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Question:Q:upgrade OSX for MacBook5,2

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Question:Q:

upgrade OSX for MacBook5,2

MacBook, Mac OS X (10.5.8)

Posted on Aug 1, 2012 3:05 AM

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Aug 1, 2012 6:22 AM in response to crazymichel In response to crazymichel

Welcome to Apple Support Communities.

Summoning my very best 'Carnac the Magnificient' powers of deduction...

(Enter 'Johnny Carson, Carnac' into your favorite search engine for details and hilarious images and videos)

I'm sensing that you want to know which version(s) of OS X you can upgrade to, and how much it costs to do it.

The good news: Your MacBook 5,2 is either an early-2009 or mid-2009 model:

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1635

IT IS compatible with the very latest version of OS X, 10.8 'Mountain Lion':

http://www.apple.com/osx/how-to-upgrade/

The cost of the download is $20, available from the Mac App Store.

The bad news: You'll first need to call Apple (1-800-MY-APPLE in the US) and order a $30 OS X 10.6 'Snow Leopard' upgrade disc and install it when it arrives, updating your system to OS X 10.6.6 or later, in order to get the Mac App Store so you CAN download 'Mountain Lion'. You'll only be using the Snow Leopard upgrade long enough to install Mountain Lion, but it is still a requirement today, because the only way to purchase 'Mountain Lion' upgrade is a download, and the only way to purchase a 'Snow Leopard' upgrade is on disc.

If you have just 2GB RAM installed, I'd also suggest upgrading to at least 4GB RAM for best performance when installing OS X 10.7 Lion or OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. You might also consider a larger hard disk if you are have less than 15GB to 20GB free space remaining on yours.

I responded to this similar message thread earlier today with a bit more detail about a few other OS X upgrade options, all that cost MORE than the 'Snow Leopard' + 'Mountain Lion' combined purchase:

https://discussions.apple.com/thread/4165083?answerId=19122683022#19122683022

Aug 1, 2012 6:22 AM

Aug 2, 2012 11:49 AM in response to kostby In response to kostby

HELLO <<<<<<<CARNAC THE GREAT >>>>>.....

First...I want to thank you for your efforts ..... I really have very little knowledge of OS ...I'm more a classic end user that used to relied on "tech support" people to fix things.

When I left the corporate world ... I switched to Apple and now also have ( and couldn't live without) an IPad, an IPhone , & a big silver IPod. But I'm more into the front end ...the OS world is beyond my attention span ....it seems..

When I have a problem, I have run down to see a "genius" ..... but with my finding this discussion group ( yesterday (@#&*%*^) ...its much better because it seems one can get not only help ..... but also "work around's" that geniuses don't tell you about. But there are people like you willing to share their knowledge. BRAVO!

But Maybe your cards got out of order because I have .....a late 2007 ....... It may have been That Hat.

Model Name: MacBook

Model Identifier: MacBook3,1

Processor Name: Intel Core 2 Duo

Processor Speed: 2.2 GHz

Number of Processors: 1

Total Number of Cores: 2

L2 Cache: 4 MB

Memory: 2 GB

Bus Speed: 800 MHz

Boot ROM Version: MB31.008E.B02

SMC Version (system): 1.24f3

Serial Number (system): W874305R01X

Hardware UUID: C7F39B2D-878F-5929-A0CE-26A274E0A587

Sudden Motion Sensor:

State: Enabled

And ....... I am already running on OS X 10.7.4

But when I go to the app store and try and buy Mountain Lion .... It says my computer is not compatible.

From what been said it seems the only problem lies with the " Late 2007" thing. Is the 4MB I have the right MG ?

Got any ideas ....of what I might do.

Its just not a good time for be to buy a new Mac...

So your help is greatly appreciated.

And I know that I may be left in the dust and eventually become unsupported...its just the way it is ....

Thanks for your comments...and help....

Travel Safe....

PS ` What do you think Apple was thinking >>>> Apple knows EXACTLY what I have but they still sent me an email telling me to by Mountain Lion. Do you think they just don't take time the to sort their database .... or is it really a way to make you feel "out of Date" .....until all his started I did not even know my MacBook was a " late 2007"...or ?

