Lincoln mig welders

Lincoln mig welders DEFAULT

We know it: Hobart and Lincoln, two well-known and trusted names when it comes to welders.

They make similar 140 amp models, and for most welders, both are a great option.

But when looking for a reliable welder made by a reputable manufacturer, it is inevitable. At some point, you will end up comparing these two well-made units head to head.

They have surprisingly similar features and specifications. However, depending on the work you intend to do, one or the other might be a better fit.

With that in mind, let’s dig in and explore the particulars for these two workhorses. There are some differences, and the details matter when trying to pick which one is right for your shop.

A Quick Comparison

 Hobart Handler 140Lincoln Easy MIG 140
Imagehobart handler 140 mig welder
Manufactured InUSAMexico
Welder TypeMIG, Flux CoreMIG, Flux Core
Input Voltage110V/115V/120V110V/115V/120V
Duty Cycle20% @ 90A(18.5V)20% @ 90A (19.5V)
Amperage25 – 140A30 – 140A
Voltage 5 Fixed Positions4 Fixed Positions
Wire Feed SpeedInfiniteInfinite
Weldable MaterialsMild steel, stainless, aluminumMild steel, stainless, aluminum
Mild Steel Thickness (Single-pass)24 ga. – 0.25 in.24 ga. – 3/16 in.
Wire Thickness0.024 – 0.035 in.0.025 – 0.035 in
Wire Feed Speed40 – 700 ipm50 – 500 ipm
Wire Spool Sizes4-in., 8-in.4-in., 8-in.
Spool Gun Ready
Welder Dimensions (H x W x L)12.375 in. x 10.625 in.  x 19.5 in.13.7 in. x 10.15 in. x 17.9 in.
Weight57 lbs.50 lbs.
Warranty5/3/1 years3 years
User Ratings★★★★★★★★★★
PriceSee Best Deal
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Hobart Handler 140 (#500559)

Welding enthusiasts know the Hobart Handler 140 for a reason. This particular welder earned its reputation as a reliable, versatile, straightforward machine. In particular, the wire feed system has won many fans with its great design and dependability.

For the hobbyist or small business owner, the Handler 140 performs MIG and flux core welding for various jobs. From welding of rugged suspension parts on a tractor to thin sheet metal, this unit performs various tasks and is easy to use. One of the many reasons it made it onto our 110v MIG buying guide.

Plus, manufacturing in the USA matters to some people, and the Illinois Tool Works owns Hobart and Miller Electric. Both brands are made in the midwest, in separate plants, with Hobart focusing on the design and manufacture of welders for homeowners and small businesses.

Full Hobart Handler 140 review

What’s Included with the Handler 140

  • HR-100 gun with 10 ft. (3 m) cable
  • Owner’s manual
  • 10 ft. (3 m) ground cable with clamp
  • Built-in gas solenoid valve
  • Dual-gauge regulator with gas hose
  • Spool hub assembly for 4 in. or 8 in. spools
  • Sample spool of .030 in. (0.8mm) self-shielding flux-cored wire
  • .030 in. (0.8mm) contact tips
  • Quick Select™ drive roll for .024 in. (0.6mm) or .030/.035 in. (08/.9 mm) solid wire, and .030/.035 in. (0.8/0.9 mm) flux-cored wire
  • Power cord with plug
  • Welding guide
  • Material thickness gauge

Hobart Handler 140 Highlights Compared to Lincoln 140

Pros

  • Reliable wire feed system up to 700 inches per minute (including aluminum)
  • Welds aluminum without the additional cost of a spool gun
  • 5 voltage settings for better heat control
  • User-friendly 3-groove drive roller (“Quick Select”)
  • Wide WFS range
  • Strong Warranty (e.g., transformer covered for 5 years)
  • Made in the USA

Cons

  • Cannot use with a spool gun
  • Regulator not C100 compatible 
  • Work clamp is light and undersized
  • The aluminum thickness range is smaller (only 16 to 20 gauge.)

Where to buy

A few retailers are selling Hobart Handler 140. However, the main 3 selling this at the best price are:

Lincoln Electric 140 Easy MIG (#K2697-1)

The Lincoln Electric Easy MIG 140 comes with a solid heritage. With over 100 years of manufacturing welders, Lincoln Electric boasts a proud history and a significant worldwide presence. They are based in Ohio but manufacture the welders in Mexico.

This Easy MIG 140 finds a home in many home enthusiasts and small business shops for a reason. It is easy to use and capable, especially with sheet metal. Plus, with flux-core wire, you can weld up to 5/16 in. thick mild steel with multiple passes. So, it is a versatile welder.

Lincoln Electric makes many different welders, and that can create confusion for the consumer. You will find a variety of 140 models sold under several brand names. But most share identical features and specifications. These include:

  • Weld-Pak 140
  • MIG-Pak 140
  • Easy-Mig 140
  • Pro-Mig 140

(Note: the Power MIG 140C and 140MP are NOT the same. They have differences in the power supply, wire drive, and voltage control.)

What’s Included with the Easy MIG 140

  • Magnum® 100L gun and 10 ft. (3.0 m) cable assembly 
  • .025 in (0.6 mm) contact tips (Qty 3) 
  • .035 in. (0.9 mm) contact tips (Qty. 3)  
  • Gasless nozzle for Innershield® welding  
  • Gas nozzle for MIG welding  
  • Spindle adapter for 8 in. (203 mm) diameter spools  
  • Dual track drive roll for MIG and flux-cored welding of .025 – .035 in. (0.6 – 0.9 mm) diameter wire 
  • Harris® 3000290 Gas Regulator 
  • 52 in. (1.3 m) hose for use with Ar/CO2 or CO2 gases. (requires an adapter to use with C100 gas tanks, not included.)  
  • Sample spool of .025 in. (0.6 mm) diameter SuperArc® L-56® premium MIG wire  
  • Sample spool of .035 in. (0.9 mm) diameter Innershield® NR®-211-MP flux-cored wire 
  • 10 ft. (3.0 m) cable and work clamp 
  • How TO MIG Weld DVD  
  • Instruction manual

Lincoln Easy MIG 140 Highlights Compared to Handler 140

Pros

  • Spool gun ready, which allows welding 22 to 10 gauge aluminum
  • Rugged clamp with braided strap
  • Comes with more contact tips
  • No tools needed for wire spool, wire drive, and polarity adjustments

Cons

  • Extra expense to add the spool gun needed to weld aluminum
  • WFS more limited
  • Made in Mexico 
  • Shorter warranty
  • Fewer voltage selections

Where to buy

The Lincoln Electric 140 Easy MIG seems to be more widely available. However, there can be a big difference in what you pay depending on where you shop. Here are a few online retailers we found:

Hobart 140 vs Lincoln 140 – The Main Differences

With similar features and specs, you might want to know the differences that do exist. That is only natural since these variances will be what helps you decide which unit is right for you. To make that easy, we have summarized the differences below.

Welding Controls

The operating panel on both units is pretty straightforward—a simple on/off toggle and two control knobs. One dial controls the WFS, and a second to select the voltage setting.

You can operate the controls with gloves on with both welders, even though the knobs are on the small side.

So, there is not much difference between the controls, except for orientation. The Hobart 140 uses a vertical stacking of the two dials, while the Lincoln 140 sets the two knobs horizontal or side by side. Some may find one or the other more convenient, but this is a minor difference.

Wire Feed Speed

The wire feed speed (“WFS”) control found on each welder allows “infinite” control over the machine’s WFS range. This enables fine-tuning that is often needed to get that perfect arc. And both welders do produce good arcs, with little difference, when the controls are set right.

But these machines do differ in the WFS range. The Hobart 140 range is wider at 40 to 700 inches per minute (“ipm”). For comparison, the Lincoln 140 offers 50 to 500 ipm.

When welding aluminum, the Hobart wire feed system feeds soft aluminum at the high speeds needed without birdnesting, crushing, or jamming. With the Lincoln, you can weld aluminum, but you need to purchase a separate spool gun. More on welding aluminum later.

In general, if you compare the two welders straight out of the box, the Handler 140 wire feed system is a better design and more versatile than the Easy MIG 140.

Voltage Selection

Both units have preset voltage selections. But the Handler 140 from Hobart offers 5 presets. The Easy MIG 140 offers 4. 

With one more preset, the Handler 140 provides you with more options to adjust the heat. That means better tuning of your arc.

Welder Parts

Wire Drive Mechanism

The Lincoln and Hobart welders come with dependable cast aluminum wire drives, and you can change the drive roller for different size wire without tools on each. Plus, both also provide tension control with clear markings to aid in properly setting the wire tautness. 

