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    Jacobs Tent Fellowship in Cleveland, TN.

    Led by Bill Cloud, Jacobs Tent is a collection of people from various spiritual backgrounds, but all of whom believe the entire Bible – from Genesis to Revelation – is for all of God’s people.

    This app is packed with Biblical content rooted in the Torah, as well as many resources to help our community of believers stay connected with what the Father is doing through Jacob's Tent in Cleveland, TN. With this app you can:
    - Listen to Past Services
    - Watch Live
    - Read articles and blogs
    - Sign up for Events
    - Listen to Podcasts
    - Stay up to date with push notifications
    - Download messages for offline listening
    - Much More!

    Our congregation honors the Sabbath, we observe the Biblical feasts (moedim) and we eat Biblically clean. Most importantly, we believe that Yeshua (Jesus) is the Messiah of Israel and Savior of the world. As His disciples (talmidim), we believe that the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob is the One, True God and that He is calling His people to return to Him and to His ways. That is why we meet on Shabbat to praise, sing, dance, study and fellowship.

    While we love to utilize Hebrew prayers, songs and customs in our worship experience, we don’t consider ourselves to be exclusively Messianic or Hebrew Roots. We want all members of the Body to feel welcome, inspired, as well as challenged in our services. Our desire is to cultivate an environment that invites the Presence of the Almighty to abide with us and empower us to walk upright before Him and in unity with each other. It is in the spirit of “loving God” and “loving our fellow man” that we have established Jacob’s Tent. We hope that you can join us soon!

    Version 5.16.0

    - Added support for iOS 15
    - If enabled, Subsplash Messaging notifications now displays the sender’s avatar on iOS 15+
    - Misc. bug fixes and improvements

    Ratings and Reviews

    YHWH moves in this Congergation!

    We love love love this Congergation!!!! YHWH moves through out this amazing fellowship. The app is very nice and has jame packed full of information and videos! Highly recommend!!!

    So happy!

    Been listening online for over a year.
    Visited twice. It’s a wonderful congregation with great leadership.

    Awesome

    Great app even better fellowship

    The developer, Jacob's Tent Fellowship, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

    Data Not Linked to You

    The following data may be collected but it is not linked to your identity:

    Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

    Information

    Seller
    Jacob's Tent Fellowship

    Size
    28.3 MB

    Category
    Education

    Compatibility
    iPhone
    Requires iOS 12.2 or later.
    iPad
    Requires iPadOS 12.2 or later.
    iPod touch
    Requires iOS 12.2 or later.
    Apple TV
    Requires tvOS 10.0 or later.
    Languages

    English, French, Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, Spanish

    Age Rating
    4+

    Copyright
    App: © 2021 Subsplash, Content: © 2021 Jacobs Tent

    Price
    Free

    Supports

    • Family Sharing

      With Family Sharing set up, up to six family members can use this app.

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    Sours: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/jacobs-tent/id1559381342

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    We use cookies to let us know when you visit our websites, how you interact with us, to enrich your user experience, and to customize your relationship with our website. Uncover biblical truth for yourself. Account; View Profile; Member List; Request a Personal Prophecy; Prayer Request; Staff Menu Toggle. The Upper Room is a global ministry dedicated to supporting the spiritual formation of Christians seeking to know and experience God more fully. Find customizable templates, domains, and easy-to-use tools for any type of business website. Consider how the prophecies of Isaiah, Christ’s own parables of the Kingdom, and the imagery of the book of Revelation all evoke and require a full imaginative response, not simply a literal reading. With Logos 9, you’ll find answers to your biblical questions with easy-to-use tools and a library of trusted books. I am writing to request a copy of my graduation certificate awarded in the spring commencement services. World War Three. (Tuesday nites find out more >>>click here) Kent Simpson, Apostolic Prophet. Randy is a compassionate, kind host and loves to prophesy to all those who are searching for Him but got lost in the process. It requires the full extension of hospitality, sustenance, and succor to those in need. Prophet Michael will personally pray for you and seek an ontime word of God for your life. 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Teachings & Articles Jan 14, 2019 · A prophetic word, also known as a “word of knowledge,” is a prophecy given by a worshiper for the congregation. Whatever your prayer need, finding peace of mind provides a foundation of strength to face any situation. You should review any planned financial transactions that may have tax or legal implications with your personal tax or legal advisor. The narrator, Alex, a precocious 15-year-old psychopath who has no feeling for others, leads a small gang in many acts of Please contact us at: 1-866-274-6627 (in Canada, toll free) or 1-506-548-7961 (outside Canada, long-distance charges apply) If you require general information about the SIN program, select this option. If you are unable to have a website remove material, Google may remove personal information that creates significant risks of identity theft, financial fraud, or other specific harms. I always watch ”The Prophetic Whisper” broadcast on your website and on YouTube. The Pure Word (Book) 3. The word 'vain' in contemporary usage has become synonymous with pride in physical appearance, however there is more to it, 'cause you know sometimes words have two meanings'. 888. Amos 3:7 (NKJV) When we get to know the Word it sets us free and whoever the son sets free is free indeed. At my request, every few years, Kent still seeks the Lord for me and sends what he has heard in the form of a prophecy on audio CD. However it is not for me to question the heart of the Father, it is my place to be obedient to speak His word to His children. When your request to join is Prophet Kyle personal prophecy . Word of Mar 29, 2015 · After payment has been received you will be added to the queue to receive your prophetic word. God uses prophets to administer a word for the purpose of encouraging and giving direction to His people. Chironna. Post Abortion Healing. ) (ONE TIME) Click below to give your donation for a prophetic word: Click 'Donate' to process your love offering for a prophetic word. 00 or more if you like. When submitting a request, please include 1) a notarized statement or a statement signed under penalty of perjury stating that you are the person that you say you are and 2) your signature. He shares about a new vocabulary being released for the Prophetic Movement and much more. Tag: prophecy,word,day,today,prophetic,personal People, Get Ready! – your Lion Bites word for today Sometimes, I just need to remind you that I’ve got this; I’ve got you. Address change notification letter is a simple yet effective way of informing business and personal contacts or customers about the change in address. Prophet Kyle, CLICK HERE. You are free to cancel any time, for any reason, from within your PayPal account. 1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brethren, I would not have you ignorant. Mirek Hufton. Awakening Word Word for 2020 Art of Hearing What is Freedom Prophetic Word Updates Worldview on War Mystery of Enlightenment Dictatorship vs Democracy Crisis in Democracy World View 2019 The Snare Word for 2018 Year End Word Review for 2017 The Perplexity of Nations Deception and False Prophets Word for 2017 Your State of Mind God's Time Line A psychic proclaims to be a seer but the Prophet can only be a Prophet of the Lord through seer-ship. Printable calendar template for monthly, weekly, and yearly calendars. Automatically file emails and share photos easily. If you are unable to use the ATIP Online Request Portal, you may request information using the Access to Information Request Form (TBC/CTC 350-57) (available in PDF or HTML formats), or send a letter clearly explaining what records you are seeking, to the ATIP Coordinator of the government institution holding the information. You might be interested in We Must Fear the Lord “No prophet is accepted in his own native place” (Luke 4:24). A letter of request could be for various reasons, for example it could be a request of change in a contract or agreement, request for an endorsement or a testimonial request for assistance, request for authorization, request to take an action, request of issuance of a letter, request for any information, about a product or a service, request for a favor. Prophecy Prayer Request is a Gift. Due to the amount of time spent with each invited guest, we are asking the host to have a minimum of five or a maximum of seven guests. This letter can be addressed to multiple contacts and can be addressed to more than one person or can be individually addressed in the salutation of the letter as per your requirement. 2011 Breaking News of Tragedy in U. Perhaps there is a dignity in defeat that hardly belongs to victory. Understand Your Place in God’s Prophetic Timetable and be a part of these Exciting Days ahead. He has always had a passion for the nations, traveling extensively throughout America and other countries with an apostolic mantle. Request a personal prophecy online. In a few places, “The Word of God” or “the Word” is used as a personal title. See 45 C. Welcome to the church online ministry of Fulfilled Life Ministries is a multi-cultural diverse church online with pastors from all over the world including the US, Nigeria, the Caribbean, India and Asia. Prophetic Word Requests : Mark Moyers Ministries. 24/7 Radio Stream. Prophetic Light Receive a Free personal prophecy. A Ministry In Need Of Finances. Dec 04, 2019 · This is the most accurate prophetic word I have ever received for my life, touching all areas of my life, my family, my marriage, my businesses, ministry, my properties that I lost through business liquidation and my sequestration. Overcoming Feeling Rejected. 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Live Sermon Streaming Feast Registration Forms Browse the Book Store Download the FREE 2021/22 Calendar Prophetic Word Magazines MAKE A DONATION Read Scriptural information on a variety of topics Explore scriptural Mar 02, 2021 · Vision #271 Mar 02/21 Tues evg Word From God “Abide In Me and I in you… I Will Continue to Shake the Nations! It Will Get Worse. Free Prophecy; About; Schedule; Testimonials; Shop; Please fill out this form to receive a prophetic word and prayers. Saturday & Sunday 6:00AM EST – 12 Midnight . To request a prophetic word for yourself or a loved one kindly make a donation to our ministry using the form below. Call in at 319-527-6027 to Randy's Show for Randy to personally prophesy to you Monday - Thursday 9pm-12am (call is free). Mar 18, 2021 · With Word versions prior to Word 2002, you can't directly change a template into a document. Find tons of free sample products in categories like candy, beauty products, food, makeup, cosmetics, condoms, perfume, cologne, baby, diet pills, etc. Some words are just human encouragement, which is completely fine. * Direct confidential prayer request to a WhisperVise prayer warrior. Summer 1998: Issue Number 5. The free versions are available in PDF format: just download one, open it in any program that can display the . Life Coaching & Mentoring. I feel the fear of the Lord again. Post a reply on your OWN TOPIC. "I am saying that he loves God. Radio Streams. Links to Important Christian Sites. My curiosity got the best of me. A complete and advanced prophetic 8 message teaching album by Perry Stone and Bill Cloud recorded live as the 2020 April Prophetic Summit Webinar. net. Christians who study Bible prophecy have not been caught off guard by the widespread pestilence, lawlessness, corruption, rebellion, and demonic activity that is taking place throughout the world. Call our ministry line and receive a direct prophetic word from Prophet Samuel Rivers, Jr. When you reject the pressure, you abort our ability to form as the diamond. annualcreditreport. Prayer Request; Members Menu Toggle. Prophecies, dreams, visions, prophetic writings and comments on endtimes concerning the whole world but especially Finland, the country of prophets, Russia, the neighbouring bear beast of Finland, Sweden and Norway, which will also be the targets of Russia in World War III, USA, which will face her downfall and judgment in the near future, European Union, which is the pilot After the judge denied their request for a dictionary, the jurors spent an entire morning wrestling with what the word intending meant. gale sheehan: 2021 word of the lord Apostle Gale Sheehan serves as the director of Christian International Apostolic Network, a network of over 900 ministers in the U. (Vigilant Citizen ) In a 2010 episode of The Simpsons, a “secret conclave of America’s media empires” releases a deadly virus to “put Americans back where they belong: In dark rooms, glued to their televisions, too terrified to skip the commercials”. Starr Scaccia said she was the only juror who was truly Create photo books, wall art, photo cards, invitations, personalized gifts and photo prints at Shutterfly. With Google Docs, you can write, edit, and collaborate wherever you are. Includes access to 11 file formats for Mac and PC including Microsoft Word and Publisher. Last Name. Prophetic Word Request. In Daniel 7 , we read the account of Daniel’s prophetic dream regarding the four beasts. com Personal Prophecy by MP3. Staff Attendance Sheet February 24th 2021 | Sample Excel Staff Attendance Sheet. IGNITE is a prophetic network birthed out of an incredible encounter with God and His Word. Joel Osteen Prayer Request (713) 491-1283 or toll free at (888) 567-5635. Free Prophetic Training. Prophet Brian Carn is an internationally recognized, prophetic voice. The Living God still speaks to His people! We have seen multitudes everywhere turning demonic tables over and being delivered and set free. (In Word 2002+ when you use "Save As" to save a template as a document, Word will strip out all AutoText/Building Blocks and will warn you that this will PandaDoc is #1 Proposal, Contract and Document solution by G2. Ephesians 4:11-14 Doug Addison is a prophetic speaker, author, and coach. Hear from God and Receive Divine Direction Regarding Your Life & Future. If you are the owner of this form you need to make sure to paste the html Jul 03, 2020 · Every Prophetic word has a Warning and a Way out . Why I Charge . In this, we simply listen to the Spirit of Jesus and tell you what we believe He is saying. It specifically targets ministries and Jan 15, 2000 · THANKS to God’s Word, the Holy Bible, true Christians view the future with faith, hope, and optimism. Prophetic Ministry CrossBridge Prophetic Ministry is a personal ministry where individuals can schedule a time with members of the CrossBridge Prophetic Team to receive encouragement. January 23, 2021: Printable Medical Forms, Journals, Charts and More. Prophetic words require faith and trust to obtain and fulfill. Sep 30, 2015 · updated prophetic word from yahweh 9-27-15- in yahshua name. Barclay brings you the uncompromised Word of God. I come before you now to offer myself to you Lord God – all of me – my body, my mind and my soul. CT. By an available appointment below, I commit to pray for you on that date. 24 Days and Complex is 111. Contact information, like address, phone number, or email address, that has been shared in a malicious or harassing way (also called "doxxing") A government-issued ID number A bank account or credit card number An image of my handwritten signature A confidential, personal, medical document Chat. com/user/albertsamuelmilton?sub_confirmation=1 ★ ★ Watch More Prophetic Word Videos ★ h Right Word, Wrong Timing. By the grace of God, we will produce a prophetic people, co-laboring in a unified and balanced pursuit of the Great Commission of our Lord, Jesus Christ. This happens to many of us who are in prophetic ministry and having words from God is our job description! But there is an order that must be followed, by the prophet and the one soliciting. Service fees are non-refundable, and a fee of per transaction will apply to all cancellations. ca Home / Request a Demo To schedule a free webinar with an IBISWorld representative who can show you the breadth and depth of our industry research, please complete the form below. Donald Trump. Choose from thousands of pre-designed decals or create your own for free! Fast Delivery, 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Customize any template to suit your specific needs with our drag-and-drop form builder. March 25, 2021 Sign Of Things To Come? Amazon Drivers Forced To Sign As President Obama has said, the change we seek will take longer than one term or one presidency. God still uses prophets to speak into the lives of His people today. I look forward to speaking the word of the Lord to you. A Prophetic Challenge to the Church: The Last Word of Bartolomé de las Casas [1] Luis N. The reading contains interpretations for all five core numbers and a few other numerology chart positions. To schedule your prophetic party, contact us by phone (708) 656-3658 or email me at [email protected] He is known for his Daily Prophetic Words, Spirit Connection webcast, podcast, and blog. net Blog May 18, 2019 · The scholarship request letter is written and submitted by those individuals who want a grant from the organizations and companies offering the same. Download a Free Chapter from 10 Commandment Series "Finding The Power of Prophecy" First Name * Last Name * Email * Mar 29, 2021 · Sometimes the word the Lord gives me for the body of Christ is rather stern and/or startling. A prophecy is a message inspired by God, a divine revelation. Get A Personal Prophetic Word FREE. Daily Prophetic Word Archives; Yearly Prophetic Words; Request a Personal Prophecy; News Menu Toggle. North Korea and USA need to be careful of what they’re planning to do especially North Korea. ”/Ministering To A Man In Hospital Bed. 26 Now in the eleventh year, on the first of the month, the word of the Lord came to me, saying, 2 “Son of man, because Tyre has said in regard to Jerusalem, ‘Aha! Jan 04, 2021 · Solomon asked for wisdom, and God was faithful to honor that request (1 Kings 3:5,15). A glance at our articles and our issue themes will show how we propose to bring Christian thinking to the questions posed by life in our world today. Connections between personal devices at home or helping friends and family remotely qualify as personal use. How to use prophetic in a sentence. As the opening talk at the “God’s Prophetic Word” District Conventions explained, Jehovah’s Witnesses have been keen students of Bible prophecy for many years. World Missionary Evangelism – (800) 501 2851 In this fresh message, James brings us "Five Clear Prophetic Words" that he believes are vital for the future and the days in which we now live. Daily Word, published by Unity, offers insight and inspiration to help people of all faiths live healthy, prosperous and meaningful lives. ” The classic was 10:10 o’clock on 10/10/10. Receiving a personal prophecy can be a powerful and miraculous moment. He lives in South Africa. He is known for his Daily Prophetic Words , Spirit Connection webcast, podcast and blog. Here is more advice about common removal requests: Remove non-consensual explicit or intimate personal images from [This form is divided into three sections. The request for money in exchange for this so-called prophetic instruction comes just two weeks after the Trump administration appointed White to head up the White House's new Faith & Opportunity Our websites and dashboards use cookies. Personal-prophetic-word. You see, He has a plan for each and every person. Christian Healing Ministries’ newsletter, Healing Line, is published several times a year. It is often described as the law that keeps citizens in the know about their government. I want God to set me free from all spiritual bondage and redeem me from marine power and deliver me from spiritual husband. The meaning of his name is uncertain. Each issue contains articles to help bring healing to the whole body of Christ, testimonies from people all over the world whom the Lord has healed and set free, and CHM's ministry and event calendar. When requesting information from a college or university, you will want to keep your letter concise and to the point. 3261 Facebook; Instagram; Twitter; Youtube; ECFA; Pinterest; Powered by Endis Low Graphics Copyright T&Cs Privacy Help Bill Winston Ministries is a results-based, truth and solution-seeking outreach ministry that solely embraces the Word of God for the basis of existence and survival. Peter seemed to imply that this Word is more sure than even his experience on that mountaintop with Christ. Prophetic Ministry. Response. Free Samples, Examples & Format Templates. Direct Words. These unique songs reflect the longing of our hearts for the presence of God. Tribe Of Christians is a prophetic and evangelistic voice seeking to encourage and inspire a unified body of believing Christians( Philippians 2:2) through “faith, hope, and love (1 Cor 13:13)” featuring a podcast and blog bringing an inspirational Corporate Donation Request. Shopping online shouldn't cost you peace of mind. Receive updates on upcoming events * indicates required. Prophetic Word – Change November 21 2020 . While targeting the multi-ethnic, multi-cultural Southern California Basin, we desire to effectively minister to people of diverse social, economic and ethnic backgrounds. These are really professional letters which are geared towards asking for donations and support from big businesses, corporations and companies. Subscribe to my free FreePrintable. net/privacy-policy/. Federal law allows you to: Get a free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each credit reporting company. com What I will say is that God gave me a model that I follow. Phone Number * E-mail * [email protected] I am going to ask you to respond by getting your free personal prophecy, so that I can put you in position to hear the rest of what God is saying to you. Also, make sure you include your GENDER and AGE. Thus, prophecy, in the sense of a “new” word from God, is no longer needed. 3-21-2021 am service A prophet may also write down the word of God which is called a scripture. He and his wife Linda live in Los Angeles, California where he is impacting the arts, entertainment and media industries. You will also be able to find these words under the "Past Meetings" section of our ministry website. ” These words were certainly true, quite literally, of the experience of Simeon in the temple that day. [clarification needed] The term usually excludes written material intended to be read in its original form by large numbers of people, such as newspapers and placards; however even these may include material in the form of an "open letter". Human Trafficking Help. Personal letters are written to people, whom we know personally and share our good or bad times with them, they are invited on personal behalf and sender wants to share his or her personal success, achievement, special moments, weather change, festivals, wedding, engagement, personal parties like birthday party or if someone is celebrating for A Personal Health Record (PHR) can be an essential tool in saving money and time, especially if it helps in preventing duplicate tests. While some believe he cannot be trusted, the millions who follow him believe he is an impressive as the second coming. Camp Employment Application ; Bethel Deliverance International Church Employment Application; This is my search section here Aesop Apr 01, 2009 · It would seem that the self-proclaimed prophet over at End Time Prophetic Words has been sued in England on multiple counts of Business Fraud and Extortion. Searches the Web or only images, video, and news. Why are you requesting a prophetic word today? Submit Request a personal prophecy from Apostle Kyle! Apr 17, 2014 · Free personal prophetic word for you! *Ehem* “Your name means…”. Dec 29, 2020 · I heard the Lord say, “Don’t blink!” That’s a word for us all in this season. The God-Kind Of Faith – Part 1 The God-Kind Of Faith – Part 2. Adoration Hallowed Be Thy Name. Disc 2: Who is Really in Control? Disc 3: 5 Things That Must Occur During These Prophetic Seasons Nov 06, 2020 · But her time to rule had come to an end, for Jehu had come in response to a prophetic word from Elijah; In fact, Jehu did not even need to lay a hand on Jezebel. "A prophetic word to me is more than just knowing what's going to happen in my future, but it's a sacred, loving seed from the Fathers heart spoken to the depth in me about His amazing plans, strategies and love towards me. So for his 60th birthday, Billy Graham wrote a prophetic word and a letter to Mr. Rosalind Miriam Franklin owns the publishing house Diggory Press. Therefore, it points to the Hittite spirit of deceit. And he said unto me, See thou do it not: I am thy fellow servant, and of thy brethren that have the testimony of Jesus: worship God: for the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. By logging the change, you gain visibility into the process of enacting the change. Please allow time to respond & be sure to use a valid email. Submit your prayer requests by filling out the form below e-Sword is a fast and effective way to study the Bible. Request for Service Level Change Instructions Request for Service Level Change RN Member Contact Form RN Member Contact Instructions RN Member Contact Form Self-Audit/Self Report Form Standard Repayment Form PC and IDDW Dual Services Request Form: PC and IDDW Dual Services Request Instructions PC and IDDW Dual Services Request Get it on Wix for free Website templates are pre-designed websites, all you need to do is add your own personal content and you're ready to jump start your own website! You can customize the website templates any way you like, all these free website templates have been coded in CSS. Thank you, we look forward to ministering to you. The well-read viewer may also notice that the movie contains some references to Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and H. Wall Decals, Wall Stickers & Printed Decals at Trading Phrases®. Direction. The truth about the word of God. of Days Simple is 21. "Being a part of preachitaudio. . Daily, personal, prophetic words, written to encourage, strengthen and comfort you. Other News. I have operated in the prophetic for many years. Mar 29, 2021 · We now offer personal prophetic ministry, a personal anointed prophetic counseling session, specifically for you, by e-mail. Doug’s message of love, hope and having fun reaches people around the world! Many thanks for you greetings. There's been some pretty funny prophesies made in the past year, but this just may be one of the extreme ones I've heard and all to happen this year!!!Origin As a Master Prophet, I can truly decree a thing and see it established — just like the prophets of the Scriptures. The Word of God clearly states the basic purpose of the five foundational administrative ministries in Ephesians 4:12 – “For the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ. You may make use of our dictionary with examples and get pronunciation of every word. Enter Your Personal Information Below: *Mailing Address: Missing Information voids your request for a free prophecy Personal prophetic word just for you. Click here to download a pdf of all three Prophecy And Truth books - FREE Or, Click here to go to our new site where you can browse all three books online - FREE Contact Us. Now with enterprise SSO and adaptive MFA that integrates with your apps. S. The free numerology calculator further below provides a free basic numerology reading. Coming to you in Word and Spirit, Dr. In every Area of my life that men and women have ignored, according to the word of the Lord, I receive favor before God and before men. Don't hem and haw around the issue—be straightforward, and include as much detail as necessary to clearly convey your request. View these articles in our prophetic training category or use the search function for specific topics. This anointing puts you above the devil and all situations and circumstances. Subject. org Aqua Regia is a spiritual intelligence company that utilizes prophecy, word of knowledge, dream interpretation, strategic intercession, and discernment to unlock practical solutions in the professional and personal realms of those we serve. Mother Mariana was praying in the upper choir loft before the Blessed Sacrament, the Sanctuary lamp went out. Confession For Businesses. PLEASE DO NOT USE AN EMAIL ADDRESS AS YOUR USERNAME. Fill out the Prayer request form if you need an urgent prayer request to be fulfilled Miracle healing prayers and prayer for healing Transform the world within you so you can transform the leaders, city. Paypal Home. A prophetic word from the Lord can change a person's life. Dec 22, 2014 · Free Online Library: Filemazio's words: Francesco Guccini and prophetic resistance. These prophetic words on my behalf have been a TREMENDOUS HELP and BLESSING FROM THE LORD still after all these years. ©2018 Demonstrate It Ministries You may have had many personal prophecies before you request this prophetic blueprint for your life, and you will find that what the Holy Spirit gives me will confirm many of these prophetic words that have come before. For Free. ” It speaking for God or to be His spokesman. Submit a Prayer Request Online Doug Addison is a prophetic speaker, author and coach. request a prophecy the fresh word of the lord request a personal prophetic word, about love, request a prophecy about career, request a personal prophetic word about direction request a prophetic word about 2018 for you request a personal prophecy for Gods direction and request a prophetic word about entering prosperity personal prophetic word personal prophetic word Want a FREE MP3? Sign up for Jennifer's newsletter and we'll sow one of her MP3 messages into your life

