News on 6 staff

News on 6 staff DEFAULT

News Team

Would you like to receive local news notifications on your desktop?

CBS 6 News Team

CBS 6 Weather Authority

  • Local News

    Hanover meeting gets heated amid transgender policy discussions

    Leland Pinder

    PM, Oct 12,

  • Local News

    Study: Virginians eligible for nutrition support aren't getting it

    Shannon Lilly

    PM, Oct 12,

  • Local News

    Richmond neighbors concerned amid rise in violent crime

    Jon Burkett

    PM, Oct 12,

  • Local News

    Richmond closer to deciding what to do with federal funds

    WTVR CBS 6 Web Staff

    PM, Oct 12,

  • Local News

    Why this dad walked through Virginia without his shoes

    Jake Burns

    PM, Oct 12,

Sours: https://www.wtvr.com/about-us/news-team

News Team

Bria Chatman

Bria Chatman
Reporter/Multimedia Journalist

Bria Chatman is a Reporter/Multimedia Journalist at WBRC FOX6 News.

Alan Collins

Alan Collins
Reporter

WBRC FOX6 News Reporter Alan Collins is a native of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Not only was he born and raised there, he also attended and graduated from the University of Alabama.

Steve Crocker

Steve Crocker
Anchor

Steve Crocker co-anchors the 6 and 9pm newscasts at WBRC FOX6 News.

Brittany Dionne

Brittany Dionne
Reporter/Anchor

Brittany joined the WBRC FOX6 News team in February of as a reporter/anchor after serving as a reporter and fill-in Anchor for First Coast News in Jacksonville, FL.

Mike Dubberly

Mike Dubberly
Anchor

Mike Dubberly is a Good Day Alabama anchor for WBRC FOX6 News. He's been part of the WBRC family since

Cassie Fambro

Cassie Fambro

Cassie Fambro is an award-winning journalist who started her career in print reporting before transitioning to broadcast journalism. She graduated with academic honors from The University of South Alabama with a double major in psychology and journalism and a minor in criminal justice.

Josh Gauntt

Josh Gauntt
Reporter

Josh joined the WBRC FOX6 News team in July as a reporter covering Tuscaloosa and other parts of West Alabama. Now, Josh serves the community as an On Your Side Investigator. He hopes to be able to continue telling stories that make a difference.

Jonathan Hardison

Jonathan Hardison
Anchor/Managing Editor/Investigative Reporter

Jonathan Hardison anchors WBRC FOX6 News Live at Five, , 6 and 10 p.m. He's worked at television stations in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and Evansville, Indiana, before joining the WBRC FOX6 News team in October

Sheldon Haygood

Sheldon Haygood
Sports Anchor/Reporter

Sheldon Haygood began his career as a Sports Reporter at WBRC FOX6 back in Since then, Sheldon has developed into one of the city's favorite weekend sports anchors.

Morgan Hightower

Morgan Hightower

Two days after graduating from college, Morgan Hightower began her journalism career in Montgomery, Alabama. Nearly a decade and a few other jobs later, she is proud to be back in Alabama. Morgan joined WBRC FOX6 News "On Your Side Investigators" in September

Jennifer Horton

Jennifer Horton
Investigative Reporter

Jennifer Horton is an investigative reporter for WBRC FOX6 News, focusing on issues that directly impact viewers, the safety of their families and how their tax dollars are spent. Jennifer joined the WBRC FOX6 News team in March and plays an integral role with the On Your Side Investigators.

Clare Huddleston

Clare Huddleston
Anchor/Reporter

Clare Huddleston is proud to serve WBRC as an anchor/reporter for Good Day Alabama.

Lauren Jackson

Lauren Jackson

Lauren is a Texas native. Her career has taken her all over the country. She received her Bachelors of Arts degree in Journalism at The University of Arkansas in - Woo Pig Sooie! While in school, Lauren worked as the Sports Director, Reporter, and Anchor for UATV News.

Russell Jones

Russell Jones
Reporter/Anchor

Russell Jones is thrilled to be back in his hometown of Birmingham. Russell graduated from Hoover High School and earned his broadcasting degree from the University of Alabama.

Chasity Maxie

Chasity Maxie

Chasity Maxie joined the WBRC FOX6 News family in April of , but her journey here has had many twists and turns. Chasity is a Chicago native who received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Studies at Northern Illinois University.

Lydia Nusbaum

Lydia Nusbaum
Political Reporter

Political Reporter Lydia Nusbaum joined WSFA and the Gray family in June

Catherine Patterson

Catherine Patterson
Reporter/Anchor

Catherine Patterson anchors the WBRC FOX6 News at 9, , and 10 pm Monday through Friday. She also serves as the editor of WBRC's "Daily 6" Newsletter.

Jeh Jeh Pruitt

Jeh Jeh Pruitt
Reporter/Sports Anchor

WBRC FOX6 Sports Anchor/Reporter Jeh Jeh Pruitt began his television career as an intern at WBRC FOX6 News while a student in college.

Kelvin Reynolds

Kelvin Reynolds
Reporter

Kelvin Reynolds is a reporter for WBRC FOX6 News in our Tuscaloosa Bureau.

Janice Rogers

Janice Rogers
Anchor

Janice co-anchors and produces Good Day Alabama.

Jonathan Skinner

Jonathan Skinner

Jonathan Skinner joined the WBRC FOX6 News family as a Reporter/MMJ Oct. and Jonathan says it’s a blessing to be able to come to Birmingham and work in one of the best cities in the south. Jonathan was born in NY but grew up most of his life in NC. Before coming to Birmingham, he worked as a Weekend Anchor/MMJ at Erie News Now in Erie, PA.

Toi Thornton

Toi Thornton

Toi Thornton joined the WBRC FOX6 News team as the Traffic Anchor for Good Day Alabama in August He graduated from Dillard University with a Bachelor's of Arts in Broadcast Journalism in Toi graduated with his Masters of Arts degree in New Media Journalism in from Full Sail University, while working as a reporter in Lafayette.

Sarah Verser

Sarah Verser
Anchor

Sarah Verser anchors the and 6 On Your Side each weekday.

Weather Team

Matt Daniel

Matt Daniel
Meteorologist

Matt Daniel joined the WBRC First Alert weather team in August as a digital meteorologist/weather producer.

Mickey Ferguson

Mickey Ferguson
Meteorologist

Mickey Ferguson is the lead weather forecaster for Good Day Alabama. He started his career in television on October 21, , as a news producer at WJSU-TV in Anniston, Alabama.

Jill Gilardi

Jill Gilardi
Meteorologist

Jill Gilardi joined the WBRC First Alert weather team on December 30, She has nearly 15+ years of experience as a broadcast meteorologist, serving audiences in St. Joseph and Springfield, Missouri, before moving to WOWT in Omaha, Nebraska, in

Fred Hunter

Fred Hunter
Meteorologist

WBRC First Alert Meteorologist Fred Hunter was born in Alabama in the historic town of Ft. Payne. He has lived, attended school, raised his family and worked in the South all his life.

Wes Wyatt

Wes Wyatt
Chief Meteorologist

Wes is the Chief Meteorologist for WBRC FOX6 News. He joined WBRC in and prior to becoming Chief Meteorologist, served as Weekend Evening Meteorologist and Severe Weather Analyst.

Marketing Team

Jenna Wood

Jenna Wood
Digital Marketing Manager

Jenna Wood is the Digital Marketing Manager for WBRC FOX6 News in Birmingham, Ala. She also serves as a contributing editor for Magic City Weekend.

Gray DC Bureau

Jacqueline Policastro

Jacqueline Policastro
Washington Bureau Chief

Jacqueline Policastro created the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in She’s covered Congress and the White House for more than a decade.

Ted Fioraliso

Ted Fioraliso
Senior Reporter/Executive Producer

Ted Fioraliso returned to Washington, D.C. in April as a senior reporter/executive producer at the Gray Television Washington News Bureau.

Peter Zampa

Peter Zampa
Multimedia Journalist

Peter Zampa joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in June as a multimedia journalist.

Alana Austin

Alana Austin
Multimedia Journalist

Alana Austin joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau team in August after spending three years covering national and state politics in Richmond, Virginia at Gray TV's WVIR-TV.

Kyle Midura

Kyle Midura
Multimedia Journalist

Kyle Midura joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in September from Gray TV's WCAX-TV.

Timothy Knapp

Timothy Knapp
Supervisor of Videography

Timothy Knapp joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in September as Studio Manager and Photojournalist. He now serves as Supervisor of Videography.

Karen Daborowski

Karen Daborowski
Producer

Karen Daborowski joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in January as a producer.

Natalie Grim

Natalie Grim
Multimedia Journalist

Natalie Grim joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau as a multimedia journalist in June

Kristin Kasper

Kristin Kasper
Multimedia Journalist

Kristin Kasper joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in July of as a multimedia journalist.

Tyler S. Smith

Tyler S. Smith
Photojournalist/Editor

Tyler Smith joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in July as a photojournalist/editor.

Nicole Neuman

Nicole Neuman
Multimedia Journalist

Nicole Neuman joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in June as a multimedia journalist.