The Lincoln 140 uses a dual groove roll. To change from the 0.025 in. to the 0.030/0.035 wire groove, you need to remove the drive roll and flip it over, which can be done without tools.

However, the Hobart 140 comes with a triple groove roller. You simply push in and twist the roller to set it for the wire size you want to use, then let go. Done. No removing the roller and no tools. It is easier to change over compared to the Lincoln welder.

The Hobart 140 wire drive has two “smooth” grooves, the same as the Lincoln welder. But there is a third, textured groove. It is designed for 0.030/0.035 in. flux-cored wire and lets you use less tension to avoid squashing or deforming a “softer” wire.

At this welder level, this is unique to the Handler 140. It is hard to push soft wire without jams, birdnesting, or other problems. But the textured groove allows for the use of flux-core wire without issue. The solid performance is actually surprising for a welder in this price range.

So, both units include quality drive mechanisms that you can rely on. But for versatility and ease of use, without buying additional accessories, the Handler 140 edges out the Easy MIG 140.

Guns and Cables

As supplied, both units provide MIG guns and cables, all 10 feet long. The guns on each welder are easy to use and fit the hand well. The cables come with quality sheathings, and they are easy to manage.

The ground cables found on the two welders are 6 gauge, thick enough to handle the load without becoming too hard to manage. But Hobart’s work clamp is smaller.

Notably, the Hobart 140 clamp is also missing a braided bonding wire to connect the clamp jaws. But the Lincoln Easy MIG 140 comes with one, and their clamp is larger.

This bonding wire allows the clamp to work no matter which jaw makes good contact. As a result, it is easier to establish a good ground with the Lincoln 140.

You can easily swap the clamp on the Hobart unit, and it is inexpensive to do so. But it is still an additional expense plus your time and effort after buying a brand new welder.

So, out of the box, the Lincoln 140 comes with a better work clamp. The Hobart clamp works, but it is small and not as forgiving.

Shielding Gas Regulator and Hoses

Both welders include a regulator and gas hose in the kit. Each regulator comes with dual gauges and brass connections for attaching them to the gas tank.

For both welders, the two gauges indicate the gas flow in cubic feet per hour (“CFH”) and the gas left in the tank as pounds per square inch (“PSI”).

Lincoln supplies a Harris regulator that is compatible with Argon and Argon blends (e.g., C25). It can also run pure CO2 if you use a special CO2 tank adapter (the adapter is not included in the Lincoln kit).

The Miller-branded regulator supplied with the Hobart 140 works with Argon and Argon blends. But it is not recommended for use with 100% CO2.

As you can see, the major difference is the Lincoln 140 can run pure CO2 with the supplied regulator (if you buy the adapter). Since CO2 is cheaper to use, some welders consider that to be an advantage for the Lincoln welder as supplied.

Overload Protection Circuits

Welding draws large amounts of electricity, and the various machine mechanisms can overheat or overload. To protect against damage, both units build in protection that includes:

  • Wire Drive Motor Protection: An automatic overload circuit protects both wire drive motors.
  • Output Overload Protection: On each of these welders, a circuit breaker will trip if you exceed the maximum output. This breaker then must be manually reset.
  • Thermal Protection: Both the Lincoln and Hobart units monitor the power supply temperature and will shut down the welder if it gets too hot. You then need to wait for internal fans to cool the unit before you can use it again.

The manufacturers know overheating can be an issue, and they do provide a way to rate the machines’ ability to “work” and handle the load. This is what they call the duty cycle, and it rates the time you can weld at a given output level.

The stated duty cycle for each of the 140 units being reviewed is 20% at 90 amps. So what does that mean?

Well, it means over a 10 minute period of time, you can weld for 2 minutes at 90 amps. The unit needs to cool for the other 8 minutes. Hence the 20% rating.

If you increase the output amps, the duty cycle goes down. If you decrease the output amps, the duty cycle goes up. Hobart does supply a graph of the duty cycle vs. the output amps on their cut sheet for the welder to help you understand how the duty cycle changes with output amps, as seen below:

If the duty cycle is exceeded, you risk overheating the unit and tripping the thermal protection. You then need to wait for the fans to cool it off enough to continue.

The Hobart unit has an overload light on the control panel that comes on when the overheating protection is engaged. The Lincoln welder does not. 

It is not a huge difference, but it is nice to have so you can see when the Hobart welder has cooled enough to resume. With the Lincoln, you have to guess and test with the trigger to see if it has cooled enough.

Operator’s Manual

This might be splitting hairs, but the Hobart manual appears to contain the useful information a welder wants in a clear, easy-to-use format. The Lincoln manual also includes understandable and adequate information. But it does lack a welder settings chart.

For some, those little things make a difference. But the links to each manual are included in the paragraph above, and you can see for yourself if you are so inclined.

Warranties

Lincoln Electric offers a 3-year part and labor warranty. The exceptions are the MIG gun, covered for 90 days, and the gas regulator, which is warranted for 1 year. Wear and tear on the cables is not covered at all.

Hobart offers a 5/3/1 warranty. It includes parts and labor for 5 years on the transformer and 3 years on the wire drive system, control boards, and the regulator. The MIG gun, contactors, and relays are covered for 1 year (or 90 days for industrial use).

While the Lincoln warranty is strong, Hobart does have an edge in this category.

Welding Aluminum

We saved this topic for last. Depending on how important it is for you to weld aluminum, it may be the deciding factor for which unit you should buy.

The Hobart 140 is more versatile out of the box. It can weld 16 to 12 gauge aluminum as supplied. That is convenient, and you may think it is the better option of the two. However, the Hobart welder does not accept a spool gun.

The Lincoln 140 with a spool gun accessory can weld 22 to 10 gauge aluminum. The Lincoln spool gun is well designed and eliminates common problems like birdnesting. Overall, it might even be a bit easier for welding aluminum than the Handler 140.

If your work involves aluminum in the 22 to 10 gauge thickness range, the Lincoln Easy Mig 140, plus the spool gun, may be your best choice. 

Conclusion

The Lincoln Easy MIG 140 and Hobart Handler 140 are two great welders. Either should provide years of reliable service in a home or small business shop. Plus, both options are reliable, portable, and easy to use, even for first-time welders. 

But in general, if you do a lot of aluminum work in the 22 to 10 gauge range, that may push you towards the Lincoln 140 welder plus the add-on spool gun. It is a good choice in this situation.

With a solid wire drive and strong warranty, the Hobart 140 does edge out the Lincoln 140 when aluminum is not a major part of your work. It is more versatile as supplied with more voltage control and a wider WFS range than the Lincoln 140.

Other Product Comparisons

Hobart 140 vs Eastwood 135

Hobart 190 vs 210

Lincoln 180 vs Hobart 190

Sours: https://weldguru.com/hobart-140-vs-lincoln-140/

Lincoln Welder Reviews

Lincoln Electric is a world leader when it comes to the manufacturing of a high-quality welder. You’ll find MIG welders, TIG welders, Stick welders, and multi-process welders within this brand and often for surprisingly affordable prices. Specific welding disciplines, including advanced process welders, submerged arc equipment, and multi-operator welders are also available.

If you want the best, then Lincoln Electric is a brand that you’ll want to consider. The Lincoln welder reviews will help you do just that.

Contents

Here Are the Best Lincoln Welders in One Chart

One of the strengths of the Lincoln Electric brand is the quality of the welding guns and torches that are offered. You’ll find everything from robotic to semi-automatic guns for a variety of disciplines. These are the specific models that have proven to stand up to the tests of time.

Why Choose a Lincoln Welder Today?

Lincoln Electric isn’t a brand that will work hard to sell you a welder, and then leave you on your own to figure things out. They support welders of every skill level in a wide variety of ways.

  • Easy Access to Consumables. You’ll be able to find the wire you need for flux-core welding, a replacement gun, or any other consumable that is regularly used for your welding projects. Each consumable is guaranteed to work with your branded welder.
  • Support Availability. You have full access to your operator’s manual thanks to the structure of the Lincoln Electric website. Just search by your product name or code number and you can get the documentation that is needed.
  • Helpful Knowledge. Lincoln Electric has a full range of how-tos and useful welding tips that can be accessed 24/7. You can also take a look at owner-submitted welding projects, watch instructional videos, and find out the latest in welding safety tips with one-click convenience.

The performance of the welder is something that also stands above and beyond what many other brands are able to provide. You receive an arc that is consistent with this series of welders, no matter what the discipline may be. Duty cycles are available in virtually every category as well, allowing you to weld for long periods every day or be the welding weekend warrior.

