Forerunner 55 vs 245

Forerunner 55 vs 245 DEFAULT

Garmin has been a staple in the low-end running watch market for a long time. The uber-popular Forerunner 35 from can still be found on wrists today. But there’s new competition in that sector, and Garmin needs to keep improving its tried-and-true formula, so it doesn’t lose out to smaller players like Coros.

Enter: the Garmin Forerunner This budget-friendly running watch builds on ’s Forerunner 45 in a few important ways. Read our full Garmin Forerunner 55 review to see just how this new running wearable stacks up against the heated competition.

About this Garmin Forerunner 55 review: I used the Garmin Forerunner 55 for ninedays running software version The Garmin Forerunner 55 review unit was provided to Android Authority by Garmin.

What you need to know about the Garmin Forerunner 55

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

  • Garmin Forerunner $/£/€

The Garmin Forerunner 55 is a lightweight running watch made for people new to the sport and those who don’t want to spend an arm and a leg. The Forerunner 55 is the cheapest running watch in Garmin’s ecosystem, not including previous-gen devices.

The Forerunner 55 splits the difference between the Forerunner 45 and the mid-range Forerunner It borrows some design elements and training features from higher-end running watches while also keeping the price down to $ All of the Forerunner 55’s new features aren’t technically “new,” but this marks the first time they’re coming to the company’s lowest-end running watch.

The watch goes on sale today, June 2, for $ in the US on Garmin.com. You can pick it up in Black, White, or Aqua colorways. Additional retailers and regions will be announced at a later date.

Garmin Forerunner 55 vs What’s new?

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

The Garmin Forerunner 45 was an all-around solid running watch, but the Forerunner 55 improves it in a few key ways. Here are all the new Forerunner 55 features you won’t find on the Forerunner

  • New design: The Forerunner 55 now resembles the Forerunner It’s not a match, but the similarities are abundant. The Forerunner 55 has an all-plastic case and support for quick-release straps, unlike the Forerunner  45, whose straps could only be removed with a screwdriver.
  • Improved battery life: The Forerunner 45 could last up to seven days in smartwatch mode or 13 hours with the GPS activated. The Forerunner 55 more than doubles that. It can last up to two weeks in smartwatch mode or up to 20 hours in GPS mode.
  • PacePro: Garmin’s PacePro feature allows you to keep up with your desired pace, even if your course has elevation changes that could normally throw off your numbers.
  • Race Predictor: A feature found on mid- to high-end running watches, the Forerunner 55 comes with Garmin’s Race Predictor estimates. The watch uses your VO2 max and training history to predict your finishing times for 5Ks, 10Ks, half marathons, and full marathons.
  • Cadence alerts: Garmin added cadence alerts to the Forerunner 55’s running profile. This is an improvement over the Forerunner 45, which had pace alerts but not cadence alerts.
  • Daily suggested workouts: Each day, your Forerunner 55 will recommend a workout based on the following factors: training status, training load, load focus, VO2 max, recovery time, sleep data, and recently completed workouts. Suggested workouts are meant to challenge you and help you maintain or improve your current fitness level.
  • Recovery Advisor: After you complete an activity, the Forerunner 55 will estimate how long you should take to recover. Recovery times are suggested based on the training effect of the workout you just completed, as well as the amount of recovery time you have left at the beginning of your next activity.
  • New sport profiles: The Forerunner 55 gains a few much-requested sport profiles over the 45, including pool swimming, Pilates, HIIT, virtual running, and track running.
  • Improved Body Battery: While the Forerunner 45 series came with Garmin’s Body Battery feature, the Forerunner 55 offers the improved algorithm that first appeared on the Garmin Venu 2. You can read more about the feature in our Venu 2 review, but know that it will now be more difficult to achieve a Body Battery score of
  • New health-tracking features: The Forerunner 55 can now track your respiration rate during the day and overnight. It also now features Garmin’s menstrual cycle and pregnancy tracking, relaxation reminders when you’re stressed, and hydration tracking.

Those are all the new features available on the Forerunner We’ve asked Garmin to clarify which, if any, of these features will be ported to the Forerunner 45 series, but the company said it’s still figuring that out.

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

The following features have been carried over from the Forerunner

  • Tracks total time, distance, speed, pace, and heart rate during workouts
  • Tracks steps, calories, intensity minutes, and sleep
  • Standalone GPS
  • Garmin Elevate heart rate sensor (same sensor as the Forerunner 45)
  • Post-run analytics from Firstbeat
  • Stress tracking
  • Workout programs with Garmin Coach
  • VO2 max estimates
  • Location tracking with LiveTrack
  • Assistance feature to send automated messages to emergency contacts in the event of an emergency
  • Smartwatch features including smartphone notifications, on-device weather, and compatibility with Connect IQ

How’s the new design?

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

Left to right: Coros Pace 2, Garmin Forerunner 55

The new design is one of the best parts of the Garmin Forerunner It’s nothing revolutionary — it essentially has the same design as all other modern Forerunners — but it adds to the device’s longevity and ease of use. The Forerunner 45 series’ straps were proprietary and could only be removed with a screwdriver, limiting how easily users could swap them out.

You can swap out the Forerunner 55’s straps for any standard 20mm watch straps, and you might want to consider doing so. They don’t feel nearly as high-quality as what you’d find on the Forerunner or Venu series.

The display is fine. It’s a standard Forerunner display that shows up well in direct sunlight. It’s small and has a fairly low resolution. I wish Garmin bumped up the resolution this time around — every watch face is almost distractingly pixelated. However, because the watch is so small, the Forerunner 55 will be well-suited for small wrists.

Battery life has been great in my experience. Garmin claims the Forerunner 55 can last up to two weeks on a single charge in “smartwatch mode” (i.e., not using many battery-draining features like GPS). I haven’t had the device for two weeks, but I’m on track to get a little less than that, maybe days. That’s pretty good, considering I’ve charged the watch once and have completed multiple GPS-enabled exercises each week.

Fitness and health tracking

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

Garmin Forerunner 55

The Garmin Forerunner 55 isn’t just for running; it can track other sports, too: outdoor running, treadmill, indoor track, indoor and outdoor cycling, indoor and outdoor walking, cardio, yoga, elliptical, stair stepper, breathwork, and a generic “other” category, in addition to the new activities previously listed.

The new HIIT profile works just like it does on the Venu 2, allowing you to choose between four timed workouts: AMRAP, EMOM, Tabata, and custom. There’s also a free mode if you’d like to keep tabs on your overall data.

I compared the Forerunner 55 against the Coros Pace 2 and Fitbit Sense for all-day activity tracking, and the new Garmin watch held up compared to the other devices. Step counts and calorie burn numbers were nearly spot-on with the Pace 2.

But what we’re really here for is its running performance. Garmin chose to use its previous-gen Elevate heart rate sensor in the Forerunner 55 instead of the new one that debuted on the Venu 2. It doesn’t look like that should be an issue, though.

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

You’ll see a mile run with the Forerunner 55 (purple) and the Coros Pace 2 (blue) in the screenshot above. I came away completely impressed by the Forerunner’s performance. It managed to stay spot-on with the Pace 2 throughout the entire run, even matching it in major peaks and valleys.

Related:Check out all of Garmin’s best running watches

The Forerunner 55’s performance (purple) was also impressive compared to the Polar H10 (orange) and Apple Watch Series 6 (blue) during a mile run, which you can see below.

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

Again, the Forerunner 55 performed well against the Apple Watch and Polar H There were hardly any significant variations between the three, though things did get slightly off during the two rest periods at the and minute marks. Notably, the Forerunner 55 does not report heart rate data as often as the Apple Watch and Polar H

All in all, I’d say the Forerunner 55’s heart rate sensor is a winner. It’s perfectly capable of tracking major heart rate trends and is able to compete with the best wrist-based sensors out there. Of course, you’ll always get more accurate data with a heart rate chest strap.

GPS performance is impressive, too. Take a look at the screenshot below to see the mile run with the Forerunner (purple), Pace 2 (blue), and Fitbit Sense (orange).

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

The Forerunner 55 stuck to my route almost exactly. There are a few moments where the Forerunner drifted off into the houses on the side of the street, but all in all, it was the closest to the route I took. On the same street, the Coros Pace 2 had me running on the other side of the street, about four lanes of traffic over from where I actually was. The Pace 2’s data was far better than the Fitbit Sense’s, which, well, speaks for itself.