David Ade

David Ade
Multimedia Journalist

David Ade returned to the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in July as a multimedia journalist. He previously worked at the Bureau from

Jon Decker

Jon Decker
White House Correspondent and Senior National Editor

Jon Decker is the White House Correspondent and Senior National Editor for Gray Television and has been a member of the White House Press Corps since

Sours: https://www.wbrc.com/about-us/meet-the-team/
  1. Drone with wifi camera
  2. Mordus divinity 2
  3. Deloitte tax llp
  4. Vermont population 2019
  5. Black deck ideas

News Team

John Knicely

John Knicely
Anchor

John Knicely co-anchors live at 4, 5, , and 10 p.m. nightly on WOWT 6 News

Lauren Taylor

Lauren Taylor
Anchor

Lauren co-anchors 5 and 10 p.m. newscasts for WOWT 6 News.

Sharon Chen

Sharon Chen
Anchor

Sharon Chen anchors and pm shows on WOWT 6 News.

Danielle Avitable

Danielle Avitable
Morning Anchor

Danielle Avitable joined WOWT 6 News in August as co-anchor of Daybreak, but she is no stranger to the Midwest.

Dave Zawilinski

Dave Zawilinski
Morning Anchor

Dave Zawilinski joined the WOWT team as a morning anchor in October

Brian Mastre

Brian Mastre
Investigative Reporter / Weekend Anchor

Brian Mastre can be seen weekdays reporting and anchoring for WOWT 6 News at 6 & His in-depth reports, special projects and documentaries air throughout the year.

Lauren Melendez

Lauren Melendez
MMJ / Weekend Anchor

Lauren is no stranger to the Midwest, coming from WEEK-TV in Peoria, Ill., where she was the weekend anchor and investigative reporter.

Leigh Waldman

Leigh Waldman
Weekend Anchor / MMJ

Leigh Waldman is a proud Texan excited to venture into the Midwest.

Mike McKnight

Mike McKnight
MMJ / Reporter

A Lincoln native and Journalism graduate of UNL, Mike has 30 years reporting experience at WOWT -- 10 years of that as State Bureau Chief.

Roger Hamer

Roger Hamer
Photographer

A member of the WOWT staff since , Roger Hamer has covered everything from National Championship games to presidential visits.

Tara Campbell

Tara Campbell
MMJ / Reporter

Tara brings some Canadian flavor to the WOWT newsroom: She was born and raised just outside of Vancouver, British Columbia, and spent the majority of her journalism career in the province of Saskatchewan.

John Chapman

John Chapman
Reporter

John Chapman is a veteran member of the WOWT 6 News team. The award-winning news and sports reporter has worked for close to three decades in the Omaha area.

Marlo Lundak

Marlo Lundak
MMJ / Reporter

Marlo Lundak joined the WOWT 6 News team in March

Ashly Richardson

Ashly Richardson
MMJ / Reporter

Ashly Richardson joined the WOWT 6 News team in July as a Daybreak reporter and multimedia journalist.

Gina Dvorak

Gina Dvorak
Digital Director

Gina Dvorak, who joined the WOWT newsroom in , has strong roots in Nebraska, growing up in a multigenerational farm family and graduating from UNL's journalism college.

Taleisha Newbill

Taleisha Newbill
Digital Producer

Taleisha Newbill joined the WOWT 6 News digital team in December

Sales Team

Chris Ahrens

Chris Ahrens
Local Sales Manager

Chris started his career as a commercial producer and moved to an Account Executive role. He has a true passion for advertising success for all WOWT clients.

Mary Beth Keating

Mary Beth Keating
National Sales Manager

Mary Beth Keating is an Omaha native. Mary Beth has a wide range of experience in the broadcasting field.

Weather Team

Rusty Lord

Rusty Lord
Senior Chief Meteorologist

Chief Meteorologist Rusty Lord joined the 6 News First Alert Weather Team in June of

Emily Roehler

Emily Roehler
Chief Meteorologist

Chief Meteorologist Emily Roehler joined the 6 News First Alert Weather Team in October — but it's not her first time forecasting in Nebraska.

David Koeller

David Koeller
Meteorologist

David Koeller is a meteorologist for WOWT 6 News, bringing you weather updates weekdays at 4, 5, and 10pm as well as any time severe weather threatens.

Mallory Schnell

Mallory Schnell
Meteorologist

Mallory is the Weekend Meteorologist at WOWT. She joined the First Alert Weather Team in June

Clay Ostarly

Clay Ostarly
Meteorologist/Traffic reporter

Clay Ostarly joins WOWT's First Alert Weather Team as an AP award-winning and NWA certified meteorologist and multimedia journalist.

Sports Team

Joe Nugent

Joe Nugent
Sports Director

Joe is the WOWT sports director.

Rex Smith

Rex Smith
Sports Anchor

Rex is an award-winning sports reporter who joined WOWT in December

Gray DC Bureau

Jacqueline Policastro

Jacqueline Policastro
Washington Bureau Chief

Jacqueline Policastro created the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in She’s covered Congress and the White House for more than a decade.

Ted Fioraliso

Ted Fioraliso
Senior Reporter/Executive Producer

Ted Fioraliso returned to Washington, D.C. in April as a senior reporter/executive producer at the Gray Television Washington News Bureau.

Peter Zampa

Peter Zampa
Multimedia Journalist

Peter Zampa joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in June as a multimedia journalist.

Alana Austin

Alana Austin
Multimedia Journalist

Alana Austin joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau team in August after spending three years covering national and state politics in Richmond, Virginia at Gray TV's WVIR-TV.

Kyle Midura

Kyle Midura
Multimedia Journalist

Kyle Midura joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in September from Gray TV's WCAX-TV.

Timothy Knapp

Timothy Knapp
Supervisor of Videography

Timothy Knapp joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in September as Studio Manager and Photojournalist. He now serves as Supervisor of Videography.

Karen Daborowski

Karen Daborowski
Producer

Karen Daborowski joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in January as a producer.

Natalie Grim

Natalie Grim
Multimedia Journalist

Natalie Grim joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau as a multimedia journalist in June

Kristin Kasper

Kristin Kasper
Multimedia Journalist

Kristin Kasper joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in July of as a multimedia journalist.

Tyler S. Smith

Tyler S. Smith
Photojournalist/Editor

Tyler Smith joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in July as a photojournalist/editor.

Nicole Neuman

Nicole Neuman
Multimedia Journalist

Nicole Neuman joined the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in June as a multimedia journalist.

David Ade

David Ade
Multimedia Journalist

David Ade returned to the Gray Television Washington News Bureau in July as a multimedia journalist. He previously worked at the Bureau from

Jon Decker

Jon Decker
White House Correspondent and Senior National Editor

Jon Decker is the White House Correspondent and Senior National Editor for Gray Television and has been a member of the White House Press Corps since

Sours: https://www.wowt.com/about-us/meet-the-team/

News On 6 jobs in Oklahoma

Upload your resume - Let employers find you

Sort by: relevance - date

Page 1 of jobs

new

OUTSIDE NATIONAL SALES CONSULTANT - STORM DAMAGE

General Manager- Student Housing

Assistant to the Director

Oklahoma's Own News9.com

Tulsa, OK

KOTV Master Control Operator

Oklahoma's Own News9.com

Tulsa, OK

new

KOTV Web Content Producer

Oklahoma's Own News9.com

Tulsa, OK

Be the first to see new News On 6 jobs in Oklahoma

By creating a job alert, you agree to our Terms. You can change your consent settings at any time by unsubscribing or as detailed in our terms.

Sours: https://www.indeed.com/q-News-Onl-Oklahoma-jobs.html

6 staff on news

All Personalities

Stephanie Barichello

Stephanie Barichello

Stephanie Barichello is the weekend evening/midday meteorologist at FOX6 News.

Jason Calvi

Jason Calvi

Jason Calvi is the political reporter for FOX6 News.

Kasey Chronis

Kasey Chronis

Kasey Chronis joined the FOX6 News Team in January

Brandon Cruz

Brandon Cruz

Brandon Cruz has been with the FOX6 Sports team since June

Carl Deffenbaugh

Carl Deffenbaugh

Carl Deffenbaugh has been with FOX6 since -- and is proud to be a member of the WakeUp team.

Angelica Duria

Angelica Duria

Angelica Duria joined the FOX6 News team in October , making her trek back home to the Midwest.

Stephanie Grady

Stephanie Grady

Stephanie Grady has been an anchor with the FOX6 News team since autumn

Ben Handelman

Ben Handelman

Ben Handelman joined the FOX6 News anchor team in April

Rob Haswell

Rob Haswell

Rob Haswell is the Chief Meteorologist at FOX6 News.

Amanda St. Hilaire

Amanda St. Hilaire

Amanda St. Hilaire is part of the award-winning FOX6 Investigators team.

Amelia Jones

Amelia Jones

Amelia Jones has been with the FOX6 News reporting team since October

Nikola Junewicz

Nikola Junewicz

Nikola Junewicz is one of the talented reporters who also anchors newscasts at FOX6.

Sam Kraemer

Sam Kraemer

Sam Kraemer is one of the talented journalists at FOX6 News.

Brian Kramp

Brian Kramp

Brian Kramp is a roving reporter who you'll find around southeast Wisconsin on FOX6 WakeUp and Real Milwaukee.

Bret Lemoine

Bret Lemoine

Bret Lemoine is one of the many talented reporters at FOX6 News.

Eric Manges

Eric Manges

Eric Manges is one of the meteorologists that make up the FOX6 Weather Experts.

Aaron Maybin

Aaron Maybin

Aaron Maybin is a reporter at FOX6 News who has been with the team since January

Gabrielle Mays

Gabrielle Mays

Gabrielle Mays is one of the talented reporters who also anchors the FOX6 weekend evening news.