Aug 2, 2012 11:49 AM

Aug 2, 2012 12:02 PM in response to crazymichel In response to crazymichel

Your MacBook is now done upgrading. Any pre-unibody macbooks can't upgrade to Mountain Lion. So your kinda screwed. But don't worry there is not that much is new so don't worry but if you really need it you have to get a new or used unibody mac.

Good luck

Aug 2, 2012 12:02 PM

Aug 2, 2012 10:31 PM in response to skip543 In response to skip543

Thanks for the response.

I guessed wrongly that the MacBook model number mentioned in the Description line of your post - MacBook 5,2 - was the model you owned.

From the info you posted, the amount of System RAM you have installed REALLY IS 2GB

User uploaded file

The 4MB you pointed out refers to Level 2 Cache memory, a small amount of high speed RAM that speeds up data access with prefetching data and/or storing recently used data that might be accessed again:

http://www.cpu-world.com/Glossary/L/Level_2_cache.html

I do think you would get a modest system performance boost from upgrading system RAM to 4GB or 6GB with OS X 10.7 Lion. RAM upgrade info here from OtherWorldComputing www.macsales.com: http://eshop.macsales.com/Descriptions/specs/Framework.cfm?page=macbooklate07.ht ml) Crucial.com is another reliable RAM vendor.

Finally, the response from Derekk1998 above is correct, there is simply no way to upgrade your Late 2007 MacBook 3,1 so it can run OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion.

So if you need a good excuse to purchase a new or refurbished shinier faster sleeker MacBook Air or MacBook Pro, now you have one!

Model Name: MacB

Aug 2, 2012 10:31 PM

Jan 1, 2014 9:49 AM in response to kostby In response to kostby

I have a MacBook 5,2. I have 4GB Ram and about 90GB extra space. I recently updated to Snow Leopard. There are lots of error messages and such and my system crashes sometimes. The Geeks at the Apple store told me not to update any further. However, from reading the discussions it sounds like I could. I would like your expert opinion on how far I should update. Lion? Mountain Lion? Or OS X Maverick?

Below is from my computer About.

Model Name: MacBook

Model Identifier: MacBook5,2

Processor Name: Intel Core 2 Duo

Processor Speed: 2 GHz

Number Of Processors: 1

Total Number Of Cores: 2

L2 Cache: 3 MB

Memory: 4 GB

Bus Speed: 1.07 GHz

Boot ROM Version: MB52.0088.B05

SMC Version (system): 1.38f5

Serial Number (system): W89135H84R1

Hardware UUID: 7C884712-4C1A-56B3-B918-115C5AB3A5B0

Sudden Motion Sensor:

State: Enabled

Thank you

Jan 1, 2014 9:49 AM

Jan 1, 2014 8:35 PM in response to Cindiae In response to Cindiae

Welcome to Apple Support Communities. We're mostly users here, not 'Apple Inc.'

My last reply in this thread was in August 2012!

You're usually better off posting a brand new message with your question than replying to an old one, because you'll get a faster response and the most knowledgable users (the ladies and gentlemen here with Level 7 and above) in the community will see it with '0' replies and respond, usually the same day.

In my opinion, stay with Snow Leopard, OS X 10.6.8, until you can afford to either:

A) upgrade your current computer with more RAM (8GB) and perhaps a faster, larger capacity hard drive or SSD (Solid-State-Drive with all flash memory, no moving parts);

-or-

B) purchase a more powerful Mac in the future.

Posting the specific errors here or using a popular search engine can be helpful, IF you understand what the answers you find mean, and understand how to apply the 'fixes'.

Here's a useful guide that might help diagnose errors, increase performance with Snow Leopard, and eliminate some of your crashing: https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-4941

Error messages and crashes can be an early symptom of some parts reaching the end of their useful life, the hard drive, in particular, or something as simple as dust clogging the air ventilation within the computer, causing things to get warmer than they used to when new.

4 years is a long time in 'computer years'.

If you want to buy a new 7200rpm hard drive and 8GB of RAM, it would cost a few hundred dollars and extend the useful life of your current computer another year or two. THEN you might upgrade the OS to 10.8, but be prepared for SLOWER overall performance than you have now with 10.6 and your current hardware.

Adding RAM AND a relatively expensive SSD and then upgrade to OS X 10.8 or 10.9, but again, you might end up with the same or even worse performance!