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    Thank you for the cross, Lord
    Thank you for the price You paid
    Bearing all my sin and shame
    In love You came
    And gave amazing grace

    Thank you for this love, Lord
    Thank you for the nail pierced hands
    Washed me in Your cleansing flow
    Now all I know
    Your forgiveness and embrace

    Worthy is the Lamb
    Seated on the throne
    Crown You now with many crowns
    You reign victorious
    High and lifted up
    Jesus Son of God
    The Treasure of Heaven crucified
    Worthy is the Lamb
    Worthy is the Lamb
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    Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and by the Secretary of State for the Home Department by Command of Her Majesty on 15 December 2020

    Command Paper Number: 354

    Crown Copyright 2020

    ISBN 978-1-5286-2312-4

    Joint Ministerial foreword

    Rt Hon Oliver Dowden MP  Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport  The Rt Hon Priti Patel MP  Secretary of State, Home Office

    Our world is now a digital one. From connecting with loved ones, to the way we do business and deliver public services - almost every part of our lives is at least now partly online.

    But the COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the risks posed by harmful activity and content online. The pandemic drove a spike in disinformation and misinformation, and some people took advantage of the uncertainty to incite fear and cause confusion. The pandemic has also underlined a much more grave problem; the risks posed to children online. In a month-long period during lockdown, the Internet Watch Foundation and its partners blocked at least 8.8 million attempts by UK internet users to access videos and images of children suffering sexual abuse.[footnote 1]

    This government is unashamedly pro-tech. We are committed to using digital technologies and services to power economic growth across the entire UK, and ensuring a more inclusive, competitive and innovative digital economy for the future. We are taking action to unlock innovation across digital markets, while also ensuring we keep people safe online and promote a thriving democracy, where pluralism and freedom of expression are protected. To unleash growth we need to ensure there is trust in technology.

    The government’s response to online harms is a key part of our plans to usher in a new age of accountability for tech companies, which is commensurate with the role they play in our daily lives. Our ambition is to build public trust in the technologies that so many of us rely on. Ultimately, we must be able to look parents in the eye and assure them we are doing everything we can to protect their children from harm.

    This response to the Online Harms White Paper sets out plans for a new duty of care to make companies take responsibility for the safety of their users. It builds on our manifesto commitment to introduce legislation to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online but at the same time defend freedom of expression.

    The legislation will define what harmful content will be in scope. Principally, this legislation will tackle illegal activity taking place online and prevent children from being exposed to inappropriate material. But the legislation will also address other types of harm that spread online - from dangerous misinformation spreading lies about vaccines to destructive pro-anorexia content.

    These new laws will mean no more empty gestures - we will set out categories of harm in secondary legislation and hold tech giants to account for the way they address this content on their platforms. This approach will empower people to manage their online safety and ensure that these companies will not be able to arbitrarily remove controversial viewpoints.

    Alongside tackling harmful content this legislation will protect freedom of expression and uphold media freedom. Companies will be required to have accessible and effective complaints mechanisms so that users can object if they feel their content has been removed unfairly.

    And this regulation will be proportionate. Fewer than 3% of UK businesses will be in scope. We will focus on the biggest, highest risk online companies where most illegal and harmful activity is taking place.

    This groundbreaking regulatory framework will be enshrined in law through the upcoming Online Safety Bill.

    Our criminal law must also be fit for the digital age and provide the protections that victims deserve. The Law Commission is currently reviewing whether new offences are necessary to deal with emerging issues such as cyber-flashing and ‘pile-on’ harassment. We will carefully consider using the online harms legislation to bring the Law Commission’s final recommendations into law, where it is necessary and appropriate to do so.

    As an independent country, the UK has the opportunity to set the global standard for a risk-based, proportionate regulatory framework that protects citizens online and upholds their right to freedom of expression. We will work with our international partners to develop common approaches to this shared challenge, whilst delivering on our ambition to make the UK the safest place in the world to go online. We will lead, but we are confident others will join us.

    Rt Hon Oliver Dowden CBE MP
    Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

    Rt Hon Priti Patel MP
    Secretary of State for the Home Department

    Executive summary

    1. The Online Harms White Paper set out the government’s ambition to make the UK the safest place in the world to go online, and the best place to grow and start a digital business. It described a new regulatory framework establishing a duty of care on companies to improve the safety of their users online, overseen and enforced by an independent regulator. This will build public trust in the services that these companies are offering, and support a thriving and fast-growing digital sector. The White Paper proposed that regulation be proportionate and risk-based, ensuring companies have appropriate systems and processes in place to tackle harmful content and activity. It also made clear that the framework will protect users’ rights, including freedom of expression online.

    2. The government set out the results of the formal consultation and clarified its direction of travel in the Online Harms White Paper - Initial government response, published in February 2020. The initial government response reconfirmed our commitment to the duty of care approach set out in the White Paper and announced a number of further measures to increase proportionality and protect freedom of expression. It also indicated that the government was minded to appoint Ofcom as the regulator. The government has continued to develop its policy proposals since February and has made further, important changes. The full government response confirms that Ofcom will be named as the regulator in legislation, and sets out the intended policy position.

    3. The government has taken a deliberately consultative and iterative approach in developing the framework, to ensure regulation that is coherent, proportionate and agile in response to advances in technology. It is part of the government’s overarching, pro-innovation approach to regulating digital technologies, that will address issues arising from digital technology which affect prosperity, security and our democratic values. This is an important step forward in building a safer and more prosperous digital future for everyone.

    4. Tackling online harms is a global problem and the government recognises that legislation and regulation in the UK, and elsewhere, forms only part of the response required. The UK, with its strengths in digital innovation, highly respected legal system, business-friendly environment and world-class regulators, has an opportunity to act as a global leader in this space. That is why the government is working closely with many of our international partners to address this shared challenge in order to work towards common approaches to tackling online harms. The development of the online harms regime represents an important step in the UK’s strategy to create a coherent and pro-innovation framework for the governance of digital technologies, and to set the global standard for a risk-based, proportionate regulatory framework.