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

I ran the same route on another day with the Forerunner 55 (purple) and Apple Watch Series 6 (blue), which you can see above. It was cloudier this day, but both devices expectedly performed well. I’ll give the win to the Apple Watch in this case, as it was able to stick to the exact side of the road I was on nearly the entire time. The Forerunner 55 was no slouch either.

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

While we’re on the subject of running, now is as good of a time as ever to bring up all the new training features. I set up the same cadence alerts on the Forerunner 55 and Coros Pace 2, and both devices notified me when I dipped below my threshold of SPM. Also, I’ve said this before, and I’ll say it again, Garmin’s Recovery Advisor is one of the most useful training features the company offers. It can be a little off in certain cases, but I find its recovery estimates to be quite accurate most of the time.

The Forerunner 55 should track sleep about as well as other recent Garmin devices, though I have run into one issue that I haven’t seen on other Garmins. Overall, the watch tracked my sleep stages fairly accurately compared to the Fitbit Sense and Google Nest Hub (2nd gen). However, on multiple nights, the Forerunner could not pick up on my wake times during the night. The Sense and Nest Hub both reported over 40 minutes of waking up on one night, while the Forerunner only caught seven of those minutes. This has happened multiple times throughout the testing period.

Garmin Forerunner 55 specs

Garmin Forerunner 55
Display
inch transflective memory-in-pixel (MIP) display
x resolution
Dimensions and weight
42 x 42 x mm
Fits wrists with a circumference of mm
20mm removable straps
37g
Build materials
Plastic case
Silicone band
Battery
Up to 2 weeks in smartwatch mode
Up to 20 hours in GPS mode
IP rating
5ATM
Sensors
Garmin Elevate heart rate sensor
GPS
GLONASS
Galileo
Accelerometer
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Storage
No on-device music storage
Stores hours of activity data
Compatibility
Android, iOS
Garmin Pay
No
Smartwatch features
Connect IQ-compatible
Smartphone notifications
Controls smartphone music
Garmin Assistance safety features
Colors
Black, White, Aqua

Value and competition

Garmin Forerunner 55

Garmin's cheapest running watch, improved

The Garmin Forerunner 55 offers major hardware and software improvements over its predecessor. New training features, more than double the battery life, and a new design are just some of the upgrades you'll get with the Forerunner

$ at Amazon$ at Garmin

As mentioned, Garmin has lots of competition in the ~$ running watch space.

The Coros Pace 2 is gunning for Garmin’s cheap running watch lineup, and there are a few reasons to buy it over the Forerunner First and foremost, the Pace 2 supports onboard running power metrics, which is just about unheard of for a cheap device that doesn’t need an auxiliary pod. Coros also recently debuted its EvoLab software — basically its rival to Firstbeat analytics — meaning the Pace 2 will soon offer Garmin-like training features.

However, the Forerunner 55 boasts Garmin’s wide range of health metrics, better smartwatch features, and more detailed sleep tracking than Coros’ offering. Right now, I can’t tell you whether to buy the Forerunner 55 over the Coros Pace 2, though I can say Garmin’s watch is far more polished than the Coros watch. Stay tuned for an in-depth comparison between the two.

Also read:The best fitness tracker deals we could find

Those who are getting into running should also check out the Huawei Watch GT 2e. It’s about $70 less than the Forerunner 55 and offers Firstbeat analytics for runners. The Huawei Health app isn’t nearly as feature-rich as Garmin Connect, but it’s a fine option for new athletes.

If you’re after a better smartwatch experience, the Apple Watch SE should also be considered. It costs $ and has many of the fitness features the Series 6 offers, but at a fraction of the price. It’s a solid fitness watch — especially for GPS and heart rate tracking — but the battery will only last you about a day.

Garmin Forerunner 55 review: The verdict

Jimmy Westenberg / Android Authority

I’m not surprised that I like the Garmin Forerunner 55 so much. It improves on the Forerunner 45 line in nearly every way, from design to battery life to health and training features. And it does all of that without costing any more than the Forerunner 45 line. Garmin could have easily charged $50 more for this watch considering these improvements. Of course, then it’d be creeping into Apple Watch SE territory and jeopardizing its Forerunner line while being priced above the Coros Pace 2.

Competition helps the tech industry thrive. Consumers get better products when companies are vying for those hard-earned dollars. With Coros hitting the ball out of the park at this price point and Apple offering its uber-popular smartwatch for under $, I think Garmin will have to be on its toes for the next few years. And that means we’ll see even more high-end features come to affordable devices. It really is good for the consumer.

On its own, though, the Garmin Forerunner 55 is one of the most well-rounded running watches I’ve used, and again, it achieves this at $ You can’t argue with that.

ReviewsGarmin, Wearables

Sours: https://www.androidauthority.com/garmin-forerunnerreview/

Forerunner 45 lacks these aforementioned activity tracking features.

Good enough, each of these two has a decent battery life that allows you to go long from a single charge. However, Forerunner 55 has a longer battery life than Forerunner You can expect up to 7 days on smartwatch mode with Forerunner 45, while you can get up to 2 weeks on smartwatch mode with Forerunner With continuous GPS tracking, you can get up to 20 hours of battery life with Forerunner 55 which is longer than about 13 hours with Forerunner

Both smartwatches will allow you to manage Notifications you receive on your phone. You will need the Garmin Connect app which is the companion app for both smartwatches just like other Garmin smartwatches. You can enable the apps you want to receive notifications from on the companion app, and you will get a vibration on any of these two when there is a new notification. Although, these two lack the ability to respond to notifications.

  • Health Monitoring features include
  • Heart rate monitoring with abnormal heart rate alerts. A battery energy monitor gives you insight into your fitness level to help you know the best time to train. Also, fitness age shows if your body is older or younger than your age. Others include sleep tracking, menstrual cycle tracking for women, hydration tracking, stress monitoring, and sedentary reminders.

  • Safety and Tracking Features include
  • LiveTrack lets you invite others to join in your training goals and group LiveTrack lets you invite more people to join in your training activities.

    Features Incidental fall detection and assistant that let you seek help when a fall has occurred. Holding the light button down until you feel the watch vibrate 3 times will automatically send your location to preset emergency contacts when an incidental fall or a problem has happened (phone must be connected to the watch to enable this feature).
    Also available is live event sharing that lets you share your training activities with members of the Garmin Connect community.

  • Activity Tracking Features include
  • Steps counter, sleep monitoring, calories, distance traveled, intensity minutes, TRUEUP and MOVE IQ.

  • Gym and Fitness Equipment include
  • Cardio and elliptical training, stair stepping, HIIT, pilates and yoga

  • Heart Rate Tracking Features include
  • HR zones, HR alerts, HR calories, and HR broadcast data to the paired device. Also available, are recovery time that measures how well you&#;ve recovered from previous training, helping you train at the best time.

  • Training, Planning, and Analysis Features include
  • Downloadable training plans, VO2 max, activity history on watch, GPS speed and distance, create custom activity profiles, advanced workouts, and more.

    In addition, recovery time lets you see an estimate of when you will be fit for the next training. This can help you plan and train more effectively.

  • Running Features include
  • GPS-based distance, time and pace, run workouts, foot pod capable, Racepredictor and PacePro.
    Available run profiles include running, treadmill running, track running, indoor track running, and virtual running. Other running features include cadence and run workouts.

  • Outdoor Recreational Features include
  • Area calculation (yes, via connect iq™), hunt/fish calendar (yes, via connect iq™), sun and moon information (yes, via connect iq™).

  • Cycling Features include
  • Alerts trigger an alarm when you reach goals including time, distance, heart rate, or calories. Also features speed and cadence sensor support. Available cycling profiles include biking and indoor biking.

  • Swim Tracking Features include
  • Pool swim metrics include lengths, distance, pace, stroke count, swim efficiency (swolf), and calories.
    Stroke type detection include freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly (pool swim only).
    Other features include drill logging (pool swim only), basic rest timer (up from 0) (pool swim only), &#;repeat on&#; rest timer (pool swim only), auto rest (pool swim only), time and distance alerts and countdown start (pool swim only).

    Also features underwater heart rate tracking. Available swim profiles include pool swimming.

    Pros

    • Lightweight and compact design.
    • Comprehensive activity tracker.
    • Swim-proof.
    • 2 weeks long battery life.