So you may be more comfortable applying that amount of money toward a new(er) Mac.

To summarize, in my opinion, 4GB is NOT enough RAM memory for Mountain Lion OS X 10.8 on your current computer. I would NOT upgrade your current computer to Mavericks. It is still relatively early in development and would NOT offer more reliability, fewer crashes, or better performance than what you have now.

I encourage you to browse in the Mountain Lion user community and the Mavericks community here to see what kind of issues people are having.

Message was edited by: kostby

Jan 1, 2014 8:35 PM

Jan 1, 2014 9:40 PM in response to kostby In response to kostby

Thank you, your response was very helpful. I will stay with Snow Leopard and save for a new Mac. I am not computer savey enough to do all the fancy stuff to upgrade. I also really appreciate your honesty. Thanks, Cindiae

Jan 1, 2014 9:40 PM

Jan 2, 2014 2:19 PM in response to Cindiae In response to Cindiae

Glad that my rambling was helpful. 🙂

Keep in mind that most people post messages here ONLY when they have problems. Still, there are many messages from people who upgrade compatible 2008-2009 MacBooks and MacBook Pros to OS X 10.8 or 10.9, and then are asking how to 'downgrade' back to 10.6 Snow Leopard because their systems are slower.

You can also purchase reliable 'refurbished' Macs (as well as iPads and iPods) direct from Apple, often for 10% to 15% less than the price of a new system. http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/specialdeals/mac

These carry the exact same full one-year warranty just like a new Mac, are eligible for extended 3-year AppleCare, and they cannot be distinguished from a brand new unit, except that they come in a plain brown box instead of the 'pretty' box that retail stores have. New models become available as refurbs about 3-4 months after the model is introduced to the public. Both of my Macs were Apple refurbs.

Jan 2, 2014 2:19 PM

Mar 5, 2017 3:46 AM in response to kostby In response to kostby

I just upgraded a Macbook 5.2 with 4GB RAM from Snow Leopard (10.6.8) to Mountain Lion (10.8.5) and it works perfectly. The performance is as good as it was with Snow Leopard.

Now I can install the correct version of Flash Player and Java. Even Safari works much better now.

Now I will go for Mavericks and see if it works. :-)

Mar 5, 2017 3:46 AM

User profile for user: crazymichel crazymichel

Question:Q:upgrade OSX for MacBook5,2

Sours: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/4165154

Identify your MacBook Pro model

Use this information to find out which MacBook Pro you have, and where it fits in the history of MacBook Pro.

Your Mac provides several tools to help you identify it. The simplest is About This Mac, available by choosing About This Mac from the Apple menu  in the upper-left corner of your screen. The other is the System Information app. Learn how to use these tools to identify your Mac.

If you don’t have your Mac or it doesn’t start up, use one of these solutions instead:

  • Find the serial number printed on the underside of your Mac, near the regulatory markings. It’s also on the original packaging, next to a barcode label. You can then enter that serial number on the Check Coverage page to find your model.
  • The original packaging might also show an Apple part number, such as MLH12xx/A (“xx” is a variable that differs by country or region). You can match the Apple part number to one in the list below to find your model.

List of MacBook Pro models

MacBook Pro models are organized by the year they were introduced, starting with the most recent. Click the model name for detailed technical specifications. 

MacBook Pro models from late 2013 and newer can run the latest version of macOS. For older models, the latest compatible operating system is noted.

2020

MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro17,1 
Part Numbers: MYD83xx/A, MYD92xx/A, MYDA2xx/A, MYDC2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, M1, 2020)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro16,3
Part Numbers: MXK32xx/A, MXK52xx/A, MXK62xx/A, MXK72xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro16,2
Part Numbers: MWP42xx/A, MWP52xx/A, MWP62xx/A, MWP72xx/A, MWP82xx/A 
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)

2019

MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro16,1, MacBookPro16,4
Part Numbers: MVVJ2xx/A, MVVK2xx/A, MVVL2xx/A, MVVM2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
User guide: MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro15,4
Part Numbers: MUHN2xx/A, MUHP2xx/a, MUHQ2xx/A, MUHR2xx/A, MUHR2xx/B
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro15,1, MacBookPro15,3
Part Numbers: MV902xx/A, MV912xx/A, MV922xx/A, MV932xx/A, MV942xx/A, MV952xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro15,2
Part Numbers: MV962xx/A, MV972xx/A, MV982xx/A, MV992xx/A, MV9A2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