It’s all in your hands when you choose Lincoln Electric.

Pricing Options for Lincoln Electric Welders

Prices for Lincoln Electric welders are based on the amperage it can produce if it is a multi-function process and the amount of portability that is available. Entry-level welders from Lincoln are typically priced in the $100-$200 range. If you want a multi-process welder, expect a price of $300-$500 for your new equipment. Industrial-level welders and cutting equipment are also available, with pricing topping out at $2,000 for models that can be purchased online.

There is also a complete series of Lincoln Electric Welding Helmets that are competitively priced to complement your new welder as well.

Real Life Reviews of Lincoln Welders

K2185-1

If you have the need to weld up to 1/8-inch mild steel on a single pass, then this is the MIG welder for you. It’s handy because it will weld flux corded in addition to the shielded gas and plugs into any household outlet. In return, you’ll receive up to 70 amps of welding power. This product is sold as part of a kit, so you’ll receive everything needed to get started. Great for beginners or hobbyists, you’ll want to upgrade the mask if you pursue serious welding opportunities in the future.

Get more information by viewing: Lincoln K2185-1 MIG Review.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

Power Mig 210

This is a superb lightweight welder that gives you dual voltage inputs. You can plug it into virtually any common power supply and get to work. What stands out about this welder is the push-and-turn digital controls, making it a lot easier to set up your equipment so that you can begin welding. You can also see the large color display even underneath the hood, allowing you to change settings or be guided toward the correct setting. All of the features are easy to access and understand, making it a great option for beginners, hobbyists, and entrepreneurs.

View our buying guide: Lincoln PowerMig 210 Review.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

MP 210

If you’ve been MIG welding for some time and are looking for a new welder, then give this multi-process option some consideration today. You’ll receive all of the benefits that the PowerMig 210 provides from Lincoln, but with the added benefit of being able to TIG weld or Stick weld at your convenience. It comes with everything you need to get started in one pack, including the foot pedal for TIG amperage control. If you’re ready to see what your A-game can be in the welding world, this is the equipment that can make that happen.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

K2697-1

What stands out on this MIG welder is the wire feed speed control, giving you options between 50-500 IPM. You also receive a fully adjustable drive system that reduces the amount of tangling and crushing that happens with your wire on other models or brands. The brass-to-brass gun connection is another nice upgrade to have. You can set up the welder for flux core welding or gas-shielding welding, tackling steel, stainless, or aluminum with ease. It’s a little heavy at 60+ pounds for what it can produce, but it also has a performance that is second-to-none in its category. This is a solid purchase that shouldn’t be ignored.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

AC225S

This stick welder offers operators a broad range of welding amperage, from 40-225. This gives it an incredibly versatile number of uses, welding 16-gauge or heavier materials with a single pass. Cast iron, steel, and stainless projects are handled with efficient ease. The AC arc is nice and smooth, giving the operator the control needed for whatever project they happen to be working on. The welding chord is 15 feet, while the ground cord is 10 feet, giving you enough room to work in the average garage.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

Easy MIG 180

If you’re a beginner, but want an upgrade from the best cheap welders that are in our industry today, then this is one of our top suggestions. It can be set up for flux core, offers 50-500 IPM wire feed speed control, and a fully adjustable drive system. The connections are forgiving, allowing you to single-pass 3/16-inch with consistency. Flux core welding can handle ½-inch materials. You’ll receive everything you need to get started straight from the box.

Note: Negative public reviews involve pricing, not performance, and that issue has been corrected with this product.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

K1297

This AC/DC welder produces smooth, consistent arcs that have a broad output range so that you can tackle many different jobs around the house or shop. It’s strong enough that you can use the welder for fabrication or construction, but precise enough that maintenance and repair work is solid. With AC welding, you have up to 225 amps of power, while the DC output range is 30-125 amps. You can weld 16-gauge metals or greater and handle cast iron in addition to steel. You really can’t go wrong with your welding with this model from Lincoln Electric in your shop or garage.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

MIG Handheld

If your welding projects take you out and about, then you need a strong, but portable, a welder by your side. This is that welder. It can be used for flux core welding and offers all of the advanced features that Lincoln puts on its best MIG welders. It holds up to a 10-pound spool and tends to work best with .030 wire, but you can change that out for what you need. Setting it up is fast and simple and you can get to work in under an hour. Good for ½-inch materials are thinner, it is a 220V machine.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

Square Wave 200

If you need to weld aluminum within the TIG discipline, you already know that your options are limited. We prefer this model for that need to other brands. It offers several advanced features but is still easy enough to use that anyone with MIG familiarity can get the hang of this equipment. You also have Stick welding capabilities and it all comes from the same power source. Light enough to be portable, it has dual input voltage options so you can weld up to ¼-inch on a single pass. It works like a champ, provides a consistent result, and does well with the HF start.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

K2515-1

This MIG welder is a good mid-range option to consider for advanced students or welders that tackle projects at home. It offers flux core capabilities, operating from a 230v input, to provide a 180-amp output. Operators can one-pass ½-inch once they get used to the machine, though shielded gas welding tends to top out at 3/16-inch. Flux core wires of .025-.045 are supported, letting you effectively weld 24-gauge metals cleanly and effectively. No outboard modules are required.

Click here to view the price on Amazon and get the best deal.

The best Lincoln welder reviews will help you find a durable, consistent welder that will meet your needs with relative ease. Choose this brand and you’ll be making an investment into your welding future.

Sours: https://ratemywelder.com/lincoln-welder-reviews/
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MIG Gun Contact Tips

D

C

For
Manufacturer
Model Number
StyleChoose
a Wire
Diameter
Pkg.
Qty.
 Pkg.
Lincoln Magnum 200, Magnum 250L, Magnum 300, Magnum 400D

0.023", 0.025", 0.030", 0.035", 0.040", 0.045", 0.052", 0.063"

10000000000000000
Lincoln Magnum 100LC

0.023", 0.025", 0.030", 0.035"

1000000000000000
Tweco No. 2, No. 3, No. 4D

0.023", 0.025", 0.030", 0.035", 0.040", 0.045", 0.052", 0.063"

1000000000000000
Tweco Mini No. 1C

0.023", 0.025", 0.030", 0.035"

1000000000000000

Heavy Duty MIG Guns

For Lincoln

These guns let you weld with more power for longer periods of time than standard MIG guns.

For
Manufacturer
Model Number
For
Use
With
For
Wire
Type
For
Wire
Dia.
Duty
Cycle
Max.
Current,
A
Cable
Lg.,
ft.
Cable
Material
Includes Each
Lincoln Easy-Core, Easy-MIG, PowerMIG, Pro-Core, Pro-MIG, and Weld-PakArgon/Carbon Dioxide BlendSolid, Flux Core0.035", 0.040", 0.045"8 Minutes On, 2 Minutes Off25015RubberContact Tip, Nozzle000000000000000

MIG Gun Nozzles

D

E

F

For Manufacturer Model NumberStyleBore
Size
 Each
Lincoln Magnum 200, Magnum 250LD5/8"00000000000000
Lincoln Magnum 200, Magnum 250LE1/2"0000000000000
Lincoln Magnum 300, Magnum 400F1/2"00000000000000
Lincoln Magnum 300, Magnum 400F5/8"00000000000000

MIG Gun Conduit Assemblies

For Manufacturer Model NumberFor Wire Dia.Lg.,
ft.
 Each
Lincoln Magnum 300, Magnum 4000.030", 0.035"15000000000000000
Lincoln Magnum 300, Magnum 4000.040", 0.045"1500000000000000

MIG Welders

A shielding gas is required for welding solid wire.

Optionalutilitycart allows you to easily transport your welder, gas tank, and tools from place to place.

Welders

For
Material
Thick.

For Sheet Metal
Thick.,ga.