    Cons

    • Lacks microphone and loudspeaker.
    • Lacks music storage.
    • Lacks blood oxygen measurement.
    • Lacks atimeter that enables floor climbing.
    • Lacks Garmin Pay.

    Garmin Forerunner 45 vs Should You Upgrade?

    Obviously, Forerunner 55 is a better smartwatch than Forerunner Moreover, it&#;s about the same price. If you already own Forerunner 45, should you upgrade? Although both watches have the same design and lots of activity tracking features, Forerunner 55 has more features and a longer battery life. If these added features mean a lot to you, then it&#;s worth upgrading.

    Garmin Forerunner 55 (Aqua) GPS Running Watch Power Bundle | Includes PlayBetter Portable Charger

    Garmin Forerunner 55 Black GPS Running and Fitness Watch with Texel 10,mAh Portable Battery

    Garmin Forerunner 55 (Black) GPS Running Watch Power Bundle | Includes PlayBetter Portable

    Garmin Forerunner 55, GPS Running Watch with Daily Suggested Workouts, Up to 2 Weeks of Battery

    Forerunner 45, GPS, Small, EU, Black (Renewed)

    Garmin N Forerunner 45 GPS Heart Rate Monitor Running Smartwatch (Black) - (Renewed)

    Garmin Forerunner 45 GPS Running Watch Power Bundle | Includes PlayBetter Portable Charger & HD

    Related

    Sours: https://smartwatchchart.com/garmin-forerunnervswhat-is-the-difference/
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    Garmin Forerunner 55 In-Depth Review

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    Alongside today’s announcement of the new Forerunner LTE, Garmin has also refreshed its least expensive running watch – the Forerunner This watch is aimed at folks that don’t need all the fancier features of a higher-end Forerunner , , or series – but still want the core of the run tracking. Of course, as each successive series comes out, these so-called basic running watches get more and more features that ultimately make them far more feature-capable than the last iteration of the mid-range watches.

    The Forerunner 55 has gained the majority of the features that came to the FR last time around, including running track mode (for perfect GPS lines at the track), daily suggested workouts, women’s health tracking, PacePro (this is huge), Recovery Time, now full Connect IQ support, and plenty more. Seriously, it’s almost a mini-FR now. Except $ cheaper. True, the FR does have a handful of performance-oriented features, but very few unique ones remain at this point.

    I’ve been using the Forerunner 55 for a number of weeks now on workouts and 24&#;7 wear. Additionally, my wife has also used the FR55 on a number of her workouts too. So I’ve got a pretty good feel on how well the FR55 works, and where its quirks are.

    Note that for this review I’m using a media loaner from Garmin. Once this review is done, I’ll get it boxed back up and sent back to them. After which I’ll likely go out and buy my own for future use. If you found this review useful, you can use the links at the bottom, or consider becoming a DCR Supporter which makes the site ad-free, while also getting access to a mostly weekly video series behind the scenes of the DCR Cave. And of course, it makes you awesome.

    With that, let’s get into it.

    What’s New:

    While all the attention today is on the new LTE capabilities of the just-launched FR LTE, the real attention should be on the FR55 and the slate of new features it gets. None of these are ‘new’ to Garmin, but rather, new to this price point. For runners, getting PacePro and Track Run mode specifically are huge. Let alone the Recovery Time and Daily Suggested Workouts. It’s impressive.

    Here’s the full bulleted list of changes:

    &#; Added PacePro (dynamic course-based pacing for races)
    &#; Added Daily Suggested Workouts (basically gives you custom running workouts each day based on training/recovery)
    &#; Added Track mode (makes perfect track workout GPS maps, as well as perfect distance/pacing)
    &#; Added Virtual Run mode (used on treadmills, to broadcast your pace/heart rate via Bluetooth & ANT+)
    &#; Added Finish Time Estimator (predicts finish for a given distance)
    &#; Added Predicated Race Times (shows 5K/10K/Half-marathon/Marathon times based on performance)
    &#; Added Women’s Health Tracking (allows on-watch entry/tracking for menstrual cycle and pregnancy)
    &#; Added Recovery Time (hours)
    &#; Added more sport modes including pool swimming and HIIT
    &#; Added Connect IQ support for data fields, widgets, and apps (previously only had CIQ watch faces)
    &#; Added 24&#;7 respiration rate tracking and widget (outside of workouts)
    &#; Added customizable lap banners
    &#; Added customizable auto pause thresholds
    &#; Switched to widget glances, versus full size widgets (now matching other Garmin watches)
    &#; Increased standby battery life from 1 to 2 weeks in smartwatch mode
    &#; Increased GPS battery life from 13 hours to 20 hours
    &#; Increased from 3 data fields to 4 data fields per page, plus two more custom pages (and you can customize defaults)
    &#; No more 45/45S split-size differentiator, just one size (42mm with the same 26mm screen).
    &#; Price remains same at $USD

    There’s so many big-ticket items in here. PacePro and Track Mode are huge for many runners, but things like Connect IQ data fields means you can use this with Stryd for example, for running power. And then beyond that, every day I use the watch I find all sorts of tiny little features that have changed, things that were rolled down from the FR, but also from the FR/ too. Mostly minor menu option type stuff, but for someone out there, this will be *THE* feature that pushes them over the edge. For others, they won’t care. I’m sure there’s plenty more I haven’t found or realized yet, so I’ll add them above as I spot them.

    Note the FR55 is available in black, white, or aqua. As you’ve probably deduced by now, the version you see in this review is aqua. And yes, this 6’2” very male frame has been rockin’ that in public the last few weeks. Look, after wearing that small purple Lily watch, it’s gonna be hard to phase me.

    Forerunner 55 Family image

    With that, let’s start using it.

    The Basics:

    DSC_

    To begin, the FR55 differs from something like the Venu or Vivoactive series in that it’s got plenty of buttons, as opposed to a touchscreen. There’s no touchscreen here – and frankly, I’m totally good with that. Easier access to quickly iterate through menus or options while on the run. There’s two buttons on the right, and three more on the left. They do as they’re labeled, allowing you to confirm/escape/up/down/light easily.

    That said, if I were to have one complaint about the Forerunner 55 it’s that the display is feeling a bit aged these days. Sure, by itself you probably wouldn’t notice, but when you’re testing side by side the Forerunner or LTE, you can easily see the pixilation on the numbers, and it just feels like it’s one iteration overdue for a refresh. The smaller digits just feel ’s. I get that Garmin makes the trade-off here in bringing this price point lower by using cheaper displays, but it’s time Garmin, it’s time.

    DSC_

    Still, despite my disappointment with the screen, the watch functions perfectly fine and viewable as a sport watch, even if a touch slow in occasional non-time-sensitive places (like the final saving of a run). There’s never any issues with readability or clarity, because they aren’t having to make brightness tradeoffs here to save battery power. Also, the screen is always-on, all the time. Again, no battery tradeoffs to make.

    When it comes to watch faces, you can tweak a number of the stock watch faces on the unit itself, customizing some of the data on the screen. Or, you can simply download any of the gazillions of watch faces from Garmin Connect IQ (their app platform), all of which are free.

    clip_imageclip_image[4]

    Or, you can even customize a watch-face with your own photos of friends or kittens or whatever the case may be. Your choice.

    While the Forerunner 45 had Connect IQ watch face support, the Forerunner 55 extends that to other Connect IQ app types, including data fields, apps, and widgets. In fact, later in the sport section I hook up the Stryd running power meter Connect IQ data field to show that. Note that if you’re reading this today, it can sometimes take a bit of time (days to weeks) for developers to validate their apps are valid on a given watch. This is one area where Garmin really needs to re-think how this works (for all watches), as many times developers don’t come back and check-off new watches as compatible, even if they’re entirely compatible and it’s just a minor model-name shift. Just in the same way Apple doesn’t require app developers re-validate apps are compatible for every new phone the day its released – instead, it’s based on the underlying markers.

    In any event, geekiness aside, let’s talk some of the basics of data tracking. First up is that as we scroll down in the menus we’ve got widgets – or rather, widget glances. These are smaller glanceable snippets than the full size widgets in the past. And then if you want more data you can tap into them to expand them.