2018

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro15,1
Part Numbers: MR932xx/A, MR942xx/A, MR952xx/A, MR962xx/A, MR972xx/A, MUQH2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018) 

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro15,2
Part Numbers: MR9Q2xx/A, MR9R2xx/A, MR9T2xx/A, MR9U2xx/A, MR9V2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

2017

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro14,3
Part Numbers: MPTR2xx/A, MPTT2xx/A, MPTU2xx/A, MPTV2xx/A, MPTW2xx/A, MPTX2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro14,2
Part Numbers: MPXV2xx/A, MPXW2xx/A, MPXX2xx/A, MPXY2xx/A, MQ002xx/A, MQ012xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro14,1
Part Numbers: MPXQ2xx/A, MPXR2xx/A, MPXT2xx/A, MPXU2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

2016

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro13,3
Part Numbers: MLH32xx/A, MLH42xx/A, MLH52xx/A, MLW72xx/A, MLW82xx/A, MLW92xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro13,2
Part Numbers: MLH12xx/A, MLVP2xx/A, MNQF2xx/A, MNQG2xx/A, MPDK2xx/A, MPDL2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
Colors: Silver, space gray
Model Identifier: MacBookPro13,1
Part Numbers: MLL42xx/A, MLUQ2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

 

2015

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,4, MacBookPro11,5
Part Number: MJLQ2xx/A, MJLT2xx/A, MJLU2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015)

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro12,1
Part Numbers: MF839xx/A, MF840xx/A, MF841xx/A, MF843xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015)

 

2014

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,2, MacBookPro11,3
Part Number: MGXC2xx/A, MGXA2xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2014)

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Mid 2014)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,1
Part Numbers: MGX72xx/A, MGX82xx/A, MGX92xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Mid 2014)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Mid 2014)

 

2013

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,2, MacBookPro11,3
Part Number: ME293xx/A, ME294xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Late 2013)

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro11,1
Part Numbers: ME864xx/A, ME865xx/A, ME866xx/A
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013)

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro10,1
Part Numbers: ME664xx/A, ME665xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina 10.15.7
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013)

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2013)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro10,2
Part Numbers: MD212xx/A, ME662xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina 10.15.7
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2013)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2013)

 

2012

MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro10,2
Part Numbers: MD212xx/A, MD213xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina 10.15.7
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2012)

 

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro10,1
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina 10.15.7
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro9,1
Part Numbers: MD103xx/A, MD104xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina 10.15.7
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro9,2
Part Numbers: MD101xx/A, MD102xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina 10.15.7
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2012)

2011

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro8,3
Part Number: MD311xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Late 2011)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro8,2
Part Numbers: MD322xx/A, MD318xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)


MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro8,1
Part Numbers: MD314xx/A, MD313xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2011)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2011)

 

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro8,3
Part Number: MC725xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2011)


MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro8,2
Part Numbers: MC723xx/A, MC721xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011)

 

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro8,1
Part Numbers: MC724xx/A, MC700xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2011)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2011)

 

2010

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2010)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro6,1
Part Number: MC024xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2010)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2010)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro6,2
Part Numbers: MC373xx/A, MC372xx/A, MC371xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2010)

MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro7,1
Part Numbers: MC375xx/A, MC374xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010)

 

2009

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2009)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,2
Part Number: MC226xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2009)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Mid 2009)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2009)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,3
Part Numbers: MB985xx/A, MB986xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2009)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2009)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.53GHz, Mid 2009)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,3
Part Number: MC118xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.53GHz, Mid 2009)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2.53GHz, Mid 2009)


MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,5
Part Numbers: MB991xx/A, MB990xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009)

 

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2009)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,2
Part Number: MB604xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2009)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2009)

2008

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2008)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,1
Part Number: MB470xx/A, MB471xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2008)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2008)

 

MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2008)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro4,1
Part Number: MB166xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2008)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2008)

 

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2008)
Model Identifier: MacBookPro4,1
Part Number: MB133xx/A, MB134xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6
Tech Specs: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2008)
User Guide: MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2008)

 

Published Date: 

Sours: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201300
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Apple announced a MacBook unibody aluminum model MacBook 5,1 (13-inch) featuring a new Nvidia chipset at a Cupertino, California with the tagline: The spotlight turns to notebooks. Made of a unibody aluminium case with patered edges, this model had an integrated Nvidia GeForce 9400M graphics up to five times faster than the original MacBooks’ Intel chipset. The MacBook unibody aluminium model was thinner than the original polycarbonate MacBooks. The keyboard of the higher-end model included a backlight.