Input

For
Wire
Type
For
Wire
Dia.
Min.Max.Min.Max.VoltageFrequency,
Hz
PhaseOutput
Current
Includes Each

Lincoln Easy-MIG 140

Solid, Flux Core0.025", 0.030", 0.035"1/64"11/64"247120V AC60Single90 A @ 19.5 V ACWelding Gun Contact Tips
1/2-lb. Spool of 0.025" Copper-Coated Steel Solid Wire
1/2-lb. Spool of 0.035" Steel Flux-Core Wire
10-ft. Ground Cable with Ground Clamp
Welding Hose
Argon-Mixed Gas Regulator
Gas Nozzle for Welding Solid-Core Wire
Gasless Nozzle for Welding Flux-Core Wire
00000000000000

Optional Utility Carts

Lg.Wd.For Max. Gas
Tank Dia.
 Each
27"11 3/4"7"000000000000000

Optional Aluminum Welding Kits

Includes Each
Gun with Spool Mount
1-lb. Spool of 0.035" 4043 Aluminum Solid Wire
Welding Gun Contact Tips
Electric Harness with Toggle Switch
Carrying Case
00000000000000

Multiprocess Welders

Repair most metals with a single machine—these welders perform MIG,TIG, and stick welds. MIG welding is often used for general purpose applications, as it’s faster than other techniques and easiest to learn. TIG welding works on thin metal and leaves a clean appearance, so it’s commonly used for finish work. Stick welding is the best method for heavy duty welds on thick or dirty metal. It’s also the easiest to do outdoors, since it doesn’t use shielding gas that could be affected by wind.

Carts let you easily move welders, gas and accessories from one area to another.

Spoolguns hold a small spool of welding wire for use when MIG welding aluminum.

TIGtorches are required for TIG welding.TIGfootpedals let you control amperage to make adjustments while TIG welding.

Welders

Welder

Input

For
Wire
Type
For
Wire
Dia.
For Min.
Material
Thick.
For Min. Sheet
Metal
Thick.,ga.
Duty
Cycle
VoltageFrequency,
Hz
PhaseOutput
Current
Wt.,
lbs.
Includes Each

Lincoln K3461-1

Solid, Flux Core0.025", 0.030", 0.035"1/64"246 Minutes On, 4 Minutes Off120V AC60Single115 A @ 15 V AC
80 A @ 23 V AC
95 A @ 19 V AC
351/2-lb. Spool of 0.025" Copper-Coated Steel Solid Wire
1/2-lb. Spool of 0.035" Steel Flux-Core Wire
10-ft. Ground Cable with Ground Clamp
Gas Nozzle for Welding Solid-Core Wire
Gas Regulator
Gasless Nozzle for Welding Flux-Core Wire
Welding Gun Contact Tips
00000000000000

Optional Carts

Lg.Wd.For Max. Gas
Tank Dia.
 Each
27"11 3/4"7"000000000000000

Optional Spool Guns

Spool Gun

For
Use
With
For
Wire
Type
For
Wire
Dia.
Duty
Cycle
Max.
Current,
A
Cable
Lg.,
ft.
Cable
Material
Includes Each
ArgonSolid, Flux Core0.030", 0.035"6 Minutes On, 4 Minutes Off13010Rubber1-lb. Spool of 0.035" 4043 Aluminum Solid Wire
Contact Tips
Nozzle
000000000000000

TIG Torches

TIG Torch

For
Use
With
Neck
Flexibility
Duty
Cycle
Max.
Current,
A
Cooling
Method
Cable
Lg.,
ft.
Cable
Material
Includes Each
ArgonRigid6 Minutes On, 4 Minutes Off125Air12.5RubberCable and Hose Assembly
Long Back Cap
Torch Body
Torch Handle
000000000000000

Optional TIG Foot Pedals

TIG Foot Pedal

Cable
Lg.,ft.
 Each
13000000000000000
Sours: /lincoln-mig-welders/

Top 10 Best Lincoln 180 Mig Welders 2020

Top 10 Best Lincoln 180 Mig Welders 2020

1. Lincoln Electric Power MIG 180 DUAL MIG Welder K3018-2

  • Industrial forged aluminum drive – twin gear-driven drive rolls ship constructive traction.
  • Spool gun prepared – simply take away the usual mig gun and plug within the economical magnum professional 100sg spool gun
  • Twin enter energy functionality – choose 120 or 208/230 volt enter energy
  • Diamond core expertise – delivers a forgiving arc, wonderful out-of-position arc motion, low spatter and a large voltage candy spot
  • No problem tool-less design – for enter energy modifications, wire spool mounting, wire drive service and polarity modifications.

2. Lincoln Electric Easy MIG 180 Flux-Core/MIG Welder

  • 50–500 ipm wire feed pace management
  • Brass-to-brass gun connection for enhanced conductivity
  • Can arrange for gas-free flux core welding or gas-shielded mig welding for metal, stainless and aluminum
  • Absolutely adjustable drive system reduces wire tangle and crushing
  • Solid aluminum physique with inflexible drive aids wire alignment

3. LINCOLN ELECTRIC K2698-1 Portable MIG Welder, Easy MIG 180 Series, 208/240VAC

  • Import from: mexico
  • Welding & soldering tools & provides
  • Business model: lincoln electrical

4. Forney 291 Easy Weld 180 ST 120V/230 V Welder

  • Twin voltage-120/230 enter energy and adapter
  • Rugged- all metallic case that’s constructed robust to tackle put on and tear
  • Practical- options an 8’ floor clamp, 8’ electrode holder and 8’ energy cable. it has an built-in deal with and cable wrap for straightforward storing and portability. with the elevate begin functionality for tig, there’s no want for a foot pedal
  • Responsibility cyce- 80 amps @ 30% for 120 volts; 180 amps @ 25% for 230 volts
  • Highly effective- welds as much as half” gentle metal – amperage vary: 10-90 amps for 120 volts; 10 -180 amps for 230 volts
  • Versatile- straightforward begin expertise makes each strike straightforward and eliminates the frustration of your electrode sticking. dc stick and tig welder

5. MIG Welder, Wheeled, 208/230VAC

  • Nation of producer: mexico
  • Occupational well being & security
  • Producer: lincoln electrical

6. Hobart 500559 Handler 140 MIG Welder 115V

  • Processes recommended-mig-cast iron,copper,brass,titanium, magnesium alloys. flux cored- aluminium, forged iron,copper,brass,titanium, magnesium alloys
  • Amperage output: 25–140; 20% responsibility cycle @ 90 amps, 19v
  • Welds 24 ga as much as 1/four in gentle metal
  • Operates off 115v commonplace family present.wire feed pace vary 40 – 700 ipm.
  • 50 – 740 ipm at no load
  • 5-position voltage management selector provides a clean, steady arc in any respect welding thicknesses

7. LINCOLN ELECTRIC K2697-1 Portable MIG Welder, Easy MIG 140 Series, 120VAC

  • Import from: mexico
  • Welding & soldering tools & provides
  • Business model: lincoln electrical

8. Hobart 500554 Handler 190 MIG Welder 230V

  • Highly effective and professional outcomes. operates on 230v energy
  • 7 voltage picks, enhanced magnetics and infinite wire feed pace management gives simpler fantastic management of the output parameters for improved arc efficiency with much less spatter
  • Welds 24 ga. to five/16in. metal in single move
  • 25 to 190 output amperage
  • 30% responsibility cycle @ 130 amps

9. Hobart Handler 210 MVP MIG Welder

  • Welds 24 ga. to three/eight in. metal in a single move
  • Responsibility cycle – 115v 20% at 90 amps; 230v 30% at 150 amps
  • Twin-voltage (115v/230v) with mvp plug makes the unit straightforward to discover a place to plug it in.
  • 7 voltage settings which assist fantastic tune for precision welding
  • Fast change drive roll system – no instruments required

10. Lincoln Electric PRO-MIG 180 Welder 230-Volt MIG Flux-Cored Wire Feed Model K2481-1

  • Brass-to-brass gun connection enhances conductivity. clean arc begins with minimal spatter.
  • Succesful efficiency – forgiving arc makes dialing in your utility straightforward.
  • Heavy responsibility wire drive totally adjustable drive system reduces the prospect of wire tangling and crushing
  • Sturdy forged aluminum gear field delivers added drive torque and quiet operation.
  • Enter energy – 208/230/1/60 processes – mig, flux-cored

Dinu das

Tech specialist. Social media guru. Evil problem solver. Total writer. Web enthusiast. Internet nerd. Passionate gamer. Twitter buff.

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Mig welders lincoln

Lincoln Mig Welder

"are those little red Lincoln MIG welders at home depot worth a crap?!.. "

the lincoln mig welders you see at home depot and other big box stores are not built the same as the ones you see at the lincoln electric web site.

There are 2 versions...The one you see on lincolnelectric.com is built better...the one in Big box stores is imported and some components like wire feeding mechanism are lower quality.

lincoln mig welder 115v

"I see these all the time on craigslist!.. "

Shopping for a Lincoln Mig Welder ?

Bare wire MIG vs. Flux-Core: Which is Best?