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    If we crack open the steps tracked one for example, we’ll see that the user interface is changed – now matching that of the recently released Garmin Venu 2/2S, which is a much cleaner and more stylized look. You can tap to see details like steps over the last week (distance or straight steps):

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    And then all of this data is of course synced to Garmin Connect via your phone (or, computer if you plug it in). So on Garmin Connect Mobile (that’s the phone app) you’ll get the same data, but you can slice and dice it a gazillion ways, looking at more the analytics side of it.

    clip_image[8]clip_image[10]

    The majority of the default widgets are health and fitness related, including areas like body battery, heart rate, and your daily workouts. All of them have been revamped. Here’s the heart rate one, first showing me my current heart rate, and trend over the last 4 hours. And then I can tap to see my resting heart rate trends over the last 7 days. Note this is not your sleeping resting HR (that’s separate), but your awake resting heart rate.

    clip_image[12]clip_image[14]

    Meanwhile, Body Battery helps track your energy levels throughout the day, plotted against stress as well if you want. Think of this like old-school Street Fighter style energy. As you sleep or relax on a couch, your energy levels go up. But as you do thinks like workout or a stressful presentation, they go down. Generally it takes a week or two for this to stabilize after you first start wearing the watch, but I find it a fairly good proxy in most cases. Places where it usually goes a bit askew are if you pull an all-nighter, or other ‘WTF’ type moments.

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    And again, all of this is trackable on Garmin Connect Mobile as well:

    clip_image[16]clip_image[18]

    All of these heart rate driven functions use the Garmin Elevate V3 heart rate sensor on the bottom. This isn’t quite the newest sensor that was recently launched on the Venu 2/2S (and the FRLTE), but is still a perfectly fine sensor. Garmin doesn’t enable PulseOx on the FR55, so you won’t get blood oxygen levels with this watch, though, at the moment I’m not sure that’s a huge loss. In any case, you can see the green LED’s below, which shine into your skin and then measure your heart rate:

    DSC_

    The optical sensor is on 24×7 to measure and record your resting heart rate. Then in workout mode more power is supplied to it, to handle the challenges of tracking your body bouncing around. We’ll get into that later in the review.

    From a sleep tracking standpoint, the FR55 will track your sleep at night without any button-pushing. It simply does it automatically. Note that no Garmin devices track naps however. Now you’ll get credit for those naps in Body Battery, but not in sleep tracking. Also of note is that the FR55 doesn’t have any on-device sleep widget. For those curious, I checked with Garmin and behind the scenes the device is using the older non-Firstbeat algorithms for sleep. Again, for most people that won’t have any meaningful impact one way or the other, however, the lack of an on-device sleep widget to check your sleep is a bummer (and something Polar has at this price point). Otherwise, you simply need to crack open the Garmin Connect Mobile app:

    clip_image[20]clip_image[22]

    One widget not shown by default, but that is tracked by default is respiration rate, or your breathing rate. Over the last year some people have used this as a leading indicator for whether or not you may be getting sick. There’s fair evidence to support that (be it COVID or otherwise). Like many metrics, it’s something you can use to do further digging, but don’t consider it the only data point. This is shown both as a widget on the watch (if you enable it), but also on Garmin Connect mobile as well.

    Shifting away from health and fitness widgets, there is the ability to see smartphone notifications (as well as calendar appoints, which I show in the gallery up earlier). For smartphone notifications you can simply read the contents of them and dismiss them, there isn’t the ability to type out a response (textual or verbally). You can also iterate through ones you may have missed too.

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    You can disable this, or limit it to non-workout times if you’d like. The feature utilizes your existing smartphone notification settings, so however you have those set for your phone itself, will carry through here.

    Finally, from a battery standpoint, the FR55 claims two weeks of battery life in standby mode. In doing some casual observations of daily battery burn (with roughly an hour each day of GPS time), I’m not getting anything unexpected there. But I haven’t done a super-deep dive into exact battery specifics for smartwatch mode. However, within the sport section I dive more into the battery specs for GPS-on time, and how those hold up battery-wise, using actual data from the workout files themselves.

    With that, let’s dive deeper into the sports usage.

    Sport Features:

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    As always, the reason you buy a Garmin watch over any of the more general-purpose watches is for sports usage. And the FR55 piles in a boatload of ‘new’ sport features. Or at least, new to this product line. Everything here has been seen elsewhere in Garmin’s higher-up watches, but never at this price point. The main new sport-specific features include:

    &#; Added PacePro (dynamic course-based pacing for races)
    &#; Added Daily Suggested Workouts (basically gives you custom running workouts each day based on training/recovery)
    &#; Added Track mode (makes perfect track workout GPS maps, as well as perfect distance/pacing)
    &#; Added Virtual Run mode (used on treadmills, to broadcast your pace/heart rate via Bluetooth & ANT+)
    &#; Added Finish Time Estimator (predicts finish for a given distance)
    &#; Added Race Time Predictor (using past performance)
    &#; Added Recovery Hours (looking at recent workouts and other data)
    &#; Added more sport modes including pool swimming and HIIT
    &#; Added Connect IQ Data Field Support (useful for apps like Stryd and others)

    I’m going to talk through most of these in this section, plus just regular sport mode usage. Yes, you can still just go for a run, or to the gym – and it tracks that normally just fine. Or, you can get fancy. Your choice.

    To access the sport menu, simply hit the top right button, which brings up a list of sports:

    DSC_

    There’s roughly 18 sports to choose from on the FR55, specifically: Run, Virtual Run, Treadmill, Track Run, Bike, Walk, Bike Indoor, Cardio, Indoor Track, Walk Indoor, Pool Swim, Yoga, Elliptical, HIIT, Stair Stepper, Pilates, Breathwork, and Other. Other being the catch-all anything-bucket for things like Cow Tipping and Couch Surfing.

    Once you choose a sport mode, if GPS-based, it’ll start looking for GPS as well as ensuring your optical HR sensor is all happy and reading.

    DSC_

    It’s here you can load up different training plans, workouts, and configure various run settings too. Also, if you have any sensors paired, these will light-up. From a sensor standpoint the FR55 is fairly basic, but it does support external ANT+ & Bluetooth heart rate sensors (such as a chest strap), as well as ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart cycling cadence sensors, speed sensors, and combo speed/cadence sensors.

    DSC_

    I tested this with an indoor trainer ride, allowing me to get cadence into the watch itself. There’s no direct power meter support here, but you could technically use the same 3rd party Connect IQ power meter data field on the Forerunner 55 to pair up to a power meter if you wanted to – with the (minor, depending on your point of view) caveats noted in the post.

    Note that you can enable broadcasting of your heart rate, however, that’s only (still, inexplicably) over ANT+ if you use the normal ‘Broadcast HR’ option. That works perfectly fine for some apps, or a Peloton Bike – as they can support ANT+. But if you’re on iOS (such as an iPhone/iPad) and want to connect an app there for your Garmin HR, you won’t be able to do it. At least not directly. Instead, you can scoot around that with the ‘Virtual Run’ profile, which will then show the HR over Bluetooth. Still, c’mon Garmin, it’s – just make this easy for people (Garmin says this is coming however). Below, you can see me using just the BT heart rate broadcast with Zwift, in cycling mode.

    DSC_

    Though, if you want to do a treadmill workout, then the Virtual run profile is indeed ideal, as it’ll your broadcast pace/HR/cadence to apps:

    clip_image[26]

    Now, if you want to load up a training plan/workout/PacePro plan, you’ll hold the middle left button down. It’s here you can do a one-off interval session (customizable on the watch itself), under ‘Intervals’. You can customize the Interval duration based on distance, time, or lap button (open), as well as the number of repeats and rest duration/distance/lap, plus if you want to add a warm-up or cool-down.

    DSC_DSC_

    In this same menu you can load up a PacePro Plan, which allows you to pace a given race. This can be done on a specific race course, which then accounts for the terrain. The idea is that you tell Garmin your desired finish time/pace, and it figures out the best way to pace each mile/KM of that course. You can also customize positive or negative splits accordingly, using Garmin Connect Mobile.

    clip_image[28]clip_image[30]clip_image[32]

    After that’s done, you push it to the watch, and you can load it up and go off and pace the race (or, just a training day):

    DSC_DSC_

    Then there’s Estimated Finish Time. This one is super simple. You tell it how far you’re gonna run, with some pre-defined quick-access options (or, you can just use a custom distance), and it’ll figure out how much suffering you have till you finish.

    xDSC_clip_image

    Finally, on this never-ending journey of workout options, there’s also Daily Suggested Workouts, for running. This will actually show the second you tap the Run menu option, and give you a custom workout for the day:

    DSC_

    These workouts are based on your recent training, as well as recovery status. Generally speaking, it’ll take a week or two for this to stabilize, but even within that time period it’s pretty good. Some workouts are more complex, and some are simple (like, run X time at Y intensity).