    The continuing case for action

    5. The internet has, in many ways, transformed our lives for the better. It has revolutionised our ability to connect with each other and created previously inconceivable economic opportunities. Internet use in the UK across all adult age groups increased from 80.9% in 2012 to 90.8% in 2019.[footnote 2] In April 2020, internet users in the UK spent an average of 4 hours 2 minutes online each day, a record figure.[footnote 3]

    6. However, the case for robust regulatory action continues to grow. Over three quarters of UK adults express a concern about going online,[footnote 4] and fewer parents feel the benefits outweigh the risks of their children being online, with the proportion falling from 65% in 2015 to 55% in 2019.[footnote 5]

    7. The White Paper set out the extensive evidence of illegal and harmful content and activity taking place online. The government highlighted the prevalence of the most serious illegal harms which threaten our national security and the physical safety of children. It also explained how online services are being used as a tool for abuse. The White Paper acknowledged growing concerns about the impact of harmful content on the wellbeing of children in particular. These problems have not gone away.

    8. In terms of illegal content and activity, there were more than 69 million images and videos related to child sexual exploitation and abuse referred by US technology companies to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in 2019,[footnote 6] an increase of more than 50% on the previous year.[footnote 7] In 2019, of the over 260,000 reports assessed by the Internet Watch Foundation, 132,730 contained images and/or videos of children being sexually abused (compared to 105,047 in 2018), and 46% of reports involved imagery depicting children who appeared to be 10 years old or younger.[footnote 8] Between its launch in January 2015 and March 2019, 8.3 million images have been added to the Child Abuse Image Database.[footnote 9] The National Crime Agency estimates at least 300,000 individuals in the UK pose a sexual threat to children.[footnote 10]

    9. Terrorist groups use the internet to spread propaganda designed to radicalise, recruit and inspire vulnerable people, and to incite, provide information to enable, and celebrate terrorist attacks. Some companies are taking positive steps to combat online terrorist content. The larger platforms are already taking proactive measures and using automated technology. For instance, Twitter actioned 95,887 unique accounts related to the promotion of terrorism/violent extremism between January and June 2019.[footnote 11] However, terrorists and their supporters continue to use a wide range of platforms to further their aims. It is critical that industry works together, and that the government and industry continue to build on the foundations laid by initiatives such as the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, to prevent exploitation of the internet for terrorist purposes.

    10. Alongside illegal content and activity, the White Paper highlighted increasing levels of public concern about online content and activity which is lawful but potentially harmful. This type of activity can range from online bullying and abuse, to advocacy of self-harm, to spreading disinformation and misinformation. Whilst this behaviour may fall short of amounting to a criminal offence it can have corrosive and damaging effects, creating toxic online environments and negatively impacting users’ ability to express themselves online.

    11. In 2019, according to research conducted by Ofcom and the Information Commissioner’s Office, 23% of 12-15 year olds had experienced or seen bullying, abusive behaviour or threats on the internet in the last 12 months.[footnote 12] Nearly half of girls admit to holding back their opinion on social media for fear of being criticised.[footnote 13] Galop, the LGBT+ anti-violence charity’s, most recent online hate crime survey highlighted that 8 in 10 respondents had experienced anti-LGBT+ online abuse in the last 5 years.[footnote 14] In 2019, the Community Security Trust, a charity that protects British Jews from antisemitism, saw a 50% rise in reported anti-Semitic online incidents compared to 2018.[footnote 15]

    12. During the COVID-19 pandemic, digital technologies have brought huge benefits - from unlocking innovation across public services, to enabling millions to work remotely, to supporting people to stay in touch with their friends and families. However, the risks posed by illegal and harmful content and activity online have also been thrown into sharp relief as digital services have played an increasingly central role in our lives.

    13. Research shows that 47% of children and teens have seen content that they wished they hadn’t seen during lockdown.[footnote 16] In a month-long period during lockdown, the Internet Watch Foundation and its partners blocked at least 8.8 million attempts by UK internet users to access videos and images of children suffering sexual abuse.[footnote 17] The pandemic also drove a spike in disinformation (the deliberate creation and dissemination of false and/or manipulated information that is intended to deceive and mislead audiences) and misinformation (inadvertently sharing false information) online. Social media has been the biggest source of false or misleading information about 5G technologies and COVID-19 vaccinations during the pandemic.[footnote 18]

    14. Many of the major social media companies have moved further and faster than ever before to tackle disinformation and misinformation during the pandemic through technical changes to their products, including techniques to protect user safety online. However, this is inconsistent across services. The new regulatory framework will create incentives to ensure that companies continue to take consistent and transparent action to keep their users safe. COVID-19 has shone a spotlight on the need to better understand and respond to new and evolving challenges online, particularly the risks posed to children.

    Our response

    15. The government’s approach to the governance of digital technologies aims to maximise the benefits while minimising the risks. Action is being taken in a range of areas - including data and data use, cyber security, competition, and protecting quality journalistic content - to improve online safety and security, support dynamic and competitive digital markets, and to promote our democratic values online. Our approach is proportionate with innovation at its heart. A future digital strategy will set out how the government is bringing these strands of work together.

    16. The government’s response to online harms is a key part of this overall approach. The online harms regime will improve users’ safety online, build public trust in digital services, support innovation and drive digital and economic growth.

    17. The online harms framework will be coherent and comprehensive, bringing much needed clarity to the regulatory landscape and providing support for both industry and users. It will be proportionate, risk-based and tightly defined in its scope. The legislation will avoid taking a ‘one size fits all approach’ to companies and harms in scope, to reflect the diversity of online services and harms. The government has placed particular emphasis on protecting children,[footnote 19] ensuring a pro-innovation approach, and protecting freedom of expression online. Regulation will safeguard pluralism and ensure internet users can continue to engage in robust debate online.

    18. Regulation will be only one part of the solution. The government will support growth and innovation across the UK’s safety tech sector, creating the right conditions for UK safety tech companies to deliver cutting edge safety technologies. Users must also be empowered to think critically about what they encounter online, and online products and services must be designed from the outset to be safe for users.

    Overview of the new regulatory framework for online harms

    Which online services will be in scope of the new regulatory framework?

    Services in scope and exemptions

    19. The new regulatory framework will apply to companies whose services:

    • host user-generated content which can be accessed by users in the UK; and/or
    • facilitate public or private online interaction between service users, one or more of whom is in the UK.

    It will also apply to search engines.

    20. The legislation will apply to any in-scope company that provides services to UK users, regardless of where it is based in the world. Only a small proportion of UK businesses (the government estimates fewer than 3%)[footnote 20] will fall within the scope of the legislation following the new exemptions set out below. Ofcom’s regulatory approach will focus on companies where the risk of harm is greatest.

    21. The initial government response confirmed that business-to-business services would be out of scope. Services which play a functional role in enabling online activity, such as internet service providers, will also be exempt from the duty of care, although they will have duties to cooperate with the regulator on business disruption measures. The government is introducing additional provisions to exempt many low-risk businesses from the duty of care altogether. New exemptions include services used internally by businesses, and many low-risk businesses with limited functionality (for example retailers who offer only product and service reviews). This avoids imposing regulatory burdens on low-risk companies.

    Journalistic content

    22. Stakeholders raised concerns during the consultation about how the legislation will impact journalistic content online and the importance of upholding media freedom. Content published by a news publisher on its own site (e.g. on a newspaper or broadcaster’s website) will not be in scope of the regulatory framework and user comments on that content will be exempted.

    23. In order to protect media freedom, legislation will include robust protections for journalistic content shared on in-scope services. The government is committed to defending the invaluable role of a free media and is clear that online safety measures must do this. The government will continue to engage with a range of stakeholders to develop our proposals.

    What harmful content or activity will the new regulatory framework apply to, and what action will companies need to take?

    Definition of harm

    24. The legislation will set out a general definition of harmful content and activity. A limited number of priority categories of harmful content, posing the greatest risk to users, will be set out in secondary legislation. This will provide legal certainty for companies and users.

    Duty of care and the principles of the regulatory framework

    25. Under the new legislative framework, companies in scope will have a duty of care towards their users. The legislation will require companies to prevent the proliferation of illegal content and activity online, and ensure that children who use their services are not exposed to harmful content. It will also hold the largest tech companies to account for what they say they are doing to tackle activity and content that is harmful to adults using their services. Further details on the approach are set out in paragraphs 27 and 28 below.

    26. To meet the duty of care, companies in scope will need to understand the risk of harm to individuals on their services and put in place appropriate systems and processes to improve user safety. Ofcom will oversee and enforce companies’ compliance with the duty of care. Companies and the regulator will need to act in line with a set of guiding principles. These include improving user safety, protecting children and ensuring proportionality. Further details are set out in Annex A.

    Differentiated expectations on companies

    27. The regulatory framework will establish differentiated expectations on companies in scope with regard to different categories of content and activity on their services: that which is illegal; that which is harmful to children; and that which is legal when accessed by adults but which may be harmful to them.

    28. The new regulatory framework will take a tiered approach. The vast majority of services will be ‘Category 2 services’. These companies will need to take proportionate steps to address relevant illegal content and activity,[footnote 21] and to protect children. A small group of high-risk, high-reach services will be designated as ‘Category 1 services’, and only providers of these services will additionally be required to take action in respect of content or activity on their services which is legal but harmful to adults. This tiered approach will protect freedom of expression and mitigate the risk of disproportionate burdens on small businesses. It will also ensure that companies with the largest online presence are held to account, addressing the mismatch between companies’ stated safety policies and many users’ experiences online.

    Public and private communications channels

    29. The regulatory framework will apply to public communication channels and services where users expect a greater degree of privacy – for example, online instant messaging services and closed social media groups. Ofcom will set out how companies can fulfil their duty of care in codes of practice, including what measures are likely to be appropriate in the context of private communications. This could include steps to make services safer by design, such as limiting the ability for anonymous adults to contact children. Companies in scope will need to consider the impact on users’ privacy and ensure users understand how company systems and processes affect user privacy.

    30. The scale, severity and complexity of child sexual exploitation and abuse is particularly concerning, with private channels being exploited by offenders. For example, 12 million of the 18.4 million worldwide child sexual exploitation and abuse reports made by Facebook in 2019 were for content shared on private channels.[footnote 22] In light of this, the regulator will have the power to require companies to use automated technology that is highly accurate to identify illegal child sexual exploitation and abuse content or activity on their services, including, where proportionate, on private channels. Recognising the importance of users’ privacy, the government will ensure this will be subject to stringent legal safeguards to protect users’ rights. The regulator will advise the government on the accuracy of tools and make operational decisions regarding whether or not a specific company should be required to use them. However, before the regulator can use these powers it will need to seek approval from Ministers on the basis that sufficiently accurate tools exist. The regulator will also be able to require companies to use highly accurate technology to identify illegal terrorist content, also subject to stringent safeguards but on public channels only.

    Codes of practice

    31. Ofcom will issue codes of practice which outline the systems and processes that companies need to adopt to fulfil their duty of care. Companies will need to comply with the codes, or be able to demonstrate to the regulator that an alternative approach is equally effective. The government will set objectives for the codes in legislation. Ofcom will have a duty to consult on the codes, and must help all companies to understand and fulfil their responsibilities. Ofcom must also publish an economic impact assessment for each code and will have a specific duty to assess the impact of its proposals on small and micro businesses, to avoid undue regulatory burdens.

    32. The government is publishing interim codes on terrorism and child sexual exploitation and abuse alongside this response, due to the seriousness of these illegal harms. These voluntary and non-binding interim codes will help companies begin to implement the necessary changes and bridge the gap until Ofcom issues its statutory codes of practice.

    Additional duties on companies

    33. All companies in scope will have a number of additional duties beyond the core duty of care. These include providing mechanisms to allow users to report harmful content or activity and to appeal the takedown of their content. All companies providing Category 1 services will be required to publish transparency reports containing information about the steps they are taking to tackle online harms on those services. The Secretary of State for the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will have the power to extend the scope of companies who will be required to publish transparency reports, beyond Category 1 companies, if necessary.

    Disinformation and misinformation

    34. Disinformation and misinformation that could cause significant harm to an individual will be within scope of the duty of care. Some types of disinformation and misinformation are likely to be proposed in secondary legislation as categories of priority harm that companies must address in their terms and conditions. In addition to the requirements under the duty of care, the legislation will introduce further provisions to address the evolving threat of disinformation and misinformation. This will include specific transparency requirements and the establishment of an expert working group, targeted at building understanding and driving action to tackle these issues.

    How will the independent regulator oversee and enforce the new regulatory framework?

    The regulator

    35. Ofcom will be named as the independent regulator in the legislation. Ofcom is a well-established independent regulator with a strong reputation internationally and deep experience of balancing prevention of harm with freedom of speech considerations. It has a proven track record of taking evidence-based decisions, which balance robust consumer protection with the need to ensure the regulatory environment is conducive to economic growth and innovation. This makes it a strong strategic fit for the role.

    36. Ofcom will cover the costs of running the regime from industry fees. Only companies above a threshold based on global annual revenue will be required to notify and pay the fees. In practice, this means that a large proportion of in-scope companies will be exempt from paying a fee.

    Functions of the regulator

    37. Ofcom will have a range of duties and functions under the framework. Its primary duty will be to improve the safety of users of online services (and that of non-users who may be directly affected by others’ use of them). This will include setting codes of practice, establishing a transparency, trust and accountability framework and requiring all in-scope companies to have effective and accessible mechanisms for users to report concerns. Ofcom will also have a legal duty to pay due regard to innovation, which will be underpinned by a number of non-legislative measures.

    38. To ensure the effective implementation of the regime, Ofcom will have robust enforcement tools to tackle non-compliance, including the power to issue fines of up to £18 million or 10% of global annual turnover, whichever is the higher. It will be able to consider taking enforcement action, which may include business disruption measures, against any in-scope company worldwide that provides services to UK users. The government will reserve the right to introduce criminal sanctions for senior managers if they fail to comply with the regulator’s information requests. Ofcom will take a proportionate approach to its enforcement activity. The government will establish a statutory appeals route that is accessible to companies.

    39. The government will continue to assess the institutional landscape as its digital regulation programme progresses and will take action if necessary to ensure the landscape is coherent and streamlined.

    What part will technology, education and awareness play in the solution?

    Technology

    40. The White Paper recognised the critical role of technology in improving user safety online, such as using artificial intelligence to identify harmful content quickly and accurately. The recent ‘Safer Technology, Safer Users: The UK as a World-Leader in Safety Tech’ report showed the UK is at the forefront of the rapidly developing safety tech industry, with the industry seeing an annual 35% growth rate since 2016.[footnote 23] The government will continue to invest in this sector, both to support companies in complying with the regime and to promote wider economic growth in the UK.

    Safety by design, media literacy and engaging with information

    41. Encouraging companies to build safer products and services will be key to delivering a successful regulatory regime. Our proposed safety by design framework will set out clear principles and practical guidance on how companies can design safer online products and services. The government, Ofcom and industry will also do more to equip users with the skills they need to keep themselves and others safe online, starting with the publication of an online media literacy strategy. This will build on Ofcom’s existing media literacy work. The government and Ofcom will consider the links between service design and media literacy as part of this.