MacBook 5,1 (13-Inch, Late 2008 Aluminum) and MacBook 5,2 (13-Inch, Early-Mid 2009)

macbook 5 1 5 2 main - MacBook 5,1 and MacBook 5,2 - Full Information, Specs

Introduced on January 21, 2009, the MacBook 5,2 (13-inch)  was a feature-bump of the existing low-end white MacBook model. The processor ran at a slightly slower clock-rate. The amount of RAM was doubled to 2GHz. The bus speed was increased to 1066MHz. The graphics chipset received a significant upgrade. This MacBook model was shipped in a single configuration, and was replaced in June 2009 with a new model. Introduced in May 2009, the MacBook 5,2 (13-inch, Mid 2009) was a modest speed-bump of the previous MacBook. The processor speed was increased by 6.5% to 2.13 GHz. The hard disk capacity was increased to 160 GB. This MacBook model was shipped in a single configuration, with 2 GB of RAM. It was replaced in October 2009 by the unibody polycarbonate model.

Release Dates

  • MacBook 5,1 (Late 2008 Aluminum): Announced on October 14, 2008
  • MacBook 5.2 (Early 2009): Introduced on January 21, 2009
  • MacBook 5.2 (Mid 2009): Introduced on May 27, 2008.

Specifications

  • Processor: 2.0GHz, 2.13GHz or 2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo (P7350/P8600, P7450). Front side bus 1066 MHz. Speed: Chipset 1066 MHz system bus. System memory: DDR3.
  • Memory: 2GB (two 1GB), expandable to 8GB (4GB supported by Apple).
  • Hard Drive: 120 GB. Optional 160GB, 250GB, 320GB or 500GB.
  • Internal Slot-loading Super-Drive: 4 × DVD+R DL writes, 8× DVD±R read, 4 × DVD±RW writes, 24 × CD-R, and x CD-RW recording.
  • OS: Latest possible operating system OS X 10.11 El Capitan officially. macOS 10.12 “Sierra” unofficially with Sierra Patcher.
  • Display: 13.3-inch LED backlit glossy widescreen LCD, 1280 × 800 pixel resolution. (WXGA, 16:10 = 8:5 aspect ratio).
  • Graphics: Integrated Nvidia GeForce 9400M with 256 MB shared with main memory (up to 512 MB available in Windows through Boot Camp).
  • Connectivity: Integrated AirPort Extreme 802.11a/b/g/draft-n (BCM4322 chipset). Gigabit Ethernet Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR.
  • Peripherals: 2 × USB 2.0.  1 × Firewire 400. 1 × Optical digital / analog audio line-in. 1 × Optical digital / analog audio line-out.
  • Camera: iSight Camera (640 × 480 0.3 MP).
  • Ports: Mini DisplayPort, replacing the previous model’s mini-DVI port. Two slots for PC3-8500 DDR3 SDRAM (1066 Mhz).
  • Input: Multi-touch glass trackpad which also acts as the mouse button. Combined optical digital input/analog line in. 1 × Combined optical digital output/analog line out.
  • Video out: Mini DisplayPort.
  • Battery: MacBook 5.1 – 45-watt-hour removable lithium-polymer. MacBook 5.2 – 55-watt-hour removable lithium-polymer.
  • Weight: MacBook 5.1 – 4.5 lb (2.0 kg). MacBook 5.2 – 5 lb.
  • Dimensions: MacBook 5.1 – 0.95 in × 12.78 in × 8.94 in. MacBook 5.2 – 1.08 in (Height) × 12.78 in (Width) × 8.92 in (Depth).

Discontinuation, Price

Discontinued:

  • On June 8, 2009.
  • In October 2009 – MacBook 5.2 (Mid 2009).