    In addition, you can also download plans from Garmin (also free) for various distances.

    One minor point to mention is that the FR55 is clearly a run-focused watch, and thus doesn’t have all the fancier strength and core type structured workouts with animated step-by-step instructions like the Venu or Vivoactive 4 series. So if that’s something you really want, then you’ll need to probably look at that (or higher) lineup instead.

    When it comes to data field/page customization, this gets more flexibility than the FR45 did. You’ve now got up to 4 data fields per page, and up to 4 customizable pages, plus the heart rate zone, workout, and time data pages.

    DSC_

    You don’t get quite as many fields as some of the higher-end watches, but you do get to choose from: Timer, Distance, Pace, Speed, Calories, Heart Rate, HR Zone, Average HR, Lap Time, Lap Distance, Lap Pace, Lap Speed, Average Pace, Average Speed, Cadence, Steps, Time of Day, and your Connect IQ Fields.

    Note the fields do vary a bit based on sport, so the ones above are just an example from the run data fields.

    Also, because this section is already so long and we haven’t even started running yet, note that there’s auto-lap if you want it, which is configurable by distance (not time). There’s also the new lap banner customization, which means you can customize what’s shown on the lap banner when you hit the lap button (or, it hits it). There’s also auto pause, which is off by default, but can be enabled to automatically pause the timer when you stop. And, new to the FR55 s the ability to customize this threshold as well (the FR45 didn’t have that). Also, the GPS options are in here as well, where you can toggle between the aforementioned GPS modes (GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO).

    Now, in the event you’ve selected to do a Track Run (by selecting that in the sport profiles), a couple of quick notables. The Track Run option is newish to Garmin, and came out late last summer, and has since been expanded now to all of Garmin’s running-focused watches, with the FR55 being the last tier to get it. The main thing that the Track Run profile does is make perfectly accurate GPS tracks of your running around that oval. It does this first by learning the track. The first time you go to a new track, it’ll take a couple of loops around the track to learn it. Ensure that you’re recording during this time. Personally, I then save the workout after laps, and start a new one. Again, just for the first time I’ve gone to a given track – it’ll remember that track from here on out.

    imageimage

    Note that you’ll want to ensure the lane number matches the lane that you’re running in. This is shown in the “Track Run” settings, and is because each lane is significantly different in length, especially over a longer workout.

    Aside from pretty track loops on Strava, it also gives you far more consistent pacing. This is because it knows exactly where you are on the track, and effectively snaps your pacing and distance to it. Note that on the FR55 (as compared to some of Garmin’s higher-end watches), in Track Mode it’ll lock your lap pace to second increments. So if you’re pacing at /KM (or mile) and slow down ever so slightly, it won’t show or , it’ll show Not a huge deal for many, but something to be aware of.

    image

    Another benefit of track mode is that for the most part if you press the button pretty close to the line, you’ll end up with perfect interval distances (e.g. m, m, m, etc). There are rare cases where it’s not perfect (like showing m, and this is where I wish Garmin would take the Wahoo RIVAL approach of being a bit more ‘inclusive’ and snapping anything +/m to the m marker (so m becomes m), since nobody means to hit the lap button at m, they clearly just were late (or, the algorithm slightly off).

    image

    Once you’re done with the workout, you’ll see that your GPS track is virtually perfect:

    clip_image[24]

    Now, for fun, here’s what it looks like on those first calibration loops, you can see it’s not quite perfect (though very close), and then creeps in closer.

    IMG_

    Changing topics slightly, the FR55 has the ability to do LiveTrack during a workout, which broadcasts your current position and previous track to friends and family. They’ll receive an e-mail alert, which then allows them to click on a link and follow your progress. Note that this does require you to take your phone with you. Unlike the new FRLTE, this doesn’t have cellular capabilities built into it.

    DSC_

    Ultimately, no matter whether you’re doing a regular run or a track mode run, you’ll hopefully end the workout eventually. And when you do, you’ll get a handful of data pages with overview data. Note that you don’t actually get a lot of data here. For example, the summary page is kinda disappointing:

    clip_image[11]clip_image[13]

    It only shows what you see above plus cadence and calories. That’s it. Also, for some reason it takes forever to load. Garmin is digging into why that’s happening to me.

    You can though tap to see your HR zone breakout, and lap splits:

    clip_image[15]clip_image[17]

    Of course, all of this data ends up on Garmin Connect Mobile (and the web too), and you get far more data there. Here’s the summary from a recent interval workout in the forest:

    And then this same information up on Garmin Connect Web too (for desktop access)

    image

    Further, if you’ve connected Strava, MyFitnessPal, TrainingPeaks, or any other sites, all of those will receive a copy of your workout instantly as well.

    Now, one last new feature is the recovery time. This is the first time we’ve seen recovery time on the lowest-end Garmin watch, and it’s the same algorithm as seen on the higher-end watches. It essentially looks at the workout and a slew of other metrics to determine your recovery time. That time is available immediately following a workout, as well as via the VO2Max/Performance widget. Note that this is specifically ‘Recovery time till the next hard workout’, not just any ole’ normal workout:

    clip_image[19]

    The one last thing I want to touch on in the sports section is Garmin’s Incident Detection and Assistance features. Both features are safety-focused and have two slightly different purposes, and roughly build atop the LiveTrack features I mentioned earlier:

    Incident Detection: This will automatically detect an incident while running/cycling (in a workout specifically), and notifies your predefined contacts with a text message and a LiveTrack link to see exactly where you are.

    Safety Assistance: This allows you to, with one button, send a predefined message to emergency contacts with your initial location, followed by a live tracking link. The main scenario here being you feel unsafe and want someone to be aware of that.

    Both of these features depend on you having your phone with you. Since the Forerunner 55 doesn’t have cellular in it, you need to be within range of your phone. Both features can be cancelled in the event they’re triggered accidentally. And both features are set up on Garmin Connect Mobile first. It’s here you define emergency contacts.

    Once that’s done, the crash detection will occur while cycling or running during a workout. Essentially, Garmin is looking for forward speed, followed by a significant stopping accelerometer event – and then critically – no further forward progress. Meaning, if you were running along and jumped down a big ledge and kept running, that wouldn’t trigger it, since you continued going. Whereas if you were running, jumped off the ledge, and then face-planted, that would likely trigger it since you ceased making forward progress.

    Note that Garmin isn’t notifying emergency services with the FR Instead, they’re notifying your predefined emergency contacts – aka your friends/family/etc. So be sure to pick people who actually want you saved. Just a thought.

    With that, we’ve managed to make it to the end of the sports section. Realistically though, I’ve just scratched the surface of all the features baked into this watch. Like most Garmin watches, there’s literally hundreds if not thousands of combinations. I try and test and utilize the ones that interest me the most, as well as interest other people the most. Again, don’t forget to hit that video at the start of the ‘Basics’ section, where I walk through even more details.

    GPS & HR Accuracy:

    DSC_

    In this section I’m going to look at the accuracy of the optical sensor, as well as the accuracy of the GPS. The optical sensor here is the same as piles of previous Garmin watches, using the Garmin Elevate V3 sensor. The GPS chipset is still Sony too. Nonetheless, as I’ve seen countless times before, the same GPS chipset or HR sensors in different watches can result in different accuracy levels. This can be due to firmware version changes, power draw allowances, GPS antenna design, the size and shape of the watch impacting light leakage for optical HR sensors, and plenty more. In other words, I still test them all the same.

    For all these tests I’ve got multiple other recording devices and sensors. As always, no two watches are on the same wrist so as to not interfere with each other. Extra watches are either worn elsewhere on the body (like a running pack) or bike (handlebars), or sometimes hand-carried. Those watches not on the wrist are collecting heart rate data from extra connected HR sensors/straps.