The answer is YES. That’s because its apples and oranges really. If you’re buying your first Lincoln MIG welder, you want both options. That means ponying up the extra few bucks for the capability of using shielding gas and bare wire.

Why?

Because that’s how you weld really thin stuff like fenders and body panels. You will need to get E70s6 spool wire in .023” to .025" diameter along with a bottle of 75/25 argon/co2 gas.

Use the flux core wire for welding outside and on your brother in laws rusty gate.

Gas Metal-Arc Welding:

(GMAW) as identified by the American Welding Society, is mostly known as MIG (Metal Inert Gas) and uses a continuous solid wire electrode for filler metal and an externally supplied gas (typically from a high-pressure cylinder) for shielding. The wire is usually mild steel, typically copper colored because it is coated with a thin layer of copper to protect it from rusting. The machine must be setup for DC positive polarity. The shielding gas, which is usually carbon dioxide or mixtures of carbon dioxide and argon, protects the molten metal from the atmosphere. Shielding gas flows through the gun and cable assembly and out the gun nozzle with the welding wire to shield and protect the molten weld pool. Molten metal is very reactive to oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen from the atmosphere, if exposed to it. Even a slight breeze can blow the shielding away and cause porosity. That's why welding outdoors is usually avoided unless special windscreens are used.

But if you are indoors and welding fairly clean metal, a Lincoln MIG welder with bare wire and shielding gas makes awesome looking welds. Some basic process fundamental knowledge and good technique allows welding up to around 3/16” metal. And for thin sheet metal, it’s the only way to go. The metal will warp less and there will be less grinding. Another plus is you won’t blow as many holes as you will with flux core.

Aluminum MIG

Welding aluminum requires much more than just changing to aluminum wire. Get comfortable welding steel first. Since aluminum is very soft, it requires aluminum drive rolls that have a U-groove and no teeth to bite or cause wire flaking. Cleanliness of the wire and base metal are critical. Wipe the material with acetone on a clean shop rag. Use stainless steel wire brushes that have only been used on aluminum. Drive roll tension and gun length must be minimized. A Teflon, nylon or similar gun liner is needed to minimize friction in feeding the wire and 100% pure Argon gas is required for shielding. Special contact tips are often recommended. Special gun movement techniques are often highly desirable. It is a challenge, but it can be done.

Self-shielded Flux-Cored Arc-Welding process

(FCAW per the American Welding Society), or flux-cored for short, is different in that it uses a wire which contains materials in its core that, when burned by the heat of the arc, produce shielding gases and fluxing agents to help produce a sound weld, without need for the external shielding gas. It’s a lot like Stick welding except for its easier. Most flux core is even good enough to weld in a strong breeze. The flux helps the arc to penetrate more than bare wire MIG, but it has spatter. When finished, the weld is covered with a slag that usually needs to be removed. A "drag" angle for the gun is specified which improves operator visibility. The settings on the wire feeder / power source are slightly more critical for this process. Improper technique will have results that are magnified. This type of welding is primarily performed on mild steel applications outdoors. The Innershield .035" NR-211MP is a good choice for the 115 volt machines and the .045" Innershield NR-211MP is good choice for 230 volt machines.

Hot Tip...Hobart Fabshield 21b is the Shiznit! and runs with no gas..thats right I said no gas!


MIG welding with your Lincoln mig welder

As a rule of thumb, it is recommended to use a compact 115volt input MIG wire feeder/welder indoors on clean new steel that is 24 to 12 gauge thick. 12 gauge is a little less than 1/8" thick. 24 gauge is less than 1/16" thick. (You can weld a little thicker if you can preheat and weld uphill.)The smallest wire(.023") is the bomb for bodywork.

If you need to weld ¼" or thicker material with MIG, you will need the higher capacity machine which will require 230 volt input. The 230 volt machine could also run .035" diameter wire. To MIG weld material more than ¼" thick, you need a higher capacity truly industrial machine. If most of your welding will be performed indoors on clean material that is less than 1/8" thick, a MIG machine that operates on 115 volts is probably your best bet for economic reasons in that a 230 volt input machine will be more expensive.

Flux-Cored

The flux-cored process is only recommended on materials as thicker than 20 gauge, a bit thicker. In general, this process is best for welding thicker materials with a single pass, especially if you need to weld outdoors such as to repair a tractor out in the field. A 115 volt flux-cored machine using an electrode such as .035" Innershield NR-211-MP will generally allow you to weld steel up to ¼"thick. With the proper electrode on a proper machine, such as .045" Innershield NR-211MP, and a 230 volt input machine, you can weld steel up to 1/2" thick. Note that NR-211MP requires that the machine be setup for DC negative polarity.

While there are advantages and disadvantages to both processes, we will try to outline for you some of the most common.

MIG

Advantages

The best choice when cosmetic appearance is an issue since it provides lower spatter levels than flux-cored. The arc is soft and less likely to burn through thin material.

The lower spatter associated with MIG also means no slag to chip off and faster cleaning time.

MIG is the easiest type of welding to learn and is more forgiving if the operator is somewhat erratic in holding arc length or providing a steady travel speed. Procedure settings are more forgiving.

If you are skilled and get specific proper guns, shielding gas, liners, drive rolls, and electrode, MIG can weld a wider range of material including thinner materials and different materials such as stainless, nickel alloys or aluminum.

Disadvantages

Since a bottle of external shielding gas is required, MIG may not be the process of choice if your are looking for something that offers portability and convenience. MIG also requires additional equipment such as a hose, regulator, solenoid(electric valve) in the wire feeder and flowmeter.

The first thing is to prepare the surface by removing paint, rust and any surface contamination.

MIG has a soft arc which will not properly weld thicker materials (10 gauge would be the maximum thickness that MIG could soundly weld with the 115 volt compact wire feed welders we are referring to or ¼" with the 230 volt input compact wire feed machine.) As the thickness of the material(steel) increases, the risk of cold lapping also increases because the heat input needed for good fusion is just not possible with these small machines. Flux-Cored

Advantages

The Self-Shielded electrodes are best for outdoor welding since the flux is built into the wire for positive shielding even in windy conditions. An external shielding gas and additional equipment are not needed, so setting up is simpler, faster and easier.

The flux-cored process is most suited for applications with thicker materials as it is less prone to cold lapping.

Disadvantages

It is not recommended for very thin materials (less than 20 gauge).

When flux-cored welding, machine settings need to be precise. A slight change in a knob position can make a big difference in the arc. In addition, the gun position is more critical in that it must be held consistently, and at the proper angle, to create a good weld.

This process creates spatter and slag that may need to be cleaned for painting or finishing. It should be noted that the same machine can be used to weld with both MIG and flux-cored processes though a special package is usually needed to change from one application to the other. Drive rolls, shielding gas, gun liners and contact tips and procedure settings need to be addressed when changing processes.

Choosing Wire

Another area that may cause the novice welder some concern is how to choose the best wire. Proper electrode diameter is related to plate thickness and the welder you have. A smaller wire makes it easier to weld thinner plate.

For a 110 volt input MIG machine, 025" is the smallest available size and the easiest to use on very thin material.

Realize that these small machines are good, but they cannot do everything.

1) It is very important to get a good, solid ground connection. This means you should thoroughly clean or grind the surface of the metal where attaching the ground clamp and use a tightly attached work clamp so electricity can easily flow through the work piece and back to the welder. Paint and rust are insulators. Remove them. This is a very common mistake to overlook. If you have ever heard the machine gun burst when someone pulls the trigger on a mig gun, you have heard the sound of a bad ground connection. It doesn't matter whether you are using a Miller, Century, or Lincoln mig welder. A bad ground connection will make things go south quickly. To learn how to make an awesome ground booster click here Awesome Ground booster

2)Plug the mig welder on a separate circuit breaker that is properly fused as stated in your Operators Manual. Don’t buy an extension cord at the dollar store and expect things to go well. You are melting steel here. You cannot weld with inadequate input power. Don't even try. The torch on a Lincoln Mig welder is not a magic wand.

3) Good fit up is a big plus. Avoid gaps whenever possible to minimize burn through problems. This is especially critical on thin sheet metal. Again the lincoln mig welder torch is not a magic wand that will heal bad fitups.

4) Keep the gun cable as straight as possible for smooth wire feeding. Don't sharply bend it. Don’t even let it loop at all if possible, arrange the torch cable so that the wire can feed easily.

5) Make sure the contact tip hole looks good (not elongated or melted) and it is tightened to the diffuser. You can run a tip cleaner through it and dress the tip with a file or grinder to extend the life of the tip buy don’t be a cheap ass. Keep a pack of welding tips in your toolbox at all times. All the fun can easily be squished out of welding by trying to pinch pennies by welding with a crapped up tip.