Prices:

  • This model was shipped with one price of US$999.

Features

Troubleshooting with MacBook 5.1: Occasionally you may have problems while working with your computer, but if you experience a problem with your MacBook, there is usually a simple and quick solution. Think about the conditions that led up to the problem. Keep in mind that making a note of things you did before the problem occurred will help you narrow down possible causes and find the answers you need. Note the following:

  • The applications which where running when the problem occurred. Sometimes problems that occur with a specific application, but not with the others might indicate that this specific application is not compatible with the version of the Mac OS installed on your computer.
  • Any new software that you recently installed, especially software that added items to the System folder.
  • Any hardware that you installed, such as additional memory, a peripheral, etc.

On rare occasions, an application might “freeze” on the screen. Mac OS X provides a way to quit a frozen application without restarting the computer. To force an application to quit:

  1. Press Command – Option-Esc or choose Apple Menu > Force Quit from the menu bar.
  2. The Force Quit Applications dialog appears with the application selected. The application quits, leaving all other applications open. If you need to, you can also restart the Finder from this dialog. Next, save your work in any open applications and restart the computer to make sure the problem is entirely cleared up.

If the problem occurs frequently, choose Help > Mac Help from the menu bar at the top of the screen. Then search for the word “freeze” to get help for times when the computer freezes or doesn’t respond.

On the other hand, if the problem occurs only when you use a particular application, check with the application’s manufacturer to see if it is compatible with your computer.

If you know an application is compatible, you might need to reinstall your computer’s system software.

If your MacBook freezes during startup, or you see a flashing question mark, or the screen is dark and the sleep indicator light is glowing steadily (not in sleep). The flashing question mark may mean that the computer can’t find the system software on the hard disk or any disks attached to the computer.

Wait a few seconds. If the computer doesn’t soon start up, shut it down by holding down the power button for about 8 to 10 seconds. Disconnect all external peripherals and try restarting by pressing the power button while holding down the Option key. When your computer starts up, click the hard disk icon, and then click the right arrow. After the computer starts up, open System Preferences and click Startup Disk. Select a local Mac OS X System folder.

If that doesn’t work, try using Disk Utility to repair the disk:

  • Insert the Mac OS X Install DVD into your computer.
  • Restart your computer and hold down the C key as it starts up.
  • Choose Installer > Open Disk Utility. When Disk Utility opens, follow the instructions in the First Aid pane to see if Disk Utility can repair the disk.
  • If using Disk Utility doesn’t help, you might need to reinstall your computer’s system software.

If your MacBook doesn’t turn on or start up Try the following suggestions in order until your computer turns on:

  • Make sure the power adapter is plugged into the computer and into a functioning power outlet. Be sure to use the 60W MagSafe Power Adapter that came with your MacBook. If the power adapter stops charging and you don’t see the indicator light on the power adapter turn on when you plug in the power cord, try unplugging and replugging the power cord to reset it.
  • Check whether the battery needs to be recharged. Press the small button on the left side of your computer. You should see one to eight lights indicating the battery’s level of charge. If a single indicator light is on, connect your power adapter to recharge.

If the problem persists, return the computer to its factory settings by disconnecting the power adapter, removing the battery, and holding down the power button for at least 5 seconds.

If you recently installed additional memory, make sure that it is correctly installed and is compatible with your computer. See whether removing it and reinstalling the old memory allows the computer to start up.

Press the power button and immediately hold down the Command, Option, P, and R keys simultaneously until you hear the startup sound a second time. This resets the parameter RAM (PRAM).

If you still can’t start up your MacBook, see “Learning More, Service, and Support” for information about contacting Apple for service.

If the screen suddenly goes black or your MacBook freezes, try restarting the computer:

  1. Unplug any devices that are connected to your MacBook, except the power adapter.
  2. Press the power button to restart the system.
  3. Let the battery charge to at least 10 percent before plugging in any external devices and resuming your work. To see how much the battery has charged, look at the Battery status icon in the menu bar. The screen might also darken if you have energy saver features set for the battery

If you press the battery button, and all battery indicator lights flash five times quickly,this means that your battery needs to be replaced. Contact an Apple Retail Store or an Apple Authorized Service Provider (AASP).

