ (US) Inventory #HL ISBN: UPC: Width: "Length: " pages

Prices and availability subject to change without notice.

Sours: https://www.halleonard.com/product//guitar-worldsgreatest-rock-songs-of-all-time


34738 34739 34740 34741 34742