    Next steps

    42. The Online Safety Bill, which will give effect to the regulatory framework outlined in this document, will be ready in 2021. The government also expects the Law Commission to produce recommendations concerning the reform of the criminal offences relating to harmful online communications in early 2021. The Law Commission is currently consulting on its proposals for updating the criminal law in this area.[footnote 24] The government will consider, where appropriate, implementing the Law Commission’s final recommendations through the Online Safety Bill.

    43. As the new regulatory framework will be the first comprehensive approach to tackling online harms in the world, the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will undertake a review of the effectiveness of the regime 2-5 years after entry into force. The government will produce a report setting out findings from the review and conclusions about whether changes are necessary, which will then be laid in Parliament. Parliament will have an opportunity to debate the findings of the report.

    Part 1: Who will the new regulatory framework apply to?

    Summary

    Consultation questions covered in Part 1:

    Are proposals for the online platforms and services in scope of the regulatory framework a suitable basis for an effective and proportionate approach?

    • The new regulatory framework will apply to companies whose services host user-generated content or facilitate interaction between users, one or more of whom is based in the UK, as well as search engines. Services playing a functional role in enabling online activity will remain out of scope, as will business-to-business services.

    • Exemptions will be applied where the risk of harm is sufficiently low that any regulatory requirements would be disproportionate. The government will exempt services used internally by organisations, services managed by educational institutions that are already subject to regulatory or inspection frameworks (or similar processes) that address online harm, email and telephony providers, and services with limited user functionality. Ofcom will take a risk-based and proportionate approach to its regulatory activity, focusing on companies whose services pose the biggest risk of harm.

    • The government will put in place safeguards to ensure that media freedom is upheld. Content and articles produced and published by news services on their own sites do not constitute user-generated content and therefore fall outside the scope of legislation. Below-the-line comments on articles on news publishers’ sites will be explicitly exempted from scope. In order to protect media freedom, legislation will include robust protections for journalistic content shared on in-scope services.

    • The regulatory framework will apply to public communication channels, and services where users expect a greater degree of privacy, such as online instant messaging services and closed groups. The regulator will set out how companies can fulfil their duty of care in codes of practice, including what measures are likely to be appropriate in the context of private communications.

    Services in scope

    White Paper: The White Paper set out that the regulatory framework will apply to companies that provide services or tools that allow, enable or facilitate users to share or discover user-generated content, or interact with each other online. It noted that regulatory requirements will need to be flexible, risk-based and proportionate. Search engines will be included in the scope of the regulatory framework.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: There was broad support for the proposed approach. Many parties expressed a need for clarity around organisations in scope. There were calls to exclude business-to-business services due to the lower risk of harm on those services.

    Initial government response: The initial government response confirmed that only a small proportion of UK businesses (estimated to account to less than 5%) are likely to fall within the scope of the regulatory framework. It also confirmed that business-to-business services will be out of scope of regulation.

    Final policy position: The government will be maintaining a broad regulatory scope encompassing services that host user generated content and facilitate interaction between users, as well as search engines. The government also recognises that some businesses and services present a lower risk than others and that any approach must be proportionate to the level of risk and companies’ capacity to address harm. Specific exemptions have been introduced for low-risk services. For example, reviews and comments by users on a company’s website which relate directly to the company, its products and services, or any of the content it publishes, will be out of scope.

    1.1 As set out in the White Paper, the companies in scope of the regulatory framework will be defined by the types of services they provide. Companies[footnote 25] will fall into scope if their services:

    • host user-generated content which can be accessed by users in the UK; and/or
    • facilitate public or private online interaction between service users, one or more of whom is in the UK.

    This covers a broad range of services, including (among others) social media services, consumer cloud storage sites, video sharing platforms, online forums, dating services, online instant messaging services, peer-to-peer services, video games which enable interaction with other users online, and online marketplaces.

    1.2 Only companies with direct control over the content and activity on a service will be subject to the duty of care. This means that business-to-business services will remain outside the scope of the regulatory framework. It also means that services which play a functional role in enabling online activity will remain out of scope, including internet service providers, virtual private networks, browsers, web-hosting companies, content delivery service providers, device manufacturers, app stores, enterprise private networks and security software. However, such services will, where appropriate, be legally required to comply with the regulator as part of any business disruption enforcement measures (see Part 4 for further details).

    Box 1: User-generated content and user interactions

    Legal definitions of these concepts will be set out in the legislation; however, these will cover:

    User-generated content

    • digital content (including text, images and audio) produced, promoted, generated or shared by users of an online service
    • content may be paid-for or free, time-limited or permanent. It must have the potential to be accessed, viewed, consumed or shared by people other than the original producer, promoter, generator or creator

    User interaction

    • any public or private online interaction between service users with potential to create and promote user-generated content
    • interaction may be one-to-one or one-to-many and may involve means other than text, images and audio

    In both cases, ‘user’ refers to any individual, business or organisation (private or public) that puts content on a third-party online service. Users may be members, subscribers or visitors to the service, and may generate content or interact directly or through an intermediary, such as an automated tool or a bot.

    1.3 Search engines will be included in scope of the regulatory framework. Search engines do not host user-generated content directly or facilitate interaction between users. However, there is evidence of harm occurring on these services, including facilitating easy access to child sexual exploitation and abuse content online. There are clear actions they can take to mitigate the risk of harm and they will be expected to put in place proportionate systems and processes to keep their users safe. This could include: removing known child sexual abuse images from their image search results; identifying keywords used to access illegal content; ensuring algorithms and predictive searches do not promote relevant illegal content; and protecting users online by signposting to resources and support. Given the distinct nature of search engines, legislation and codes of practice will include specific material for them. All regulatory requirements will be proportionate, and respect the key role of search engines in enabling access to information online.

    1.4 The White Paper consulted on defining private communications, and what regulatory requirements should apply to them. It also said that companies would not be required to monitor for illegal content on these services in order to protect user privacy.

    1.5 The regulatory framework will apply to both public communication channels and services where users expect a greater degree of privacy - for example online instant messaging services and closed social media groups. All companies in scope will be required to fulfil the duty of care by ensuring that they take reasonably practicable steps to tackle relevant illegal content, and protect children where they are likely to access their services. The regulator will set out how companies can fulfil their duty of care in codes of practice, including what measures are likely to be appropriate in the context of private communications. This could include steps to make services safer by design, such as limiting the ability for anonymous adults to contact children. The scale, severity and complexity of child sexual exploitation and abuse is particularly concerning, with private channels being exploited by offenders. In light of this, Part 2 sets out the circumstances in which the regulator will have the power to require companies to use automated technology to identify child sexual exploitation and abuse.

    Voluntary best practice guidance for infrastructure service providers

    Box 2: The government will produce voluntary best practice guidance for infrastructure service providers which is separate from the online harms regime.

    Exemptions

    1.6 Many companies and representative groups expressed concerns through the consultation about low-risk businesses being captured in scope of the new framework. The COVID-19 pandemic has also placed unprecedented challenges on UK businesses. In response, a number of services will be exempt from the regulatory requirements. These exemptions apply to specific services, rather than entire companies. These exemptions are:

    • Business services. Online services which are used internally by organisations - such as intranets, customer relationship management systems, enterprise cloud storage, productivity tools and enterprise conferencing software - will be excluded from scope. The risk of harm on these services is low, as the user base is limited and users tend to be verified and acting in a professional capacity. Organisations will already have policies in place for protecting users and managing disputes. Requiring them to comply with the legislation would be a disproportionate regulatory burden.

    • Online services managed by educational institutions, where those institutions are already subject to sufficient safeguarding duties or expectations. This includes platforms used by teachers, students, parents and alumni to communicate and collaborate. This is to avoid unnecessarily adding to any online safeguarding regulatory or inspection frameworks (or similar processes) already in place.

    • Email and telephony. Email communication, voice-only calls and SMS/MMS remain outside the scope of legislation. It is not clear what intermediary steps providers could be expected to take to tackle harm on these services before needing to resort to monitoring communications, so imposing a duty of care would be disproportionate.

    Low-risk functionality exemption

    1.7 The legislation will exempt many low-risk businesses with limited functionality. It will exempt user comments on digital content provided that they are in relation to content directly published by a service. This will include reviews and comments on products and services directly delivered by a company, as well as ‘below the line comments’ on articles and blogs. This approach avoids imposing costs on businesses to familiarise themselves with the legislation when they are unlikely to have to take action to comply with the duty of care, given the low risk that this functionality poses to most users. It will also help to ensure the protection of media freedom and freedom of speech.

    1.8 The online harms regulatory framework has been designed to reduce the burden on UK business by focussing on the areas that present the greatest risk of harm. The government estimates that, overall, fewer than 3% of UK businesses in total will be in regulatory scope following the new exemptions outlined above.[footnote 26] Ofcom, as the regulator, will also take a deliberately risk-based and proportionate approach to companies in scope, some of whose services will be low-risk.

    1.9 Any exemption creates the potential for harm to be displaced from other services, particularly as technology and user behaviour evolve. The government will exempt these functionalities in a way which allows the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport to bring them into scope, should evidence of the level of risk they pose change.

    Journalism

    White Paper: The White Paper committed to ensuring protections for freedom of expression within the regulatory framework. Subsequently, Ministers confirmed that there would be strong protections for journalistic content. The Conservative and Unionist Party Manifesto 2019 reaffirmed the commitment to the protection of media freedom in the legislation .

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: There were calls to exclude journalistic content from scope, to protect freedom of expression and avoid negatively affecting the public’s ability to access information or undermining quality news’ media.

    Final policy position: Content and articles produced and published by news websites on their own sites, and below-the-line comments published on these sites, will not be in scope of legislation. In order to protect media freedom, legislation will include robust protections for journalistic content shared on in-scope services. The government is committed to defending the invaluable role of a free media and is clear that online safety measures must do this. The government will continue to engage with a range of stakeholders to develop these proposals.

    1.10 Freedom of expression is at the heart of the regulatory framework and there will be strong safeguards to ensure that media freedom is upheld. Content and articles produced and published by news services on their own sites do not constitute user-generated content and so are out of scope. The government recognises the importance of below-the-line comments for enabling reader engagement with the news. User comments below articles on news publishers’ sites will be explicitly exempted from scope. This will be achieved via the low-risk functionality exemption (see above).

    1.11 Journalistic content is shared across the internet, on social media, forums and other websites. Journalists use social media services to report directly to their audiences. This content is subject to in-scope services’ existing content moderation processes. This can result in journalistic content being removed for vague reasons, with limited opportunities for appeal. Media stakeholders have raised concerns that regulation may result in increased takedowns of journalistic content.

    1.12 In order to protect media freedom, legislation will include robust protections for journalistic content shared on in-scope services. The government will continue to engage with a wide range of stakeholders to develop proposals that protect the invaluable role of a free media and ensure that the UK is the safest place in the world to be online.

    Advertising

    Box 3: Online harms regulation and advertising

    1. The online advertising ecosystem is complicated and includes services within and also beyond the scope of the online harms regulatory framework. Last year the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport announced a review of the way that the online advertising market is regulated in the UK, which is being considered through the Online Advertising Programme. This programme of work, amongst other areas of focus, is identifying where regulatory gaps may exist and ensuring that advertising regulation answers the needs of the changing advertising marketplace. It will consider a full range of approaches, including support to help regulators meet the challenges posed by new advertising technologies and the potential for changes to the regulatory landscape.

    2. As part of the Online Advertising Programme, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will launch a public consultation on measures to enhance how online advertising is regulated in the UK in the first half of 2021. The consultation will build on the call for evidence launched on this subject earlier this year and will consider options to enhance the regulation of advertising content and placement online.

    3. Separately, as part of the government’s new strategy ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’, the government has committed to introducing a watershed ban on the advertising of foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) on broadcast TV, as well as further restrictions online. The strategy also announced that the government wanted to explore going further online. A consultation has been published on how a total HFSS advertising restriction online would be introduced, and the response to this and the previous 2019 consultation will be published in early 2021, setting out plans in more detail.

    4. As the government considers further action on these issues, it will seek to avoid duplication between these areas, ahead of future regulatory requirements.

    5. Nevertheless, some types of advertising will still fall in scope of the online harms regulatory framework. The definition of user-generated content will encompass organic and influencer adverts that appear on services in scope of the legislation. This includes images or text posted from users’ accounts to promote a product, service or brand, and may or may not be paid for. As these are indistinguishable from other forms of user-generated content, it is therefore important, for clarity and consistency, that online harms safety systems and processes apply to these advertising posts.

    6. The Advertising Standards Authority will remain responsible for overseeing the regulation of advertising. It will continue to regulate the content of individual adverts and advertisers’ compliance with the advertising codes. Policy or political arguments - both online and offline - which can be rebutted by rival campaigners as part of the normal course of political debate are not regulated and the government does not support such regulation. It is a matter for voters to decide whether they consider materials to be accurate or not. The laws on defamation and the long-standing electoral offence of false statements about a candidate would also remain in place.

    Part 2: What harmful content or activity will the new regulatory framework apply to, and what action will companies need to take?

    Summary

    Consultation questions covered in Part 2:

    What further steps could be taken to ensure the regulator will act in a targeted and proportionate manner?

    In developing a definition for private communications, what criteria should be considered?

    What channels or forums that can be considered private should be in scope of the regulatory framework? What specific requirements might be appropriate to apply to private channels and forums in order to tackle online harms?

    • The legislation will set out a general definition of the harmful content and activity covered by the duty of care. This will include only content or activity which gives rise to a reasonably foreseeable risk of harm to individuals, and which has a significant impact on users or others. A limited number of priority categories of harmful content, posing the greatest risk to individuals, will be set out in secondary legislation.

    • All companies in scope will be required to understand the risk of harm to individuals on their services, and to put in place appropriate systems and processes to improve user safety and monitor their effectiveness. The legislation will not change companies’ liability for individual items of illegal content that meet the definition of harm. Instead it will require companies to ensure that their policies and processes are adequate to protect their users.

    • Recognising the importance of freedom of expression, the government will establish differentiated obligations on companies in scope with regard to different categories of content and activity. Only a small number of high-risk, high-reach Category 1 services will have to address legal but harmful content and activity accessed by adults on their services.

    • The regulator will issue codes of practice to outline the systems and processes that companies can adopt to fulfil the duty of care, including what measures are likely to be appropriate in the context of private communications. The government is publishing interim codes on terrorism and child exploitation and sexual abuse alongside this document.

    • The duty of care will apply to disinformation and misinformation that could cause harm to individuals, such as anti-vaccination content. The legislation will introduce additional provisions targeted at building understanding and driving action to tackle disinformation and misinformation. These provisions will include an expert working group which will build consensus and technical knowledge on how to tackle disinformation and misinformation.

    Definition of harm

    White Paper: The White Paper set out an initial list of harms in scope but made clear this was, by design, neither exhaustive nor fixed. A static list could prevent swift regulatory action to address new forms and types of online harm. It also set out specific exclusions from scope where there are existing government initiatives to tackle these harms.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: Stakeholders wanted more detail on the breadth of both services and harms in scope. There were calls to protect freedom of expression and a focus on protecting children. Some suggested that further work should be done to increase education and public awareness of online harms.

    Final policy position: The legislation will set out a general definition of the harmful content and activity in scope of the regime. A limited number of priority categories of harmful content will be set out in secondary legislation. Some categories of harmful content will be explicitly excluded, to avoid regulatory duplication. This will provide legal certainty for companies and users and prioritise action on the biggest threats of harm.

    Harmful content and activity covered by the duty of care

    2.1 The regulatory framework will require companies to have effective systems and processes in place to improve user safety. The response to the consultation flagged concerns about the broad range of potential harms in scope of the regime and called for greater clarity. The legislation will set out a general definition of the harmful content and activity in scope. This will help provide legal certainty for companies and users and set a clearly defined statutory remit for Ofcom.