    First up we’ve got a track workout from yesterday. Seems as good a place as any to look at optical HR, and then a quick look at GPS. For the optical HR side we’re comparing the FR LTE on one wrist, the FR55 on the other, and then against a Wahoo TICKR X chest strap and a Polar Verity Sense armband. Here’s that data set:

    image_thumb[1]

    This was a warm-up, followed by a slate of ’s, and then some m sprints. You can see that looking at the ’s, it’s darn near perfect. Like, nothing of real concern here. These weren’t quite as high intensity as some of my ’s (hang tight for that in a second), but more than enough to cause difficulties in sensors if need be.  On the ’s, these were shorter, only seconds long, and thus you can see the FRLTE with its newer ELEVATE v4 sensor seemed to struggle slightly, whereas the FR55 with it’s older ELEVATE V3 sensor did better. Of course, this could also just be quirks of left vs right hand too.

    image_thumb[3]

    That said, even the FR55 was a bit latent on some of these, though did get the gist of it. Whereas the FRLTE was latent on all of them. Again though, keep in mind these were second all-out sprints, versus more measured intervals.

    If we switch to look at the GPS tracks, all of the Garmin watches were in track mode, which means they snapped perfectly to the track after a quick one-time calibration set (3 loops around the track):

    image_thumb[5]

    For comparison, I also had with my the Suunto 9 Peak, which doesn’t have a track mode. As a result, here’s what that looks like when added in:

    image_thumb[7]

    While the GPS track isn’t horrible, you can see it’s essentially all over the track (and beyond). Mind you, I stayed in Lane 1 virtually the entire time. This isn’t to poke fun at Suunto’s track here, but to show the power of track mode for watches from Garmin, Wahoo, and COROS that have it.

    Next, let’s take a look at a forest run from yesterday. For this I had the FRLTE, FR55, FR, and the Suunto 9 Peak. You can see that overall, at a high level, there’s no crazy pants ones here. Everyone is roughly in line:

    image_thumb[9]

    Now despite all four of the watches using the Sony GPS chipset, you can still see nuanced differences. Some of it may be left side vs right side (body-wise), but I suspect it’s also just differing internal aspects too. Here’s a more dense forest section, leading out to some fields:

    image_thumb[11]

    You can see that for most of it, all four watches are within a few meters, though there was a few times towards the bottom section that we saw more separation from some of them, including the FR55 a bit. Of course, fast forward a few seconds and it’s the FRLTE contemplating a different path:

    image_thumb[13]

    And then it’s the Suunto 9 Peak considering alternate facts:

    image_thumb[15]

    The point being, none of them are perfect (though, the FR comes darn close), but for most people the data will be similar enough, even in the woods. Once I exit the woods, they’re virtually identical.

    image_thumb[17]

    Meanwhile, looking at the heart rate on this run, I made this forest run an interval run too. ’s followed by ’s, but of course with the complexities of not tripping on roots and such. Overall, things were pretty good:

    image_thumb[19]

    Again you see some minor wobbles (more minor this time than last time) on the FR LTE during the ’s (shorter ones at the end), but the FR55 was really solid here. The Polar Verity Sense was solid as always.

    Next, let’s look at an outdoor ride. I realize there’s a lot to take in here, with a lot of lines and a lot of data. Like trying to find Waldo in Where’s Waldo, it’s best to just squint and focus on one thing – or here, one color. The FRLTE is in yellow, and the FR55 is in red. What I’d consider references would be the TICKR in Blue, and the Polar Verity Sense in green. And if you want to move around the graphs, go here.

    image_thumb[21]

    Now, the main things you’ll notice is that the FRLTE seems to have a few more drops and spikes than the FR55 does. In general, I don’t find many wrist-based optical HR sensors that do well road cycling, especially with any intensity changes. The FR55 actually does relatively well here compared to the FRLTE. It’s not that the FRLTE is horrible or anything, rather, it’s just what I tend to see sometimes variability-wise. Meanwhile, the FR55 seems to have lucked out more on this ride.

    As for GPS? Zero issues road cycling. Here’s the high level:

    image_thumb[23]

    And here’s some tough tunnel sections under the airport runways. Mind you, you’re not getting GPS underground. But rather, I’m interested to see that it properly disengages and re-engages without throwing crazy spikes here and there. And it does that perfectly.

    image_thumb[25]

    Overall though, for GPS accuracy it looks pretty darn good, and for the optical HR sensor, it’s very good. Very few wobbles across any of my data sets, indoors or outdoors, running or cycling – all is spot-on. I haven’t been able to get to a pool yet for pool swimming though, so that’s something I’ll do.

    (Note: All of the charts in these accuracy portions were created using the DCR Analyzer tool.  It allows you to compare power meters/trainers, heart rate, cadence, speed/pace, GPS tracks, and plenty more. You can use it as well for your own gadget comparisons, more details here.)

    Wrap-Up:

    DSC_

    I’ve gotta wonder if the Polar Ignite/Ignite 2 re-energized Garmin a bit on their budget friendly options. Or perhaps it’s the Apple Watch Series 3 at sub-$ After all, as I noted recently, those two units had started to make folks question the value of the Forerunner 45 in comparison to the larger non-running features that you’d find on those watches. But this time, Garmin has unequivocally thrown down on the running and training features…hard. They’ve basically taken almost everything found in the higher end Forerunner watch and pulled it into the FR Sure, there’s a few minor things, but for any runner out there, they’re likely going to be perfectly happy with this watch.

    If someone wanted me to start training and racing on this watch, versus my usual FR, it frankly wouldn’t have any any impact running-wise (other sports like cycling, sure). But for running, I easily used this entirely on my interval workouts. Yesterday’s track workout I did % looking only at the FR55, pacing each split easily using Track Mode. And the same goes for a number of other runs over the past near-month.

    Now, there’s still some quirks. While Garmin went for the fences on running features, the display just seems out of sync with the rest of their offerings. I’m not asking for AMOLED here, but I shouldn’t so obviously see pixilation on the default watch face due to lack of resolution in And similarly, with more and more people using watches to broadcast their heart rate to fitness apps, Bluetooth Smart HR broadcasting should be an easy-button. I shouldn’t have to do a clunky workaround using a run profile designed for Zwift, simply to transmit my HR to a fitness app at the gym.

    Minor annoyances aside, this is a very strong watch for Garmin for runners, and in some ways, the fact that they used the existing Elevate V3 sensor seems to have done better than the newer V4 sensor in my testing this round. And ultimately, that’s mostly what this watch is: Taking ‘known good’ features from all of Garmin’s higher end watches, and stuffing them into a lower price point. Worked out pretty well this time.

    With that, thanks for reading!

    Found This Post Useful? Support The Site!

    Hopefully you found this review useful. At the end of the day, I’m an athlete just like you looking for the most detail possible on a new purchase – so my review is written from the standpoint of how I used the device. The reviews generally take a lot of hours to put together, so it’s a fair bit of work (and labor of love). As you probably noticed by looking below, I also take time to answer all the questions posted in the comments – and there’s quite a bit of detail in there as well.

    If you're shopping for the Garmin Forerunner 55 or any other accessory items, please consider using the affiliate links below! As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, but your purchases help support this website a lot. Even more, if you use Backcountry.com or Competitive Cyclist with coupon code DCRAINMAKER, first time users save 15% on applicable products!

    And finally, here’s a handy list of accessories that work well with this unit (and some that I showed in the review). Given the unit pairs with ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart sensors, you can use just about anything though.

    Amazon$33

    This is a dual ANT+/Bluetooth Smart cycling cadence sensor that you strap to your crank arm, but also does dual Bluetooth Smart, so you can pair it both to Zwift and another Bluetooth Smart app at once if you want.

    Amazon$56

    This is one of the top straps I use daily for accuracy comparisons (the others Polar H9/H10 and Wahoo TICKR X). It's dual ANT+/Bluetooth Smart, and in fact dual-Bluetooth Smart too, in case you need multiple connectons.

    Amazon$

    This is the pinnacle of Garmin chest straps, and includes dual ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart, Swimming support, Running Dynamics, as well as back-fill of HR/Steps/Intensity Minutes/Calories if not wearing the watch in certain sports. Note: Not all watches support Running Dynamics/Swimming HR backfill, check your watch first!

    Amazon$

    While optical HR works on some newer Garmin watches, if you're looking for higher levels of accuracy, the HRM-TRI or HRM-SWIM are less expensive than the HRM-PRO, but lack the Bluetooth connectivity and a few other features.

    Amazon$9

    Seriously, this will change your life. $9 for a two-pack of these puck Garmin chargers that stay put and stay connected. One for the office, one for your bedside, another for your bag, and one for your dog's house. Just in case.