If you press the battery button, and the battery indicator lights flash from left to right and then from right to left, five times in a row, this means that your battery is not recognized. Check that your battery is installed properly in your computer.

Using Trackpad and Keyboard

Here are some guidelines Apple suggests the users follow when working with trackpad and keyboard on their MacBook:

Use the trackpad to move the pointer and to scroll, tap, double-tap, and drag. How far the pointer moves onscreen is affected by how quickly you move your finger across the trackpad. To move the pointer a short distance, move your finger slowly across the trackpad; the faster you move your finger, the farther the pointer moves. To fine-tune the tracking speed in System Preferences, choose Apple menu to go to System Preferences, and then click Keyboard & Mouse. Next click Trackpad.

Some useful trackpad and keyboard tips and shortcuts:

Secondary clicking or “right-clicking” lets you access shortcut menu commands. To set this option, select Place two fingers on trackpad and click button for secondary click in the Trackpad pane of Keyboard & Mouse preferences. Alternatively the user can secondary click by holding down the Control (ctrl) key while the user clicks.
Two-finger scrolling lets the user drag two fingers to scroll quickly up, down, or sideways in the active window. To set this option, select Use two fingers to scroll and Allow horizontal scrolling in the Trackpad pane of Keyboard & Mouse preferences.

Using the MacBook Battery

When the MagSafe power adapter is not connected, this MacBook draws power from its battery. The length of time that you can run your MacBook varies, depending on the applications you use and the external devices connected to your MacBook. Turning off features such as AirPort Extreme or Bluetooth wireless technology can help conserve battery charge. However if the battery runs low while you are working, you should attach your power adapter immediately and let the battery recharge. To replace a low battery with a charged one when your computer isn’t connected to a power adapter, shut down your computer. You can determine the charge left in the battery by looking at the battery level indicator lights on the battery itself. Press the button next to the lights, and the lights glow briefly to show how much charge is left in the battery. You can check the charge with the battery in or out of the MacBook. Important note: If only one indicator light is on, very little charge is left. If no lights are on, the battery is completely drained and the MacBook won’t start up unless the power adapter is connected. If this happens, plug in the power adapter to let the battery recharge, or replace the drained battery with a fully charged battery. The amount of battery charge left can also be checked by viewing the Battery status icon, which will be found in the menu bar. The battery charge level displayed in the status iconis based on the amount of power left in the battery with the applications, peripheral devices, and system settings the user is currently using. If you prefer to conserve battery power, you should close applications and disconnect peripheral devices not in use, then adjust your Energy Saver settings.

Charging the Battery: When the power adapter that came with your MacBook is connected, the battery recharges whether the computer is on, off, or in sleep. The battery recharges more quickly, however, when the computer is off or in sleep, as the battery doesn’t drain because the computer does not perform any operations.

To replace the battery: Place the right side of the battery into the battery compartment. Gently press the left side of the battery down. Use a coin to turn the latch a quarter turn counterclockwise to lock the battery into place.

Boosting Memory

This MacBook has two memory slots that you access by removing the computer’s battery. The computer comes with a minimum of 2 gigabytes (GB) of 667 MHz Double. Data Rate (DDR2) Synchronous Dynamic Random-Access Memory (SDRAM) is installed. Both memory slots can accept an SDRAM module that meets the following specifications:

  • Double Data Rate Small Outline Dual Inline Memory Module (DDR2 SO-DIMM) format. 1.25-inch.
  • 1GB or 2GB.
  • 200-pin.
  • PC2-5300 DDR2 667 MHz Type RAM

It is possible to add two 2 GB memory modules for a maximum of 4 GB of memory. For best performance, the user can fill both memory slots and install an identical memory module in each slot. Important warning: Apple recommends that the user invites an Apple-certified technician install memory. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for information about how to contact Apple for service. If the user attempts to install memory and damage the equipment, such damage will not covered by the limited warranty on the computer.

How to Install Additional Memory

Installing memory involves removing and replacing the battery. The following procedure includes instructions for removing the battery from this MacBook, adding memory, and replacing the battery:

Remove the battery:

  • Shut down your MacBook. Disconnect the power adapter, Ethernet cable, USB cables, and any other cables connected to the MacBook to prevent damaging the computer.
  • Turn over the MacBook and locate the battery latch. Use a coin to turn the latch a quarter turn clockwise to unlock the battery, and gently remove it.