    2.2 The legislation will set out that online content and activity should be considered harmful, and therefore in scope of the regime, where it gives rise to a reasonably foreseeable risk of a significant adverse physical or psychological impact on individuals. Companies will not have to address content or activity which does not pose a reasonably foreseeable risk of harm, or which has a minor impact on users or others. Harms to organisations will not be in scope of the regime.

    2.3 A limited number of priority categories of harmful content, posing the greatest risk to users, will be set out in secondary legislation. These will cover (i) priority categories of criminal offences (including child sexual exploitation and abuse, terrorism, hate crime and sale of illegal drugs and weapons) (ii) priority categories of harmful content and activity affecting children, such as pornography or violent content, and (iii) priority categories of harmful content and activity that is legal when accessed by adults, but which may be harmful to them, such as abuse and content about eating disorders, self-harm or suicide. Further information on the approach, and the expectations on companies, is set out below.

    2.4 In line with the position set out in the White Paper, a number of harms will be excluded from scope where there are existing legislative, regulatory and other governmental initiatives in place. The following will be excluded from scope:

    • Harms resulting from breaches of intellectual property rights
    • Harms resulting from breaches of data protection legislation
    • Harms resulting from fraud
    • Harms resulting from breaches of consumer protection law
    • Harms resulting from cyber security breaches or hacking

    The online harms regulatory framework will not aim to tackle harm occurring through the dark web.[footnote 27] A law enforcement response to tackle criminal activity on the dark web is more suitable than a regulatory approach.

    Box 4: Online fraud and sale of unsafe goods

    White Paper: The White Paper did not set out a definitive position on whether economic and financial harms to individuals, including online fraud and sale of unsafe goods, would be in scope of the new regulatory framework.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: A number of organisations suggested that economic harms (for instance, online fraud) should be in scope, noting that such activity could also lead to significant psychological harm. Others argued that the scope of the regulatory framework was too broad, and that any further extension would pose disproportionate regulatory burdens on businesses.

    Final policy position: The government is deeply concerned by the growth, impact and scale of online fraud, recognising the devastating harm these types of fraud can cause. The government has determined that the fraud threat will be most effectively tackled by other mechanisms and as such the legislation will not require companies to tackle online fraud. We are working closely with industry, regulators and consumer groups to consider additional legislative and non-legislative solutions. This ongoing programme of work aims to effectively address the harms posed by all elements of online fraud in a cohesive and robust way. This includes work on the Online Advertising Programme, led by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which will be considering further regulation of online advertising to reduce online harms, including fraud.

    As noted elsewhere, most forms of advertising, fake websites and data and cyber-security breaches are not in scope of the online harms regulatory framework. This would have limited the impact the regulatory framework would have had on tackling fraud if it were in scope.

    The government is committed to tackling the sale of unsafe consumer products. The Office for Product Safety and Standards has a clear remit for consumer product safety, including products sold online. In order to avoid regulatory duplication the sale of unsafe products will be excluded from the online harms regulatory framework.

    Duty of care and principles of the regulatory framework

    White Paper: The White Paper stated that there would be a new statutory duty of care to make companies take more responsibility for the safety of their users. This duty would be risk-based and proportionate and focused on systems and processes, not individual pieces of content. Important principles would apply to the regulatory framework including users’ rights to freedom of expression and privacy, innovation and protecting small and medium-sized enterprises.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: Many stakeholders welcomed the approach, noting that this would underpin an effective, future-proofed framework. Nevertheless, industry responses sought greater reassurance and certainty about how it would be proportionate in practice, particularly for small and medium-sized enterprises; and how flexibility would be balanced with certainty about what the duty of care requires of companies. Rights groups and industry also emphasised the need to provide more certainty about how safety would be balanced with freedom of expression, particularly in relation to legal but harmful content.

    Final policy position: In order to provide more clarity and target effectiveness, the duty of care has been refined. It will cover content and activity that could cause harm to individuals. The legislation will also introduce additional provisions targeted at building understanding and driving action to tackle disinformation and misinformation.

    2.5 The primary purpose of the duty of care will be to improve safety for users of online services, and to prevent other people from being harmed as a direct consequence of content or activity on those services.

    How the duty of care works

    2.6 The duty of care consists of two parts. The first part relates to the duties on companies and the second part relates to the regulator’s duties and functions. Companies and the regulator will be required to carry out their responsibilities under the framework in line with a range of guiding principles (not all will apply to both). Further details on how the regulatory framework will be delivered against the guiding principles are set out in Annex A.

    Duties on companies in scope

    2.7 The primary responsibility for each company in scope will be to take action to prevent user-generated content or activity on their services causing significant physical or psychological harm to individuals. To do this they will complete an assessment of the risks associated with their services and take reasonable steps to reduce the risks of harms they have identified occurring.

    2.8 The steps a company needs to take will depend, for example, on the risk and severity of harm occurring, the number, age and profile of their users and the company’s size. Search engines will need to assess the risk of harm occurring across their entire service. Ofcom will provide guidance specific to search engines regarding regulatory expectations.

    2.9 Companies will fulfil their duty of care by putting in place systems and processes that improve user safety on their services. These systems and processes will include, for example, user tools, content moderation and recommendation procedures. The proposed safety by design framework (detailed in Part 5) will support companies to understand how they can improve user safety through safer service and product design choices.

    2.10 Robust protections for freedom of expression have been built into the design of duties on companies. Companies will be required to consider users’ rights, including freedom of expression online, both as part of their risk assessments and when they make decisions on what safety systems and processes to put in place on their services. Regulation will ensure transparent and consistent application of companies’ terms and conditions relating to harmful content. This will both empower adult users to keep themselves safe online, and protect freedom of expression by preventing companies from arbitrarily removing content.

    2.11 The regulatory framework will improve user safety online but it will not eliminate harm or the risk of harm entirely. Users must be able to report harm when it does occur and seek redress. They must also be able to challenge wrongful takedown and raise concerns about companies’ compliance with their duties. This is essential to improving users’ safety, and to help companies understand the risk and incidence of harm on their services.

    2.12 All companies in scope will have a specific legal duty to have effective and accessible reporting and redress mechanisms. This will cover harmful content and activity, infringement of rights (such as over-takedown), or broader concerns about a company’s compliance with its regulatory duties. Ofcom’s codes of practice will set out expectations for these mechanisms. The government expects the codes to cover areas such as accessibility (including to children), transparency, communication with users, signposting and appeals. Expectations on companies will be risk-based and proportionate, and will correspond to the types of content and activity which different services are required to address. For example, the smallest and lowest risk companies might need to give only a contact email address, while larger companies offering higher-risk functionalities will be expected to provide a fuller suite of measures.

    2.13 The government will not mandate specific forms of redress, and companies will not be required to provide financial compensation to users (other than in accordance with any existing legal liability). Forms of redress offered by companies could include: content removal; sanctions against offending users; reversal of wrongful content removal or sanctions; mediation; or changes to company processes and policies.

    2.14 The regulatory framework will not establish new avenues for individuals to sue companies. However, the existing legal rights individuals have to bring actions against companies will not be affected. As outlined in the White Paper, the government expects legal action to become more accessible to users as the evidence base around online harms grows, and as regulatory precedent is established. Users will be able to use regulatory decisions that are publicly available as evidence in any relevant legal action they pursue.

    Box 5: Service design and the risk of online harms

    • The design of a service and its features can be one of the factors that contributes to the risk of harm occurring to a user. For example, a service is likely to be higher risk if it has features such as: allowing children to be contacted by unknown adult users; allowing all users - including children - to live-stream themselves; and including private messaging channels where the content on those private channels is not or cannot be moderated. A lower risk service might include features such as: the ability to moderate all content; having public messaging forums with text content only; and taking steps to ensure an age appropriate environment for children, for example by restricting contact of children by unknown users.

    • As part of their duty of care, companies in scope will be expected to consider, as part of their regular risk assessments, the risk of online harms posed by their service, including the risk presented by the design of their service and its features. Companies will be expected to reassess the risk of online harms if they are planning significant changes to their services.

    • Following the risk assessment, companies will be required to take steps to address the risks they have identified. This will be key to them fulfilling their duty of care to their users and delivering a higher level of protection for children.

    • The regulator will set out the steps that companies should take to address the risk posed by their services, and ultimately will have the power to assess whether the steps taken are sufficient to fulfil the company’s regulatory requirements. Failure to fulfil the duty of care may result in the regulator taking robust enforcement action.

    • The decisions taken by a company on the design or functionality of their service will not exempt them from needing to comply with other regulatory requirements. For example, all companies in scope must comply with information requests from the regulator. In tightly prescribed circumstances, and subject to stringent legal safeguards, the regulator will be able to require the use of highly accurate technology to identify specific categories of illegal child sexual abuse or terrorist content and activity. As with all regulatory requirements, the onus will be on the company to comply with these requirements.

    Differentiated expectations on companies

    White Paper: The White Paper set out that all services in scope will be required to address illegal and legal but harmful content and activity. It stated that the regulatory approach would impose more specific and stringent requirements for illegal harms than for content and activity which are legal but have the potential to cause harm, depending on the context. It acknowledged that the impact of harmful content and activity can be particularly damaging for children and placed particular emphasis on keeping children safe online.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: The consultation responses flagged concerns about the broad scope of harms, calling for greater clarity and highlighting the subjectivity inherent in identifying many of the harms, especially those which are legal. Many respondents objected to the latter being in scope. There were concerns that proposals could impact freedom of expression online. Respondents to the consultation welcomed the approach to the protection of children.

    Final policy position : The initial government response developed the original position, confirming a differentiated approach for illegal content and activity versus content that is legal but harmful. Only companies providing Category 1 services will have to take action in respect of adult users accessing legal but harmful content on their services.

    All companies in scope will be expected to assess whether children are likely to access their services, and if so, take measures to protect children on their services including reasonable steps to prevent them from accessing age-inappropriate and harmful content.

    2.15 The regulatory framework will establish differentiated expectations on companies in scope with regard to different types of content and activity. This will ensure companies prioritise tackling relevant illegal content and activity on their services, and that children are protected from age-inappropriate and harmful content online. The differentiated approach can be summarised as follows:

    • All companies will be required to take action with regard to relevant illegal content and activity.
    • All companies will be required to assess the likelihood of children accessing their services. If they assess that children are likely to access their services, they will be required to provide additional protections for children using them.
    • Only companies with Category 1 services will be required to take action with regard to legal but harmful content and activity accessed by adults. This is because services offering extensive functions for sharing content and interacting with large numbers of users pose a significantly increased risk of harm from legal but harmful content. The approach will protect freedom of expression and mitigate the risk of disproportionate burdens on small businesses. It will also address the current mismatch between companies’ stated safety policies and many users’ experiences online which, due to their scale, is a particular challenge on the largest social media services.

    Designating Category 1 services

    2.16 Category 1 services will be determined through a three-step process. First, the primary legislation will set out high level factors which lead to significant risk of harm occurring to adults through legal but harmful content. These factors will be: the size of a service’s audience (because harm is more likely to occur on services with larger user bases, for example due to rapid spread of content and ‘pile-on’ abuse); and the functionalities it offers (because certain functionalities, such as the ability to share content widely or contact users anonymously, are more likely to give rise to harm).

    2.17 Second, the government will determine and publish thresholds for each of the factors. Ofcom will be required to provide non-binding advice to the government on where these thresholds should be set. The final decision on thresholds will lie with the government, to ensure democratic oversight of the scope of the regulatory framework.

    2.18 Ofcom will then be required to assess services against these thresholds and publish a register of all those which meet both thresholds. These services will be designated as Category 1 services and be required to take action against legal but harmful content accessed by adults. Ofcom will be able to add services to the list of Category 1 services if they reach the thresholds, and to remove services if they no longer meet the thresholds. If a company believes its service has wrongly been designated as Category 1, then it will be able to appeal to an appropriate tribunal (further detail on Appeals is set out in Part 4). Ofcom will also be able to provide advice to the government if it considers a change to the thresholds to be necessary.

    Illegal content and activity

    2.19 All companies in scope will need to take action to prevent the use of their services for criminal activity. They will need to ensure that illegal content is removed expeditiously and that the risk of it appearing and spreading across their services is minimised by effective systems.

    2.20 The government will set priority categories of offences in secondary legislation, against which companies will be required to take particularly robust action. These will be offences posing the greatest risk of harm, taking account of the number of people likely to be affected and how severely they might be harmed. Examples of priority categories of offences include child sexual exploitation and abuse and terrorism. The identification of priority categories of offences will focus companies’, and the regulator’s, efforts on the most harmful issues. Companies will still be required to tackle other relevant illegal material on their services, where this is identified through their systems or where it is reported to them.

    2.21 For priority categories of offences, companies will need to consider, based on a risk assessment, what systems and processes are necessary to identify, assess and address such offences (for example devoting more resources to content moderation or limiting algorithmic promotion of content). Recognising the severity of child sexual exploitation and abuse and terrorism, companies may be required to proactively identify and block or remove this type of illegal material if other steps have not been effective and safeguards are in place. Further details are set out later on in Part 2.

    2.22 All companies in scope must additionally take steps to minimise the risk of other relevant illegal content and activity occurring on their services. This will require putting in place effective user reporting and redress mechanisms for dealing with such illegal content and activity.

    2.23 Companies may already be liable for illegal content and activity on their services. Under existing law, they may be liable for such content if they have been notified of its existence, have subsequently failed to remove it in good time, and the hosting of such content gives rise to criminal or civil liability. These existing legal responsibilities will remain in place.

    2.24 The regulatory framework will require companies to address illegal content and activity which could constitute a UK criminal offence or an element of a UK criminal offence and which meets the definition of harm, as set out above. It will not cover online material which only gives rise to a risk of civil liability (e.g. negligence or defamation). Some areas of criminal law will be excluded, as set out above in paragraph 2.4.

    Freedom of expression and relevant illegal material

    2.25 To avoid companies taking an overly risk-averse approach to the identification and removal of material likely to be illegal, the regulatory framework will enshrine strong safeguards for freedom of expression. Further details are included in Annex A. Companies will be required to consider the impact on and safeguards for users’ rights when designing and deploying content moderation systems and processes. This might involve engaging with stakeholders in the development of their content moderation policies, considering the use of appropriate automated tools, and ensuring appropriate training for human moderators. Companies should also take reasonable steps to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of their systems, including considering the amount of legitimate content that was incorrectly removed.

    2.26 The regulatory framework will also require companies to give users a right to challenge content removal, as an important protection for freedom of expression. Certain companies will also need to produce transparency reports, which are likely to include information about their measures to uphold freedom of expression and privacy (see Part 4 for more information on transparency).

    2.27 The online harms regime will not change companies’ liability for individual items of illegal content that meet the definition of harm. Instead it will require companies to ensure that their policies and processes are adequate to protect their users. Where moderation procedures meet the above objectives, individual instances of illegal content or activity appearing on a company’s services will not necessarily mean it has failed to fulfil the duty of care.

    Box 6: Taking, making and sharing intimate images without consent

    • The evolution of technology has made it easier for users to create images to send to friends, family or post en masse to the public. It also means that it is easier to distribute images of individuals without consent. This is particularly harmful when those images are ‘intimate’ in nature, such as revenge and deepfake pornography.

    • Currently, there is no single criminal offence in England and Wales that captures the taking, making and sharing of intimate images without consent. Instead, we have a range of offences that have developed over time, some of which existed before the rise of the internet and use of smartphones.