    Amazon$35

    This speed sensor is unique in that it can record offline (sans-watch), making it perfect for a commuter bike quietly recording your rides. But it's also a standard ANT+/BLE sensor that pairs to your device. It's become my go-to speed sensor.

    And of course – you can always sign-up to be a DCR Supporter! That gets you an ad-free DCR, access to the DCR Quarantine Corner video series packed with behind the scenes tidbitsand it also makes you awesome. And being awesome is what it’s all about!

    Thanks for reading! And as always, feel free to post comments or questions in the comments section below, I’ll be happy to try and answer them as quickly as possible. And lastly, if you felt this review was useful – I always appreciate feedback in the comments below. Thanks!

    Found This Post Useful? Support The Site!

    Hopefully you found this review useful. At the end of the day, I’m an athlete just like you looking for the most detail possible on a new purchase – so my review is written from the standpoint of how I used the device. The reviews generally take a lot of hours to put together, so it’s a fair bit of work (and labor of love). As you probably noticed by looking below, I also take time to answer all the questions posted in the comments – and there’s quite a bit of detail in there as well.

    If you're shopping for the Garmin Forerunner 55 or any other accessory items, please consider using the affiliate links below! As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, but your purchases help support this website a lot. Even more, if you use Backcountry.com or Competitive Cyclist with coupon code DCRAINMAKER, first time users save 15% on applicable products!

    And finally, here’s a handy list of accessories that work well with this unit (and some that I showed in the review). Given the unit pairs with ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart sensors, you can use just about anything though.

    AmazonBuy Now$33

    This is a dual ANT+/Bluetooth Smart cycling cadence sensor that you strap to your crank arm, but also does dual Bluetooth Smart, so you can pair it both to Zwift and another Bluetooth Smart app at once if you want.

    AmazonBuy Now$56

    This is one of the top straps I use daily for accuracy comparisons (the others Polar H9/H10 and Wahoo TICKR X). It's dual ANT+/Bluetooth Smart, and in fact dual-Bluetooth Smart too, in case you need multiple connectons.

    AmazonBuy Now$

    This is the pinnacle of Garmin chest straps, and includes dual ANT+ & Bluetooth Smart, Swimming support, Running Dynamics, as well as back-fill of HR/Steps/Intensity Minutes/Calories if not wearing the watch in certain sports. Note: Not all watches support Running Dynamics/Swimming HR backfill, check your watch first!

    AmazonBuy Now$

    While optical HR works on some newer Garmin watches, if you're looking for higher levels of accuracy, the HRM-TRI or HRM-SWIM are less expensive than the HRM-PRO, but lack the Bluetooth connectivity and a few other features.

    AmazonBuy Now$9

    Seriously, this will change your life. $9 for a two-pack of these puck Garmin chargers that stay put and stay connected. One for the office, one for your bedside, another for your bag, and one for your dog's house. Just in case.

    AmazonBuy Now$35

    This speed sensor is unique in that it can record offline (sans-watch), making it perfect for a commuter bike quietly recording your rides. But it's also a standard ANT+/BLE sensor that pairs to your device. It's become my go-to speed sensor.

    And of course – you can always sign-up to be a DCR Supporter! That gets you an ad-free DCR, access to the DCR Quarantine Corner video series packed with behind the scenes tidbitsand it also makes you awesome. And being awesome is what it’s all about!

    Thanks for reading! And as always, feel free to post comments or questions in the comments section below, I’ll be happy to try and answer them as quickly as possible. And lastly, if you felt this review was useful – I always appreciate feedback in the comments below. Thanks!

    Sours: https://www.dcrainmaker.com//06/garmin-forerunnerdepth-review.html

    Best Garmin GPS running watches in | Forerunner Series | See differences here

    Se Jesper Petersen's profil
     By Jesper Petersen

     

     

    Garmin make probably the market's best running watches. Their Forerunner watches are a series of dedicated GPS running watches. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or elite runner, you’ll find the watch you’re after among their Forerunner series.

    In this article you’ll learn about the differences between the Garmin Forerunner 45, Garmin Forerunner 55, Garmin Forerunner Music, Garmin Forerunner Music, Garmin Forerunner , Garmin Forerunner  and the Garmin Forerunner LTE. 

    Take a look at our guide to choosing a Garmin running watch below.

     

        

    OVERVIEW

    This article consists of the following headlines. You can click on any of the headlines to go directly to that section.

    - COMPARISON OF THE GARMIN FORERUNNER SERIES - TABLE

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER 45 / 45S

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER 55

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER MUSIC

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER MUSIC

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER

    - GARMIN FORERUNNER LTE

      

      

    COMPARISON OF THE GARMIN FORERUNNER SERIES

    Here you can find a clear overview of what all the GPS running watches in Garmin’s FORERUNNER series can actually do, as we compare the Garmin Forerunner 45, Garmin Forerunner 55, Garmin Forerunner Music, Garmin Forerunner Music, Garmin Forerunner XT, Garmin Forerunner , and the Garmin Forerunner LTE. 

      

    garmin forerunner 45 vs forerunner music vs forerunner music vs forerunner vs forerunner

    Garmin Forerunner series       

         


          

    GARMIN FORERUNNER 45 / 45S

    Of their many running watches, Garmin’s Forerunner 45 is the easiest to use. Despite its simplicity, it has ALL the standard features you’d expect from a running watch - and much more.

    The watch comes in two versions: The Garmin Forerunner 45 and the Garmin Forerunner 45S. The watches can do EXACTLY the same thing - the only difference is their physical size. The Garmin Forerunner 45S is slightly smaller than the Garmin Forerunner

    Recommended for: TheGarmin Forerunner 45 is an affordable running watch for beginners and athletes looking for a relatively simple running watch.

    garmin forerunner 45 / 45S

       

    GARMIN FORERUNNER 45 ADVANTAGES:

    - Measures all the basics: Distance, Pace/Tempo, Time, Heart rate.

    - Optical heart rate monitor at the wrist.

    - Fitness assessment (VO2 Max).

    - Activity tracker features: Step counter, Sleep, Calories, Estimated distance, Stress, Energy level measuring (Body Battery).

    - Smart notifications: Incoming calls, messages, reminders etc. directly on the watch. 

    - Music: Control music on your smartphone from the watch. 

    - Safety and tracking features (Incident Detection).

    - FREE adaptive training plans through GARMIN COACH.

    - Activity profiles for Running, Treadmill, Cycling, Walking, Cardio, Indoor running, Indoor cycling (spinning), Indoor walking, Elliptical (Cross-training), Stepper, Yoga, and more.

    - Easy to use.

    - Affordable.

      

    GARMIN FORERUNNER 45 DISADVANTAGES:

    - Lack of advanced training features and data.

    - No Garmin Music, Garmin Pay, or built-in maps.

    - Not possible to download apps or widgets from Garmin Connect IQ (app store).

       

    Read more about Garmin Forerunner 45 here: Test: Garmin Forerunner 45

    Purchase here:

    Buy Garmin Forerunner 45 here 

     

      

        


     

          

    GARMIN FORERUNNER 55

    Garmin Forerunner 55 is a superb and affordable GPS-running watch - and a completely new update of Garmin Forerunner 45/45S. Garmin Forerunner 55 and the many new features, specific for running, makes it possible to improve as a runner and exerciser. 

    Its a GPS-watch for the one who is looking to introduce more activity into his everyday life, learn more about his health in general and make training a regular part of his daily life.

    Recommended for: Garmin Forerunner 55 is an affordable GPS-watch for beginners as well as more experienced exercisers who want a summary of their basic health and training data. 

                

    Garmin Forerunner 55

        

    GARMIN FORERUNNER 55 ADVANTAGES:

    - does ALL the same things as Garmin Forerunner 45

    In addition you get,

    - Longer battery life

    - Full access to the Connect IQ app (for downloading apps, widgets and dials).

    - More activity profiles, Track run, Virtual Run, Pool Swim, Pilates, Hiit and Breathwork among others.

    - Advanced sleep tracking 

    - Health tracking for women (Incl. pregnancy tracking)

    - Improved running features, incl.
               - Recommended training sessions (lite-version)
               - Recommended recovery time (lite-version) 
               - Running calculator
               - PacePro Pace strategies
               - Interval mode
               - Finishing-time calculator

         

    GARMIN FORERUNNER 55 DISADVANTAGES

    - Lacks many advanced training features and - data

    - Lacks Garmin Music, Garmin Pay and integrated maps.