Bill Miston

Bill Miston

Bill Miston has been a member of the FOX6 News reporting team since April

Kim Murphy

Kim Murphy

Kim Murphy is one of the main anchors on the FOX6 WakeUp News team.

Ted Perry

Ted Perry

Ted Perry has been with FOX6 News since and anchors evening newscasts.

Evan Peterson

Evan Peterson

Evan Peterson is one of the multimedia journalists at FOX6 News.

Bryan Polcyn

Bryan Polcyn

Bryan Polcyn is part of the award-winning FOX6 Investigators team.

Jenna Sachs

Jenna Sachs

Jenna Sachs gets answers and assistance for FOX6 News viewers by leading Contact 6.

Gino Salomone

Gino Salomone

Gino Salomone is a Hollywood insider who calls Milwaukee home.

Angélica Sanchez

Angélica Sanchez

Angélica Sanchez has been with the FOX6 News reporting team since September

Ashley Sears

Ashley Sears

Ashley Sears is one of the talented reporters at FOX6 News -- and has been with the team since June

Mary Stoker Smith

Mary Stoker Smith

Mary Stoker Smith is one of a team of anchors leading the evening newscasts at FOX6.

Suzanne Spencer

Suzanne Spencer

Suzanne Spencer is one of the talented reporters who also anchors newscasts at FOX6.

Christina Van Zelst

Christina Van Zelst

Christina Van Zelst is a multimedia journalist at FOX6 News.

Tim Van Vooren

Tim Van Vooren

Tim Van Vooren is the Sports Director at FOX6.

Brhett Vickery

Brhett Vickery

Brhett Vickery is a multimedia journalist at FOX6 News.

Tom Wachs

Tom Wachs

Tom Wachs is one of the talented meteorologists who make up the FOX6 Weather Experts.

A.J. Waterman

A.J. Waterman

A.J. Waterman is one of the meteorologists who make up the FOX6 Weather Experts.

Derica Williams

Derica Williams

Derica Williams is one of the talented reporters who also anchors Weekend WakeUp News.

Cassidy Williams

Cassidy Williams

Cassidy Williams has been with the FOX6 News reporting team since January

Lily Zhao

Lily Zhao

Lily Zhao has been with the FOX6 Sports team since July

Sours: https://www.fox6now.com/person/all
Morning News NOW Full Broadcast - Oct. 11

KOTV-DT

Not to be confused with KTVO, WOTV, WTOV, WTVO, or TVOntario.

For the television station in Okinawa, Japan, see Okinawa Television.

CBS affiliate in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Television station in Oklahoma, United States

KOTV 6 logo.png
News on 6 Now logo.png
ChannelsDigital: 26 (UHF)
Virtual: 6
BrandingKOTV 6 (general)
[The] News on 6 (newscasts)
News on 6 Now (DT3)
AffiliationsCBS (since )
The CW (since )
News on 6 Now (since )
OwnerGriffin Communications
(Griffin Licensing, LLC)

Sister stations

TV: KQCW-DT
Radio:KBEZ, KFAQ, KHTT, KVOO-FM, KXBL

First air date

October&#;22, (71 years ago)&#;()

Former channel number(s)

Analog:
6 (VHF, –)
Digital:
55 (UHF, until )
45 (UHF, –)

Former affiliations

All secondary (main feed):
Paramount (October –)
ABC (November –September )
NBC (October –December )
DuMont (October –)
NTA (–)
DT3:This TV (–)

Call sign meaning

Oklahoma
TeleVision

Licensing authority

FCC
Facility ID
ERP kW
HAAT&#;m (1,&#;ft)
Transmitter coordinates36°1′15″N95°40′33″W / °N °W / ;
Translator(s)19 (UHF) McAlester
30 (UHF) Caney, KS

Public license information

Profile
LMS
Websitewww.newson6.com

KOTV-DT, virtual channel 6 (UHFdigital channel 26), is a CBS-affiliatedtelevision stationlicensed to Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. Owned by Griffin Communications, it is part of a duopoly with Muskogee-licensed CW affiliate KQCW-DT (channel 19); it is also sister to radio stations KFAQ ( AM), KBEZ ( FM), KVOO-FM (), KXBL ( FM) and KHTT ( FM). All of the outlets share studios at the Griffin Communications Media Center on North Boston Avenue and East Cameron Street in the downtown neighborhood's Tulsa Arts District; KOTV's transmitter is located on South rd East Avenue (just north of the Muskogee Turnpike) in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma.

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

On March 24, , the Cameron Television Corporation (originally doing business as George E. Cameron Inc.) submitted an application to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for a construction permit to build and license to operate a broadcast television station in Tulsa that would transmit on VHF channel 6.[1] The company was owned by George E. Cameron Jr., a Texas-born independent oil producer, broadcasting executive Maria Helen Alvarez and John B. Hill, a salesman for a Tulsa oil field supplier (both Hill, who would serve as KOTV's original sales manager, and Alvarez owned 15% stakes in the company).

The formation of the partnership traces to when Alvarez – at the time, an employee of the Tulsa Broadcasting Company, then owner of local radio station KTUL ( AM, now KTBZ) – conducted a study authorized by John Toole "J. T." Griffin, majority owner and president of Tulsa Broadcasting and Muskogee-based wholesale food distributor Griffin Grocery Company, and his sister, Marjory Griffin Leake, into whether a television venture in Tulsa could be successful. After two years of research, Alvarez suggested to the Griffins that they file a television license application as quickly as possible. The Griffin siblings ultimately decided that such a venture would be too risky at that point and planned to wait a year before going to the FCC to apply, only to have those plans stalled by an agency-imposed freeze on television station license applications instituted by the FCC in September (The Griffins and James C. "Jimmy" Leake, husband of Marjory and brother-in-law of J. T., would eventually venture into television when their Oklahoma Television Corporation signed on CBS affiliate KWTV in Oklahoma City in December ; J. T. Griffin would launch his second television property in September , when Tulsa Broadcasting signed on Muskogee-based ABC affiliate KTVX [channel 8, now KTUL, which would relocate to Tulsa in September ].) Alvarez subsequently resigned from Tulsa Broadcasting and began casting about for investors who would be willing to get a station on the air right away. At a social event, she was introduced to Cameron, who was looking to spend monthly royalty checks he had saved, totaling $50,, on a business venture.

The FCC granted the construction permit for channel 6 to the Cameron-Alvarez-Hill group on June 2, , as no other applications had been submitted for agency review.[2][3] However, the group soon discovered that they would need to re-file the request, as a previously unnoticed typo in the application had assigned KOVB as the call letters for the new station, rather than the calls that Cameron had requested, KOTV (for "Oklahoma Television"). The FCC would approved the change to the KOTV calls in March [4] While this was happening, Alvarez negotiated a leasing agreement to utilize an International Harvester dealership and repair shop at West Third Street and South Frankfort Avenue in downtown Tulsa to serve as KOTV's studio building, and converted it into what became the largest television studio facility in the United States at the time (a second floor was added to the existing 7,square-foot [&#;m2] facility in the fall of ).[5] The station's 1,foot (&#;m) transmitter antenna and dish, which was built in the backyard of chief engineer George Jacobs, was eventually hoisted to the top of the National Bank of Tulsa Building on East 3rd Street and South Boston Avenue. Alvarez had spent a year convincing National Bank of Tulsa officers that the tower would be safe and, in time, become a local landmark. While the tower was being installed, a workman's wrench fell from atop the building, fatally striking the head of a woman who was passing below the construction site. Detractors of the station – who took to calling the accident, "Cameron's Folly" – jumped on the story, proclaiming it as a sign that KOTV was "jinxed" from the start. A local radio executive who spoke at a Tulsa Chamber of Commerce luncheon said that anyone investing in KOTV or buying a television set was "foolish"; Cameron Television continued on, however, with Alvarez (who served as president of Cameron Television and general manager of KOTV) handling all aspects of the station's development, while Cameron himself primarily focused on supervising his many oil properties in California. Alvarez and her company co-partners invested nearly $, into developing the station; in an interview with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch shortly before the station signed on, she made the bold statement that KOTV would be operating in the "black" within six months of its sign-on, a comment dismissed by many of its detractors. Alvarez also visited 42 of the 89 existing television stations already in operation throughout the United States to study the intricacies of running a television station.

KOTV first began test transmissions on October 15, ; the pattern signal was seen by a handful of viewers among the 3, northeastern Oklahoma residents that owned television receivers, carrying as far away as Enid and Eufaula, Oklahoma, Monett, Missouri and Fayetteville, Arkansas. The station started regular broadcasts on October [6] It was the first television station to sign on in the Tulsa market, the second to sign on in the state of Oklahoma (after WKY-TV [now KFOR-TV] in Oklahoma City, which debuted five months earlier on June 6) and the 90th to sign on in the United States. More than one month later, on November 23, KOTV broadcast its first locally produced program: a live meeting by the Tulsa Chamber of Commerce at the Tulsa Club (on East 5th Street and South Cincinnati Avenue), which was attended by many of the station's original critics. One week later, on November 30, the station commenced regular broadcasts at &#;p.m. with a "Special Dedication Program" that featured guests such as Oklahoma governorRoy J. Turner; Tulsa mayor Roy Lundy; singer Patti Page; Leon McAuliffe and his western swing band; and Miss Oklahoma Louise O'Brien.[7] The next day on December 1, KOTV broadcast a two-hour sampling of the top programs from all five networks of the time from which the station carried programming during its first few years. Over 3, television sets were placed throughout the city for public viewing, some of them set on sidewalks outside of appliance stores. After several days of this sampling, the public began to buy their own television sets and KOTV began to cement a small, but growing, viewing audience in the Four State Area.