    • To ensure that legislation provides victims with the right support and protection from these harmful behaviours, the Ministry of Justice has sponsored the Law Commission to review the law around the taking, making and sharing of non-consensual intimate images. The Law Commission has not yet issued its draft recommendations for this review but following the final recommendations the government will consider taking forward the proposals, where appropriate, in a legislative vehicle.

    • All companies in scope of the duty of care will be required to take action against illegal content and activity, including intimate image abuse.

    Legal but harmful content and activity accessed by adults

    2.28 Only companies providing Category 1 services will be expected to take steps in respect of legal but harmful content and activity that is accessed by adults. The legislation will not require the removal of specific pieces of legal content. Companies must consider the impacts of their decisions regarding moderation and design choices on user safety. The approach will ensure transparent and consistent application of companies’ terms and conditions relating to harmful content. This will both empower adult users to keep themselves safe online and protect freedom of expression, by preventing companies from arbitrarily removing content

    2.29 The government will set out priority categories of legal but harmful material in secondary legislation (e.g. content promoting self-harm, hate content, online abuse that does not meet the threshold of a criminal offence, and content encouraging or promoting eating disorders). Ofcom will be required to provide non-binding advice to the government on what should be included in that secondary legislation. Categories of legal but harmful material must meet the definition of harmful content and activity described in paragraph 2.2. This approach will ensure that the regulatory framework provides sufficient clarity for businesses, users and the regulator about the categories of legal but harmful material that these companies should, at a minimum, address through their terms and conditions.

    Box 7: Material that, of itself, may not be illegal but is linked to child sexual exploitation and abuse online

    • The government remains committed to taking action against material that may not be illegal, but is linked to child sexual exploitation and abuse online. Such material can have a devastating impact on victims, contributing to their re-traumatisation and facilitating further offences.

    • The government has engaged extensively with tech companies on the importance of responding to this content. In March 2020, the Voluntary Principles to Counter Online Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse were launched, endorsed by a range of tech companies and the UK, US, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand governments. These recognise the importance of taking appropriate action on certain images, videos, discussions and other material which may fall below the threshold of illegal but still warrant action. The government will continue to explore regulatory and legal options to ensure companies are taking effective and consistent action to tackle this content.

    2.30 Companies providing Category 1 services will be required to undertake regular risk assessments to identify legal but harmful material on these services, covering both the priority categories set out in secondary legislation and any other types of harm present or at risk of arising. Risk assessments should consider the risk to adult users, including vulnerable users. Companies providing Category 1 services will use the definition of harmful material in paragraph 2.2 to identify and notify the regulator of emerging legal but harmful harms. The regulator’s codes of practice will include information on the risk assessment process.

    2.31 These companies will be required to set clear and accessible terms and conditions which explicitly state how they will handle the priority categories of legal but harmful material established in legislation, and any others identified by them through their risk assessment. They will need to make clear to users what is acceptable on their services for such content, and how it will be treated across their services. Companies will be expected to consult with civil society and expert groups when developing their terms and conditions. This will encourage the adoption of terms and conditions that meet user needs and build on existing best practice on how to effectively tackle different types of harmful content and activity.

    2.32 These terms and conditions must be enforced consistently and transparently, irrespective of what the company’s policy is. This will include having effective and accessible reporting and redress mechanisms, with the regulator’s codes of practice setting out the steps which companies can take to meet expectations. Terms and conditions will not simply be about accepting or removing content. They could include, for example, circumstances in which content has a label applied to it, or is de-prioritised. They could also include circumstances in which users are signposted towards support, or nudged in order to discourage behaviour.

    2.33 This approach will empower adult users to keep themselves safe online, while ensuring that the legislation will not require companies providing Category 1 services to remove specific pieces of legal content unless specified as not permitted by their terms and conditions. It will be particularly beneficial for vulnerable adults and those disproportionately affected by online harms, including groups with protected characteristics or those with particular mental or physical health conditions, as they are currently more likely to experience harm associated with such content or activity online. It will also ensure companies providing Category 1 services are accountable for their public commitments in their terms and conditions.

    2.34 This approach recognises the importance of high risk, high reach platforms as public forums where people can engage in robust debate online. Companies will not be able to arbitrarily remove controversial viewpoints and users will be able to seek redress if they feel content has been removed unfairly. When combined with transparency requirements (see Part 4), will also increase understanding about what content is taken down and why. In this way, regulation will promote and safeguard pluralism online, while ensuring companies can be held to account for their commitments to uphold freedom of expression.

    Box 8: Safety by design

    • The White Paper recognised that companies themselves have a crucial role to play in tackling the proliferation of online harms. The design of an online product or service can give rise to harm or help protect against it.

    • The government’s forthcoming safety by design framework will set out what ‘good’ looks like for safe product and service design. The framework will be open source and developed with industry, subject and technical experts. It will contain clear principles and practical guidance for product designers, managers and developers on how to build safer online products and services from the outset. Further details are in Part 5.

    • The safety by design framework will be an important step in ensuring that all companies, especially small businesses, are equipped with the know-how to effectively embed safety into the design of their online products and services, to help minimise regulatory burdens and support fulfilment of the duty of care.

    • Device security also has an important role in user safety. In January 2020, the Minister for Digital Infrastructure announced that the government would be developing legislation to protect citizens and the wider economy from the harms that can arise from ‘smart’, Internet of Things (IoT) or ‘internet-connected’ devices that lack important cyber-security measures. This work is underway with a view to introducing legislation as soon as parliamentary time becomes available.

    Box 9: Anonymous abuse

    • As set out in the White Paper, anonymous abuse can have a significant impact on victims, whether members of the public or high-profile public figures. It is important that the regulatory framework adequately addresses this issue, whilst protecting freedom of expression.

    • Anonymous abuse has been on the rise. In a sample of 4.2 million tweets collected during the 2019 General Election campaign, abusive replies sent to candidates were found in nearly 4.5% of all replies, compared to just under 3.3% in the 2017 General Election.

    • The consultation did not specifically cover anonymous abuse but respondents put forward arguments both for and against preserving online anonymity, particularly in regard to protecting the identity of those individuals who flag harmful content.

    • The regulatory framework will address abuse online, including anonymous abuse, whilst protecting freedom of expression and the legitimate use of anonymity online by groups such as human rights advocates, whistleblowers and survivors of abuse. The legislation will, therefore, not put any new limits on online anonymity.

    • Under the duty of care, all companies in scope will be expected to address anonymous online abuse that is illegal through effective systems and processes. Where companies providing Category 1 services prohibit legal but harmful online abuse, they will need to ensure their terms and conditions are clear about how this applies to abuse perpetrated anonymously. They will then need to enforce these terms and conditions consistently and transparently.

    • Being anonymous online does not give anyone the right to abuse others. The police have a range of legal powers to identify individuals who attempt to use anonymity to escape sanctions for online abuse, where the activity is illegal. The government is continuing to review with law enforcement whether the current powers are sufficient to tackle illegal anonymous abuse online. The outcome of that work will inform the government’s future position in relation to illegal anonymous abuse online.

    • The government recognises that in the context of online abuse, the line between illegal and legal behaviour is not well understood. The Law Commission has reviewed the legal framework relating to abusive and offensive communications online. They are now consulting on their provisional proposals, which aim to improve the existing communications offences, ensuring the law is clearer and more effectively targets serious harm online.

    • As highlighted in their consultation, the Commission acknowledges that anonymity online often facilitates and encourages abusive behaviours. Combined with an online disinhibition effect, abusive behaviours, such as pile-on harassment, are much easier to engage in on a practical level.

    • To deal with such abusive behaviours online, the Commission has put forward several recommendations. These include replacing existing offences with new laws which more effectively criminalise online behaviours likely to cause harm. These proposals are subject to consultation.

    • The Law Commission is expected to provide its recommendations for reform of the criminal law in this area in early 2021. Once the final recommendations have been published the government will consider, where appropriate, whether to bring these recommendations into law as part of the Online Safety Bill.

    • Intimidation and abuse in public life can also stop talented individuals, particularly women and those from minority backgrounds, from standing for public office, or undertaking high profile roles such as journalism. Journalists are often subject to online abuse and harassment, which can undermine their ability to carry out their vital democratic function.

    • The government is therefore taking forward a co-ordinated programme of work to safeguard the integrity and security of our democratic processes. Under the Defending Democracy programme, a key priority is tackling the intimidation of elected officials by strengthening our legislative framework, driving policy across government, and engaging with partners.

    • We are also encouraging respect for open, fair and safe democratic participation for voters and candidates by implementing the recommendations set out in the government’s response to the Committee on Standards in Public Life report on Intimidation in Public Life.

    • The government has committed to introduce a new sanction of intimidation against candidates or campaigners, either in person or online. The new electoral sanction is being developed to crack down on the intimidation and abuse being suffered by those at the forefront of public service. The government has also committed to the development of a National Action Plan for the Safety of Journalists.

    Content and activity that is legal but harmful to children

    2.35 The online harms regime will ensure the most comprehensive approach possible to protecting children. It will deliver the objectives of Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act, to protect children from accessing online pornography, and go further to protect children from a broader range of harmful and age-inappropriate content on all services in scope.

    2.36 The framework will deliver a higher level of protection for children than for adults. All companies in scope will be required to assess the likelihood of children accessing their services. Only services which are likely to be accessed by children will be required to provide additional protections for children using them. This is the approach taken in the Information Commissioner’s Age Appropriate Design Code, which requires companies to apply the Code’s standards for protecting children’s personal data where they have assessed that children are ‘likely to access’ their service. This will provide consistency for companies who may be required to comply with both the Age Appropriate Design Code and the duty of care.

    2.37 Companies which have assessed their service as likely to be accessed by children will be required to conduct a child safety risk assessment of their service specifically for children, identify and implement proportionate mitigations to protect children, and monitor these for effectiveness. Companies will be required to undertake regular child safety risk assessments to identify legal but harmful material on their services impacting children, covering both the priority categories set out in secondary legislation (as detailed in paragraph 2.38 below) and any other types of harm present or at risk of arising to children. These companies will also be required to assess the risks that material on their services poses to children of different ages and to put in place age-appropriate protective measures. The regulator will be required to have regard to the fact that children have different needs at different ages when preparing codes of practice relevant to the protection of children. The regulator’s codes of practice will include guidance on the risk assessment process. Companies will also need to put in place effective and accessible user reporting and redress mechanisms for content and activity which is harmful to children.

    2.38 In addition to the approach for priority categories for illegal material and legal but harmful material accessed by adults described above, the government will also set out in secondary legislation priority categories of legal but harmful content and activity impacting children. The regulator will be required to provide non-binding advice to the government on what should be included in those categories. Categories of legal but harmful material impacting children must meet the definition of harmful content and activity described in paragraph 2.2. This approach will ensure that the regulatory framework provides sufficient clarity for businesses, users and the regulator about the categories of legal but harmful material impacting children that companies in scope should, at a minimum, take action on.

    2.39 Companies with services likely to be accessed by children will need to make clear what is acceptable on their services for legal but harmful material as described above for adults. The regulator will determine appropriate levels of risk-based and proportionate protection for children and set out through its codes of practice the steps companies need to take. This is expected to cover legal but harmful content and activity such as cyberbullying, and access to age-inappropriate content such as online pornography. Specific measures required to address illegal harms such as child sexual exploitation and abuse are covered above in paragraphs 2.19 to 2.24.

    2.40 The regulator will focus on ensuring that companies whose services are likely to be accessed by children have good systems and processes in place to protect children. This includes providing terms and conditions and user redress mechanisms that are suitable for children as well as more transparency about how services are providing greater protection.

    2.41 Under our proposals companies will be expected to use a range of tools proportionately, to take reasonable steps to prevent children from accessing age-inappropriate content and to protect them from other harms. This includes, for example, the use of age assurance and age verification technologies, which are expected to play a key role for companies in order to fulfil their duty of care.

    2.42 The government would not in every case expect age assurance technologies to be used to block children from content or services, but where appropriate, to protect children within a service and enhance a child user’s experience by tailoring safety features to the age of the user. For example, the Lego Life app requires parental consent to unlock features and functions, to provide an age-appropriate service. The proposed safety by design framework will also reflect these design objectives in its guidance.

    2.43 Although the government will not be mandating the use of specific technological approaches through the legislation to prevent children from accessing age-inappropriate content and to protect them from other harms, the government does expect that the regulatory framework will drive innovation and take-up of age assurance and, where appropriate, age verification technologies. The government is working closely with stakeholders across industry to establish the right conditions for the market to deliver these technical solutions ahead of the legislative requirements coming into force.

    2.44 Technical standards also have an important role to play in tackling online harms. In line with this approach, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is supporting the update of Publicly Available Standard 1296: 2018 ‘online age checking’. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport recognises the benefit PAS 1296 brings to the age assurance sector and to child online safety. The Department has contributed funding and is working closely with the British Standards Institute and other relevant stakeholders to bring the standard in line with current policy and industry needs.

    2.45 In keeping with its existing priorities in broadcasting, the government expects Ofcom to prioritise children in its approach to enforcement in accordance with the principle of delivering a higher level of protection to children. In its enforcement guidelines, Ofcom will be required to set out how it will take into account any impact on children due to a company’s failure to fulfil its duty of care.

    Box 10: Online harms and the Digital Economy Act

    • In October 2019 the government announced that it would deliver the objective of protecting children online through the online harms regulatory framework instead of Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act 2017. The government has carefully reviewed how to ensure the objectives of the Digital Economy Act will be delivered by the framework. Through the regulatory framework, the government will go further to protect children from a broader range of harmful and age-inappropriate content, across a wider range of sites in scope, going beyond the Digital Economy Act’s focus on online pornography on commercial adult sites.

    • One of the criticisms of the Digital Economy Act was that its scope did not cover social media companies where a considerable quantity of pornographic material is accessible to children. The government’s new approach will include social media companies and sites where user-generated content can be widely shared, including commercial pornography sites. Where pornography sites have such functionalities (including video and image sharing, commenting and live streaming) they will be subject to the duty of care. The online harms regime will capture both the most visited pornography sites and pornography on social media, therefore covering the vast majority of sites where children are exposed to pornography. Taken together we expect this to bring into scope more online pornography that children can currently access than the narrower scope of the Digital Economy Act.

    • The regulator will determine appropriate levels of risk-based and proportionate protection for children. Companies in scope which are likely to be accessed by children will need to put in place measures to keep children safe from harmful activity and prevent them from accessing age-inappropriate or harmful content, including online pornography.

    • The online harms legislation will not mandate the use of specific technological approaches to prevent children from accessing age-inappropriate content and to protect them from other harms. However, the government expects the regulator will take a robust approach to sites that pose the highest risk of harm to children, including sites hosting online pornography. This may include recommending the use of age assurance or verification technologies.

    Interim measures from the government

    2.46 The government is already undertaking initiatives to keep children and young people safe online and to build momentum ahead of the implementation of the online harms regime.

    2.47 These measures include providing practical guidance for business on how to improve child safety online, steps companies can take to tackle cyberbullying, collaboration between government and industry to better understand the impacts of online harms on users, and cross-government research on child safety.

    Box 11: Interim measures ahead of the online harms regulatory framework

    ‘One Stop Shop for companies on protecting children online’

    • The government will publish a ‘One Stop Shop’ with practical guidance for companies on how to protect children online. It will be designed as an interim tool to support businesses ahead of the regulatory framework.