6) Cut the wire at an angle to a point before starting to weld for better starts.

7) Use correct electrode stickout and maintain it as well as proper welding procedures. Correct stickout means about ½ inch. For short circuit bare wire mig. A longer stickout on thin sheet metal can help. On thicker metal it softens the arc and makes the weld pile up without penetration. Not good!!

8) Make sure the drive rolls feed smoothly with proper tension.

9) Relax and try to hold the gun as steady and smooth as possible. Take a few dry runs before you flip the helmet down. Things look different in the dark.

10) Make sure you observe and follow all welding safety precautions. For more details, consult ANSI Z 49.1.

11) Oops! there were only supposed to be 10 things about welding with a lincoln mig welder! So here is a bonus...USE BOTH HANDS!!! holding the torch with one hand is a sure way to make a weld that looks like Fido's ASS

good luck  Leave Lincoln Mig Welder and view home page

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Lincoln 180 Vs Miller 212 - Mig Welder Shootout - Head to Head Comparison - Powermig 180C

15 Best MIG Welders 2021 Reviews

MIG welders can be used for a range of projects including autobody work, hobby welding, maintaining equipment or a huge number of other things. MIG welding is often chosen as a preferred technique as it produces good quality welds, it’s easy to learn, and does not cost a lot of money.

Contents

What is the Best MIG Welder for You?

When buying a welder, there is a range of factors to consider such as price, metal thickness, input voltage, weight, duty cycle and more. We have written our recommendations based on our experience.

In this MIG Welder Buyer’s Guide, you can find explanations of the best welder for your needs and a summary of why these are the best. We have also written more in-depth product reviews which you can read and a description of the different factors to consider when choosing your welder.

Click any of the links below to find which welder is best suited for your needs.

Best MIG Welder Comparison Chart

Below is a comparison chart of the best Mig welders on the market today. We've included a full range of welders from small, beginner welders to heavy industrial welders.

What are the Best MIG Welders?

1. Hobart Handler 210

medal Best dual voltagemedal Best under $1000

The Hobart Handler 210 has the typical great quality Hobart build with durable parts that stand the test of time. The 210 is more suited to autobody repair and construction than the 190 and 140 and it welds up to 3/8 inch. It’s also a flexible unit with the capacity to weld off 115V and 230V. At under $1000 it’s lot cheaper than the Ironman 240 and is a wise choice if you’re looking for a welder that packs real power but isn’t the price of the heavy industrial welders. It you’re looking for the all round MIG package for power, versatility, quality and value for money, the Hobart 210 is our top pick. See our full review of the Hobart Handler 210 here.

Specifications

BrandHobart
ModelHandler 210 MVP
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)25-210
Duty Cycle20% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115/230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/8 in
Weight (lb)79
Dimensions (in)12.4 x 10.6 x 19.5
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)40-680
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Dual voltage
  • Cast aluminum drive roll
  • Quick release tension
  • Infinite wire feed speed control
  • 7 position voltage control
  • Available at a good price

Cons

  • Heavy
  • Can’t automatically select settings

2. Lincoln PowerMIG 210MP

medal Best multi-process

medal Best under $2000

The Lincoln PowerMIG 210 is the ultimate MIG welder for versatility. It comes with the capability to perform MIG, Stick, TIG and Flux Core welding at both 120v and 240v. This is perfect if you’re looking to buy a MIG welder and are considering buying a TIG or Stick welder as well. Buying a multi-process welder like the PowerMIG 210 can save you a lot of money rather than buying separate machines.  Lincoln are the market leaders when it comes to manufacturing quality and the PowerMIG 210 is top of the range to build quality and weld quality. The digital display on the front of the machine lets you easily key in your variables to get you get set up in no time at all with an easy to use user interface. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandLincoln Electric
ModelPowerMIG 210MP
Process TypeMIG, Flux, Stick, TIG
Amperage Range (A)20-220
Duty Cycle25% @ 200A
Input Voltage (V)115/230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/8 in
Weight (lb)40
Dimensions (in)14 x 10.8 x 19
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)50-500
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Lightweight and easy to carry
  • Dual Voltage
  • Automatically selects settings
  • Digital display with easy set up
  • Capable of MIG, TIG, Stick and Flux
  • Excellent build quality

Cons

  • More expensive that similar power MIG welders
  • Not suitable if you want a MIG only welder
  • No AC Tig for aluminum

3. Hobart Ironman 240

medal Best 220V MIG welder

The Hobart Ironman 240 is updated Ironman 230 and it’s a really powerful welder that can comfortably weld 1/2 inch steel in single phase with fantastic arc quality. This new power packs even more power than the 230 and goes up to 280A and has a better duty cycle of 60% duty cycle at 200A. What’s great is that they’ve kept it a similar price. It’s a huge unit, but there’s wheels to help move it around, and a build in cylinder rack to store your gas cylinder. Most hobbyists won’t need a welder this powerful, but if you want a reliable MIG welder with a bit of extra power, this is our top pick. It still has 12 different voltage settings and infinite wire speed control.

Specifications

BrandHobart
ModelIronman 240
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)30-280
Duty Cycle60% @ 200A
Input Voltage (V)230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 1/2 in
Weight (lb)186
Dimensions (in)30 x 19 x 40
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)50-700
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Durable with high manufacturing quality
  • Powerful, can weld up to 1/2 inch steel
  • Wheels attached so you don’t need a cart
  • 12 voltage settings
  • Infinite wire feed speed control
  • 15 foot MIG gun
  • High duty cycle for increased productivity

Cons

  • Large, heavy unit
  • Quite expensive
  • No 110V capability

4. Miller Millermatic 211

Miller have spent time crafting a machine to the highest manufacturing standards that is perfect for reducing set up times and welding up to 3/8 in steel. The most notable feature is the Advanced Autoset feature which gets you welding out the box in no time. All you have to do is select your wire diameter, process type and metal thickness and you’re good to go. You can input your parameters manually if you’d prefer, but the Autoset is so advanced that you really won’t need to, the arc quality is spot on.  It’s a versatile unit that is dual-voltage and is super lightweight so it’s easy to carry with the handle on the top. There are plenty of other fine details in this machine like the ‘Auto Spool Gun Detect’ which can automatically detect a spool gun and ‘Smooth-Start Technology’ to enable smooth welds. You have to pay a bit more for this welder, but you get a quality machine with fine attention to detail. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandMiller
ModelMillermatic 211
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)30-230
Duty Cycle40% @ 150A
Input Voltage (V)115/230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/8 in
Weight (lb)38
Dimensions (in)12.5 x 11.25 x 20.5
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)60-600
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Smooth-Start technology to prevent spatter
  • Advanced Auto-Set feature for fast setup
  • Dual Voltage
  • Durable, quality manufacturing
  • Lightweight and portable
  • Fan on demand to save energy

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Duty cycle isn’t much better despite higher price
  • Ground clamp is a bit flimsy

5. Hobart Handler 190

Another quality machine from Hobart that has 25A for 190A output range so you can weld up to 5/16 in steel. The power input is only 230V so you won’t be able to use this on your standard household power outlet. The 190 is a wise choice if you’re considering buying a 140A welder but think you may want to upgrade in the future. It’s not much more expensive and you can always turn the 190 down but you can’t turn a 140 up.  There’s loads including for the price, you get power, durability, a good duty cycle and all the extras you need to get started, including .030 contact tips, 0.30 flux cored wire and gas gauges. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandHobart
ModelHandler 190
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)25-190
Duty Cycle30% @ 130A
Input Voltage (V)230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 5/16 in
Weight (lb)68
Dimensions (in)12.3/8 x 10.5/8 x 19.1/2
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)40-700
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Good value for money
  • Durable build
  • Quick Select drive roll
  • 7 position voltage selector
  • Helpful set up guide

Cons

  • Not compatible with 120V input
  • On the heavy side

6. Lincoln EasyMIG 180

The Lincoln EasyMIG 180 is a well-built welder that’s reliable and will serve a range of light fabrication and workshop projects. Its power input is 230V but it doesn’t have the power of the Hobart 190. This is a great entry level 230V welder that will give you quality welds. It won’t tackle thicker metal but this will do the job for most hobby welders. It’s a great choice for a hobbyist if you have a convenient 230V power outlet.