Originally broadcasting for 11½ hours per day from &#;p.m. to midnight seven days a week, the station has been a primary CBS television affiliate since it signed on. Channel 6 initially also maintained secondary affiliations with NBC, the DuMont Television Network and the Paramount Television Network at its launch; KOTV would add a fifth affiliation on November 15, when it began carrying a limited selection of ABC network programs.[8][9] Along with network shows, in its early years, one-third of the station's schedule was devoted to locally produced programs. Even though KOTV's relations with all of the commercial broadcast networks were smooth, the station showed a preference for CBS's program offerings over the others. At first, network programming was aired about one week after their initial live broadcast on the East Coast; it would not be until , before the installation of a microwave link with New York City made reception of live network programming possible.[10] Three hours of programming were filled by varied network content during the evening hours.

On May 12, , Cameron and Hill sold a controlling 85% interest in KOTV to another Texas oil magnate, Jack D. Wrather Jr., and his mother, Maizie Wrather, for $ million (a purchase price far exceeding the amount it cost to build the station). Wrather knew little about television, and persuaded Alvarez – who retained 15% of the station's shares – to stay on as general manager (a role she had held since KOTV signed on, and a groundbreaking one in broadcasting, as she became the first female to work as a general manager of a television station). Wrather also made her a full partner in a new joint venture entity that became known as Wrather-Alvarez Inc. (later renamed the General Television Corporation in January ). The sale received FCC approval on July [11][12][13] By , the station expanded its daily schedule to 17 hours per day from &#;a.m. to midnight.

Because of the aforementioned freeze on license application grants, KOTV was the only television station in the Tulsa market until That March, KOTV gained its first competitor when UHF station KCEB (channel 23, channel now occupied by Fox affiliate KOKI-TV) signed on as a primary NBC and secondary DuMont affiliate. However, as manufacturers were not required to include UHF tuners on television sets at the time, NBC struck a backdoor agreement with KOTV that allowed channel 6 to continue "cherry-picking" stronger shows from that network. In April , KOTV installed color transmission equipment, in a byproduct of an agreement with NBC to carry network programs produced in the format; the station would air its first network color broadcast, the children's program Ding Dong School, one month later on May A few months later on December 5, KVOO-TV (channel 2, now KJRH-TV) signed on and took the remaining NBC programs that KOTV carried. In preparation of losing NBC programming, KCEB had switched to a primary ABC affiliation in July of that year, with that network agreeing to affiliate with channel 23 on the condition that KOTV be allowed to cherry-pick its shows as well. KTVX took all of the remaining ABC programs when that station debuted on September 18, , which left KOTV with an exclusive CBS affiliation and KCEB (which, like many early UHF television stations, would cease operations in December of that year as a result of losing its affiliations with NBC and ABC) saddled with fourth-ranked DuMont. Also in , KOTV constructed a 1,foot (&#;m) transmitter tower at the Osage–Tulsa county line (north of Sand Springs) near Big Heart Mountain, a hill which was named by station president C. Wade Petersmeyer. KOTV management subsequently reached an agreement with the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority (OETA) to lease space on the tower – which became the fifth tallest structure in the world at the time of its completion that October – for the transmitter of proposed educational station KOED (channel 11), which would eventually sign on January 12, The new transmission facility also came with an increase in its transmitter power from &#;kW to &#;kW, expanding KOTV's signal coverage to a 24,square-mile (15,,acre) area.[14][15][16] In , KOTV began carrying select programs from the NTA Film Network.[17]

Corinthian Broadcasting and Belo ownership[edit]

KOTV logo used from February to October 24,

In April , General Television sold KOTV to Indianapolis-based venture capital firm J.H. Whitney & Company for $4 million. The transaction involved a two-phase transfer in which KOTV was reassigned from General Television directly to Alvarez, Wrather and the latter's mother, Maizie Wrather, all of whom would then transfer their interests to Whitney-owned licensee Osage Broadcasting Corp. The transfer received FCC approval on May 14, with KOTV becoming Whitney's first broadcasting property.[18][19][20][21][22] Whitney (whose namesake owner, philanthropist and investor John Hay "Jock" Whitney, was the brother-in-law of CBS chairman William S. Paley) folded the group – which had expanded to include fellow CBS affiliates KGUL-TV (now Houston-based KHOU) in Galveston, Texas, WISH-TV (now a CW affiliate) and WISH-AM (now WTLC) in Indianapolis, and WANE-TV and WANE radio (now WIOE) in Fort Wayne, Indiana – into a new subsidiary, the Corinthian Broadcasting Corporation, on April 26, [23][24]

In , KOTV became the first television station in Oklahoma to install videotape equipment for the production and broadcast of programming. The following year, in , KOTV upgraded its equipment to broadcast local film shows in color; the later began broadcasting its local programming in color in December On December 3, , Corinthian Broadcasting – which had its ownership transferred directly to J.H. Whitney from his company's Whitney Communications Corporation unit two years earlier – announced it had reached an agreement to be acquired by private equity firm Dun & Bradstreet for $ million in stock. Following a month-long regulatory review process that included a deadlocked tie vote when the agency first considered the sale's approval in November , the purchase received FCC approval on April 14, , and was finalized the following month on May [25][26][27][28][29] In , KOTV maintained an affiliation with the TVS Television Network, carrying the network's World Football League game telecasts in place of CBS's Thursday night lineup.[30]

On June 19, , the Dallas, Texas-based A. H. Belo Corporation acquired the six Corinthian Television properties (with WISH-TV and WANE-TV subsequently being spun off to LIN Broadcasting) from Dun and Bradstreet for $ million; KOTV's purchase price was $41 million. The sale – which was considered to be the largest group purchase by a single broadcasting company up to that time, surpassing the price of the Gannett Company's $million purchase of Combined Communications Corporation in – received FCC approval on November 22, , and was finalized in late January [31][32][33][34] In , KOTV and KJRH formed a consortium to have a new 1, feet (&#;m)-tall tower constructed between Broken Arrow and Oneta, which was completed in Additional transmitters were subsequently installed to serve as auxiliary facilities for KOED and religious independent stationKWHB (channel 47).[35]

Griffin Communications ownership[edit]

On October 18, , Belo announced that it would sell KOTV to Oklahoma City-based Griffin Communications (now run by the descendants of John T. Griffin) for $82 million. Under Griffin ownership, the company intended to pool resources and content between the news operations of KOTV and Oklahoma City flagship station KWTV; the purchase also made KOTV a sister station to NBC affiliate KPOM-TV (now Fox affiliate KFTA-TV) and satellite station KFAA (now KNWA-TV) in the adjacent Fort Smith–Fayetteville, Arkansas market (Griffin Communications would sell the latter two stations to the Nexstar Broadcasting Group in , in order to focus on its broadcast properties in Oklahoma City and Tulsa). The purchase was finalized on January 3, , returning the station to Oklahoma-based ownership after 38 years.[36][37][38][39][40] On May 1, , Griffin launched a Tulsa area feed of its cable news joint venture with Cox Communications, News Now 53, offering live and repeat newscasts from KOTV (maintaining the same rolling news format that had been in place when the channel launched on Cox's Oklahoma City system with news content from KWTV in December ). Griffin Communications acquired Cox's interest in News Now 53 on April 1, , converting it into a broadcast-originated service via subchannels of KOTV and KWTV under the respective brands News on 6 Now and News 9 Now.[41][42] Griffin invested $10 million to purchase production control and master control equipment to accommodate high-definition and digital broadcasts as well as upgrades to its digital transmitter.

On October 8, , Griffin Communications purchased Muskogee-licensed WB affiliate KWBT (channel 19, now CW affiliate KQCW-DT) from Spokane, Washington-based Cascade Broadcasting Group for $ million ($ million for the non-license assets and $ million for the license itself). Under the terms of the deal, Griffin assumed responsibility for KWBT's advertising sales and administrative operations under a local marketing agreement (LMA) that continued until the sale's closure. When the deal was finalized on September 29, , KOTV and KWBT became the fourth commercial television station duopoly in the Tulsa market, after Fox affiliate KOKI-TV and then-UPN affiliate KTFO (channel 41, now MyNetworkTV affiliate KMYT-TV), which had been jointly operated through an LMA since and became commonly owned when Clear Channel Communications purchased channel 41 outright in KWBT subsequently migrated its operations from its studio facility in Yukon, into KOTV's Frankfort Avenue studios on December 6 of that year.[43][44]