    • The One Stop Shop will support smaller companies in particular, providing practical advice to help them better understand child online harms and their existing legal requirements.

    Cyberbullying

    • The consultation highlighted that vulnerable young people are in particular need of support to stay safe online to tackle harms such as cyberbullying. We expect the regulator to set out steps companies need to take to tackle cyberbullying in its codes of practice. The Social Media Code of Practice, published alongside the White Paper, sets out the principles that companies should adhere to in the interim before the regulator is operational.

    • In the longer term, the government will align its work on cyberbullying with the cross-government plan on tackling loneliness, recognising that loneliness, particularly amongst young people, can be exacerbated or directly caused by cyberbullying. The government will conduct further research and develop further guidance on tackling cyberbullying as part of this.

    Screen time

    • Being online can be a hugely positive experience for children and young people. However, the impact of harmful content and activity can be particularly damaging for children and there is also growing concern about the relationship between social media and the mental health of children and young people.

    • In 2019, the UK Chief Medical Officers conducted a systematic evidence review on children and young people’s screen and social media use. Whilst the research did not present evidence of a causal relationship between screen-based activities and mental health problems, it did find some associations between screen-based activities and negative effects, such as increased risk of anxiety or depression. The Chief Medical Officers therefore advised a precautionary approach to screen time, including agreeing boundaries with children and young people around their screen usage and considering the impact that screen use has on health promoting activities such as sleep.

    • Since the Chief Medical Officers’ review, the Department for Health and Social Care has commissioned research to explore the views of children and young people to help prioritise research questions on social media and mental health. It will also be developing robust methodologies to better examine the relationship between the two.

    Box 12: Collaboration with industry

    Harmful content including suicide, self-harm, and eating disorder content

    • The online harms framework will place regulatory responsibilities on in-scope companies likely to be accessed by children to protect their child users from harmful content and activity, including suicide, self-harm and eating disorder content. However there are wider government-led initiatives to develop voluntary cooperation in this area ahead of legislation.

    • The Department for Health and Social Care has coordinated a strategic partnership with social media companies and the Samaritans to set guidance on moderating suicide and self-harm content, and educating users to stay safe online.

    Box 13: Cross-government research

    Verification of Children Online

    • Companies will need to know which of their users are children and this is likely to be achieved through the use of age assurance technologies.

    • Age assurance is the broad term given to the spectrum of measures that can be used to assure a user’s age online. Age assurance allows companies and users to jointly choose from a range of measures that are appropriate to the specific risks posed and their service needs. The selected methods may rely on different sources of data, which may have different privacy implications and cost models.

    • The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, the Home Office and Government Communications Headquarters have collaborated on a recent child safety research project - the Verification of Children Online - that responds to the challenge of platforms knowing which of their users are children. The project engaged with parents and children, industry, regulators and online safety professionals to consider the technical, commercial, legal and behavioural factors that would enable companies to recognise and better protect their child users. A key success of the project was a technical trial run during phase two. The trial successfully demonstrated that age assurance solutions could be run at scale in a way that was simple for users and protects the privacy of their personal data.

    • The Verification of Children Online (VoCO) Phase 2 Report was published in November 2020.

    Codes of practice

    White Paper: The White Paper stated that the independent regulator would set out how companies could fulfil the duty of care in codes of practice.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: Some respondents argued that too many codes of practice would cause confusion, duplication, and potentially, an over reliance on removal of content by risk averse companies.

    Final policy position: There will not be a code of practice for each category of harmful content. The codes of practice will focus on systems, processes and governance that in-scope companies need to put in place to uphold their regulatory responsibilities. The regulator will decide which codes to produce, with the exception of the codes on child sexual exploitation and abuse and preventing terrorist use of the internet.

    The government will set out high level objectives for the codes of practice with the regulator ensuring that its codes of practice meet these objectives during drafting. Ofcom will consult with relevant parties during the drafting of the codes before sending the final draft to the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Home Secretary. Ministers will have the power to reject a draft code and require the regulator to make modifications for reasons relating to government policy.

    Parliament will also have the opportunity to debate and vote on the objectives and the completed codes will be laid in Parliament.

    Due to the seriousness of the harms, and to bridge the gap until the regulator is operational, the government has published interim codes of practice on how to tackle online terrorist and child sexual exploitation and abuse content and activity.

    2.48 Ofcom will have a duty to issue statutory codes of practice that set out the steps companies can take to fulfil the duty of care. The codes of practice will focus on systems, processes and governance that in-scope companies need to put in place to uphold their regulatory responsibilities. Companies may take alternative steps to those set out in the codes of practice, provided they can demonstrate to Ofcom that those steps are as effective as or exceed the standards set out in the codes.

    2.49 Given the range of services in scope of the regulatory framework, some of the steps may not be applicable to every company; conversely the codes will not cover every conceivable risk or emerging technology. If there is no code of practice which covers a particular emerging technology, companies will still need to be compliant with the overarching duty of care. This can be achieved by in-scope companies assessing and responding to the risk associated with those emerging technologies.

    2.50 Ofcom will be required to consult with a range of stakeholders when developing codes of practice. This will be critical to ensure that codes take into account existing expertise and best practice regarding how to effectively tackle the range of harmful content and activity in scope of regulation.

    Interim codes of practice

    2.51 The White Paper committed the government to work with law enforcement agencies and other relevant bodies to produce interim codes of practice on terrorism and child sexual exploitation and abuse due to the serious nature of these harms. The interim codes are voluntary and are intended to bridge the gap until the regulator is operational and ready to produce its own statutory codes on terrorism and child sexual exploitation and abuse, building on the work of the interim codes. The government will work with industry stakeholders to review the implementation of the interim codes so that lessons can be learned and shared with Ofcom, to inform the development of their substantive codes.

    2.52 The interim codes are published alongside this response. The government has undertaken an extensive period of engagement across wider government, industry, international partners and civil society, to ensure the measures set out are proportionate but robust enough to tackle these most serious and illegal online harms. As the government is proposing that the interim codes of practice are adopted by all companies in scope, this will include small and medium-sized enterprises. To reduce the burden on businesses and ensure consistency across the industry, the interim codes set out detailed aims and examples of best practice on how to implement each principle.

    2.53 The child sexual exploitation and abuse interim code of practice builds on the Voluntary Principles to Counter Online Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, that were developed by the UK, US, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand governments, following consultation with tech companies and non governmental organisations.[footnote 28]

    Using technology to identify illegal child sexual exploitation and abuse content and activity

    White Paper: The White Paper set out that some private channels would be in scope of the online harms regime, however companies would not be required to scan or monitor for illegal content on these services, reflecting the importance of privacy.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: Some consultation respondents including industry and civil liberty groups argued that private communications should either fall out of scope or be subject to very limited requirements, to protect user privacy. By contrast, some online safety organisations and children’s charities argued private communications should be in scope because there is a high risk of harmful activity - such as child grooming - on private channels.

    Final policy position: The regulatory framework will apply to both public communication channels and services where users expect a greater degree of privacy. The regulator will set out how companies can fulfil their duty of care in codes of practice, including what measures are likely to be appropriate in the context of private communications. Companies in scope will need to consider the impact on users’ privacy and ensure users understand how company systems and processes affect user privacy. The scale, severity and complexity of child sexual exploitation and abuse is particularly concerning, with private channels being exploited by offenders. In light of this, the regulator will have the power to require companies to use automated technology that is highly accurate to identify illegal child sexual exploitation and abuse activity or content on their services. Recognising the importance of protecting users’ privacy, the government will ensure this will be used only where there are no alternative measures that are capable of achieving the same aim of reducing harm and subject to stringent legal safeguards to protect users’ rights.

    Child sexual exploitation and abuse on private channels

    2.54 The government and many stakeholders are particularly concerned about the extent of child sexual exploitation and abuse occurring on some private channels, where offenders believe their illegal activity is less likely to be detected. This could include sharing child sexual abuse material with other offenders, grooming children for sexual purposes, or the livestreaming of abuse.

    2.55 These actions cause severe harm and there is clear evidence they are occurring. For example, 12 million of the 18.4 million worldwide child sexual exploitation and abuse reports made by Facebook in 2019 were for content shared on private channels.[footnote 29] The identification of this material has real world impact, allowing law enforcement to arrest offenders and safeguard children who would otherwise have been at risk of, or subject to, ongoing abuse. It also protects victims, who can continue to be traumatised long after their abuse by the knowledge that offenders continue to trade in and enjoy the images of their abuse.

    2.56 Technology that can identify known illegal content accurately and at scale has been in use for many years, supplied by a number of non governmental organisations and web hosting services, and new technology continues to evolve. Some companies already take action against child sexual exploitation and abuse on private channels, but others do not. For example, some companies use PhotoDNA (see Box 14) to identify child sexual abuse material and the gaming sector commonly uses technology to identify harmful activity in communication between users, particularly where a game is aimed at younger children. According to Facebook’s community standards enforcement report, in 2019, they actioned 37.4 million pieces of content that violated their child nudity or child sexual exploitation policy. More than 99% of this came to light as a result of the company’s proactive efforts (such as use of technology).[footnote 30]

    2.57 The government has set out in the interim code of practice for online child sexual exploitation and abuse that companies should consider voluntarily using automated technology to identify child sexual exploitation and abuse. The government will continue to support companies using technology to identify online child sexual exploitation and abuse on a voluntary basis once online harms legislation is in force. The government does not intend that restrictions placed on the regulator’s power to require a company to use technology should limit companies that choose to go further in taking action.

    2.58 Given the serious risk of harm to children, the regulator must have appropriate powers to compel companies to take the most effective action to tackle illegal child sexual exploitation and abuse content and activity on their services, including private communications, subject to stringent legal safeguards.

    2.59 Therefore, the regulator will have the express power, where alternative measures cannot effectively address child sexual exploitation and abuse (see 2.58), to require a company to use automated technology that is highly accurate to identify only illegal child sexual exploitation and abuse content or activity on their service. The power is more likely to be considered proportionate on public platforms than on private services. The regulator can take enforcement action if this requirement is not met.

    2.60 Robust safeguards will be included in the online harms legislation to govern when the regulator can require the use of automated technology. The regulator will only be able to require the use of tools that are highly accurate in identifying only illegal content, minimising the inadvertent flagging of legal content (‘false positives’) for human review. The regulator will advise the government on the accuracy of tools and make operational decisions regarding whether or not a specific company should be required to use them. However, before the regulator can use the power it will need to seek approval from Ministers on the basis that sufficiently accurate tools exist. The government assesses that currently, sufficiently accurate tools exist for identifying illegal child sexual exploitation and abuse material that has previously been assessed as being illegal.

    2.61 In addition, in order to inform debate around the use of automated technology, the regulator will have to report annually to the Home Secretary and lay a report before Parliament on the use of the power, including the effectiveness and accuracy of the available tools, and any other factors relevant to their suitability for use (for example affordability, availability, and effectiveness).

    2.62 In addition to ensuring the accuracy of tools, before requiring a company to use technology to identify child sexual exploitation and abuse, the regulator would need to:

    • have gathered evidence which it assesses as demonstrating persistent and prevalent child sexual exploitation and abuse on the service, which the company has failed to address.
    • be satisfied that no alternative, less intrusive approaches are available to address the problem and the requirement is proportionate.
    • issue a public notice of the regulator’s intention to require a company to use automated technology to identify child sexual activity and exploitation, to ensure that users are fully informed.

    2.63 In exercising this power, the regulator will balance users’ rights to privacy and freedom of expression with the rights of children to be protected from sexual exploitation and abuse.

    Box 14: Example of automated technology: PhotoDNA

    • One of the technologies commonly used today to identify child sexual abuse material is PhotoDNA, or ‘hash matching’. This converts images into a numerical code (or hash) that can be compared against the codes for known images of child sexual abuse.

    • This technology is only capable of assessing whether an image is child sexual abuse, and makes no other inferences about the image or user’s communication. When a match is detected, the image can be reviewed, blocked, taken down or reported by the company.

    • The false positive rate is estimated to be between one in two billion and one in ten billion, protecting the privacy of legitimate users whilst ensuring no safe space for child sexual abuse offenders to operate.

    • A range of non governmental organisations and web hosting providers make this technology and the hash data sets available to companies looking to protect their service from abuse.

    Using technology to identify terrorist content and activity on public services

    White Paper: The White Paper set out that the regulator would not compel companies to undertake general monitoring on their online services, as this would place a disproportionate burden on companies and raise concerns about freedom of expression and user privacy. Instead, the new regulatory framework would increase the responsibility of online services in a way that is compatible with the European Union’s e-Commerce Directive, which limits their liability for illegal content until they have knowledge of its existence, and have failed to remove it from their services in good time. However, it noted the strong case for mandating specific monitoring for tightly defined categories of illegal content where there is a threat to national security or the physical safety of children.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: Industry welcomed the commitment to maintaining existing intermediary liability provisions set out in the e-Commerce Directive, including the prohibition on general monitoring.

    Final policy position: Many companies already use technology to identify and remove illegal terrorist content from their services. The regulator will also be given an additional express power in legislation, to require a company to use that technology to identify and remove illegal terrorist content from their public services where this is the only effective, proportionate and necessary action available, and the regulator is confident that the tools available are highly accurate at identifying only illegal content to minimise the need for human review of legal content.

    Companies’ liability for specific pieces of content will remain unchanged. Once a company is aware of illegal content on their service, it will still be required to take this down quickly otherwise it could become liable for that content. Where technology is used to identify the tightly defined categories of illegal content set out above, companies’ will therefore need to remove it to avoid incurring liability. The technology used will be highly accurate and therefore unlikely to identify illegal content that does not constitute an offence relating to terrorism. This applies equally to the requirements relating to child sexual exploitation and abuse, set out above.

    2.64 The White Paper set out the reasonable steps that companies should take in advance of legislation to prevent new and known terrorist content and activity on their services. This included the proactive use of automated technology, where appropriate, to identify, flag, block or remove illegal content and activity.

    2.65 The government has set out in the interim code of practice for online terrorist content and activity that companies should consider voluntarily using automated technology to identify and remove terrorist content and activity from their public services. The government will continue to support companies using technology to identify online terrorist content and activity on a voluntary basis once online harms legislation is in force.

    2.66 The regulator will also be given an additional express power in legislation to require a company to use such automated technology to identify and remove illegal terrorist content from their public channels, where this is the only effective, proportionate and necessary action available. The regulator can take enforcement action if this requirement is not met.

    2.67 This power will be used only if (i) the technology is highly accurate in identifying illegal terrorist content (ii) there is evidence of persistent and prevalent illegal terrorist activity on public channels of a service and (iii) other measures could not be equally effective. As with the rest of the online harms framework, any requirements resulting from this power must be proportionate.

    2.68 Automated technologies are already employed by some companies on a voluntary basis, as part of their own efforts to tackle terrorist content and activity on their services. However, this is not done widely or consistently.

    2.69 Companies also rely on user reports or referrals from law enforcement to alert them to content already on their services, so that they can remove it (if illegal or breaching their terms and conditions). These reports also help fine-tune their automated tools. However, reactive measures such as those set out above cannot by themselves adequately tackle the speed and scale with which terrorist content online is often disseminated. Referrals from the Counter Terrorism Internet Referral Unit successfully led to over 310,000 individual pieces of terrorist content being removed by companies between 2010 and the end of 2018,[footnote 31] but transparency reports indicate that this is just a fraction of what companies can action proactively on their own services. For example, Facebook reported that between April and June 2020, 8.7 million pieces of terrorist content were actioned, 99.6% of which were found and flagged by Facebook before users reported it.[footnote 32]

    2.70 The safeguards built into the regulation, detailed in paragraph 2.62, will ensure the approach to terrorist content and activity on public services is proportionate – balancing taking action against illegal terrorist content and activity in the interests of protecting national security and upholding users’ rights online.