Specifications

BrandLincoln Electric
ModelEasyMIG 180
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)35-180
Duty Cycle30% @ 130A
Input Voltage (V)230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/16 in
Weight (lb)66
Dimensions (in)14 x 18.6 x 10.15
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)50-500
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Excellent build quality with cast aluminum
  • Smooth arc start to prevent spatter
  • Fully adjustable drive system to prevent tangling

Cons

  • Only 230V compatible
  • Not much power for a 230V unit

7. Hobart Handler 140

medal Best for beginners medal Best under $500medal Best 110v

The Hobart Handler 140 is an excellent choice for beginner welders, which is why it’s probably the most popular welder on the market. This thing is solidly built and is a step above many of the other 140A welders. The arc runs smooth and produces great results. It’s suitable for a range of general repair tasks and projects like trailer frames, autobody repair and anything up to 1/4 inch thick. If you’re just getting into welding, you can’t go wrong with this little machine! What’s better is that it’s an absolute steal at under $500. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandHobart
ModelHandler 140
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)25-140
Duty Cycle20% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 1/4 in
Weight (lb)57
Dimensions (in)12.4 x 10.6 x 19.5
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)40-700
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Great value for money
  • Excellent Arc Quality
  • Durable build with cast aluminum
  • Easy to use
  • Infinite wire feed speed control
  • Enough power for most home DIY projects

Cons

  • Power cord is only 5ft
  • Only suitable for small-medium sized projects

8. Miller Millermatic 141

medal Best 110v if Money isn’t an Issue

If you’re a beginner welder but don’t mind splashing the cash for a top of the range welder, then try the Millermatic 141. Miller have really pushed the boundaries of usability with this welder and it features an auto-set feature for an easy set up, and infinite voltage and wire speed control. All you have to do is select the thickness of the metal you’re welding and you’re ready to start welding straight away. If you open up the machine you can tell that all the parts are great quality and really durable as well. There are more powerful welders on the market for the price, but there’s nothing better for welding up to 3/16 inch steel. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandMiller
ModelMillermatic 141
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)30-140
Duty Cycle20% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/16 in
Weight (lb)51
Dimensions (in)12.5 x 11.25 x 20.5
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)15-360
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Auto-set for fast set up time
  • Infinite voltage control
  • Auto spool gun detect
  • Quick select drive roll
  • Excellent manufacturing quality
  • High quality arc
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • More expensive than similar power MIG welders
  • Only suitable for small-medium projects
  • 5 ft power cord

9. Forney 318 190

Forney have built a simple, mid range MIG welder that’s solid and reliable. It has some good power for the price but doesn’t have as good a duty cycle as the Hobart 190 or Lincoln 180. Forney aren’t one of the big three brands but this machine is still solidly built and I’d feel comfortable buying this. If you want a basic 220v welder without any special features, this is a good choice. Read the full review here.

Specifications

BrandForney
Model318 190A
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)35-190
Duty Cycle25% @ 120A
Input Voltage (V)230
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/8 in
Weight (lb)63
Dimensions (in)19 x 9.5 x 16.5
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • 15 foot power cable
  • Cast aluminum drive roll
  • Euro-style gun disconnect to help save time
  • Simple design with fast set up
  • Available at a lower price than similar power welders

Cons

  • Not as powerful as many 230V welders
  • Not compatible with 110V household power outlet
  • Does not have advanced features
  • Lower duty cycle

10. Lincoln EasyMIG 140

The Lincoln EasyMIG is a reliable 110v MIG welder. It doesn’t have the versatility of infinite wire feed speed like the Hobart and Miller 140A MIG welders and doesn’t offer the same value for money as the Hobart Handler 140, making it a less popular model. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandLincoln Electric
ModelEasyMIG140
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)30-140
Duty Cycle20% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/16 in
Weight (lb)50
13.7 x 10.15 x 17.9
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)50-500
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Toolless polarity changes
  • Simple design
  • Solidly build. Rigid drive improves wire alignment and gear box is aluminum.
  • Great arc quality
  • Easy drive tension adjustment
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • More expensive than over 140A MIG welders
  • No infinite wire feed speed control

11. Everlast Poweri 140e

The Everlast Poweri 140e is a really lightweight due to its IGBT inverter technology. There’s no welding chart on the inside which is a useful feature that more MIg welders have. The duty cycle is much better than other 110v welders and it performs 60% @ 90A. At just 28lbs it’s perfect for contractors or hobby welders who want something they can use every now and then and carry it about. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandEverlast
ModelPoweri-MIG 140e
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)25-140
Duty Cycle60% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 3/16 in
Weight (lb)28
Dimensions (in)13.5 x 8.5 x 17.5
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)0-360
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Super Lightweight
  • Excellent Duty Cycle
  • Euro type connector
  • Aluminum and steel wire feed system

Cons

  • No MIG wire included
  • No door chart
  • Ground clamp isn’t great qualtiy
  • Not the same manufacturing quality as Miller or Lincoln.

12. Lincoln K2185-1 Handy MIG

medal Best for small welding projects

The Lincoln Handy MIG is a popular beginners’ welder. It’s not very powerful, and it only welds up to 1/8 inch steel, but this is still enough for most general home repair projects. This is really easy to use for beginners and is available at a good price for a Lincoln welder. This is the perfect welder for small projects where you’re not looking to weld over 1/8 inch but want a welder that won’t take up too much room and isn’t too expensive. See the full review here.

Specifications

BrandLincoln Electric
ModelHandy MIG
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)35-88
Duty Cycle20% @ 70A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 1/8 in
Weight (lb)46
Dimensions (in)12.8 x 8.8 x 18
Wire Feed Speed (IPM)0-300
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Lightweight and portable
  • Durable, long lasting machine
  • Indoor settings chart
  • Fan cooling system
  • Infinite wire feed speed control

Cons

  • Only 4 voltage settings
  • Limited power, only welds up to 1/8 inch steel

13. Lotos MIG 140

If you’re looking for a good value welder that can thicker metal than the Lincoln Handy MIG, the Lotos MIG 140 is a solid choice that welds up to 1/4 inch. It’s a lot cheaper than the big-name 140A welders but it is still a reliable welder. One of their selling points is their “10 minute setup time” and simple control panel with digital display which is aimed to help beginner welders. See our full review here.

Specifications

BrandLotos
ModelMIG140
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)30-140
Duty Cycle20% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 1/4 in
Weight (lb)54
Dimensions (in)14.5 x 9.6 x 16
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Good value for money
  • Digital display and simple interface for easy setup
  • 2T/4T switch
  • Ground cable quick connector for fast +/- changeover

Cons

  • Not the same build quality as Miller, Lincoln or Hobart

14. Forney 308 140

The Forney 309 140A welder is immense value for what you get. At comfortably under $500, you’ll struggle to find a welder as reliable or good quality anywhere for the same price, and it has a better duty cycle that most 120V welders. Forney have also recently upgraded this model in response to customer feedback to make it even better. It’s a simple design with no extra features but it does the job well.

Specifications

BrandForney
Model309 140A
Process TypeFlux Core/MIG
Amperage Range (A)30-140
Duty Cycle35% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 1/4 in
Weight (lb)57
Dimensions (in)16.5 x 9.5 x 19

Pros

  • Aluminum wire feed system
  • Allows 4″ and 8″ spools
  • Improved duty cycle.

Cons

  • Not much cheaper than similar welders that have better features.

15. Forney Easy Weld 261 140FC

medal Best gasless MIGmedal Best under $300

The Forney Easy Weld Flux Core welder is an amazing option for beginners who are looking to weld without gas. This is a flux core only machine so you won’t get the same weld quality as MIG but you can save a lot of money with a extremely portable machine. You can weld up to 1/4 plate steel and it weighs just 19lbs so you won’t need to buy a cart to put it on. This is definitely one to look at if you’re thinking of welding for the first time and have a budget under $300.

Specifications

BrandForney
ModelEasy Weld 140 FCi
Process TypeFlux Core
Amperage Range (A)30-140
Duty Cycle30% @ 90A
Input Voltage (V)115
Weld Thickness24ga. – 1/4 in
Weight (lb)19
Dimensions (in)12 x 8.125 x 16.75
Full specsSpecifications

Pros

  • Most lightweight welder
  • Under $300
  • Infinite voltage control
  • Infinite wire feed speed control
  • Easy to use
  • Great for beginners

Cons

  • Cannot connect gas for MIG

Factors when Selecting a MIG Welder

1. MIG/Flux-Cored Welders or Multifunction

MIG welders are either flux cored, require a gas cylinder, or have the capability for both. Flux core welding might be appealing because you don’t need to hook up a gas cylinder to your cylinder, but flux core creates a layer of slag which needs to be chipped away.