Install memory:

  • Loosen the three captive screws that secure the L-bracket, pull out the long end first to remove the bracket, and place it to the side (Levers on the memory slots spring out when you remove the bracket).
  • To remove a memory module installed in a slot, move the lever all the way to the left in one swift motion until the edge of the memory module pops out. Pull out the memory module. Repeat to remove the other memory module.
  • Insert the new memory modules in the slots: 1) Insert the gold edge first, with the notch on the left side. 2) Use two fingers with firm, even pressure to push in the memory modules. You should hear a click when the memory is inserted correctly. Note: The new memory module may have some residue on it from a lubricant that makes the memory easier to install. The residue is normal and should not be wiped off. c) If the levers don’t return to the closed position, move them to the right to close them. d) Replace the L-bracket by inserting the short end first and tightening the screws.

MacBook 5,1 Models

MacBook (13-inch, 2.4GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, Late 2008 Aluminum)

MacBook (13-inch, 2.0GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, Late 2008 Aluminum)

MacBook 5,2 Models

MacBook (13-inch, 2.13GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, Mid 2009)

MacBook (13-inch, 2.0GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, Early 2009)

Miscellanea

  • The LED display replaced the fluorescent tube backlights used in the previous model which contain mercury.
  • The FireWire 400 port was removed in the MacBook aluminium model. Thus this MacBook doesn’t support Target Disk Mode, used for data transfers or operating system repairs without booting the system.
  • Though the processor of this MacBook model ran at a slightly slower clock-rate, other specifications were improved: the bus speed was increased to 1066 MHz, and the amount of RAM was doubled to 2GHz.
  • The graphics chipset received a significant upgrade to the same chipset used in the more costly MacBook 5,1 (13-inch, Late 2008 Aluminum).

Links

MacBook Review [Video]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VcMWF8cApsM
CNET’s Dan Ackerman runs through updates to Apple’s line of laptops, with more processing power for the MacBook Pro, MacBook and MacBook Air. Published on June 5, 2017 by CNET.

Categories: MacBook

Tags: 2008, 2009, P7350, P7450, P8600

Other posts

MacBook 4,1 and MacBook 4,2 «» MacBook Air 2,1 (13-Inch, Late 2008 and Mid 2009)

Sours: https://igotoffer.com/apple/macbook-5

Since the introduction of the first white MacBook with Intel technology nothing has been changed at the exterior of the entry-level laptop. However, thanks to the simple straightforward design the laptop still appears optically up to date and in no way aged. Many of the current design elements of the aluminium MacBook series are simply made further use of in the small MacBook.

Indeed, compared to the aluminium Macbook Pro 13.3 the white model clearly appears to be of less high-quality, but compared to other products on the market, however, it is still an outstanding device. Our review model was liked by some even better than the cool aluminium case of the more expensive MacBook Pro laptops.

Another drawback of the used plastic body, is the sesintivity to scratches (particularly the high gloss surfaces on the outside) Even in our practically brand new test device we already found several traces of wear after only a few hours of use.

The haptics of the deployed plastic can be considered thoroughly high-quality (particularly on the inside). You can only anticipate from user reports how the dirt-susceptible white colouring gets on after longer use. In older MacBook laptops you very often see visual wear on the trackpad, the space key and the wrist rests. However, this also indicates a high degree of utilisation. Users of the first models also complained about a rapid fading in the areas where the wrists rest. You should therefore be aware that the white polycarbonate casing is clearly more susceptible to wear than the aluminium Unibody case of the more expensive models.

Despite the case is made of polycarbonate, the stability of the white MacBook is very good. Only the display lid lacks the rigidity of the aluminium. The ability to be distorted is however OK for the thickness and construction (no clamshell).

The large display hinges leave behind a good impression, but unfortunately the lid cannot be openedfar enough in order to reach a good viewing angle when working on bent knees. This was improved in the Unibody aluminium laptops.

Just like in the more expensive models, you also get the useful additional features in the currently cheapest Apple laptop, like the mentionable MagSafe power supply, or the small mains adapter with a handle for practical rolling up of the cable.

Sours: https://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Apple-MacBook-White-5-2-Mid-2009.18130.0.html

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