    Data retention and reporting to law enforcement

    White Paper: The White Paper stated that the regulator would provide specific guidance in its code of practice on the content companies should preserve following removal and for how long. It also set out that the regulator would provide guidance on when companies should proactively alert law enforcement and other relevant government agencies about specific illegal content.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: Stakeholders, including the National Crime Agency and National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, argued that there should be new, mandatory reporting requirements for child exploitation and sexual abuse content to increase reporting and standardise the approach. In their view, this will improve the ability of law enforcement to tackle child sexual exploitation and abuse offenders and safeguard victims in the UK and elsewhere.

    Final policy position: The government is minded to introduce a requirement for companies to report child sexual exploitation and abuse identified on their services, with these reports being made to a designated body. A requirement to retain child sexual exploitation and abuse data will not be introduced through this legislation. However, the government is considering introducing this through alternative legislation.

    With regards to terrorist content and activity, the government expects companies to report to law enforcement where they consider there is a threat to life or risk of imminent attack. The legislation will not introduce a requirement for companies to retain this data.

    2.71 The White Paper indicated that the regulator would be expected to set out in the terrorist and child sexual exploitation and abuse codes of practice the reasonable steps that companies could take in relation to retaining data and reporting these types of content. The regulator would include guidance on how long companies should retain data for and the circumstances in which content should be reported to law enforcement and other agencies.

    2.72 Following the White Paper consultation and further engagement with law enforcement and other agencies, the government is minded to introduce a mandatory requirement on companies to report child sexual exploitation and abuse identified on their services. Further work is being undertaken to explore a suitable body to receive these reports and to ensure this system does not duplicate companies’ existing reporting obligations. This would be a standalone legislative requirement, rather than part of the duty of care. This approach reflects the seriousness of this crime and seeks to ensure that companies provide high quality reports with the information law enforcement need to identify offenders and safeguard victims.

    2.73 Companies will be encouraged to retain child sexual exploitation and abuse data for law enforcement purposes. The online harms legislation will not introduce a requirement to retain this data but the government is considering introducing this requirement within alternative legislation.

    2.74 The government expects companies to report terrorist content and activity on their services to law enforcement where they consider there is a threat to life or risk of imminent attack. The government will work with the regulator to ensure that it encourages this and provides companies with clear guidance on how this could best be done and information on where to report to. The online harms legislation will not introduce a legal requirement for companies to report and retain this data.

    Disinformation and misinformation

    White Paper: The White Paper did not set out a definitive position on how disinformation and misinformation would be addressed under the regulatory framework. Disinformation was included in an indicative list of harmful content or activity that would be within scope of the legislation, because it can be harmful to both individuals and to society.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: A range of stakeholders, including civil society organisations, raised concerns about including disinformation and misinformation in scope of the regulation because of the impact this might have on freedom of expression. Many stakeholders are concerned about the threat that disinformation and misinformation poses to individual users, as well as its potential broader impact on public safety, national security and community cohesion.

    Final policy position: Companies will need to address disinformation and misinformation that poses a reasonably foreseeable risk of significant harm to individuals (e.g. relating to public health).

    The legislation will also introduce additional provisions targeted at building understanding and driving action to tackle disinformation and misinformation. For example, establishing an expert working group on disinformation and misinformation, measures to improve transparency about how companies deal with disinformation and building on Ofcom’s existing duties to promote media literacy.

    Where disinformation and misinformation presents a significant threat to public safety, public health or national security, the regulator will have the power to act.

    2.75 The White Paper set out the dangers of online disinformation and misinformation to both individuals and society. Disinformation is the deliberate creation and dissemination of false and/or manipulated information that is intended to deceive and mislead audiences, either for the purposes of causing harm, or for political, personal or financial gain. Misinformation refers to inadvertently spreading false information.

    2.76 COVID-19 has brought these dangers into sharp focus. Ofcom data suggests that in week one of the UK lockdown, nearly 50% of respondents reported seeing information they thought to be false or misleading about the pandemic, with this figure at almost 60% for 18-34 year old respondents.[footnote 33] While Ofcom has recorded a gradual decrease in self-reported exposure to narratives considered false or misleading, navigating a COVID-19 online environment can be challenging and at times, confusing for many people in the UK.[footnote 34]

    2.77 The government is taking a range of steps to tackle disinformation and misinformation online. In response to the pandemic, the government stood up the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport-led cross-Whitehall Counter Disinformation Unit, to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and the reach of disinformation and misinformation, and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. Since standing up, the Unit has observed a range of false narratives, some of which have caused significant harm to individuals and society. Examples include conspiracy theories inaccurately linking COVID-19 with 5G technologies, health misinformation promoting a range of junk cures, and stories using outdated footage to suggest certain groups were breaking social distancing.

    2.78 As the pandemic has progressed, the Unit has also seen other narratives gain traction, particularly those which seek to undermine efforts to produce a COVID-19 vaccine. Anti-vaccination disinformation and misinformation has the potential to cause significant harm to individuals. Given the pace at which such narratives can develop on social media, combined with established movements against inoculation, reducing the risk of such harm remains a key priority. The Department for Digital Culture, Media and Sport is working with cross-Whitehall partners, particularly the Department for Health and Social Care, and social media services, to mitigate and tackle the risk of anti-vaccination false information.

    2.79 Coupled with these efforts, the government has continued to build audience resilience to disinformation and misinformation, enabling people to critically assess, appraise and challenge information online. Through the ‘Don’t Feed the Beast’ campaign and SHARE checklist, UK users have been given five easy steps to identify false content, encouraging them to consider information they share online. The forthcoming online media literacy strategy (see below and Part 5 for more information on Media Literacy) will set out more action to improve and strengthen audience resilience. Under the Cabinet Office led Defending Democracy programme, the government is also taking further steps to strengthen the integrity of UK elections and promote fact-based and open discourse. This includes responding to recommendations on press sustainability made in the Cairncross review (see Box 22), and the introduction of a digital imprints regime.

    Disinformation and misinformation under the new regulatory framework

    2.80 Legislation has an important part to play in tackling this harm. The White Paper included disinformation in the indicative list of harmful content or activity that would be within scope of the legislation, because it can be harmful to both individuals and to society.

    2.81 As set out in paragraph 2.2, the duty of care will apply to content or activity which could cause significant physical or psychological harm to an individual, including disinformation and misinformation. Where disinformation is unlikely to cause this type of harm it will not fall in scope of regulation. Ofcom should not be involved in decisions relating to political opinions or campaigning, shared by domestic actors within the law.

    2.82 Under our proposals, disinformation and misinformation that could cause significant harm to an individual will be within scope of the duty of care. The vast majority of disinformation and misinformation is legal, while potentially harmful. As an example, this would include content which suggests that users should go against established medical advice, such as avoiding vaccinations. There may also be some cases where disinformation is illegal and could cause significant harm to individuals - for example, disinformation which directly incited harm against individuals. In these cases, companies would be expected to remove such content.

    2.83 Some types of legal but harmful disinformation and misinformation are likely to be proposed in secondary legislation as categories of priority harm that companies must address in their terms and conditions. Companies must also risk assess for categories of emerging harm. As with other legal but harmful content, companies providing Category 1 services will need to make clear what is acceptable on their services for such content in their terms and conditions and will be required to enforce this. Companies whose services are likely to be accessed by children will also need to take steps to protect children from disinformation and misinformation which could be harmful to them.

    2.84 As the pandemic has demonstrated, there may be instances when urgent action is required to address disinformation and misinformation during emergency situations. Where disinformation and misinformation presents a significant threat to public safety, public health or national security, the regulator will have the power to act. In such situations, Ofcom will be able to take steps to build users’ awareness and resilience to disinformation and misinformation, or require companies to report on steps they are taking in light of such a situation.

    2.85 To ensure the future regulatory framework is well equipped to deal with the longer-term challenges presented by disinformation and misinformation, the regulator will be required to establish an expert working group on disinformation and misinformation. The working group will aim to build consensus and technical knowledge on how to tackle disinformation and misinformation. This working group will include a range of stakeholders such as rights groups, academics and companies.

    2.86 The regulatory framework will also help build an understanding of what companies are doing in relation to disinformation and misinformation through transparency reporting requirements. As set out in the transparency section, the regulator will have the power to require certain companies to publish annual transparency reports, setting out the extent and response to this harm. As part of this, companies could be required, where relevant, to report on processes and systems in place to respond to disinformation and misinformation.

    2.87 The regulatory framework will build on Ofcom’s existing duties to promote media literacy. This will help increase user awareness of, and resilience to, disinformation and misinformation online (for more information on Media Literacy, see Part 5).

    2.88 The government has also committed to publishing a safety by design framework (see Part 5). This will set out best practice and specific measures that companies can take to address the risk of harm on their services. This will include design measures to address the risk of misinformation and disinformation spreading on services, and empower users to engage critically with information online.

    Part 3: The regulator

    Summary

    Consultation questions covered in Part 3:

    What role should Parliament play in scrutinising the work of the regulator, including the development of codes of practice?

    Should an online harms regulator be: (i) a new public body, or (ii) an existing public body? If your answer to question 10 is (ii), which body or bodies should it be?

    A new or existing regulator is intended to be cost neutral: on what basis should any funding contributions from industry be determined?

    • The government can now confirm that Ofcom will be named as the online harms regulator in legislation. Ofcom has a strong strategic fit for this role, and relevant organisational experience as a robust independent regulator. Empowering an existing regulatory body will help the timely introduction of the online harms regime by allowing Ofcom to begin preparations now to take on the role.
    • Ofcom will raise the required income to cover the costs of the regime from industry.
    • The regulator will be accountable to Parliament. Ofcom as the regulator will lay its annual report and accounts before Parliament and be subject to Select Committee scrutiny. The annual report will give details about how it has discharged its functions in relation to online harms.

    Body (new vs. existing) and identity of regulator

    White Paper: The White Paper stated that the online harms regime will be overseen and regulated by an independent regulator. It also explained that the government would consider whether a broader restructuring of the regulatory landscape would reduce the risk of duplication and minimise burdens on business.

    Consultation responses and stakeholder engagement: The responses emphasised the need for there to be consistency between existing and new regulatory regimes, and for the regulator to be equipped to function effectively. Views on the identity of the regulator were balanced, highlighting the benefits and risks of a new body versus an existing one.

    Final policy position: In February 2020, the government announced that it was minded to give Ofcom the role of the independent online harms regulator. The government can now confirm that Ofcom will be named as the regulator in legislation. Empowering an existing regulatory body will help the timely introduction of the online harms regime, by allowing Ofcom to begin preparations now to take on the role.

    3.1 To inform the set up of the independent online harms regulator, the consultation asked questions about its identity, funding model and accountability to Parliament. The government has examined a range of options including creating a new body or appointing an existing regulator. These options were assessed against a number of key criteria, including effectiveness, efficiency and strategic coherence, and were informed by feedback from the consultation response.

    3.2 In February 2020, the government announced that it was minded to give Ofcom the role of the independent online harms regulator. Ministers have now decided to confirm the appointment of Ofcom to this role, subject to the passage of legislation. This preference was based on its organisational experience, robustness, and experience of delivering whilst holding challenging, high-profile remits across a range of sectors. Ofcom also offered a strong strategic fit given its role regulating activities increasingly related to online harms, and their new responsibilities in relation to regulating UK-established video sharing platforms.

    3.3 Ofcom was established by the Office of Communications Act 2002 from the convergence of five existing communications regulators covering broadcasting and telecommunications, and received its full authority from the Communications Act 2003. Since then, it has had other duties added to its remit, including postal services in 2011 and the BBC in 2017. The technological revolution of traditional communication industries has meant that digital and online services have increasingly become part of Ofcom’s existing remit. It is therefore well placed to play a similar role for online harms.

    3.4 Whilst meeting the challenge of online harms requires new ideas, it is also vital that the government utilises the experience, expertise and infrastructure of the UK’s existing world class regulators. Ofcom has an existing network of relationships in the tech sector, experience of dealing with a high volume of small businesses, and a research-led, risk-based approach to regulation. This provides a strong foundation for taking on the online harms regime.

    3.5 Earlier this year, the government announced Ofcom as the national regulator for UK-established video sharing platforms under the Audiovisual Media Services Regulations. These came into force on 1 November 2020. The regulations introduce new requirements for UK-established video sharing platforms to protect users from harmful content. In the longer term, the government intends for the regulation of UK-established video sharing platforms to be part of the online harms regime. This alignment between the two regimes offers the opportunity for early engagement with stakeholders and for testing regulatory processes ahead of the online harms legislation coming into force. Ofcom’s increasing role in regulating activities relating to online harms further emphasises its strong strategic fit to be the independent online harms regulator.

    Box 15: Audiovisual Media Services Regulations 2020

    • The UK’s Audiovisual Media Services Regulations 2020 place requirements on UK-established video sharing platforms to protect their users from certain types of harm.

    • The regulations include a requirement for UK-established video sharing platforms to take appropriate measures to protect children from harmful content, and to protect the general public from incitement to hatred and violence and from criminal content. They also include requirements relating to standards around advertising. The statutory framework was introduced into legislation in Autumn 2020 and came into force from 1 November 2020. Ofcom is actively engaging with providers of video sharing platforms, and will be developing and publicly consulting on regulatory guidance for platforms in the coming months.

    • The regulations share broadly similar objectives to the online harms regime. The government’s preference is for the requirements on UK-established video sharing platforms to transition to, and be superseded by, the online harms regulatory framework, once the latter comes into force. Under the online harms regulatory framework, UK-established video sharing platforms will continue to have systems and processes in place to protect users.

    • The requirements on UK-established video sharing platforms in relation to audiovisual commercial communications under the Audiovisual Media Services Regulations 2020, will also be repealed and will not be encompassed in the online harms regime. This is because the Advertising Standards Authority’s self-regulatory rules already apply equivalent standards for advertising as those in the regulations. The Advertising Standards Authority’s rules require all online advertisers to adhere to specific advertising standards. Even after the requirements of the revised regulations have been subsumed by the online harms regime, the Advertising Standards Authority’s rules will continue to apply to all online advertisers.

    • In tandem with the online harms work, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is currently engaged in a programme of work related to online advertising which, amongst other areas of focus, is looking at ensuring that advertising regulation answers the needs of the changing advertising marketplace. Further details on this are set out in Box 3.

    3.6 Ofcom has a strong track record of engagement. Its annual report details how it seeks to understand consumers’ and citizens’ interests and behaviours, and how it engages with industry and government. Successful delivery of the online harms regime will require being able to clearly communicate the purpose and reach of the regulatory framework and the regulator’s role, as well as listening to others. The regulator will be required to take a consultative approach, including on the production of codes of practice. The legislation will introduce a super-complaints function and user advocacy mechanisms (see Part 4). Users will also be able to report their concerns to the regulator, however, the regulator will not investigate or arbitrate on individual cases. This would conflict with the principle of a systems and processes approach, and could overwhelm Ofcom, given the likely volume of complaints. Instead, receiving user complaints will be an essential part of Ofcom’s activity to ensure the regulator is actively listening to users’ experiences and addressing their concerns.

    Sours: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/online-harms-white-paper/outcome/online-harms-white-paper-full-government-response
    Managing Your Slack - Clifford Campbell - Jacob's Tent

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