Most of the welders on the market have both the MIG and flux core functions, however, there are some that have just one of these. I would generally recommend a welder with both of these functions available to ensure you have the maximum diversity.

2. Input Voltage

MIG welders have different input voltages so they might not be compatible with the electrical outlet where you are welding. Most welders are either 110/115/120V or 220/225/230V, but some have the capability for both.

110 Volt Welders

These lower input voltage welders are perfect for if you’re a hobby welder as you can plug them into a household power outlet. The only downside of this is that it limits the output power and you won’t be able to weld thicker metals without increasing your power and amperage.

220 Volt Welders

If you’re planning on working on some more powerful welds on thicker metals you’ll need a 220 volt welder. This means you’ll need a 220V power outlet installed. These welders are useful if you’re working on remote sites or industrial welding where you might not have access to a 110V outlet.

3. Output Power

You will need to have a different output power depending on what you’re trying to weld. Many manufacturers will include a chart with the welder to help you choose the correct settings to help you get the highest quality weld.

Below is a chart which shows an estimate of metal thickness and the required output power to achieve this.

GaugemmRequired Amps
84.2165
103.4135
122.7105
141.975
161.560
181.248
200.936
220.830
240.624

4. Size & Transportability

When choosing your welder, you will need to consider the ease of transport of the machine, including its size and weight. If you’re planning on leaving it in your workshop, then weight might not be too much of a consideration. However, if you’re going to be working at multiple locations then it’s likely you will want a welder with a handle that isn’t too heavy to carry. If you need a large and powerful welder, you can of course store it in a cart on wheels, but the heaviest welders will still be hard to transport on concrete even with two people.

The smallest good quality MIG welders weigh 25lbs. These have inverter technology which reduces the weight significantly compared to the heavier transformer models. For the heavy industrial welders you can be looking at machines weighing 200lbs plus.

5. Spool Gun

If you’re planning on MIG welding aluminum, you will need to buy a welder with a spool gun. Many of the smaller welders do not come with the ability to do this so make sure you look out for it. For example, the Hobart 140 is a brilliant welder which does not include this. If you’re looking at buying a spool gun, I recommend one which has a quick release feature.

6. Duty Cycle

The duty cycle is a key factor concerning the length of time you’re looking to weld. If you need to use your MIG welder for a long time in one go, then you will need a welder with a high duty cycle. Duty cycle is shown as a percentage, this percentage will be the percentage of a 10 minute period that the welder can be operated before it overheats. For example, a 40% duty cycle could be operated for 4 minutes and would need a 6 minute cooldown period.

Often you will see that the higher the output power of your welder, the lower the duty cycle will be, as it takes a longer time to cool down. Small welders without a cooling system also have a low duty cycle. Fortunately, many large welders also have powerful fans to reduce the cool-down time.

If overheating is something you’re worried about, then you should buy a welder with thermal overload protection which prevents any damage to the welder by stopping the process if the duty cycle is exceeded.

 7. Brand & Warranty

You want to choose a reliable and trustworthy brand for your welder. Welder manufacturers offer different levels of support, but generally, you will find that Hobart, Miller, Everlast, and Lincoln are the best quality and stand the test of time.

Always check the warranty on your welder and don’t risk buying a cheap welder with a poor warranty. Hobart and Longevity welders come with a fantastic 5-year warranty, these are high-quality anyway, but this warranty gives you extra assurance in your investment. If you’re considering welders by less well-known brands then make sure you thoroughly research their reviews and testimonials.

8. Price

Choose the welder which matches your budget and is best suited for your needs. Don’t approach your purchase with a “the most expensive will be the best” attitude, as this will usually not be the case. If you understand what you’re looking for, or if you have a budget, then you can accurately pick the welder which will save you the most money and give you the best performance. Our guides below will help you choose the best welder for your needs.

Maintaining your MIG Welder

One of the ways to ensure you get quality welds is by looking after your welder and it maintains high performance levels for longer. MIG welders do not need much maintenance, but little things can make the difference in the long run.

Cover

If your workshop is particularly dusty,  put a cover over your MIG welder when you’re not using it. Dust can get into welders and damage them over time so it’s better to keep it covered. Most welder manufacturers sell covers for specific models.

Drive Rolls

As wire is continually fed through the drive rolls, dirt can build up on the rolls. Blow some air through the rolls or brush them down every few uses to clear out the dust.

Contact Tips

Keep your contact tips clean on your MIG gun. Sometimes spatter gets stuck to the contact tips which can cause porosity. If you have lots of spatter stuck to the tip then this will limit the flow of shielding gas that protects the bead from contamination. Use nozzle dip to coat the tip and help prevent spatter from sticking to it.

Other Equipment for your Welder

Before you can get started with your welder you will need to have all the right equipment to keep you safe and ensure you get the best possible weld. Below are the other pieces of equipment to consider for use with your welder.

1. Gas Cylinder

When MIG welding you will need to use a gas cylinder. Different types of welding require different types of gas. The most popular type of MIG welding gas is Carbon Dioxide because it has the lowest operating cost. CO2 is a low alternative to other gases which are a mixture of CO2 and Argon, these mixes are more expensive but will provide a higher weld quality and reduced spatter that Co2. You can also use Pure Argon if you’re welding magnesium or titanium, but this should not be used if you’re welding ferrous metal such as steel.

2. Regulator

You will need to attach a regulator to your gas cylinder before you can use it. There are different types of regulator you can buy, including gaugeless, single gauge and dual gauge. Dual gauge regulators are slightly more expensive and will show two things on the gauges – how much gas is left in the tank, and a flowmeter to set the flow depending on which gas you are using. The single gauge regulators will show how much gas is left in the bottle on the gauge and you will have a non-gauge flowmeter.

3. Torch

Usually when you buy your welder it will come with a torch, but you should check to make sure it does.

4. Welding Mask

Your welding mask is the most important piece of equipment to have when you are MIG welding. When you are MIG welding, the arc is incredibly bright and damaging to your eyes. You need a helmet to protect you from this and to allow you to see the weld pool. The price for these varies, with the most expensive masks being the auto-darkening helmets which help you see your work and position the torch with ease.

5. Clothing

When welding you should wear the correct clothing, cotton or leather clothes with long sleeves and welding gauntlets are a must. Any flying sparks are extremely hot and you do not want this to touch your skin. If you’re wearing synthetic material then you should change to cotton or leather as the heat from the spark could make this stick to your skin and burn you.

 Final Thoughts

Too many people end up buying a welder which isn’t what they wanted, so I set up this guide to help you choose the best welder for your needs. I tried to include as much information as I could in this guide and present it in an easy to understand way, but if you have any questions or feel there is anything I have missed, please leave a comment and I’ll answer it the best I can.

We hope you liked our article “The Best MIG Welders in 2020” if so, we’d really appreciate it if you could rate and share it.

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Sours: https://www.kingsofwelding.com/buyers-guides/best-mig-welder-reviews/

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Item Details

  • Power MIG 260 welding machine sets the standard for MIG and flux-cored welding in light industrial shop fabrication, maintenance, and repair work.

Features

  • Automatic settings provide optimal weld parameters
  • Memory Capability— Ability to load and save weld settings
  • Run-in– Adjustable speed at which wire strikes the plate to enhance starting
  • Burnback– Adjustable time delay between turning off the arc and the wire feed to prevent wire sticking to the puddle
  • Spot Timer— Adjustable arc time for repetitive tack and spot welds

Specifications

  • Input Power: 208/230/460/575V
  • Rated Output: 250 Amps, 26.5 V, 40%
  • Duty Cycle Output Range: 30 - 300 Amps

Includes

  • Maxtrac® Wire Drive
  • Magnum® PRO 250L Welding Gun
  • Quick Storage Accessories
  • 10FT Work Cable with Clamp
  • Gas Regulator
  • 10FT Power Cable with Plug

Applications

  • General Fabrication
  • Maintenance and Repair
  • Farm/Autobody

Product Attributes

Trade Name

» POWER MIG®
» POWER MIG® 260

Input AC Voltage

» 208 V
» 230 V
» 460 V
» 575 V

Feeder Information

» Built In

Output DC Amps (Max)

» 300

Process

» Flux Cored (FCAW)
» MIG (GMAW)

Duty Cycle

» 250 Amps At 26.5 Volts At 40% Duty Cycle

Phase

» Single Phase

» Show more details and specs

Sours: https://www.airgas.com/product/Welding-Products/Welders-%26-Accessories/MIG-Welders/p/LINK3520-1


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