     

    In addition you can read an extended review of GARMIN FORERUNNER 55 here.

            

    Read more about Garmin Forerunner 55 and purchase here: 

    Buy Garmin Forerunner 55 here 

     

      

        


     

       

    GARMIN FORERUNNER MUSIC

    The Garmin Forerunner is Garmin’s take on an intermediate-class running watch. It has a long list of advanced functions that we earlier only saw in Garmin’s top models. This makes the Garmin Forerunner an incredibly good running watch for the money. The vast majority of runners would find the Garmin Forerunner satisfies their every need.

    The watch can be found in two models: Garmin Forerunner  and Garmin Forerunner Music. Both do exactly the same, except the Music model allows you to directly transfer music onto the watch – and therefore play music without the need for a smartphone close by.

    Recommended for: TheGarmin Forerunner is a great running watch that will meet the criteria of the majority of runners - regardless of experience.

     

    garmin forerunner music

      

    GARMIN FORERUNNER ADVANTAGES:

    - Has EVERYTHING the Garmin Forerunner 55 has.

    In addition you get,

    -   Larger display (1,2” vs 1,04”).

    -   Replacable strap (Quick release)

    -   Longer battery life in GPS-mode

    -   Electronic compass

    -   Pulse Ox sensor (measures the saturation of the blood)

    -   Music in the watch  – compatible with fx Spotify (requires premium) – Only valid for Garmin Forerunner Music.

    -   More activity profiles, rowing among others

    -   Advanced training features (Training status, training effect, training load, recovery time)

    -    Virtual partner (train with a digital person) 

    -    Navigation-/Outdoor-features (Point-to-point, follow a route, return to start, GPS-coordinates, UltraTrac mode)

    -    Running dynamics (requires heart rate belt or foot sensor)

      

    GARMIN FORERUNNER DISADVANTAGES:

    - No Garmin Pay.

    - Lacks the most advanced training features and data.

    - No barometric altimeter, which measures precise altitude.

    - No built-in map or real navigation.

    - Not many activity profiles – lacks e.g. triathlon profile.

      

    Read more about Garmin Forerunner and purchase here:

    Buy Garmin Forerunner here

        

       

     


     

         

    GARMIN FORERUNNER MUSIC

    The Garmin Forerunner is Garmin’s high-end GPS running watch. It’s loaded with advanced training functions including Garmin Pay, which makes it possible to pay directly with the watch. 

    The watch comes in two models: Garmin Forerunner  and Garmin Forerunner Music. They are exactly the same watch, apart from the Music version allows you to transfer music directly to the watch – and therefore play music without the need for a smartphone close by.

    Recommended for: TheGarmin Forerunner is a running watch for the serious runner, who’s looking for advanced training statistics and functions, and the ability to pay for goods with the watch.

    garmin forerunner music

       

    GARMIN FORERUNNER ADVANTAGES:

    - Can do (for the most part) everything the Forerunner 45 and Forerunner can do.

    Plus:

    - Garmin Pay: Use the watch to pay for goods where contactless payment is possible.

    - Estimated acid threshold (anaerobic threshold).

    - Barometric altimeter (air pressure change): More precise elevation data and height profile.

    - Bezel in rust-free stainless steel.

    - Strava live segments compatible (Strava Premium account needed).

    - Outdoor activity profiles: Skiing, Snowboarding, XC-skiing, Stand up paddleboarding, Rowing.

      

    GARMIN FORERUNNER DISADVANTAGES:

    - Missing a few training functions found on the Forerunner and Fenix 6 series.

    - No built-in map or real navigation.

    - Not many activity profiles – lacks e.g. triathlon profile.

       

    Read more about Garmin Forerunner and purchase here:

    Buy Garmin Forerunner here

       

         

     


      

        

    GARMIN FORERUNNER

    Garmin Forerunner is the latest running - and triathlon smartwatch from Garmin. The watch has the same functions as Garmin Forerunner Music and Garmin Forerunner Music, but in addition Forerunner has a full triathlon- og multisport-function as well as the latest workout functions from Garmin.

    With the new function Daily Suggested Workouts, Garmin takes on the role as your personal running - and cycling coach who, based on your current fitness level and training intensity as well as sleep, stress and recovery status, offers CONCRETE recommendations for SPECIFIC training sessions, which you can follow on a daily basis.

    Recommended for: Garmin Forerunner is the perfect watch for the serious athlete with a passion for running and triathlon, who wants guidance how to get better results.

     

    garmin forerunner  

     

    GARMIN FORERUNNER ADVANTAGES:

    - Has all the same functions as Garmin Forerunner Music and Garmin Forerunner Music.

    In addition you get:

    - More ativity profiles including triathlon.

    - Daily Suggested Workouts. Training guide for the athlete who doesn´t  follow a structured training schedule, but who want to improve. Get recommendations for specific training sessions directly on the watch - based on current training intensity, shape, sleep, stress and recovery.

    - Improved recovery recommendations: Sleep, stress and daily activities affect the watch's recommendations for recovery.

    - Track Run mode: Improved GPS accuracy when running on a m track.

    - Built-in wrist heart rate monitor that works under water.

    - Approximately the same physical size as the Forerunner and Forerunner Smaller and lighter than the Forerunner

      

    GARMIN FORERUNNER DISADVANTAGES:

    - Lacks built-in map and real navigation.

    - Missing a number of activity profiles compared to the Garmin Forerunner

    - Less battery life than Garmin Forerunner

       

    Read more about the Garmin Forerunner and purchase here:

    Buy Garmin Forerunner here

         

      

     


     

       

    GARMIN FORERUNNER

    The Garmin Forerunner is currently the best training watch on the market. Full stop. It’s loaded with all the newest training functions and also has a built-in map with real navigation, Garmin Music, and Garmin Pay. The Garmin Forerunner has pretty much the same functions as the Garmin Fenix 6 series, but in a lightweight package. 

    Recommended for: TheGarmin Forerunner is the multi-sports GPS watch for the serious athlete who craves the best of the best and is interested in advanced data and statistics. It meets all the criteria of even the most demanding runner or triathlete.

     

    garmin forerunner

      

    GARMIN FORERUNNER ADVANTAGES:

    - Can do EVERYTHING mentioned previously in the Forerunner series.

    Plus:

    - Longer battery life.

    - Built-in topographic map with real ”turn-by-turn” navigation.

    - Newest and most advanced training functions, including ”Training Load Focus,” and heat and altitude acclimation.   

    - Advanced outdoor features.

    - Over 20 activity profiles including Golf, Mountain biking, Skiing, and Open water swimming.

     

    GARMIN FORERUNNER DISADVANTAGES:

    None.

        

    Read more about the Garmin Forerunner and purchase here:

    Buy Garmin Forerunner here

       

      

          


                 

    GARMIN FORERUNNER LTE

    Garmin Forerunner LTE is a new update of the Garmin Forerunner With Garmin Forerunner LTE,  Garmin have preserved all the best features from Forerunner , but added improvements to interval training and most interestingly, a completely new LTE-network connection. This means a completely new, smartphone-free safety- and tracking feature  – all at your fingertips and completely without your mobile.


    Recommended for: Garmin Forerunner LTE is suited for the exact same athletes as the Garmin Forerunner I.e. the watch is for the serious athlete, who wants the best of the best and who is into advanced data and statistics and who wants backing as well as security completely without the mobile.

        

    Garmin Forerunner LTE

       

    GARMIN FORERUNNER ADVANTAGES:

    - Does ALL the same things as the other watches in the Forerunner-collection. 

    In addition you get:

    - Smaller size than Garmin Forerunner (mm vs. 47mm)

    - New interval feature

    - LTE-network connection – makes it possible to call emergency services, receive backing and share Livetrack-info with family/friends completely without your mobile.

           

    GARMIN FORERUNNER LTE DISADVANTAGES:

    -  Using the LTE-connection requires a Garmin-subscription

                  

              

           

         

    More inspiration?

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    Inspiration and content 

    Sours: https://www.runningxpert.com/en/inspiration/garmin-forerunner-series

    Vs 245 55 forerunner

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    Garmin Forerunner 45 vs Forerunner 245 Comparison review. Which one is best?

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