On October 25, , Griffin announced that it would construct a 50,square-foot (4,&#;m2) media center on North Boston Avenue and East Cameron Street in downtown Tulsa's Brady Arts District (renamed the Tulsa Arts District in September ) that would house KOTV, KQCW and Griffin New Media, which manages the websites operated by Griffin Communications. The station – which, amid an increase in staffing from employees prior to Belo's sale of the station to around since Griffin took ownership, had been renting a portable building on a lot near the Frankfort Avenue studio to house its advertising sales department, and annexed space in the Pierce Building on Third Street and Detroit Avenue to house KQCW's staff – intended to consolidate the employees of its various departments into a single facility. Groundbreaking on the site took place on April 8, , with an original targeted completion date for sometime in the summer of However, construction on the $million facility was delayed in the midst of the global recession; construction formally commenced in October , and was completed in early November [45][46][47][48][49][50][51] The facility incorporates a 5,square-foot (&#;m2) production studio (which is sound-proofed with multiple layers of sheet rock and insulation in the walls and ceiling, and incorporates upgraded equipment that allowed for KOTV to begin producing its news programming to full high definition); an adjoining 7,square-foot (&#;m2) newsroom; two control rooms that relay high definition content; and LED lighting equipment throughout the building and an underground system of 32 geothermal heating and cooling wells beneath its parking lot to reduce electricity costs. KOTV/KQCW's news, sales and marketing departments moved to the new Griffin Communications Media Center – which was dedicated in the names of company founders John T. and Martha Griffin – on January 19, (commencing broadcasts with that evening's edition of the &#;p.m. newscast), ending KOTV's year tenure at the South Frankfort Avenue facility; all remaining operations were moved into the new facility by January Some archival material in the former building (including news footage, specials and still photographs dating to the s) was donated to the Oklahoma Historical Society.[52][53]

On June 25, , the E. W. Scripps Company announced it would sell its Tulsa-area radio properties – KFAQ ( AM), KVOO-FM (), KBEZ ( FM), Muskogee-licensed KHTT ( FM) and Henryetta-licensed KXBL-FM () – to Griffin Communications for $ million. The purchase marks Griffin's entry into radio station ownership, even though the company has owned the Radio Oklahoma Network syndicated news service since ; it also puts KOTV in the unusual position of being co-owned with KFAQ, a station which – through its then-ownership by the Southwestern Sales Corporation – founded rival KJRH (as KVOO-TV) in December [54][55][56] Griffin began operating the radio stations under an LMA on July 30, and completed the purchase on October 2, [57]

Subchannel history[edit]

KOTV-DT2[edit]

Main article: KQCW-DT

KOTV-DT2 is the second digital subchannel of KOTV-DT, which operates as a simulcast feed of CW-affiliated sister station KQCW-DT; it broadcasts in widescreen standard definition on UHF digital channel (or virtual channel ). KOTV-DT launched a digital subchannel on virtual channel in , which originally carried a live feed of the station's Doppler radar (then known as "WARN 6 Doppler") accompanied by an audio simulcast of Tulsa-based NOAA Weather Radio station KIH On June 26, , KOTV-DT2 was converted into a standard definition simulcast feed of Muskogee-based WB affiliate KWBT, in order to relay that station's signal to portions of northeastern Oklahoma located north of a line from Salina to Drumright that—because the channel 19 transmitter is located in rural northwestern Muskogee County, in compliance with FCC regulations that prohibit broadcast transmitters from being located more than 25 miles (40&#;km) from the station's city of license—could not adequately receive the KWBT signal. Because of technical limitations resulting from the main signal being transmitted in the heavier-bitrate i format, the KQCW simulcast is carried over KOTV-DT2 in widescreen SD.

KOTV-DT3[edit]

Main article: News on 6 Now

KOTV-DT3 (branded as "News on 6 Now") is the third digital subchannel of KOTV-DT, which maintains a locally programmed rolling news format; it broadcasts in widescreen standard definition on UHF digital channel (or virtual channel ). On cable, KOTV-DT3 is available on Cox Communications channel 53 in the Tulsa area and Suddenlink Communications digital channel in Muskogee, as well as on other cable providers throughout the market.

KOTV launched a digital subchannel on virtual channel on January 20, , which originally served as an affiliate of movie-focused network This TV. On April 1, , KOTV-DT3 switched to a locally programmed format under the brand "News on 6 Now," which resulted in the This TV affiliation being shifted to KQCW-DT2.[42][58] The successor of the cable-only News Now 53, which had its ownership transfer exclusively to Griffin Communications with its conversion into a broadcast-originated channel, it maintains that service's format of primarily airing simulcasts of KOTV's live newscasts as well as repeat airings of the most recent KOTV newscast that, in most cases, are shown until the next live newscast on channel 6. The subchannel also carries a ticker that displays current conditions and weather forecasts for major cities across northeastern Oklahoma, and a three-hour block of educational programming aimed at older children and teenagers on Saturday afternoons to fulfill subchannel compliance guidelines included in the Children's Television Act. News on 6 Now may take on the responsibility of being a substitute carrier of CBS programming in the event that extended breaking news or severe weather coverage required preemption on KOTV's main channel.

Programming[edit]

KOTV-DT currently broadcasts the entire CBS network schedule, albeit with variances for certain programs that place them outside of their network-recommended scheduling (as detailed in the section below). However, it may preempt some CBS programs in order to air long-form breaking news or severe weather coverage, or occasional specials produced by the KOTV news department, which may either be diverted to KQCW, or, less commonly, rebroadcast on tape delay over KOTV's main channel in place of regular overnight programs. Station personnel also gives viewers the option of watching the affected shows on CBS' website and mobile app, Paramount+ or its cable/satellite video-on-demand service the day after their initial airing. Syndicated programs broadcast by KOTV as of September [update] include Dr. Phil, Whacked Out Sports, Extra and Entertainment Tonight.[59]

Channel 6 served as the Tulsa market's "Love Network" affiliate for the Muscular Dystrophy Association's Jerry LewisMDA Labor Day Telethon for 38 years from September until September Because of the station's commitments to run CBS' entertainment and sports programming, KOTV usually aired the telethon on a three-hour tape delay following its &#;p.m. newscast on the Sunday preceding Labor Day, although some CBS sports telecasts—such as final-round coverage of the US Open, which aired on other local stations and local origination cable channels, and from to , News on 6 Now—was preempted in favor of the telethon. (The rights to the broadcast were assumed by Fox affiliate KOKI-TV in September ; the broadcast—by then reduced to a two-hour special—moved to ABC in September , airing thereafter by association on KTUL until the final telecast of the retitled MDA Show of Strength in August )[60][61][62][63]

Local programming[edit]

One of KOTV's first locally produced programs was Lookin' At Cookin', a daily cooking show that was originally hosted by Anne Mahoney. The program was one of several locally produced cooking shows that were produced and sponsored by Oklahoma Natural Gas, and was the longest-running such program produced by the utility company; Lookin' At Cookin' was broadcast from the nation's first "Telecast Kitchen", which operated at the South Frankfort Avenue studios throughout the show's year run until its cancellation in Eventually, the show was cut down to a five-minute mid-morning program and was retitled Coffee Break, which pre-empted the Douglas Edwards-anchored CBS Midday Newsbreak.[64][65][66] One of the station's most successful local shows was Lewis Meyer's Bookshelf. Hosted by author and literary critic Lewis Meyer beginning in , the program featured reviews and excerpts read by Meyer of new and classic books showcased from his eponymous bookstore (which operated at 35th Street and South Peoria Avenue in the city's Brookside district for many years, and was featured in a Paula Zahn profile on Meyer and his program in a March CBS This Morning segment). Meyer would close each program by reminding viewers that "the more books you read, the taller you grow". The program ran on Sunday mornings for its entire year run, the longest tenure of any non-news local program in Tulsa television history, until January , when it ended its run with a tribute to Meyer (who died from heart failure earlier that month).[67][68][69]

The children's variety program King Lionel's Court, which aired from to , featured host Lee Woodward and his lion puppet sidekick named King Lionel (Woodward created and puppeteered King Lionel, whom Woodward would bring on to make regular appearances during the station's &#;p.m. newscasts for most of the s). Woodward spent most of tenure at channel 6 as the station's lead meteorologist, and also served as host of the series Dance Party, an American Bandstand-style Saturday afternoons dance show that courted such famed musicians as The Temptations, Paul Revere and the Raiders, and The Beach Boys.[70][71] Other noted local programs that have aired on channel 6 include The Uncanny Film Festival and Camp Meeting, a Saturday late-night film showcase and sketch comedy program hosted by Gailard Sartain as Dr. Mazeppa Pompazoidii and local comedian/radio DJ Jim Millaway (using the stage name Sherman Oaks) from to , and which also featured a then-unknown Gary Busey among its sketch players; Zeta, on Satellite Six, a space-themed children's program showcasing Little Rascals shorts that was hosted by Jim Ruddle (who would later transition into a career in television news that began at KOTV) from to ; and The Woman's Page, a daily talk show hosted by Betty Boyd that ran from to [72][73][74][75]

Program preemptions and deferrals[edit]

Since its sign-on, KOTV has periodically preempted or given tape-delayed clearances to some CBS programs to air local, syndicated or special event programs. Between September and August , KOTV was one of several CBS stations to preempt the network's late night lineup, opting to air syndicated sitcom and drama reruns in place of the CBS Late Movie / CBS Late Night and Crimetime After Primetime blocks and the short-lived Pat Sajak Show. (Independent station KGCT-TV carried the CBS late night block from September until it temporarily ceased operations in February )[76][77] Upon its August premiere, KOTV was among a handful of CBS affiliates that received network permission to air the Late Show with David Letterman on a half-hour delay, in order to air syndicated reruns of Designing Women after its &#;p.m. newscast; it would give in to airing Letterman in its recommended timeslot in January [78][79][80] The station also delayed The Late Late Show—during the entire Tom Snyder and Craig Kilborn runs, and the first six years of Craig Ferguson's tenure—until &#;a.m. from the program's September debut until March 28, in favor of syndicated sitcom reruns and, later, same-day encores of Inside Edition.

As a result of the expansion of its local morning newscast into a two-hour broadcast in September , KOTV has aired CBS' morning news-talk programs—CBS This Morning (both the – and – versions) and The Early Show (from to )—on a tape delay to accommodate Six in the Morning; in September , channel 6 began preempting most of the first hour of (the original) CBS This Morning in favor of an additional hour of its morning newscast (titled Six This Morning), after exercising a network option that allowed affiliates to produce a mix of in-house local segments and a selection of national segments from the first hour of the This Morning broadcast; in January , KOTV began airing the Early Show in its entirety on a one-hour delay from to &#;a.m., which carried over into the version of This Morning. (The station similarly aired predecessor show Morning a half-hour earlier than its recommended slot by way of a live feed tape delay from to , in favor of airing the half-hour local talk show Tulsa Morning.) On September 13, , KOTV began airing the rebranded CBS Mornings from to a.m., in line with other CBS affiliates in the Central Time Zone.

In December , the station began to preempt The Bold and the Beautiful (B&B) to make room for an expanded one-hour edition of its noon newscast. Thereafter, B&B could only be viewed within the market via fringe reception or rural cable availability of either KWTV, KOAM-TV in Joplin or KFSM-TV in Fort Smith. CBS eventually gave KOTV permission to air B&B after the network's late night schedule (at &#;a.m.) in September (Sister station KQCW aired the program in its network-recommended slot from September until January , while continuing to air on KOTV in late night.)[81][82]

After Face the Nation expanded to a one-hour broadcast in April , as certain other CBS affiliates have done since that time, KOTV aired the first half-hour of the Sunday morning talk show live-to-air on Sunday mornings and the second half-hour early Monday mornings on tape delay until February (during this time, the program aired in its entirety on KOTV-DT2 off its "live" feed in the form of a partial simulcast with the station's main feed during FTN's first half-hour). To accommodate the network's Saturday morning newscast, channel 6 also aired CBS' Saturday morning children's program block in two separate sub-blocks from January until September , with much of the block airing in pattern on its normal airdate from to &#;a.m. and an additional hour airing on Sundays from to &#;a.m. for most of that period (As of September [update], the station elects to air the final two hours of the CBS Dream Team educational programming block on Sunday mornings between and &#;a.m., to make room for CBS This Morning Saturday and a two-hour-long Saturday edition of Six in the Morning.)

KOTV was one of five Belo-owned CBS affiliates that preempted a November 22, , 60 Minutes segment on controversial pathologistJack Kevorkian, which included a video of a voluntary human euthanasia that Kevorkian administered to ALS patient Thomas Youk two months earlier. In place of the minute-long segment was a disclaimer message from KOTV general manager Ron Longinotti explaining why the station would not air the segment, and an abbreviated local news insert. The decision—which was made directly by Belo management due to objections over the video's graphic content—fielded approximately phone calls from viewers, most of which were critical of the move.[83][84] The station also received criticism for preempting the final round of the PGA Tour's AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am Tournament on February 7, (which was held on a Monday due to rain delays that suspended play the day prior) in favor of airing its regular daytime lineup of Maury and Oprah, preventing viewers from seeing Tiger Woods' comeback to under-par to win that year's tournament. The criticism was amplified by the fact that a KOTV telephone receptionist told some viewers calling into the station that satellite transmission issues prevented the tournament round from being broadcast. Then-KOTV general manager Bud Brown claimed that the station would have lost more than $10, in advertising revenue and received "twice or three times as many complaints" had Oprah been preempted that day.[85]

Sports programming[edit]

Seven years before Griffin Communications acquired the latter station, KOTV and KWTV in Oklahoma City partnered to simulcast three games involving the state's two Central Hockey League franchises, the Tulsa Oilers and the Oklahoma City Blazers, during the league's –94 regular season; the respective sports directors of both stations at that time, Bill Teegins and John Walls, conducted play-by-play for the broadcasts, with KWTV sports anchor Ed Murray (who would later become a news anchor in , and remain in that role until his retirement from television news in ) doing color commentary.[86] From to , KOTV maintained a broadcast partnership with the Sooner Sports Network, holding the local over-the-air broadcast rights to Oklahoma Soonersmen's and women'scollege basketball games as well as weekly coaches programs for the Sooners' basketball and football teams produced through the University of Oklahoma's sports broadcasting unit.

News operation[edit]

KOTV presently broadcasts 48½ hours of locally produced newscasts each week (with eight hours each weekday, five hours on Saturdays and 3½ hours on Sundays).[87] In addition, the station broadcasts a minute sports highlight and discussion program on Sunday evenings, Oklahoma Sports Blitz, which is co-hosted by KOTV sports director John Holcomb and KWTV sports director Dean Blevins; the program is produced out of KWTV's studio facility on Kelley Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard in northeast Oklahoma City.

News department history[edit]

Channel 6's news department began operations along with the station on October 22, , originally consisting of minute-long newscasts at noon and &#;p.m., and a half-hour newscast at &#;p.m. The newscasts were first anchored by Bob Hower, the first television news anchor in the Tulsa market, who opened that first newscast with the introduction, "Good evening, let's look at the news." At the time of its sign-on, in addition to his news duties, Hower served as KOTV's staff announcer as well as host of the station-produced game showWishing Well. (After leaving KOTV following his recall into the Army to fight in the Korean War in the fall of , Hower would eventually become known among Tulsa-area viewers during his tenure at KTUL from to , during which he created the Waiting Child segment series – typically read Associated Press and United Press wire copy headlines – with still newspaper photographs being shown while reading some of the featured stories – four times a week.)[88][89]

Clayton Vaughn joined KOTV as an anchor and assignment reporter in , working off-and-on at the station for 33 years (with respective stints in Los Angeles and New York City interrupting his tenure at channel 6 from to , and again from to ). He rejoined KOTV as main anchor of its evening newscasts in , and took on additional duties as managing editor of the news department in In , Vaughn – along with then-news director David Cassidy, KOTV and then-parent company Belo – was sued by Robert Joffe (an anchor and feature reporter who joined KOTV in , and became known for his "You've Got a Friend" series that chronicled children and senior citizens in need of friendship) for $11 million. Joffe claimed he was fired by KOTV after Vaughn spread a rumor to station management that Joffe had a sexual liaison with a male hairstylist. Station manager Lee Salzberger stated that the firing resulted from "a [] lack of confidence in his news and editorial judgment[,] doubts about his ability to effectively function as a news reporter[,] and his limited anchoring and reporting capabilities." In January , Tulsa County District Court Judge Jane Wiseman granted a $4 million judgement to the estate of Joffe – who died from self-inflictedcarbon monoxide poisoning in January – on charges of wrongful discharge, intentional infliction of emotional distress and interference with an employment contract (an additional claim of slander had earlier been dismissed). The ruling was upheld in two proceedings in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Supreme Court.[90][91][92][93][94][95][96][97][98][99][][] Vaughn remained primary co-anchor until February 28, , when he shifted behind the scenes as full-time managing editor, a role Vaughn continued to hold until he retired from broadcasting in December [][][]

Jim Giles was a fixture for many years as KOTV's chief meteorologist, replacing the retiring Lee Woodward in During his tenure in the weather department, Giles helped gravitate KOTV to increase its emphasis on weather. He also received numerous awards for his charitable work, having started several community initiatives overseen by the station that help low-income residents, including "Giles' Coats for Kids" (a partnership with The Salvation Army Tulsa Area Command and local dry cleaners to collect donated winter coats and other winter clothing for needy Oklahomans). From to , Giles and the KOTV weather staff presented the "[Jim Giles] Wild, Wild Weather Show", a weather education tour around Oklahoma communities during the spring and summer that included an hour-long show which taught tornado safety information and promoted the station's severe weather forecasting efforts.[] In , Giles convinced station management to deploy an automated computer tracking application for use alongside its Doppler radar system; the "Pathfinder" application, which was developed by KOTV employee David Oldham and mirrored a similar application created by KWTV that same year, which projected the arrival time of precipitation at a particular location.[] In , the station acquired a FirstLook Video system (produced and marketed by Broken Arrow-based PC Designs) that sent photos and near-real-time video over cell phone transmissions using a Macintosh computer combined with video compression codecs, allowing KOTV's news crews to send video of breaking news and severe weather events over mobile telephone relays for broadcast.[] Giles remained with KOTV until his retirement from broadcasting on November 21, , citing existing health issues, including the advanced-stage liver cancer that would claim his life one month later on December 21; Travis Meyer – who had worked as a meteorologist at ABC affiliate KTUL since and spent his last 15 years at channel 8 as its chief meteorologist – joined KOTV as its weeknight &#;p.m. meteorologist on June 1, , and subsequently took over as chief meteorologist the following day.[][][][][]

The station's morning newscast, Six in the Morning, debuted on July 14, as an hour-long broadcast at &#;a.m., displacing the CBS Morning News and first-run syndicated religious and news programs that had previously aired in that time period. Focusing mainly on local and national news, weather updates, interviews and lifestyle features, it was initially anchored by Rick Wells (who remained anchor of the program until ) and Julie Matsko. Channel 6 became the first Tulsa television station to air its morning newscast after &#;a.m. (predating the launch of KOKI's weekday morning newscast twelve years later) in September , when it added a second hour of Six in the Morning and began tape delaying CBS This Morning by one hour. A straight news-based extension program, The News on 6: Morning Update, premiered on March 31, (this &#;a.m. broadcast was originally intended to debut on August 19, , but plans for the expansion were suspended for nearly six months; that broadcast, which was eventually folded into the Six in the Morning banner, expanded into an hour-long broadcast at &#;a.m. on October 4, ). Other extensions to the newscast were made as time went on, with the addition of an hour to the main broadcast on September 3, , and the addition of a &#;a.m. half-hour on January 12, The program underwent a format change in November , which retooled the entire broadcast as a more hard news-focused program, emphasized during the &#;a.m. hour.[][81][78][][][][][82][][] On December 6, , KOTV expanded its noon newscast to one hour.[81]

Since the station came under the ownership of Griffin Communications, KOTV has collaborated with Oklahoma City sister station KWTV to cover local news stories occurring in their respective markets. On August 26, , KOTV premiered the Oklahoma Sports Blitz, a minute-long (later reduced to 35 minutes) statewide sports news program created in partnership with KWTV and airs after the respective late evening newscasts on both stations, which features sports highlights, analysis and commentary and utilizes the resources of the KWTV and KOTV sports departments; it has been hosted since its debut by KOTV sports director John Holcomb and KWTV sports director Dean Blevins. In Tulsa, the program replaced Sunday Sports Special, a weekly sports highlight program (originally running for 15 minutes until September , and then for 35 minutes thereafter) that premiered on KOTV in April [][][][] The Sports Blitz has been criticized by Tulsa-area viewers for slanting its coverage toward University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University athletics and not including enough segments about Tulsa area sports teams.[] Under Griffin ownership, KOTV outfitted its photojournalists with the first digital video cameras in the market.

In April , KOTV debuted a retrofitted Bell JetRanger helicopter for aerial newsgathering (branded as "SkyNews 6," later altered to "Osage SkyNews 6" through a brand licensing agreement with Osage Casino in ). KWTV management had sold the helicopter, which it had operated for years under the "Ranger 9" moniker and was fitted with a gyroscopic-zoom camera mounted under the aircraft's nose in , to KOTV after the Oklahoma City station purchased a $million Bell helicopter equipped with an optical high-definition camera (branded as "SkyNews9 HD"). The two helicopters are occasionally used by both stations to collaborate on aerial coverage of breaking news and severe weather events in areas where the Oklahoma City and Tulsa markets overlap.[][] The helicopter crashed in a field near William R. Pogue Municipal Airport in Sand Springs on June 20, , while it was making a low-level pass above a station ENG truck on the far west side of the airport's main runway during the filming of a station promo, with the rotors of the chopper clipping a satellite antenna near the truck's front end. The out-of-control chopper went down about yards (&#;ft) east of the truck's position and left a debris field scattered over several hundred feet to the south edge of the runway (the helicopter's main fuselage and rear assembly crashlanded about 30 feet (&#;m) away from the tail and rotary blades that had broken away prior to impact). Chopper pilot Joseph Lester (who suffered a head laceration, a minor leg injury and some bruises) and station photographer Nicholas Stone (who escaped without injury) survived the accident.[][][][][] The helicopter was replaced on May 5, , incorporating an additional microprocessor-controlled gyro camera on the craft's tail (branded as "SteadiZoom "), which allows for showcasing the chopper's side in profile on the left side of the screen, while showing on-scene footage on the right;[] further upgrades to "SkyNews 6" were made on July 1, , with the installation of a camera capable of shooting high-definition video.[]

On September 18, , following the closure of Griffin's purchase of that station from the Cascade Broadcasting Group and coinciding with the station's affiliation change to The CW, KOTV began producing a weeknight-only, half-hour newscast at &#;p.m. for KQCW. (The program was expanded to include Saturday and Sunday editions on October 27, , with the weeknight editions expanding to one hour on June 17, ; the Saturday and Sunday editions would also expand to an hour five years later, in September ) It directly competes against Fox affiliate KOKI's established hour-long prime time newscast, which had become the ratings leader in that time slot in the years since that program's debut upon the February launch of channel 23's news department.[][][][][] KOTV subsequently added a weekday morning newscast to KQCW on January 7, , when the &#;a.m. hour of Six in the Morning was migrated to that station to allow channel 6 to comply with carriage requirements implemented by CBS at the beginning of the year that required its affiliates to carry the full two-hour broadcast of The Early Show (which was replaced by CBS This Morning in January ).

In November , KOTV expanded the Saturday edition of its &#;p.m. newscast to a full hour, titling the half-hour as News on 6 Late Edition (Oklahoma City sister station KWTV-DT had similarly expanded its Saturday &#;p.m. newscast to one hour the year prior). On October 24, , beginning with the &#;p.m. newscast on KQCW, KOTV introduced new on-air graphics designed by Hothaus Creative Design, a new station logo (a rounded red square with a "6" in Goudy type, an upside image of the logo adopted by KWTV) and a new slogan ("Oklahoma's Own"), which – along with "The CBS Enforcer Music Collection" news package by Gari Media Group (which KOTV has used since ) – was also adopted by Oklahoma City sister station KWTV on that same date. Although its Oklahoma City sister station KWTV upgraded its news programming to high definition with the adoption of the new standardized look, the KOTV and KQCW newscasts were upgraded only to widescreen standard definition as the age of the South Frankfort Avenue facility as well as the pending construction of the Brady District facility prevented the duopoly from upgrading its news production to HD at that time.[]

On January 19, , KOTV and KQCW became the last two television stations in the Tulsa market to upgrade production of their local newscasts to full high definition. With the completion of the duopoly's operational migration into the Griffin Communications Media Center on that date, the KOTV-KQCW news department began utilizing an upgraded Avid MediaCentral platform to provide a digitized, collaborative news workflow that eased access to content from Oklahoma City sister station KWTV to transfer, store and edit for inclusion into their newscasts.[] On July 5, , KOTV expanded its &#;p.m. newscast on Saturday evenings to one hour, after Discover Oklahoma (a statewide-syndicated program produced by the Oklahoma Department of Tourism and Recreation) moved to KTUL.[] On March 21, , KOTV debuted weekend editions of Six in the Morning, originally anchored by Erin Conrad and meteorologist Stacia Knight; the broadcasts run for two hours from to &#;a.m. on Saturdays and with a one-hour edition on Sundays on to &#;a.m., becoming the third television station in the Tulsa market (after KJRH-TV, which launched its own weekend morning newscasts in January , and KOKI-TV, which launched theirs on January 4, ) to carry a morning news program on weekends.[][][]

For many years, KOTV's newscasts resided at a strong second place (behind KTUL) among viewership totals for the market's local television news operations. This streak continued until , when KOTV overtook KTUL as the most-watched television news outlet in Tulsa. KOTV's news broadcasts continue to win all time periods by comfortable margins, largely aided by the strengths of CBS's prime time programming. In November , the station's &#;p.m. newscast was the eighth highest-rated late newscast in the United States.[]

Notable current on-air staff[edit]

  • Travis Meyer (AMS Seal of Approval; member, NWA) - chief meteorologist; weeknights at , and on KOTV

Notable former on-air staff[edit]

  • John Anderson – sports anchor (–; now at ESPN)
  • Chuck Bowman – announcer (late s–s; later moved to Los Angeles as an actor/producer)
  • Betty Boyd – host of The Woman's Page (–; later Oklahoma House of Representatives for the 23rd Legislative District from to , now deceased)
  • Denny Delk – staff announcer (s–s; now based in San Francisco)
  • Mike Flynn – news anchor/reporter/musician (s; later producer/host of the nationally syndicated radio show The Folk Sampler)
  • Jim Giles – chief meteorologist (–; deceased)
  • Jim Hartz – news anchor (–; formerly with NBC as co-host of Today and NASA reporter, writer/author, co-host of PBS's Over Easy)
  • Bob Losure – anchor (late s–early s; later anchor at CNN Headline News; deceased)
  • Spanky McFarland – host of children's program Spanky's Clubhouse (–, formerly appeared as a child in the Our Gang series of shorts; deceased)
  • Cameron Sanders – reporter (–; later CNN correspondent and host of public radio's Marketplace)
  • Gailard Sartain – host of The Uncanny Film Festival and Camp Meeting (–; actor/comedian, longtime actor on Hee Haw, moved on to highly successful movie career)
  • Harry Volkman – meteorologist (–, later at WKY-TV in Oklahoma City, and WMAQ-TV, WBBM-TV, WGN-TV and WFLD in Chicago; deceased)

Technical information[edit]

Subchannels[edit]

The station's digital signal is multiplexed:

Analog-to-digital conversion[edit]

KOTV began transmitting a digital television signal under special temporary authorization on UHF channel 55 on May 1, Cox Communications began carrying KOTV's high-definition feed on digital channel throughout its Tulsa service area on December 17, , initially transmitting it daily from noon to midnight.[]

KOTV shut down its analog signal, over VHF channel 6, on February 17, , the original date in which full-power television stations in the United States were to transition from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate.[][][] The station's digital signal operated on a high-band UHF channel (in the 52 to 69 channel range) that was removed from broadcast use after the official June 12, transition date, its analog channel assignment was in the low-band VHF range (channels 2 to 6) and therefore prone to signal interference from impulse noise. The station selected UHF channel 45 for its post-transition digital operations.[][][] Through the use of PSIP, digital television receivers display the station's virtual channel as its former VHF analog channel 6.

KOTV's audio signal could be heard on MHz on the FM band in Tulsa and the surrounding areas prior to the digital switchover, digital television does not place its audio on an FM subcarrier as the analog system typically does and therefore television stations operating a digital signal cannot be heard using standard broadcast FM radio receivers.

Translators[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Eight More Asking for Television Grants"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. March 29, p.&#; Retrieved January 8, &#; via World Radio History.
    "For the Record: FCC Actions"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. March 29, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  2. ^Blanca Gonzalez (January 28, ). "OBITUARY: Maria Helen Alvarez Smith: Businesswoman was TV pioneer, ex-wife of C. Arnholt Smith". U-T San Diego. Platinum Equity.
  3. ^"Video Grants: FCC Authorizes Seven More"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. June 7, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
    "For the Record: FCC Actions"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. June 7, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  4. ^"For the Record: FCC Actions"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. March 7, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  5. ^"KOTV (TV) to Expand"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. October 20, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  6. ^Joshua Brakhage (January 15, ). "6 On The Move: KOTV's Historical High Points". KOTV-DT. Griffin Communications. Retrieved January 11,
  7. ^"KOTV (TV) Tulsa; Official Opening Set For Nov. 30"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. November 21, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  8. ^"Network Plans; Set by KOTV(TV), WNBF-TV"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. October 31, p.&#; Retrieved January 8, &#; via World Radio History.
  9. ^"At Deadline Two TV Affiliations"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. November 14, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  10. ^Rita Sherrow (March 25, ). "Television: Dream to Reality: TV shows once came by plane". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 11,
  11. ^"KOTV(TV) Sale; Wrather Buying 85%"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 12, p.&#; Retrieved January 8, &#; via World Radio History.
  12. ^Jennie Lloyd (January 28, ). "MARIA HELEN ALVAREZ ; Television pioneer showed Tulsa". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 11,
  13. ^"Transfer Week; WCCO, WTCN-TV, KOTV(TV) Okayed"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. August 4, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
    "For the Record"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. August 4, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  14. ^"Educational TV Granted at Tulsa"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. July 26, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  15. ^"Breaking Ground"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. October 11, p.&#; Retrieved January 11, &#; via World Radio History.
  16. ^"KOTV (TV) to Commemorate Fifth Year, Power Boost"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. November 29, Retrieved January 8, &#; via World Radio History.
  17. ^"Require Prime Evening Time for NTA Films", Boxoffice: 13, November 10,
  18. ^"Wrather-Alvarez Sell KOTV (TV) for $4 Million to Whitney Firm"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 5, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
    "Wrather-Alvarez Sell KOTV (TV) for $4 Million to Whitney Firm"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 5, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  19. ^"Nine Station Properties Involved in Sales Activity"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 12, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  20. ^"At Deadline: Sale of KOTV (TV) Approved; Lee Concerned Over Trend"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 17, p.&#;9. Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  21. ^"For the Record"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 26, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  22. ^"For the Record"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 24, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  23. ^"Closed Circuit: New Name in Radio-TV"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 1, p.&#;5. Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  24. ^"Whitney Forms Top Policy Arm"(PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 29, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  25. ^"Whitney to take over Corinthian"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 29, p.&#; Retrieved January 20, &#; via World Radio History.
    "For the Record"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 29, p.&#; Retrieved January 20, &#; via World Radio History.
  26. ^"New media merger in the works"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. December 8, p.&#; Retrieved January 20, &#; via World Radio History.
  27. ^"Split vote stalls Corinthian merger"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. November 30, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
    "Split vote stalls Corinthian merger"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. November 30, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  28. ^"Corinthian-D&B deal approved"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 19, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
    "Corinthian-D&B deal approved"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. April 19, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  29. ^"Corinthian, D&B tie the ribbon on the merger"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 31, p.&#; Retrieved January 20, &#; via World Radio History.
  30. ^"Closed Circuit: May 27"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. May 27, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  31. ^"Belo's record buy"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. June 27, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
    "Changing Hands"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. June 27, p.&#; Retrieved January 20, &#; via World Radio History.
  32. ^"In Brief". Broadcasting Publications, Inc. October 17, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  33. ^"In Brief". Broadcasting Publications, Inc. December 5, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  34. ^"Changing Hands (inset story: Consummated)"(PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications, Inc. February 6, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.
  35. ^Paul Tackett (November 22, ). "Town lays claim to towering presence". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 20,
  36. ^Mel Bracht (October 18, ). "Tulsa station sold to owners of city's KWTV". The Daily Oklahoman. Oklahoma Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  37. ^"OC company buying KOTV-6". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. October 18, Retrieved December 18,
  38. ^"Changing Hands"(PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. Cahners Business Information. November 20, p.&#; Retrieved December 18, &#; via World Radio History.Alt URL
  39. ^"Belo to Sell Tulsa, Okla., TV Station to Oklahoma City Communications Firm" (Press release). Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News. October 18, Archived from the original on November 5, &#; via HighBeam Research.
  40. ^"Tulsa station's purchase completed". The Daily Oklahoman. Oklahoma Publishing Company. January 3, Retrieved December 18,
  41. ^Rita Sherrow (April 7, ). "KOTV, Cox to provide hour news channel". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  42. ^ ab"KWTV to repurpose News Now 53". HDTVOK.com. February 15,
  43. ^Jason Collington (October 8, ). "Company that owns channel 6 buys local WB affiliate". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  44. ^Jim Stafford (October 8, ). "Griffin acquires 2nd TV station in Tulsa market". The Oklahoman. Oklahoma Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  45. ^P.J. Lassek (August 3, ). "KOTV move reportedly in works". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  46. ^P.J. Lassek (August 4, ). "KOTV plans $25 million expansion". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  47. ^"Griffin to Build $20 Million Downtown Media Center". Tulsa Business & Legal News. World Publishing Company. October 25, Retrieved December 18, &#; via Tulsa World.
  48. ^Ray Tuttle (February 18, ). "Broadcast News". Tulsa Business & Legal News. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18, &#; via Tulsa World.
  49. ^"Griffin Breaks Ground on Downtown Media Center". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. April 9, Retrieved December 18,
  50. ^"Griffin Breaks Ground on Tulsa Media Center". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media. April 8, Retrieved December 18,
  51. ^Kyle Arnold (October 5, ). "Construction begins on Griffin Communication building". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  52. ^Frank Beacham (October 25, ). "Griffin Going Green With New Tulsa Digs". TVNewsCheck. NewsCheck Media.
  53. ^Rita Sherrow (January 17, ). "KOTV starts work from new Brady District building this weekend". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved December 18,
  54. ^Colleen Almeida Smith (June 25, ). "Griffin Communications buying Tulsa radio stations". Tulsa World. BH Media.
  55. ^Adam Jacobson (June 25, ). "Oklahoma TV Owner Enters Radio With Scripps' Tulsa Cluster". Radio-Television Business Report. Streamline-RBR, Inc.
  56. ^Jon Lafayette (June 25, ). "E.W. Scripps Sells Tulsa Radio Stations to Griffin". Broadcasting & Cable. NewBay Media.
  57. ^"Scripps Closes First Of Four Radio Spinoff Deals". Inside Radio. October 2, Retrieved November 2,
  58. ^Rita Sherrow (April 5, ). "Griffin, Cox cable change channels". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved November 15,
  59. ^"TitanTV Programming Guide -- What's on TV, Movies, Reality Shows and Local News: KOTV-DT schedule". Titan TV. Broadcast Interactive Media, LLC. Retrieved January 19,
  60. ^"Cowboys' games set for Tulsa". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. July 27, Retrieved January 4,
  61. ^Michael Peters (September 10, ). "KOTV opts to shift U.S. Open men's final". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 4,
  62. ^"It's Telethon time at KOKI". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. September 1, Retrieved December 18,
  63. ^"'MDA' Telethon Heads to Primetime on ABC". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. June 17,
  64. ^"Ann Mahoney Bryce, Pioneer of Oklahoma TV, Dies at 92". March 27, Retrieved January 4,
  65. ^"Ann Mahoney Bryce, One Of KOTV's First Personalities, Passes Away". KOTV-DT. Griffin Communications. March 27, Retrieved January 4,
  66. ^Sharon Dowell (June 27, ). "ONG has served up tasty recipes to customers for seven decades". The Oklahoman. Oklahoma Publishing Company. Retrieved January 4,
  67. ^"Lewis Meyer". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. January 7, Retrieved January 4,
  68. ^"Lewis Meyer Will Appear on "CBS This Morning'". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. March 12, Retrieved January 4,
  69. ^A.B. Sidibe (January 7, ). "Lewis Meyer Dies // Heart Failure Claims Life Of Well-Known Book Dealer". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 4,
  70. ^Tim Stanley (June 20, ). "Lee Woodward • Lee Woodward, longtime Tulsa TV weatherman and the voice behind 'King Lionel' the puppet, dies". Tulsa World. BH Media. Retrieved January 4,
  71. ^Kristina Dudley (March 24, ). "Community Focus: Television memories". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 4,
  72. ^John Wooley (October 2, ). "The Lost Tapes of Mazeppa // Legendary Late-Night Show Resurfaces on Videotape". Tulsa World. World Publishing Company. Retrieved January 4,
  73. ^Joshua Brakhage (January 15, ). "6 On The Move: Remember 'Dance Party' And 'Dr. Mazeppa Pompozoidi?'". KOTV-DT. Griffin Communications. Retrieved December 29,
  74. ^
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KOTV-DT

You will also like:

How are you with them. I gasped. Lida gasped. Do you want to see how clients fuck me.



44830 44831 44832 44833 44834